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THE VERNON PIONEER
Lamar County Alabama

Heartfelt thanks to Veneta McKinney for donating The Vernon Pioneer transcriptions..

Microfilm Ref Call #373 Microfilm Order #M1992.4466 from The Alabama Department of Archives and History

THE VERNON PIONEER

“Agriculture, Labor, The Mechanic Arts and Literature”

WILLIAM R. SMITH, Editor and Proprietor Two Dollars per annum. Payable in advance

Volume I Vernon, Sanford Co, Ala. May 27, 1875 No. 18

THE PIONEER Vernon, Ala Published Weekly W. R. SMITH, Proprietor

Terms of Subscription One copy one year $2.00 One copy six months 1.25 All subscriptions payable in advance

Rates of Advertising One inch, one insertion $1.00 One inch, each subsequent insertions .50 One inch, twelve months 10.00 One inch, six months 7.00 One inch, three months 5.00 Two inches, twelve months 15.00 Two inches, six months 10.00 Two inches, three months 5.00 Quarter Column 12 months 35.00 Half Column, 12 months 60.00 One column, 12 months 100.00 One column, 3 months 33.00 One column, 6 months 60.00 Professional Cards $10.00 Special advertisements in local columns will be charged double rates. Advertisements collectable after first insertion Local notices, 20 cents per line. Obituaries, tributes of respect, etc. making over ten line, charged advertising rates.

PROFESSIONAL CARDS JNO. D. MCCLUSKY, Attorney-At-Law and Solicitor in Chancery – Vernon, Alabama - will practice in Sanford and adjoining counties in the Federal Courts and in the Supreme Court of Alabama.

EARNEST & EARNEST. GEO. S. EARNEST W. F. EARNEST , Attorneys-At-Law and Solicitors in Chancery. Birmingham and Vernon, Ala. Will practice in the counties of this Judicial Circuit.

W. H. DEROCHEMOMT Attorney At Law and Solicitor in Chancery. U. S. Commissioner. Vernon, Ala. Will practice in the counties of the 3d Judicial Circuit and in the Federal Court of Huntsville.

WILLIAM R. SMITH, Attorney At Law. Tuskaloosa, Ala. Will give prompt attention to all businesses trusted to his care. Will practice in the Federal Courts, at Huntsville, Montgomery, and Mobile.

ELLIOTT P. JONES, Attorney At Law, Fayette C. H., Ala. Will practice in the Courts of Fayette, Sanford, Marion, and Walker counties.

J. H. TERRY, Attorney At Law and Solicitor in Chancery. Fayette C. H. Will attend promptly to all business entrusted him in the Courts of Sanford County – Chancery Circuit and Probate – and will attend the Circuit court promptly.

SANFORD & NESMITH. S. B. SANFORD, Fayette, C. H. and T. B. NESMITH, Pikeville. Attorneys At Law. Having formed a co-partnership in the practice of law, we will practice in all the courts of Sanford County.

MEDICAL Dr. J. D. RUSH. Vernon, Ala. Office – One door east of BURNS.

Dr. D. PERRIN, Surgeon Dentist. Tuskaloosa, Ala. Artificial teeth inserted from one to a full double set. Also, fillings, sealing, extracting, etc, done in the best style. All operations warranted to give perfect satisfaction. Office, on Main Street one door east of the Atlanta Store.

ANDREW MUNROE (picture of a boot) maker. Vernon, Sanford Co., Ala. Will be always on hand to fill orders for boots or shoes. Repairing done in good style on short notice. Terms – Strictly CASH on delivery of work. Works on no other terms.

COLUMBUS CARDS W. F. HAMILTON of Sanford County, Alabama with NATHAN BROTHERS, importers and wholesale dealers in Wines, Liquors, Cigars, Tobacco and Pipes. 82 Main Street. Columbus, Mississippi.

Columbus, Miss. Jan’y 1, 1875. Mr. W. B. HARRIS, having purchased – in the Hardware business of Winston & Co., of Columbus, Miss, the business will be conducted in the future under the firm name and style of WINSTON & HARRIS, No. 58 Market Street. We are now prepared to do a Wholesale and Retail business in the Hardware line having in stock a full assortment of Hardware from the lowest to the highest grades. We pay cash for all goods we buy, and hence can afford to sell at much cheaper rates than those who buy on time. We cordially invite merchants and others who desire to buy hardware of any grade at (torn) to call and examine our stock (torn). We are also prepared (torn) Blinds, Sash (torn) and every variety of furnishing material for building purposes in wholesale or retail lots at the lowest cash prices. Send for our price list. Winston & Harris. No. 58 Market Street.

CADY’S HORSE MANSION is the place to hire good teams and hacks and to have your horses fed when you go to the city. Give him a call. W. CADY Columbus, Miss.

LOWNES COUNTY GRANGE AGENCY. 73 Main Street, Columbus, Miss. In Hatch’s Building. Save money by buying for Cash! J. H. SHARP

ECLIPSE LIVERY STABLE – No. 100 Main Street. Columbus, Miss. The undersigned having purchased the entire stock of the Eclipse Stable is now prepared to accommodate all who may call on him. The stable, lots and stalls are in splendid order, and kept clean and neat. Special preparations made for drovers. Also, carriages, buggies, hacks, wagons, and saddles. Horses kept constantly on hand. Patronage solicited. R. A. COOK, Proprietor.

ABERDEEN CARDS JAMES D. SHELL, (Successor to J. D. Shell & Co.). Aberdeen, Miss. Wholesale and retail druggists and dealers in paints, oils, dye stuffs, and liquors, and c. Would respectfully call the attention of buyers to his full stock of everything in his line, and invites customers from a distance to call and examine his goods and prices before purchasing elsewhere. We keep a fine stock of whiskeys of all grades, from one dollar and twenty-five cents per gallop to five dollars, and also soda, pepper, soaps, and everything usually kept in a first class drug store. All of which, he guarantees to sell at the very lowest prices for cash.

JOB WORK neatly executed at this office.

COMMENCEMENT The Closing Exercises of the present session of the Vernon District high School will take place on the 27th and 28th of June next. PROGRAMME: SUNDAY, the 27th at 10 a.m. Sermon by REV. D. S. MCDONALD of North Port, Ala. At 3 ½ p.m. Singing by the Sunday School. At 5 p.m. Love Feast. At 8 p.m. Sermon BY REV. R. D. CARVER, of Pickensville, Ala. MONDAY, the 28th, at 7 p.m. Meeting of the Board of Trustees (all of whom are respectfully requested to be present). At 10 a.m. Literary Address by REV. G. R. LINCH. At 10 ½ a.m. Original Speeches and Essays by the students. At 3 p.m. Declamation of the part of the school. At 8 p.m. Plays, Dialogues, etc. All are invited to attend. - D. M. RUSH, Principal.

POEM The following lines were sent by one of our most sober-sided citizens to his “fair devoted” just twenty years ago and are now printed rather for the gratification of that worthy than for the adornment of our columns.

PARTING LOVERS – C. M.

The time draws near, by dearest dear, When you and I must part; There’s no one knows the inward grief Of my poor troubled heart. All this I suffer for your sake, The girl I love so dear; Oh, shall I go my dearest dear, Or shall I tarry here?

My truelove’s arms are long and small, Like snowy billows appear; Her eyes are as the diamonds bright, Her beauty is so rare; Her cheeks are as the roses red, Her lips like rubies be; There is no fault in my truelove As mortal man can see.

I have a request to ask of you, If I may be so bold; To have a room within your breast, My secrets to unfold. To have a room within your breast, That cannot be removed That this whole world may plainly see You are the girl I love.

I wish your breast was made of glass, -----I might behold, -------would in secret write, ------of bright gold, ------would in secret write, Believe me what I say, You are the girl I shall adore Until my dying day.

The blackest crow that eves flew Shall surely turn to white, If ever I prove false to you, Bright day shall turn to night, Bright day shall turn to night, my dear, The elements shall mourn, If ever I prove false to you, The roaring sea shall burn.

And when I am gone far away, Think of an absent friend, And when the wind sets fair, my dear, A line or two pray send, O every day seems three months long; And every hour ten, Which makes me weep when I should sleep, And say, I’ve lost a friend.

O, how shall I behave myself, To take you by the hand, And then to take my leave of you At the doleful word, command? The birds may sing, the valleys ring; While your fair face I view, No doubt but I shall shed some tears The day I part with you.

ARTICLE – “ADVERTISING” There is a class of persons who imagine they are doing judiciously by advertising through the medium of circulars. They scatter a few thousands through the country accounting their business and await the results fully convinced that in so doing they have taken all the necessary preliminaries to success. Various circulars are to be found almost daily on the doorsteps and entry ways of respectable houses. Their fate is generally that they are either thrown into the street by the indignant waiting girl or summarily pitched aside by the man of the house, who finds then when he returns home, and who desires no suggestion of new methods of lightening his purse. The use of circulars may in certain limited cases, answer every purposes, but the vast majority of those who have made money be advertising have found that the columns of a newspaper are the best and the surest, and in the end the cheapest medium of communication between the business world and the public. – {Ex.

Said a colored Georgia preacher: “Dar’s robbin’ and stealing’ all around. Dar’s de Beecher business, de Woodhull business, summer is dead, tornadoes whoopin’ round, de Freedman’s bank has busted, and it ‘pears as if de end was nigh, mighty clus at han.”

Even the laziest boy can sometimes catch a whipping.

ARTICLE – “THE GIRL TO FIND” The true girl has to be sought after. She does not parade herself in show goods. She is not fashionable. Generally she is not rich. But, oh, what a heart she has when you find her, so large and pure and womanly. When you see it you wonder if those showy things out were women. If you gain her love your two thousand are millions. She’ll not ask you for a carriage or a first class house. She’ll wear simple dresses, and turn them when necessary with no vulgar magnificate to frown upon her economy. She’ll keep everything neat and nice in your sky parlor, and give you such a welcome when you come home that you think your power higher than ever. She will entertain true friends on a dollar, and astonish you with a new thought of how little happiness depends on money. She’ll make you love home (if you don’t you’re a brute) and teach you how to pity, while you scorn, a poor fashionable society that thinks itself rich and vainly tries to think itself happy. Now, do not say any more – “I can’t afford to marry”. Go find the true woman and you can. Throw away that cigar, burn up that swith (sic) cane, be sensible yourself, and seek your wife in a sensible way.

QUOTES - by JOSH BILLINGS a. Habits are often az relikilous az they are stong; yu often see folks who kant pick up a pair of tongs, without spittin on their hands fust. b. Very great minds are seldom fully appreciated bi the age they live in. c. It iz easier to get a friend than to keep one. d. Politeness makes all the other accomplishments easy and agreeable. e. If yu don’t respekt yurself, how can yu expect others to do it for yu. f. It is very hard to lose sight of poor relashuns, but we often have to hunt up our rich ones. g. Sudden wealth seldom comes by honesty. h. He who kan whistle on tune need never be entirely lonesome. i. The strongest friendships i have ever notised have been between those who though differently, but akted alike. j. It is might onsartin woat a lazy boy or a big snaik will amount to. k. He who iz afraid of work iz a koward in everything else. l. If yu are anzious to bekum famous yu must be willing to be abuzed. m. Lice are not the only things that cum home to roost, all evil things do. n. The experience of life has taught me that there iz more happiness among the lowly than the great. o. Honesty once lost may be secovered, but modestly never kan. p. Time is a great physician; it cures broken heart, broken heads, and even broken crockery. q. I her aiwus sed, and I stick to it yet, that he who repents or sin iz a stronger and safer man than he who don’t commit it. r. The slowest time on rekord iz skule time, and the fastest iz spankin time. s. The man who iz alwuz prepared for good or bad luck, and treats them both alike iz a hero. t. I believe all those who have made themselves common enemies mankind hav died a violent death. u. Take away the fear or the law and I had rather live amung the howling beasts on the desert than amung mankind. v. He who forgits another forgits himself, for we are all ov us guilty or about the same sins. w. The obituary notiss of menny an old man iz only this: “John Doe, died, aged ninety-four years.” x. Speciatys are shat wins in the world. A jak ov all trades is like a man with fleas all over him; he iz too bizzy with the fleas to do ennything well.

NEWS Enterprise. The Chicago Times sold twenty thousand copies on the strength of the editor’s going to jail.

ARTICLE – “MAN IN THE DILUVIAL PERIOD” – by Popular Science Monthly The question was long since raised whether traces of human existence had been, or were to be found in the sand and gravel of the Post-Tertiary of Diluvial period, which immediately preceded the present. Some affirmed the finding of such remains in these and the contemporaneous deposits of certain caves, while most geologists have rejected such statements as erroneous, or at best unauthenticated, plausibly urging that ancient animal and recent human remains might easily have become intermingled. And such researches were discredited and discouraged by Cuvier’s magisterial dictum, that man did not exist in the Diluvial period, and that it was, therefore, vain to look for evidences of his existence. Some twenty years ago, however, M. Boucher de Perches discovered a quantity of rude stone implements in the Diluvial gravel-beds of Abbeville, in the valley of Somme, in intimate connection with bones of mammoths. This discovery attracting much attention, in 1858 the French Academy of Sciences sent to the spot a committee of investigation, composed, be it not forgotten, of men utterly skeptical as to the fact of the issue. This committee, strengthened by the accession of several English geologists, worked long and carefully at its task, and the Academy’s discussion upon its report was earnest and thorough. Yet the result was the complete confirmation of De Perthe’s reputed discoveries, and of the conclusion he had drawn therefrom. Cuvier was confused; the existence of man in the Diluvial period was established. Similar discoveries in the ---country and caves of Germany, Italy, Spain, England, Belgium, and especially France, followed in rapid succeeded. We cannot mention much less describe all the localities in which have been found the closely- conjoined remains of man and of animals confessedly belonging to the drifted or Diluvial period. We shall discuss only a few of the many cases, of which we may safely affirm that the often easy and common mingling of ancient with recent remains could not have occurred.

ARTICLE – “YIELD A LITTLE” It is better to yield a little than to quarrel a great deal. The habit of standing up, as people call it, for their (little) rights is one of the most disagreeable and undignified in the world. Life is too short for the perpetual bickerings which attend such a disposition; and unless a very momentous affair indeed, where other people'’ claims and interests are involved, it is a question if it is not wiser, happier and more prudent to yield somewhat of precious rights than squabble to maintain them. True wisdom is first pure, then peaceable and gentle.

JOKES A lady entered a crowded streetcar the other day, and for a moment or two no one offered her a seat. Then a fat man, affected with the asthma, beckoned to her and said: “Madam, please take - - take” (cough, cough) – She stood there waiting for his seat, and as soon as he was over his coughing fit, he concluded: “Madam, please take care and not step on my sore foot!” The look she gave him was appalling, but all the rest saw the joke.

A little American lad who had just commenced reading the newspapers, asked his father if the word “Hon” prefixed to the name of a member of Congress meant “honest”

A little four year old work up very early one morning and seeing the full morning and seeing the full moon from the window, he innocently remarked: “I should think it was about time for God to take that moon in.”

PUNGENT PARAGRAPHS – (Note: the article is very badly torn) How does a fool weigh literally? A simple ton.

The only suits that last longer than what you want are lawsuits.

When Agassiz was pressed------deliver a lecture for pay, he -------cannot afford to waste my ------ money.

What is the difference between-----belle and a burglar? The belle carries-----false locks and the burglar false keys.

They wondered at the ------and investigated to find that -----of the collectors had tar in ------his hat.

Lord, make us truly thankful for what we are about to receive -----biscuit ain’t fitten for a dog - ---the way a Louisiana man ---blessing.

Luv is sed tu be blind, but I ---lots ov phellows in luv who can-----twice as much in gals as I can. – JOSH BILLINGS

The tenor and soprano ----choir were married----exchange says that ---chants, the usual way, and ------agreed to duet. And the first ad------to the family will be a trio.

ARTICLE – “THE SAMOAN EXPEDITION” (note: this article is very badly torn) A correspondent of the San Francisco “Chronicle” who accompanied C. Steinberger on his Samoan Islands expedition, throws some light upon the movements of that mysterious individual. The Tuscarora was lying in the harbor of Apia, Upola Island, on April 1, a court of inquiry having been convened to investigate the land claims of American citizens against the Samoans. The chiefs of the other islands had been notified that Apia would be -------ed as the headquarters of -----Government and Col. Steinberger---arrnging to establish a ----Protectorate. The chief-------had given Steinberger a bod-----twelve natives, and the ----nition, etc., on the Tuscarora----be presented to the Samoan government in a few days. The ultimate-----sign is to establish a naval -----the islands for the South Pacific ----ron. Upola Island, where Capt. Steinberger is at present located, -----harbor at Apia, capable of -----ing six vessels. It has -----square miles and is about-------and is about forty miles long----in the center of height of 2,------above the sea. A portion of the ------is very productive in tropical ----coffee, etc. The natives of Upola---been subjected to missionar----a good many years, and -----may converts there, who -----by their cropped hair. The ----translated into the native lan------a printing press was put into ----some time ago. Col. Steinberger ---- doubtless make an official rep-----long, and the exact natural-------can then be determined. I------time, with the body guar---Samoan, he need not be-----------.

PAGE 2

THE PIONEER Vernon, Ala. Published Weekly. W. R. SMITH & SON, Proprietors. Wednesday, May 27, 1875.

ARTICLE – “BRIDGE ACROSS THE BUTTAHATCHIE” (note: this article is very badly torn) We have given some attention to -- matter, as to the propriety, or rather – a necessity of building a bridge – the Buttahatchie; and deem it – to elaborate the vast benefits – we might derive from such an --. They are so plain that – ask this question, which is the -- onable one, “where should the – located in order to benefit – of Vernon and the people of -- _aty generally.!” -- would answer this question in -- ay, as regards our interest and – interest of the flourishing city of Aberdeen; that it should be located somewhere near Nail’s Ferry, or, on a direct route from Vernon to Aberdeen. – reasons for this are patent to all – given the subject a moment’s -- It would five the most fer__ of Sanford County a choice – Columbus or Aberdeen. – two cities about equi-distance upon this route there are no streams between Vernon and Aberdeen, but small ones, which can -- ssed at almost any time, and – up only remain so a very short – route crossing them near their – road to Columbus crosses – where – and -- ly hap__ (large chunk missing here) -- Bridge near Nail’s or Coch _-Ferry, Aberdeen would get a scope of country trade which now – choice in markets as it is – to get to Aberdeen in the – season. This trade belongs to Aberdeen, geographically speaking. -- with regard to the especial__ -- of Aberdeen. It is quite plain. --- bridge above the point suggested…(a large chunk missing here) The merchants in Vernon are friendly to the cities of Columbus and Aberdeen, but they are so hemmed in between the Buttahatchie that they have no choice. Consequently, if Aberdeen should make herself the better market and give better bargains, we in “these” parts are none the better. We have made these suggestions merely to elicit discussion and because – what we say. We are, -- convincible if shown to be in error. Let Columbus and Aberdeen bestir themselves properly in this matter and –confident that Sanford will – a helping hand so far as in __ties.

ARTICLE – “EGYPTIAN COTTON” About nine ----the Department procured, -----the United States Consul at Alexandria, some Egyptian cotton seed-----was distributed among Southern-------. The reports hitherto have -----almost invariably unfavorable. ----- following report from Mr. Savage, Montgomery, Ala., though late is worth noting. He says: -----years ago I procured about a ----Egyptian cotton seed from ---- Department. I planted it by itself in a sixty-acre field, and found it was four or five weeks earlier than native cotton. Consequently I had -----crop before the worms made their appearance. I believe, if I had planted the whole field in Egyptian cotton, I ----have made from twenty to thirty-----ead of six. Last year I planted -----in it and packed and sold 2 ----the other was ready to pick. -----ler it twenty-five or thirty-----------

“THE CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION QUESTION-“ - from The Limestone News A GREAT GUN – GOVERNOR HOUSTON ON THE MERITS OF THE ISSUE We take great pleasure in placing before our readers today, the following extracts from a speech of His Excellency, Geo. S. Houston, delivered at Athens on the 3rd May, and reported at length in the limestone News, being confident that we could furnish nothing more appropriate or interesting. A careful perusal of the Governor’s views will give a deeper and clearer insight into the merits of the proposed Constitutional Convention than any thing yet laid before the people, will certainly convince the most obdurate and should be quite sufficient to quiet the apprehensions of those far-seeing statesman who keep up a continual howl with regard to the imaginary expense of holding the Convention. *******We have lived under the present Constitution since 1868, and I feel that I can most truthfully say that it is a failure; and has shown itself to be entirely inadequate as an organic government for the protection and prosperity of the people. On the contrary, it has proven itself to be deeply oppressive and paralyzing, and now in the true light of our own sad experience, I appeal to my fellow citizens of all classes and races to aid us in our efforts to remedy its patent and acknowledged defects. ****************** This Constitution, by usurpation of power, was forced upon us by the U. S. Congress, against our wishes and that too, after we had voted it down, and rejected it according to the rules laid down by Congress in its law upon that subject. So fellow citizens, this is not, and never was, in truth, our Constitution, but is the. (sic)******************* All parties in Alabama stand pledged to economy -----reform, and the dominate party of the State have redeemed their pledge as far as it can be done without proper amendments to the Constitution. There are certain offices, created by the Constitution, which, I think, are unnecessary and cause a waste of money, yet they cannot be abolished and the salary and expenses saved to the State, without a change of the Constitution. For instance, take the office of Lieutenant Governor, at present filled by one of our best and most deserving men. His salary is $15.00 per year. Of what necessity is that office? His duty is to preside over the deliberations of the Senate, keep order, and administer its rules. The present Lieutenant Governor, most worthily and ably discharges these duties, yet I think the duties should be performed as they were before the war. Then the Senate elected one of its members to discharge these duties, made him its presiding office, gave him a small compensation for the extra services imposed upon him; and he performed all the duties, which, since 1868, have been performed by the Lieutenant Governor. Then why not restore the old order of things? Why not save the people from paying this amount of unnecessary and improper tax? True the amount is small in this one item, but you know that many small items when added make a large sum, and nothing is more truthful than the old saying: “Take care of the pennies, and the pounds will take care of themselves.” Comparatively small items of expenditure consist and make up the hundreds of thousands of dollars expended in the administration of the State government of Alabama; and wherever it can be properly done, these useless items of expense, however small they may be, should be cut off, and the consequent tax required to pay them saved to the tax-payers. Who will deny this? Let this question be answered without evasion. As the men who oppose the Convention, and thus strive to keep these taxes fastened upon you. Take also the Bureau of Industrial Resources, with its Commissioner, clerks and other expenses aggregating $5,000 or more. What are its duties? Look to the Constitution. They are general, vague, undefined and undefinable, - wholly useless. What good has ever grown out of it? Does anybody know? Then why retain such Bureau and officers and the unnecessary attendant expenses? Why not relieve the taxpayers of this annual but useless expense? It should be done. Who refuses the relief? Watch and see. The Board of Education consists of two members from each Congressional District. They meet annually at Montgomery as a special Legislature to make laws upon the subject of education. They receive the same mileage, etc., as members of the General Assembly; so that, in truth, we have a double Legislature. And why? What necessity exists for it? I ask you, gentlemen, if your General Assembly can not better do the entire legislation for the State, and thus save the large waste of money required to keep up this additional Legislature? I say do it better, because our legislation should all be parts of a general State policy, or system of State government. That system can be made harmonious and kept so by one General Assembly, or legislative body, taking jurisdiction over all subjects of legislation, instead of two separate and independent Legislatures, each one having jurisdiction over a portion of the various legislative subjects, and acting upon them without consulting with or referring to the action of the other. In the one case, the result would be uniformity in the system; the other will produce discordant and conflicting legislation. The important question again recurs: Why not save this expense, and relieve the people from taxation to that extent? Our duty demands it and we must meet the question like men who mean to do right.******* Much, fellow-citizens, being said about the expense of holding the Convention. I admit it will cost something; but the expense will be saved threefold in one year if these suggestions are adopted. I have already pointed out to a large amount that will be saved by abolishing offices and modifying in many essential particulars, the cumbrous and expensive Common School System, which costs when the items are ---counted, probably one hundred thousand dollars, and at the -----by wise modifications make the ------of education stronger and more efficient for good. Besides the expense of the Convention will be fully saved by the fact that it will supercede the necessity, and save the expense of taking the Census. In this one item the cost of the Convention will be saved. The expense of the Convention is for only this year; while the savings, to which I have called your attention, are continuing and will repeat their benefits every year.******** Fellow citizens, our present system of public education is cumbrous and unnecessarily expensive. With its Superintendent, School Board, and clerk, County Superintendent, and incidents the cost will run over a hundred thousand dollars; much, if not the most of which, could be saved by a proper revision of the whole system. These matters, and indeed the whole question, should be in the power of the General Assembly to make, modify and revise, as it may see fit. The Constitution sets apart one fifth of the general revenue for school purposes, and this sum must be paid by the tax-payers, regardless of the financial condition of the State or of themselves. It makes no difference what calamity may befall, or overtake the State of the taxpayers, this one fifth must be paid to the school fund. The Constitution requires it. The General Assembly cannot prevent it. This should not be. The General Assembly should have the power over this matter to modify and change, if need be, to meet the necessities of the State and the people and at the same time, when in its power, to strengthen and advance the general interests of education. I am friendly to a well-digested system of common schools in this State, and hope to see it made more successful by such needed reforms as I have suggested. At present there are too many officers connected with it, unnecessarily costing many thousands of dollars. Very many of them could be dispensed with, and not only ---largely to the school fund, but all ---prove and make more useful the school system. ******** Now fellow citizens, let us look upon our own condition in regard to elections, and see how we stand. Are our elections pure and free from corrupt interferences? How was it last Fall? Will you answer me? It is important that we talk of this matter fully and freely, for our liberties are in imminent peril. It is time we should consult and take proper steps for our safety as well as for the integrity of our State government. Did you ever see Federal Supervisors supervising an election in Alabama last Fall? Did you ever see our ballot boxes surrounded by U. S. Marshals and Deputy Marshals before that time? Did you ever see Federal soldiery hovering around your voting places, intimidating and overawing voters before the last few elections? My countrymen, these things, outrageous and infamous as they are, transpired at our State election last Fall, and they augur harm to our government and people. They are, as it were, the bugle notes of the usurper giving us warning of an impending deadly attack. In times past when you honored me with your confidence by a seat in the United States Congress there were no such officers as Federal Supervisors of State elections. What a change has taken place!***** You seeing the great danger, very naturally ask me to point out the way of escape. I answer: Vote for a State Convention. Revise and change the present unfriendly Constitution. Separate our State elections from the Federal elections. Make the State elections a matter of legislation by the General Assembly. Let that body appoint our State elections on the first Monday in August, the old election day. If we should do this the Federal authority cannot interfere with the exercise of our free choice between candidates, and we shall be saved from the sight and influence of Federal bayonets at our State elections. By thus separating the State and Federal elections, we prevent fraudulent and corrupt practices, and other interference by Federal appointees and soldiery.****** Our success last Fall was highly gratifying, and the first decided step towards a perfect restoration of law and order in Alabama. If we fail to follow our success in the pending call for a Convention, we not only lose all we have gained, but by failure dampen the ardor of our friends and depress their energies. We must not do this. We have the highest incentive to be energetic and active. Good government is at stake. We can secure it. Let us do it. The great question of reform and economy, and consequent relief from unjust and unnecessary taxation involved in the issues now before the people of this State are, and should be ample to secure your -----active aid in voting the -----. But it becomes much ------just demands upon us-----------take into consideration the important effect it must have upon the freedom and purity of our elections. Either is abundant ground for action; but when combined they are irresistible. I leave these questions in the hands of the people not doubting the results.

EDITORIAL – As your excellent paper has an extensive circulation in our county, it will afford me a convenient medium of communication with the Patrons of Husbandry; if you will be so kind as to publish for me an occasional article. In the first place, I am prepared to furnish the annual password, and there are several of the masters in the county who have not received it, and as it will not be convenient for me to visit the Granges for a few weeks, so they will please call on me at my residence while on business at the Court House. The Patrons will bear in mind that our County Council is to be held at Vernon on the 1st Saturday in July next, and it is desirable that we have a good attendance. All personal interest on the subject of the Grange and who desire organizations in their vicinity are requested to correspond with me at Vernon, Ala. I am prepared and authorized to organize Granges, and will attend at any point in the county when desired for that purpose. Respectfully, JAMES MIDDLETON, Co. Dep.

QUOTES – President Grant and Simon Carmen have quarreled “When rogues fall out, honest people recover stolen property” – from the Jefferson Independent

This conundrum is respectfully submitted to the best speller: If S-I-O-U-X spells so, and E-Y-E spells I, and S-I-G-H-E-D spells side, why doesn’t S-I-O-U-X-E-Y-E-S-I-G-H-E-D spells suicide.

ADVERTISEMENT – CADY’S HORSE MANSION is the place to hire good teams and hacks and to have your horses fed when you go to the city. Give him a call. W. CADY Columbus, Miss.

SECOND QUARTERLY CONFERENCE The Second Quarterly Conference for Vernon Circuit, Tuskaloosa District, was held at Vernon, the 22nd inst. The Presiding Elder Rev. J. L. COLEMAN, was present; several official members form different portions of the country were also present. The session of the Conference was unusually interesting; besides the questions which are always asked by the Presiding Elder, and the answers, more or less similar to those of every session; other matters of general interest to the Church and ministry were attentively considered. On Sunday, the 24th inst, the exercises were very impressive, and there was a deep responsive feeling in the large audience. The sermon, at 11 o’clock preached from Matthew 7:21, was rarely excellent. The great principle of obedience, which threads the entire Bible, and which is so frequently inculcated, was the foundation stone of the discourse, and was made to appear unmistakable the grand point on which personal salvation hinges. The subject, so far as considered, was well digested, well arranged, and well expressed. The phrase “so far as considered” must not be taken as a depreciating insinuation for while the discussion was not continued beyond the limits of appropriate length, as too many, me judice, have been, yet it was sufficiently in all essential respects to make the audience feel that they heard a complete sermon without the tedium consequent upon a supplement of an hours duration, or an introduction of equal length. The Love Feast in the afternoon, was indeed a refreshing from the presence of the Lord. It seemed to be the culmination of the great sympatic wave, which spread over the hearers at 11 o’clock. It is hoped the impressions for good, and the consequent solemn reflection, will not be lost, but will find expression in more exemplary lives and circumspect Christian demeanor. - An Editor

ADVERTISEMENT – JAMES D. SHELL, (Successor to J. D. Shell & Co.). Aberdeen, Miss. Wholesale and retail druggists and dealers in paints, oils, dye stuffs, and liquors, and c. Would respectfully call the attention of buyers to his full stock of everything in his line, and invites customers from a distance to call and examine his goods and prices before purchasing elsewhere. We keep a fine stock of whiskeys of all grades, from one dollar and twenty-five cents per gallop to five dollars, and also soda, pepper, soaps, and everything usually kept in a first class drug store. All of which, he guarantees to sell at the very lowest prices for cash.

ADVERTISEMENT – Dr. D. PERRIN - Surgeon Dentist. Tuskaloosa, Ala. Artificial teeth inserted from one to a full double set. Also, fillings, sealing, extracting, etc, done in the best style. All operations warranted to give perfect satisfaction. Office, on Main Street one door east of the Atlanta Store.

ADVERTISEMENT – ANDREW MUNROE - (picture of a boot) maker. Vernon, Sanford Co., Ala. Will be always on hand to fill orders for boots or shoes. Repairing done in good style on short notice. Terms – Strictly CASH on delivery of work. Works on no other terms.

ADVERTISEMENT – ECLIPSE LIVERY STABLE - No. 100 Main Street. Columbus, Miss. The undersigned having purchased the entire stock of the Eclipse Stable is now prepared to accommodate all who may call on him. The stable, lots and stalls are in splendid order, and kept clean and neat. Special preparations made for drovers. Also, carriages, buggies, hacks, wagons, and saddles. Horses kept constantly on hand. Patronage solicited. R. A. COOK, Proprietor

ADVERTISEMENT – LOWNDES COUNTY GRANGE AGENCY. 73 Main Street, Columbus, Miss. In Hatch’s Building. Save money by buying for Cash!! J. H. SHARP

NOTICE – LAND SALE The following lands will be sold on the first Monday in June at the CourtHouse door, for the non-payment of taxes for the year of 1874. These lands were assessed to “owners unknown”. (Following is a list of land descriptions, no names) – JOHN R. KING, Tax Collector of Sanford Co.

ADVERTISEMENT – I have just received 50 of the Excelsior Premium Plows, at very low prices. The best and cheapest known. THOS. MAXWELL.

PAGE 3

THE PIONEER. Vernon, Ala. Published Weekly. W. R. SMITH & SON, Proprietors.

Terms of Subscription One copy one year $2.00 One copy six months 1.25 All subscriptions payable in advance

Rates of Advertising One inch, one insertion $1.00 One inch, each subsequent insertions .50 One inch, twelve months 10.00 One inch, six months 7.00 One inch, three months 5.00 Two inches, twelve months 15.00 Two inches, six months 10.00 Two inches, three months 5.00 Quarter Column 12 months 35.00 Half Column, 12 months 60.00 One column, 12 months 100.00 One column, 3 months 33.00 One column, 6 months 60.00 Professional Cards $10.00 Special advertisements in local columns will be charged double rates. Advertisements collectable after first insertion Local notices, 20 cents per line. Obituaries, tributes of respect, etc. making over ten line, charged advertising rates.

(Section cut out)

MASONIC Vernon Lodge No. 389, meets on the 2nd Saturday of each month, at 10 a.m. I.O.O.F. Moscow Lodge, No. 43, meets on the 2nd and 4th Saturday in each month, at night. I.O.G.T. Vernon Lodge, Number 86, meets on Wednesday night of each week, at seven o’clock.

FAYETTE DIRECTORY

Representative – J. C. KIRKLAND

Probate, County and Commissioners courts meet same as in Sanford.

County Officers (torn) Commissioners (torn) G.W. MUSGROVE ELLIS LOGAN

MARION DIRECTORY

Representative – JAMES F. HAMILTON

Probate, County, and Commissioners courts meet same as in Sanford

County Officers J. D. TERRELL, Judge of Probate Sheriff, ex officio Tax Collector, J. H. HUGHES Solicitor, THOS R. NESMITH ROBERT CLARKE, Tax Assessor ALVIN M. JONES, Treasurer

LOCAL CAPT. JNO. D. MCCLUSKY, is agent for the Pioneer, and is fully authorized to collect and receipt for all dues for subscription, advertising, &c. CAPT. L. J. MORGAN, of Aberdeen, Miss. will receive all subscriptions and advertising matter intended for our paper from that city. WILLIAM F. HAMILTON is our authorized agent at Columbus, Miss.

ISAAC SANDERS’S Mill three miles south of Vernon, is constantly turning out the very best quality of Meal and Flour. Meal and flour always on hand at the lowest market price. Also, promptest attention given to all orders for lumber, and a good supply is kept on hand for sale. Give us a trial.

Call on J. B. SELLICK, (next door to DR. GUILD’S Office) when you go to Tuskaloosa if you want your watches and jewelry repaired in the very best--. Money refunded if satisfaction--.

DAILY DOTTINGS We have received an invitation from the Alabama Press Association to join an excursion to the Empire State, at the urgent invitation of the New York Editorial Association. The trip will occupy some two or three weeks and has been arranged almost without cost. Sorry we cannot excurt. (sic). We have, however, every reason to believe that the PIONEER will be represented, and wish our brother quill-drivers a magni-glorious time.

We are pained to learn of the illness of our young friend, W. T. MARLER. Tom is a universal favorite here, and the absence of his happy, genial face from our streets seems to throw a damper upon the entire community. Tom is a pupil of the High School, and as such is an earnest and laborious student; enjoying the confidence and love of teachers and pupils; probably his greatest trial in his present affliction is the inability to attend “books.” All join us in sincere wishes for his speedy recovery.

Wheat, we understand, in the neighborhood of the Furnace, has been cradled, threshed, and floured. First blood for Sanford County.

MRS. LAWRENCE treated us to quite a vegetable dinner last week. Mrs. Lawrence is first in garden, first in kitchen and first in the hearts of her boarders; notwithstanding the fact that she has to ring them up morningly.

The Grangers will be interested in the abort communication of County Deputy MIDDLETON. In this connection we would state that pro rata space in our columns is cheerfully extended to the Grange for anything in the way of communications, essays, etc., that may lead to the material advancement and prosperity of the Order in our county.

We saw MR. LAWRENCE buying a scythe blade from the Grange Store the other day; his wheat ranks with the best in the county and will be ready for cutting in a few days.

Mr. S. P. GOODWIN has been quite ill for eight or ten days but we are glad to hear is now convalescing.

No dots from Hell’s Creek on hand this week. Bestir yourself, Mr. “Special Correspondent.”

Our many local correspondents of last week seem to have collapsed. For pity sakes gentlemen, don’t let us form a spasmodic opinion of your interest in the Pioneer. Wake up. In case your “coms” don’t suit we --- bag them and suggest that you try again – “O, do not be discouraged,” etc.

Mr. JACK MORDECA is now the Columbus Mail rider, vice GILPIN discharged.

Our office was thronged with friends and patrons from the county on last Saturday – We are always happy to see them and cordially invited to make our office their headquarters while in the city.

We are authorized to state that CAPTAIN JOHN D. MCCLUSKY will canvass the county in the interest of the Constitutional Convention. The Captain can always be heard, is a power on the stump, and will no doubt accomplish much good.

BEN. POE, an old Negro in the employ of CAPTAIN OGDEN, while in a spasm a few days ago, and was horribly burned (sic). He lingered awhile in the most intense agony and died. Ben was an honest old Negro and knew nothing but work. He enjoyed the good of all who knew him, both white and black.

WILL COBB “played the devil” for us this week, and will receive our warm thanks for it. The naturalness with which these Sanford county youths adapt themselves to the art of printing is no less a marvel than a gratification to us. It requires us twelve months and upwards to learn how to play the devil, and in the language of Uncle Mart, we are “only a half-scholar” yet. WILL learned it in so many hours.

MRS. LINCOLN, widow of President Lincoln has been sent to the Insane Asylum on the petition of her son Robert. Her property is said to be worth over $80,000.00.

For groceries, staple dry goods, and general merchandise, at low prices, go to W. F. FUTRELL’s cheap cash store. D. J. and F. W. CRIBBS, of Alabama, will always be pleased to see their friends. Give them a call when you go to Aberdeen.

Saddles! Saddles! Just received a fine lot of Ladies and Gentlemen’s Saddles which I will sell dirt cheap for Cash. G. C . BURNS

Garden Seed. -- --- of every variety, just -- ---. G. C. BURNS

George S. Houston has politically redeemed Alabama. T. MAXWELL (at the Old Bee Hive) is redeeming the trade of Tuskaloosa, by selling for less than Granger’s prices. Buy nothing — until you go there and see.

LETTER – TO THE PATRONS ON THE DISTRICT SCHOOL. With the exception of one week, I have up to this time, been unremitting in punctuality and discharge of my duty. I have been scrupulously attentive to every interest of the school and its pupils. On my return from my week’s relaxation, I learned, with pain, that some of my patrons were expressing a little dissatisfaction at my protracted absence, intimating that the school was, probably, not doing so well as when I was present. Such fears were groundless; and I felt so confident that the school had been conducted in a manner so far from warranting those chimerical apprehensions, that I did not interest myself to ascertain who were the complainers. In consideration of my health, my absence from the schoolroom was a necessity and no less a duty. Thus much have I said, as preliminary to the few remarks which I shall add, rather than as an allusion to my absence and the consequent complaints. I wish to say to my patrons, that my health is such that I can not confine myself to the schoolroom. I must have recreation. It will be necessary for me to spend a portion of every day in riding or some other outdoor exercise. In my absence my assistants carry on the school; and I have every assurance that they discharge their duties faithfully and conscientiously. I hope to hear of no more complaints, unless a just cause can be shown for their existence. I wish, moreover, my patrons to understand, distinctly, that I do not neglect any duties which I owe to the school, and that I will not be the scapegoat to support and bear off false charges, and unfounded complaints. - D. M. RUSH

ADVERTISEMENT – Call at W. V. FUTRELL’S Hotel and Restaurant if you would receive the best accommodation and politest attention.

ADVERTISEMENT – If you want to gather honey, Go to MAXWELL’S with your money. He’s the Granger’s “Old King Bee.” Who, while he sets your Greenbacks free, Will do it on the Mutual plan That stands for right – ‘twixt man and man. And you must read, if you would thrive, -------- for “Seventy-Five” (note: rest of advertisement is torn)

NOTICE - PROBATE State of Alabama, Sanford County Probate Court, May 11, 1875 This day came H. T. HENSEN, administrator of the Estate of JAMES METCALF, dec’d. and filed his petition in writing and under oath asking permission to compromise certain debts therein named whereupon. It is ordered by the Court, that Friday, the 11th day of June next, be set for the hearing and passing upon said Petition when --- where all parties interested in said Estate – come and contest said Petition if they think proper. Given under my hand this eleventh day of May 1875. ALEXANDER COBB, Judge of Probate

NOTICE - SHERIFF’S SALE NOTICE! NOTICE! SHERIFF’S SALE: By virtue of an Execution issued from the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Sanford County, I will espouse to public sale, for – before the Court House door, in Vernon on the 7th day of June 1875, the following described property, to-wit: (note from transcriber: legal land descriptions – no names associated with property) Also the following described personal property, to wit: one boiler, two boots, blowers. – forge hammers, one lot of blacksmith tools, one old wagon, one flask, one – of stone hollow ware and machinery patter--. Sold to satisfy said Execution in favor –K. KIRK vs. HALE AND MURDOCK IRON Co. May 13, 1875 S. P. KEMP, Sheriff Sanford County

NOTICE COMMENCEMENT: The Closing Exercises of the present session of the Vernon District high School will take place on the 27th and 28th of June next. PROGRAMME: SUNDAY, the 27th at 10 a.m. Sermon by Rev. D. S. MCDONALD of North Port, Ala. At 3 ½ p.m. Singing by the Sunday School. At 5 p.m. Love Feast. At 8 p.m. Sermon by Rev. R. D. CARVER, of Pickensville, Ala. MONDAY, the 28th, at 7 p.m. Meeting of the board of Trustees (all of whom are respectfully requested to be present). At 10 a.m. Literary Address by Rev. G. R. LINCH. At 10 ½ a.m. Original Speeches and Essays by the students. At 3 p.m. Declamation of the part of the school. At 8 p.m. Plays, Dialogues, etc. All are invited to attend. D. M. RUSH, Principal.

ADVERTISEMENT – Every Free-Mason and Odd Fellow should belong to the “Mutual Benefit Association”. This association has for its object the relief of the widows, orphans and heirs of deceased members. It is the best and cheapest plan of Insurance, making as it does provision for the loved and dependent ones. For blank application and all necessary information apply to ANDREW MUNROE.

ADVERTISEMENT – S. M. DAVIS, of Aberdeen, Miss. We take pleasure in calling attention of our readers to the fact that this gentleman has recently established a Wholesale Liquor House in Aberdeen, and is fully prepared to furnish every variety of Wines, Whiskeys, Brandies, etc. known to this continent. A visit to his house is more easily imagined than described. When you go to Aberdeen be sure to call on DAVIS, we are ready to guarantee you good bargains and a nice time, whether you indulge or not. Mr. Davis is thoroughly conversant with his business and knows how to act on the square. HARRY D. is a splendid fellow. Just try him.

ADVERTISEMENT – Merchants please take notice, that the largest, best selected and cheapest stock of ready made Fall and Winter Clothing ever brought to Mobile is now ready for inspection at the Mammoth Clothing house of M. P. LEVY & CO. Nos. 16, 18 and 20 North Water Street, Mobile, Ala.

ADVERTISEMENT – GREENWOOD SPRINGS. The Messrs. PERKINS will open the Hotel of Greenwood Springs today, for the season, and we are very sure that we could not make a more acceptably announcement to the many sufferers from Dyspepsia, Asthmas, etc., who have in the past found by little relief save that obtained from these wonderful waters. We have no hesitation in saying to our distant readers that the waters of Greenwood Springs afford cure or relief for almost every physical affliction, to say nothing of the rustic summer retreat offered by the Hotel to all whose rest from the labors and anxieties incident to busy life. – Aberdeen Examiner.

ADVERTISEMENT – Decidedly the best place in the city to get a round, square meal at W. V. FUTRELL’s, Aberdeen, Mississippi.

ADVERTISEMENT – Go to MAXWELL’S and get the best safest Kerosene Oil in use. Tuskaloosa, Ala.

ADVERTISEMENT – Smith’s Alabama Justice and Officers Guide – a good farm book – a few copies may be had at this office at the low price of ---.

(Note from transcriber – a major chunk cut from the paper.)

ADVERTISEMENT – Over the Bridge to the “Old Bee Hive” T. MAXWELL is at the Old Corner – ready at all times to serve his friends and patrons. Every variety of Staple Goods may be found in his line. Dry goods and groceries of the best quality and at the lowest Cash prices! Tuskaloosa, Ala.

ADVERTISEMENT – S. P. GOODWIN, Confectioner, Vernon, Ala. Keeps his establishment well supplied with the best selection of candies, jellies, cakes, fruits, raisins, almonds, oysters, sardines and all kinds of canned goods. Also the best cigars and tobacco.

ADVERTISEMENT – Variety. A. MUNROE – (note: rest of page is torn)

ADVERTISEMENT – G. C. BURNS – Vernon, Ala. is replenishing his Fall and Winter stock of staple dry goods, and all kinds of Family Groceries. He will keep his supplies for up to the demands of the market. Here the ladies may always have a variety of dress goods. Silks, calicoes, domestic bonnets, ribbons, shoes. Here the gentlemen may find furnishing goods in patterns or ready made of the best material. Hats, boots, and shoe. Here the farmer may supply himself with the implements of farming, iron, nails, axes, hoes, spades, chains, bagging, hatchets, hammers, ties and plows. He invites customers and ---(rest is torn)

PAGE 4

NOTICE – LAND SALE Notice. The following described lands will be sold on the 1st Monday in June at the Court House door, for the non-payment of Taxes for the year 1874. These lands were assessed to “owners unknown”.. (Note: gives legal descriptions of land – no names associated with article)

ADVERTISEMENT- Domestic Sewing Machines. Domestic Paper Fashions. Domestic Monthly, New York.

ADVERTISEMENT – Drug Store. W. K. KIRK J. D. RUSH. Dr. Kirk & Rush. Vernon, Ala. Have just received a fine assortment of fresh drugs, medicines, chemicals, etc. A full line of Domestic medicines, patent pills in variety, - a full line of toilette soaps, perfumeries of all descriptions, Brushes for the hair, teeth, shaving, &c. Stationery, fancy articles, choice chewing and smoking tobacco, cigars, pipes, &c., &c. All of which we will sell at small profits – only for Cash. Asafetida, Alum Allspice, Bluestone, Coperas, Cream tartar, camphor, gum, Epsom salts, dye-stuffs, inks, laudanum, paregoric, No 6 pepper, oil – of fish, spike, sassafras, turpentine – soda, sulphur, &c. Cheap for the cash. Call in. Kirk & Rush.

ADVERTISEMENT – ALEXANDER COBB, Vernon, Ala. deals in staple dry goods and family supplies. His stock is carefully selected and consists of all such substantial articles as the market demands. Ladies dress goods of every variety. Cloths and ready-made clothing for gentlemen. Boots, shoes, hats, bonnets, gloves, stockings, laces, ribbons. Hardware, axes, hatchets, hammers, nails, carpenters’ tools, horse-shoes, iron, &c. Crockery & glassware, all of which he offers to sell very low for cash and ---(rest torn)

ADVERTISEMENT- The VERNON PIONEER – A weekly paper published at Vernon, Sanford County, Ala. by W. R. SMITH & Son. offers ----(torn) City Merchants for Advertising, &c. This paper is devoted to the Agricultural, mechanical, mercantile, and moral interests of the country at large and to the local interests of Sanford County in particular. Terms - $2.00 per annum, payable invariably in advance.

ADVERTISEMENT – TOMMIE CLEMENTS, North Port, Ala. Confectioner and dealer in all kinds of Candies, Plain and Fancy, cakes, nuts, vegetables, fruits, &c. Oysters, sardines, lobsters and every variety of canned goods. The best cigars, smoking and chewing tobacco. Highest CASH price paid for butter, eggs and other country produce. Terms CASH.

ADVERTISEMENT- P. C. COMBS, Vernon, Ala. Undertaker. Cabinet maker, and dealer of furniture, bureaus, bedsteads, etc. sash & blinds, made to order.----

ADVERTISEMENT – Merchants please take notice, that the largest, best selected and cheapest stock of ready made Fall and Winter Clothing ever brought to Mobile is now ready for inspection at the Mammoth Clothing house of M. P. LEVY & CO. Nos. 16, 18 and 20 North Water Street, Mobile, Ala.

ADVERTISEMENT – To the Fro__ Campaign for 1875!! R. & S. PALMER & Co. (Successors to T. L. HUDGINS) Miller Block, Tuskaloosa, and their old Stand North Port, Alabama. Jobbers & retailers. The largest stock in west Alabama. Our motto: “Always Bottom Prices for CASH!” Our stock is now complete, embracing every variety of staple and fancy groceries. Our specialties are Bacon, flour, tobacco, and liquors, and our stock, having been bought for cash, enables us to offer superior inducements. Purchasers of groceries will save money by examining our stock and prices before buying. We will not be undersold by any house in Alabama. R.& S. PALMER & Co. Jobbers and retailers, Tuskaloosa and North Port.

ADVERTISEMENT – North Port Ware House North Port, Ala. WM. R. DODSON, Sole Proprietor. The public is hereby advised that this ware house is entirely new and has been built out of the most substantial materials, with a view to safety as well as capacity. The whole being surrounded with a substantial enclosure. This House is situated on the bluff of the Warrior River Steamboat Landing, and presents the best facilities for shipping cotton. The Proprietor will attend to the shipping of cotton free of charge! All sorts of merchandise will be received on storage, and prompt attention given. The wharf is in first rate condition. Insurance may be effected on cotton, in this Ware House as cheap as at any other in Tuskaloosa. Come on, you will find me at my post. W. R. DODSON

ADVERTISEMENT – Ayer’s Sarsaparilla, for purifying the blood. The reputation this excellent medicine enjoys is derived from its cures, many of which are truly marvelous. Inveterate cases of Serofalonus disease, where the system seemed ---- (rest of paper torn)

ADVERTISEMENT – At the ATLANTA STORE, the cheapest dry goods, hats, --, shoes, and --, Tuskaloosa, Ala.

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