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Nottihgham, Mr.

 
The Atlanta Constitution
Atlanta, GA
September 18, 1881 TAC
 
Transcribed and submitted by: 
 

Nottihgham, Mr.

18 Sept 1881 (The Atlanta Constitution) The Paulding Tragedy. Yesterday a Constitution representative met a gentleman from near Douglasville who was acquainted with the particulars of the Mitchell-Cook shooting affair, which occurred between Douglasville and Powder Springs Friday morning. “You see.” said the gentleman. “the parties were J.F. Cook, his stepson Joe Mahathy, William Mitchell, his son and a man named Nottingham. For years past there has been an old difficulty between Mitchell and Cook and on more than one occasion the tragedy of yesterday came near being enacted, but both men were men of standing and friends kept them apart. Mitchell lived on a farm in Douglas vounty and Cook in Paulding county. Their farms adjoin and this was the cause of the original difficulty. I can’t tell you the particulars but it was something about a line fence that caused the first fuss. On last Monday Cook found a lot of Mitchell’s hogs in his corn field and drove them out. Mitchell happened to see Cook driving his hogs away, and made an assault upon him. He was accompanied by a young man named Nottingham who was working for him, and the two were too tough for Cook, who was compelled to abandon the battle field. This renewed the old difficulty, and Cook swore he would be revenged. Last Friday morning Cook again found Mitchell’s hogs in his corn field. He sent Mitchell word that they were there and then went home and armed himself with an old musket loaded with shot and ball. Accompanied by his step-son, Joe Mahathy, Cook then went back to the corn field for the purpose of driving the hogs out, but was met by Mitchell, his son, aged about eighteen years, and Nottingham. The sight of the trio did not frighten Cook and his son, and they went for the hogs in gallant style, but the Mitchell’s came to the defense of their property, and a general fight ensued. it seems that Nottingham, who was a stout young man, rushed at Cook, who told him to go away, but with threats, Nottingham continued his advance until Cook fired. Cook’s aim was good, and Nottingham fell dead with a dozen holes through his heart. The elder Mitchell then struck Cook with a stone knocking him down. As soon as Cook fell Mitchell jumped upon him and began stabbing him with a knife, Mahathy, Cook’s stepson, then picked up the musket and struck the ender Mitchell two fearful blows over the head with it, crushing the skull terribly. When the battle was over Nottingham was dead, Cook was badly wounded having received three ugly knife cuts, and Mitchell was unconscious. As soon as possible the wounded men removed to their homes where Dr. Pool of Douglasville, and Dr. Cotton, of Powder Springs visited them. Cook’s wounds are pronounced serious but is believed that he will soon recover. Mitchell’s injuries are thought to be fatal. The gun was a heavy weapon and the skull was so badly crushed that the brain oozed out. The affair occurred in Paulding county and the coroner held an inquest yesterday over the body of Nottingham. After a careful investigation a verdict of justifiable homicide was rendered. The affair has created the wildest excitement.



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