Terre Haute Twp.
Page 448
Submitted by Debra Mondorf
Among the present business men of Terre Haute, and those to whom Henderson county is their birth-place and home , is James M. Allen. He was born in 1848, and reared on the farm. His early education was such training as he could get in the district school. He followed the vocation taught him by his father till 1881, when he engaged in the general mercantile business in Terre Haute, which business he still continues with a good trade. His father was Silas and his mother Mary Allen, both of New York. They came to Illinios in 1845, and settled in Henderson county. The father died in 1851; the mother afterward married W.A. Rogers,and now lives one mile south of Terre Haute. Silas Allen was a farmer, well respected by all in the community. He raised a family of five children, all of which are now living. J.M. was married in 1869, to Sarah Louisa Perry, a native of Wisconson, born in 1851, and daughter of James and Lydia (Edmunds) Perry, both of Ohio; came here with the early settlers. The mother died in 1856, aged thirty-two; the father now lives in Wisconson. They came to Henderson county from Wisconson and returned. Mr. Allen has by this marriage three children; Ida V.(deceased), James A. and Clide M. He and wife are members of the Methodist church. He is a member of the I.O.O.F. lodge at Terre Haute.


Terre Haute Twp.
Page 424
Submitted by Debra Mondorf
Joseph Allen was born in New York in 1821. His parents were Amasa and Susanna Allen ; his father, of Connecticut, his mother of New York, where they were Married. In 1855 they came to Henderson county, and now live with their son, Joseph. They raised a family of twelve children, seven of whom are now living. Mary, Rodger and Joseph live in Henderson County. He and wife are members the Free-Will Baptist church, at Terre Haute. He is now ninety-five, his wife ninety-one years old. Joseph Allen was reared on the farm, his education was that of the common school. He resided in his native state till 1854, when he came to Henderson County, Illinois, and located where he now resides. In 1848 he was married to Miss Amy C. Wescott, a native of New York, born in 1823,and daughter of Henry and Amy D. Wescott, both of Massachusetts, and emigrated to New York when young. In 1854 they, her parents, came to Henderson county, where her father died shortly after his arrival, in the seventy-seventh year of age. Her mother lived thirteen years after her emigration to this county, and died at eighty-four years of age. She was a member of the Close-Communion Baptist church. The last nine years of her life she was blind, but bore patiently her loss and was never heard to complain. Joseph Allen and wife have one adopted son Willie J. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, at Terre Haute. He has held most of the offices in ths church. He was county commissioner five years, and held the office of school treasurer twenty-five years.He has a well improved farm of 80 acres, located one mile north of Terre Haute.


Oquawka Twp.
James M. Akin, superintendent of schools of Henderson county, is the oldest in a family of then children. His parents, John G. and Eliza (Connell) Akin, are natives of Columbiana, but reside in Muskingum county. The Akin family, four generations ago, came from Ireland, but were more remotely Scotch. They are a long lived people, the mother of John G., and grandmother of James M., yet living and active, at nearly a hundred years of age. James M., the principal subject of these memoirs, was born in Tuscarawas county, Ohio, February 14, 1845. His educational training was acquired in the common schools near his home, and in the academy of Cambridge, Guernsey county, Ohio. Before seventeen years of age he began teaching in the common schools of the country. He was a pupil when the directors, for cause, dismissed the teacher, and requested James to finish the term of school. James hesitated, and sent them to his father, who allowed the youth to choose for himself. The school was taught successfully five months. He continued his school work, and in 1866 came to Warren county, Illinois, where he taught till 1870. He then became principal of the Biggsville schools, retaining the position for three years. He then taught at Olena, and in 1875 and was elected principal of the Oquawka public schools. In 1877 Mr. Akin was elected to the county superintendency, for the duties of which he is eminently fitted. Mr. Akin was married August 3, 1871, to Miss Lizzie, daughter of Samuel and Ortha (Callahan) Arthurs, and a native of Pennsylvania. They have one child, Orlando H. Mr. and Mrs. Akin are connected with the Presbyterian church. He is a member of the order of Odd Fellows.


Oquawka Twp. Pg. 129
Alexander Anderson (deceased) was born in York county, Pennsylvania, June 5, 1817. His parents, Thomas and Elizabeth Anderson, were natives of Scotland, emigrating to America when children. Thomas Anderson was a farmer and stock-drover. He was murdered near Lancaster, Pennsylvania, at a tavern. He had considerable money with him. Nothing but his coat was ever found. His wife died March 6, 1846, aged sixty-seven years, eight months and twenty-four days. In their family were five sons and one daughter. Alexander Anderson was raised on the farm in Pennsylvania. When a young man he came to Henderson county (1841), and purchased the S. E. 1/4 of Sec. 32, T. 9N., R. 5 W. This farm he improved. He was married February 22, 1844, to Harriet C. Davis, daughter of Abner and Luzy (Oaks) Davis, noticed in the county history. Mrs. Anderson was born in 1824. Mr. Anderson died February 12, 1854, aged thirty-six years, eight months and seven days. He left a wife and four children: James O., Lauretta (who died June 13, 1854, aged six years, five months and twenty-six days), Ada Ella (who died June 13, 1854, aged three years, six months and twenty-five days), and Charles A. James O. is noticed elsewhere.


Oquawka Twp.
James O. Anderson, sheriff of Henderson county, is a son of Alexander and Harriet (Davis) Anderson. He was born August 1, 1845, in Henderson county, Illinois. His youth was spent on the farm. His education was largely derived from public school, yet he was a student at Monmouth College during the early part of the war. He was to young for service at the outbreak, but as soon as age would allow, he could not restrain the desire to do what he could toward putting down the cruel slaughter, so enlisted May 6, 1864, in Co. A, 138th Ill. He was discharged after about four month's service. He then re-enlisted in Co. H. 28th Ill., and served till 1866. In his last term of service he aided in the capture of Mobile. He enlisted a private each time, but in his second service was promoted to sergeant, then orderly sergeant. Was commissioned second lieutenant, but the company being below the number required in order to claim commissioned officers, he could not muster as such. The war over, he returned to his home and engaged in farming till 1876, when he was elected sheriff of Henderson county, and re-elected in 1878 and 1880. Mr. Anderson was married March 6, 1867, to Rhoda B. Paul, daughter of Judge M. C. Paul, of Terre Haute, Illinois. She was born in New York, Jefferson county, October 28, 1844. Three children have been born to them: Francis M., Edwin A., and Eva M. Mr. Anderson is prominent in both oddfellowship and masonry, and a leading member of the Methodist church.


Bedford Twp. pg. 278-279
John H. Atkins was born in Elmira, New York, September 18, 1823. There he was educated, and meanwhile assisted his father. At the age twelve years he went to Pennsylvania, where he clerked in a country store for his uncle, after which he went back to New York and worked in a furniture shop, and later on the Erie canal, in the summer, and in the winter in the timber, chopping logs. He was married April 19, 1849, to Miss Abigal Dalrimple. After their marriage he moved to Steuben county, and from there to Schenectady county. Later he moved to Potter county. On the last day of October, 1854, they started for Lee county, Illinois, and in the spring of 1857 came to Henderson county. On their arrival they found the soil unbroken. There were no roads and they could take a straight course to Burlington. No houses could be seen anywhere. There were living in the neighborhood at that time David Thompson, William Van Doran and James Statts, from Ohio and Charles Edward. Mr. and Mrs. Atkins began life under the most unfavorable circumstances. They, however, went to work with a determination. They now own a fine farm and a house that cost $8,000 when built. Their children are: Sarah (wife of Mr. Frank Everett, of New Mexico), Mary Jane (deceased), and Abner D., who is residing at home. He was married to Miss Alice Biggs, of this county. Mr. Atkin's grandfather was a Scotchman, who emigrated to America at the age of eighteen. He was a soldier in the revolution, and lived to be 104 years old. Mr. Atkin's father volunteered during the revolution and was present when Gen. Ross was killed. His eldest brother enlisted as a drummer and was promoted to lieutenant. Mr. Atkins was drafted during the late war and immediately responded, leaving his family and his thriving business to vindicate upon the tented field the principles that he cherished. In the days when the expression of abolition sentiments subjected a man to social and political obliquy, he hesitated not to espouse the anti-slavery cause, and never turned his back upon the dusky fugitive that asked for succor while escaping to freedon. The fundamental principal of the republican party have received his warm support from beginning to the present time. He is a member of the masonic fraternity.



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Connie Lovitt Bates