Pencil SKetch of Courthouse by gAd

 

Gordon County was
Incorporated in 1850 and was formed from Cass, Bartow and Murray Counties.

Calhoun is the county seat, and was Inc. in 1852.

Calhoun was incorporated in 1852, and today is the seat of Gordon County and the
Gordon named for William Washington Gordon, the first president of the Georgia Central Railroad; father of Juliette Gordon Low, the founder of the Girl Scouts of America,  and the first Georgian to graduate from West Point Military Academy.  If you are interested in reading the book "History of Gordon County", you can view it online in our Online E-Book Library.  [Click here]  or here

GeorgiaGenWeb.Org Logo



 

Laid out from Floyd and Cass, in 1850. Bounded N. by Murray and Whitefield, S. by Cass, W. by Floyd and Chattoga, and E. by Cherokee and Gilmer.

    The rivers are the Oostenaula, Coosawattee, and Connasauga. There are several creeks.

    CALHOUN is the county town, distant 22 miles from Spring Place, 20 from Dalton, 21 from Cassville, 26 from Rome, and 32 from Summerville. This town has increased with rapidity. Population, 600.

    Resaca is five miles north of Calhoun.

    Fairmount is twelve miles east of Calhoun.

    New Echota is twelve miles east of Calhoun.

    Among the early settlers were, JOHN B. ADAMS, D. G. KING, A. STROUP, T. G. PHILLIPS, U. PHILLIPS, W. H. BAILEY, C. KINMAN, Wm. CURTIS, N. GRANT, JAMES SHELNOT, JOSEPH WILSON, H. S. GARDNER, T. B. SHOCKLEY, M. VANDEVIER, D. MORROW, JESSE SWAIN, O. C. WYLEY, MARTIN DUKE, COLONEL LAWSON, D. S. LAW, JAMES W. STRANGE, GEORGE STEWART, Dr. GIDEON, D. B. BARRETTE, Dr. WALL, JAMES LONGSTREET, COLONEL ADAMS, J. R. KNOTT, and others.

    Extract from the Census of 1850.---Dwellings, 861; families, 868. White males 2,646; white females, 2,510. Total free population, 5,156; slaves, 828. Deaths, 42. Farms, 419. Value of real estate, $813,935, value of personal estate, $165,205.

    Gordon County received its name from WILLIAM WASHINGTON GORDON, who was born in Richmond County, in 1796. His father, Ambrose Gordon, was a native of Maryland, and served as Lieutenant of Cavalry under the command of Colonel William Washington, in the Revolutionary War, at the close of which he came to Georgia, and settled in Augusta. At a very early age, he was left by his father under the care of his uncle Ezekiel Gordon, then residing in New-Jersey. After remaining at school in Rhode Island for several years, he entered the Academy at West Point, where he was graduated in 1815; and shortly afterwards was appointed aid to General Gaines.

    Believing that the legal profession afforded a better field for the exercise of his talents, he resigned his commission, removed to Savannah, and studied law with the Honorable James M. Wayne, now one of the Judges of the Supreme Court of the United States. He practiced his profession with great success until the early part of 1836, when he was elected President of the Central Railroad and Banking Company of Georgia, the arduous duties of which he continued to discharge until March, 1842, when he died in the city of Savannah, from a disease produced by the exposure incidental to his office. The most prominent traits in Mr. Gordon's character were honesty and firmness of purpose. He richly merited the inscription which the hand of friendship has placed upon his monument, now to be seen in the old cemetery of Savannah.

--------

Miscellaneous.

    The first Superior Court for this county was held on the 12th of November, 1850. The Grand Jurors were:

Alexander Stroup, Foreman. S. T. King,
Uriah Philips, D. G. King,
Joseph L. Neel, Wm. J. Fuller,
B. Lowry, Dennis Miller,
M. Boaz, Alexander Stewart,
D. D. Roaney, B. Kiker, Sen.,
A. G. B. Vandiveu, H. McConnell,
D. Morrow, Wm. B. Chandler,
James H. Burch, James Moore,
Henry H. Pitman, M. M. Douglas,
Thomas Bird, Oliver C. Wyley.
Israel P. Bowen,
 

    At New Echota, Schermerhorn's treaty was made. In 1832 it had 300 inhabitants. Several distinguished Cherokees resided here, viz., Elijah Hix, Boudenot and Alexander McCoy.

    Oothcologa was the residence of the Adairs. It was sparsely inhabited; but the Indians lived here better than in other part of the nation.

    Siloquoy, on the Tennessee road, was formerly occupied by the Thompsons, who married natives. The British had an agency here during the Revolutionary War, conducted by John Waters.

    Oostenaula was a large town in 1791. The Indians of this town were exceedingly hostile to the Americans.

Source:  Historical Collections by White1

 

usgennet.org --- the first server for genealogy & our host



_____________

Credits:  1 - Historical Collections of Georgia By White - Transcribed by Brenda Pierce
                          Read more of these collections online courtesy of GeorgiaGenWeb Volunteers. 
                          Graphics courtesy of:  gAd - Pencil Sketch Courthouse & Logo.
___________________________________

(C) 2005 - All Rights Reserved.
GeorgiaGenWeb