CURTIS BOLTON


Curtis Bolton, a resident of California since 1855, well deserves to be classed among the representative pioneers of Sacramento county, for with the exception of a brief period of a year passed in Nevada, he has remained continuously a resident of the Golden state, and has been an dvocate of progress and improvement along all lines which have led to the substantial development of this great commonwealth. He was born in New York city on the 1st of June, 1837, his parents being Curtis E. and Eleanor (Post) Bolton. The father was a native of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and the mother's birth occurred in the Empire state. She died when her son Curtis was only about a month old, and the father afterward married again. In 1847 Mr. Bolton accompanied his father and step-mother on their removal west to Omaha, Nebraska, where they resided for a few months, and then continued on their westward way to Salt Lake valley of Utah, where Curtis Bolton remained until 1855. That year witnessed his arrival in California. He came to this state as a teamster with Colonel Stepto, who was in command of some troops making their way from Utah to California. Mr. Bolton was employed as a teamster in connection with that expedition.

After arriving in this state Mr. Bolton turned his attention to gold mining, which he followed for a short time near diamond Springs, Eldorado county. he subsequently removed to San Joaquin county, where he was employed as a farm hand for a short time. He settled near Clay Station in Sacramento county in 1857, and with the exception of a year spent in Nevada has resided in this locality continuously since, covering a period of almost a half century. Farm work has claimed his attention, and he is now controlling an extensive tract of land of about five hundred acres.

On the 13th of September, 1869, occurred the marriage of Curtis Bolton and Mrs. Elizabeth Lewins, a native of Essex county, England, and one of the early residents of Sacramento county, having arrived here in 1854. She is therefore classed with the worthy pioneer women who, no less than the men, have done their full share in aiding in the development nd improvement of the far west. In 1858 she pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land on which she and her husband now reside, being the first woman taking advantage of the pre-emption act, at Stockton. There are three children of this union: Myrtie C., the wife of August Hauschild, of Sacramento county; Curtis, who is residing in the same county; and Elizabeth G., the wife of William D. McInerny, also of Sacramento county.

Mr. Bolton also pre-empted one hundred and sixty acres of land, but has since sold it to B. F. Wittemore. The Bolton estate now comprises nearly five hundred acres of land, and in its development and improvement Mr. Bolton has displyed the spirit of the enterprising pioneer and progressive business man, conducting his affairs with such energy and capable management that the farm annually returns to him a good income. He has also ben prominent and influential in community affairs, and for a quarter of a century he served as a trustee of Lagoona school district and was clerk of the board. Deeply interested in the cause of education, he put forth every effort in his power to promote the efficiency of the schools. Matters of public moment receive his earnest attention, and when he believes a movement will result beneficially to his community he gives it his hearty endorsement. He and his wife as pioneer people of central California certainly deserve representation in this volume. They can relate many interesting incidents of the early days, when the state was largely a mining district, and they have watched its development along other business lines, noting with interest the introduction of all the evidences of an advanced civilization.

Source: History of the New California Its Resources and People, Volume II

The Lewis Publishing Company - 1905
Edited by Leigh H. Irvine


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