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Cherokee Advance

Cherokee County, Ga.

 

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Cherokee Advance, Cherokee Co., GA

1/23/1880 - Vol. 1

Those who may receive the Advance and do not notify us to discontinue
the same will continue to receive it and be expected to pay the
one Dollar, whether you ordered it or not. Bear in mind.

Over the County

Messrs. HILLHOUSE & PAXTON have discovered a new gold slate vein near
Larkin RAGSDALE's, which pans extremely well.

Messrs. HART & TUTOR, experienced miners from Boston, Mass. are now
reopening the old McCAY mines at the Sixes. They have put up a new
engine and are working day and night going down in the shaft.

Messrs. CLARKSON & Co. have their steam saw mill running and are still
working their gold mine near the Sixes.

There is also some mining on the Abercrombie mine.

William BROADWELL, one among the oldest citizens of the county, living
near Cherokee Mills has been lying in a helpless condition
from paralysis for four years.

1/30/1880

Ophir Inklings

Nothing of special interest from this part of the vineyard.

The Cherokee Advance has reached our office and was read with great
interest.

The farmers have begun seeding oats and we fear too soon, as the spring
freezes may prove too fatal for such crops.

Efforts are being strenuously made to build a new church at Hightower.

Maj. PETTY has for sixty years had a briar in his finger. No effort of
a surgeon has proven successful.

Married - On Sunday, 18th inst. at the residence of the bride's father,
by Rev. J. A. DONALD, Mr. Wm. LATHEM to Miss Jane SANDOW. Also at the
same time and place, by Rev. J. A. DONALD, Mr. Cap FOWLER to Miss
Maggie SANDOW.

Married - On Sunday, 18th inst. at the residence of Capt. MADDOX, at
Orange, Mr. Gib FOWLER to Miss Mattie JOHNSON, of Milton County.

2/6/1880

Ophir Inklings

In the language of the spring poets "all is calm and serene".

Ophir has no boom except the potato boom, and like other booms it is
inclined to be rotten.

Fred MOORE and his squad of road hands have very creditably completed a
bridge across Cain Creek.

Rev. J. W. RED will preach at the Cross Roads school house every first
Sunday.

3/3/1880

Died from the effects of Still Beer

We learn from quite reliable source, that on Monday night of last week,
five young men, four of whom were a widowed ladies sons, Mrs. BOYDS,
who lives on Capt. HAM's place, about 14 miles from Canton, and one of
Capt. HAM's sons, went out on a coon hunt. After hunting for some time
they concluded to return home. On their way was a still house, which we
believe to be an illicit one, and some of the boys wanted to stop and
get liquor, but the older of the boys and Capt. HAM's son refused to go
so went and waited on the road side a little way off, for their
companions. The three younger of the boys went and found the beer stand
and drank from it to satisfy their thirst. On their way home the
younger of the three, about thirteen years old, who went to the still
complained of being sick and finally became so weak that the others had
to carry him; he kept getting worse until just before day he breathed
his last. The other two who accompanied him are reported in a very
critical condition and likely to die. This is indeed a sad story all
the way through should teach our young as well as the old the
importance of "Touch not, taste not, handle not the unclean thing. For
at last it bitteth like a serpent and stingeth like an adder."

Ball Ground Affairs

Property is advancing in value, and changing hands in this vicinity.

We have no good hotel. A good investment would be to build one.

People are using a good deal of fertilizer, showing they are wide-awake
to their best interest.

We have no young men who are afflicted with the Texas fever; they are
all working like beavers.

We learn that the Ellijay Courier gave one of our boys an editorial
puff.

Married- On Sunday the 21st ult. Mr. A. A. LYON to Miss Alice WILLIAMS,
of Forsyth county; also Mr. Joseph LYON to Miss Julia LOW, of this
county. We wish them a happy and peaceful life.

April 7, 1880. No. 13

John P. BUFFINGTON, who last week was bound over to the Superior court
there to answer to the charges of robbery and carrying
concealed weapons, will have a trial on the 15th inst., on a writ of
insanity. His brother from Alabama was here last week and says he is
crazy.

Convict Labor - An Appeal Against Their Use by the Marietta & North
Georgia Road

Georgia penitentiary companies Nos. 2 and 3 have filed a petition to
the Governor setting forth the facts contained in the bill pending
against the Marietta and North Georgia Railroad in which they had
prayed for an injunction, which was denied by the state court a short
time since. In this petition they state they have amended the bill for
injunction and have set forth new facts; and they state that whatever
right the Marietta & North Georgia railroad now has nearly two hundred
convicts; that these convicts are not at work for the company, nor on
its railroad, nor have they been since April 1, 1878, but that they are
being worked by the Cherokee mining company in mining, building
railroads for it, etc.; and they charge that this is a perversion and a
misappropriation of the labor, and instead of giving a railroad to the
people, the convicts are being used to make money. The petitioners ask
the Governor to pass an order requiring said convicts to be worked on
the Marietta & North Georgia railroad, and to be held, and cared for
and worked in the manner prescribed by law, until the final order and
decree in that bill now pending is given. Ex-Governor James M. SMITH
and Hopkins A. GLENN are the Attorneys for the petitioners.
-Constitution.

Ball Ground Affairs

Mr. Editor; I have not said anything recently through the columns of
your valuable paper from this part of the county. I venture a few dots.

Perhaps there are some of your readers who do not know what Ball Ground
takes her name from. It was by Indians playing ball at this place. It
was no rare thing, thirty or forty years ago for two or three hundred
Indians to meet here and play ball, which was the finest of sport for
them. The ground is pleasantly situated in a high valley, eleven miles
above your pleasant town, the site of the Cherokee and is surrounded
with beautiful farming lands. One and two miles off on the south is the
Etowah River, on the east Long Swamp and on the west Big Sharp
Mountain, with a bracing and exhilarating atmosphere. Our village and
county is admirably suited to seekers of health, happiness and farming
or mineral property. With the prospect of the early completion of the
railroad to this point we may expect our riches to be fully developed,
and the State at large benefited.

The farmers of this section are making rapid progress on the coming
crops. The wheat on uplands will give an average yield, and as yet does
not seem to be affected with worm or fly. Oats are looking fine.

The efficient gentlemen, ROBERTS, HOLCOMBE, KILBY & Co. have bought a
steam sawmill and will put it in operation here.

P. H. LYON and James PRICE Esq. were witnesses on the revenue trials in
Atlanta recently.

Canton is surely getting an enormous trade from the amount of wagons we
see going down daily from the upper counties. Canton is a go-a-head
town, and is determined to be up with the season. {You are right as to
our town. We are doing a big business now. Our merchants are happy and
lay in expectancy of a large trade this fall. Ed.}

>From present indications a larger area will be planted in cotton and
corn than ever before, especially through this part of the moral
vineyard.

April 14, 1880. No. 14

A rabid dog was promiscuously circulating around Roswell a few days
ago, biting several children and stock.

Mr. L. R. FLOYD, said to be the oldest citizen of Floyd County, died
last week. He was 96 years old. - Advertiser

Mrs. EDWARDS, in Forsyth County, a few days ago, was bitten on the hand
by a cat. It is thought doubtful whether or not she recovers.

Still Ahead

The most remarkable thing in Cherokee is two twin daughters of Mr. And
Mrs. B. W. CORNEILSON which can not be told apart by their parents
except that a piece of ribbon be tied on one or the others arm. They
are the 11th and 12th children. We are partially in wonderment to know
whether or not the twins know themselves apart. What do you think of
this? Until another development be made we shall declare that Cherokee
is ahead. We wish the proud father and mother much joy and trust the
twins will have a pleasant voyage through life.

Ophir Inklings

Torrents of rain and snow fell last Thursday. On the 6th inst. a severe
hailstorm fell; it is no exaggeration to say that plenty fell as large
as guinea eggs.

Some of our neighbors were startled to hear of certain news on April
1st, but after a while found out that it was an "April fool".

Log rollings are ripe, intermingled with slice potato pie.

A wheezing disease is prevailing among the hogs.

Allons.

Ball Ground Affairs

In those days writes John the correspondent, not the Baptist,
concerning the railroad contractors. Are they dead & if so, we have not
heard it. We would like to hear of them beginning the road at some
early day.

The sawmill company, HOLCOMBE, KILBY & Co., have met here and picked
out a location for their steam sawmill, which will be put in operation
at this place soon.

Mr. L. S. THACKER caught a large beaver in a trap last week. It is the
fourth one for him in four weeks.

Rev. F. M. WILLIAMS preached a good sermon at the Baptist church last
Sunday week.

April 21, 1880. No. 15

Adjudged Insane

John T. BUFFINGTON, the man tried before Justice HUTSON, a few weeks
since under several warrants and bound over to the Superior Court, was
brought before a jury of twelve men, consisting of Dr. J. H. SPEIR,
foreman, W. M. McCANDLESS, J. M. McAFEE, W. M.
BARTON, J. M. HARDIN, E. B. HOLLAND, B. F. CRISLER, J. H. KILBY, R. L.
PATTERSON, H. H. DAVIS, Wm. WARLICK, and after examining a few
witnesses and the alleged insane, they retired and in 15 minutes
brought in the verdict that he was insane. The jury was composed of our
best citizens and their verdict is enough for one to know he was not in
sound frame of mind. Yet we are of the belief that too many criminals
are evading justice that should be meted out to them by law in this
way. The Insane Asylum is for fanatics, not criminals. We do not wish
to be construed as believing the jury to have returned the wrong
verdict not in the least. We are strong in our judgement that the jury
did their duty. Will. J. WINN, that young and rising eminent Marietta
lawyer, was counsel for defendant. BUFFINGTON left on Saturday morning
under the charge of his brother who was appointed as his guardian, to
be place in the asylum if there was room, if not to take care of him
until a vacancy shall occur.

The Survey

Capt. TURNER begins a survey from this place to near Ellijay this
morning. He is accompanied by Mr. Will PHILLIPS, Isaac YOUNG,
and several convicts, and is making the survey with the purpose of soon
commencing work on the extension. We would be glad to see work begun on
the extension and completed to the North Carolina line.

Hickory Flat Shots

Some of our farmers are busy planting cotton, while others say it is
rather early to plant.

Maj. PUCKETT has ordered a new cotton gin with self-feeder and
condenser. He expects to carry on a large business in the way of
ginning cotton this fall.

WEBB & WORLEY speak of erecting a new store house at this place. They
are businessmen, and, by the way, right good looking men too.

Glad to hear that "Little Mary" is again running. We are lonesome
without the whistle.

The Sabbath school at this place is in a prosperous condition. May it
continue.

On Sunday last at 9 o'clock A. M. Rev. W. J. BARTON, of your town, made
a Sunday school speech; and at 11 o'clock Rev. M. B. TUGGLE preached.
Preaching at night by Rev. J. C. WINGO.

Rural.

Ophir Inklings

Ophir Inklings still exist.

Politics are beginning to attract considerable attention. We hope that
all will become united and put the right man and men at the helm.

Guano will soon cease to be.

Rev. R. A. EAKES of Cumming preached the funeral of Dr. Francis JONES,
who died in Atlanta some months since, at the Holbrook Campground last
Sunday. A large assemblage was present.

Our settlement was startled upon hearing of the sudden death of Mr. M.
M. SMITH, an old and respected citizen. While setting down at his
dinner table on last Monday he dropped dead.

A small son of Mrs. REYNOLDS, living at the mouth of Cain Creek, while
playing with a loaded pistol accidentally shot his sister in the
cheek, the ball ranging about the ear. By the efficient surgical
operations of Dr. STROTHER the ball was extricated.

Some of the wheat fields in this section are said to be red with rust.

Allons.

Ball Ground Items

Spring has come with all its loveliness and beauties.

Our farmers are taking a good deal of field exercise. Corn planting is
the general work.

The writer had the opportunity of crossing over the iron bridge a few
days ago. It is one of the best bridges ever put up in this county.

All is quiet along the banks of Sharp Mountain. Present indications
show that a larger area will be planted in cotton and corn than ever
before.

Mr. A. C. LYON is our young director of the mountains.

Death of "Uncle" John NEWEL

We are pained to chronicle the sudden death of Rev. John NEWEL, who
died at his home in this county on the 16th inst., aged 80 years and
1 day. For many years he was a devoted member of the Methodist Church,
and his walk through life fully exemplified the beautiful life of a
true Christian. When quite young he connected himself with the church;
in 1827 he was licensed to preach, and for 33 years was an
itinerant minister. He was a native of North Carolina, but came to
Georgia many years ago, and was loved and respected by all who knew
him. His remains were followed to Holbrook's Camp Ground by a large
concourse of relatives and friends, where he was buried with Masonic
honors, and his services of hi church conducted by Rev. C. M. McCLURE.
He leaves a wife, children, and grand children to mourn his death.
We sympathize with the bereaved in their loss, yet we believe him to be
at rest in Heaven where he has won the prize.

April 28, 1880. No. 16

Mr. N. A. HAVEN, writing to the Editor of the Mining Record, says of
our county: Increased interest is being felt in the gold mining
districts of Georgia, especially so in that part of the belt passing
through the county of Cherokee. In this particular section, the veins
are larger and better defined than at the extreme ends of the leads, it
being in the central portion of the belt; in every stream and every
hill on the belt for twenty-five miles, gold can be found. The mines of
note have been tested and worked, commence on the northeast with the
Franklin, Strickland, Oliver, Pascoe, Cheynogowah or Worley,
Clarkeston, Cherokee, and the Glade. The Franklin, Strickland and
Pascoe are famous for the amount of yield, when mining was in its
zenith, twenty-five or thirty years ago; at that time, work was done
very superficially, large fortunes were made from them on work done,
not exceeding one hundred feet in depth, as soon as water level was
attained work ceased, and these mines have been idle ever since; now
improved machinery has been invented and mining has become a science,
there is no reason why enormous results cannot be had. The Cheynogowah
mine, twelve miles southeast of Strickland, discovered a year since,
and on which there is a five stamp mill, promises to be one of the
richest discoveries yet made; large and continuous veins have been
opened and are permeated with the precious metal; in one place an area
of two acres, four to six feet deep has pay dirt and ore worth three to
six dollars a ton. It has been tested by mill process, which verifies
these figures. What is needed on this property is a large mill,
hydraulic washing and pumping engines, etc. With these appliances,
there is no doubt but that Dr. LITTLE's (State Geologist of Georgia)
figures could easily be obtained. He says in his report, that with a
ten-stamp mill and other needful machinery, a yield of $75,000 per
annum, can be attained. His opinion is valued as the best authority on
mining, of any man south of the Potomac. The mining region herein
described, is of easy access. A narrow gauge railroad from Marietta,
Georgia, to Canton, the capitol town of Cherokee, connects with the
great Kennesaw route to Chattanooga and the west, and at Dalton via
East Tennessee, and to New York; and from Marietta to Atlanta, twenty
miles distant, the capitol of the state. Three hours ride from Atlanta
will carry you to the mining district. What is needed is the infusion
of such spirit and enterprise as is manifest in the western states,
with capital to back it, to make Georgia gold mines famous and to yield
far more handsome dividends than has yet been obtained in the far-off
region. Here we are in a high, healthy region, abounding in timber,
abundance of provisions, cheap labor, and in sight of the railroad. We
advise those seeking investments to give this region their careful
attention.

Up ] Letters to the Governor ] War of 1812 ] Transcriptions by Kelly Joshlin ] Advocate ] Alabama Papers ] The Atlanta Constitution ] Atlanta Newspaper Project ] Augusta Chronicle ] Augusta Daily ] Christian Advocate ] The Daily Constitution ] The Daily ] Butler Herald ] Carroll Free Press ] [ Cherokee Advance ] Indian Atrocities ] Columbian Herald ] Columbian Herald ] CV Main Page ] Cuthbert Appeal ] Dale County Alabama Newspapers ] Dallas Morning News ] Early Georgia Newspapers ] Eufaula Times Main Page ] Gospel Messenger ] Macon GeorgiaTelegraph ] Macon Citizen ] Miscellaneous Newspapers ] Journal 1808-1818 ] Ga Journal and Msger3 ] The Messenger ] The Georgia Telegraph ] Montgomery  Advertiser ] Southern Christian Advocate ] Southern Banner ] Southern Recorder ] Southern Star ] Times Herald ] The Upson Pilot ] Misc. scattered Papers ]

 

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