Biographies from Albert J. Perry's 1912 History of Knox Co., IL

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REV. JOSEPH COSTA.

Rev. Joseph Costa, O. C, R. D. C, who for more than a third of a century has labored with untiring and consecrated zeal for the development of Catholicity in Galesburg, is the pastor of Corpus Christi church and also a dean of the Peoria diocese. He was born October 18, 1823, in Pettinengo, province of Biella, Italy, about thirty miles northeast of Turin, his parents being Antonio and Angela Maria (Facio) Costa. The father was occupied in land industries and also conducted a tailoring establishment. Joseph was the youngest of four brothers and the only one who entered the ministry. The records of the family, dating back for more than six hundred years, show members of it belonging to the priesthood.

Father Costa received his early instruction in letters and music in the schools of his native town. Subsequently he entered the college named Banchette and began the study of Latin under Rev. Professor W. Scaglia. Later he pursued his studies in classics in the city of Biella, and after an interval of two years of rest began his philosophical course in the College Melerio Rosmini in the city of Domodossola, remaining a student under Professor Parma for two years. Having passed his examination in philosophy and being a member of the Order of Charity, he applied himself, under able professors, to the study of divinity in the Rosminan Institute at Stresa on the borders of Lago Maggiore. In 1851, as a member of the order, he was sent by the General, the Rev. Antonio Rosmini, to the English missions belonging to the same order. In that country he reviewed his theology under Professor Caccia and prepared for the reception of holy orders. On February 18, 1853, he was examined and ordained priest in the church of Oscott College by the Rt. Rev. Bernard Ullathorne, bishop of Birmingham. As a priest he labored in Great Britain for eleven years, doing parish work, preaching at missions or teaching in college.
 

in 1880 and finished in 1881, engendered an expenditure of eleven thousand, three hundred and eighty-eight dollars and fifty-two cents. The ground upon which Corpus Christi church stands cost four thousand, eight hundred and eighty-five dollars. The contract for the building was given to Matthias Schnell, of Rock Island, and its cost, including heater, seats, bell, etc., was thirty-eight thousand, six hundred and eleven dollars and forty-three cents. Corpus Christi rectory, including heating apparatus, cost five thousand, five hundred dollars. The lot of St. Mary's primary, on the corner of Fourth and Seminary streets, cost twenty-five hundred dollars and the new building sixteen thousand dollars. The lot on which Corpus Christi lyceum stands was purchased for five thousand dollars, while the building and furniture cost about forty-two thousand dollars. Its erection was begun in 1891 and completed in 1894. This edifice is private property of the Order of Charity in the United States. Father Costa has done much in the erection of buildings in Galesburg, expending more than one hundred and forty thousand dollars for that purpose and the benefit of his church. He has now passed the eighty-ninth milestone on life's journey, and his long years of unselfish ministrations and activities have been a potent factor for good and his personal characteristics are such as have endeared him to his parishioners and fellowmen.
JOHN BECKETT.
The late John Beckett, a well known civil engineer, of Knoxville, was born in the vicinity of Oxford, Ohio, on the 1st of February, 1845, ms parents being William and Sarah Beckett. Flis father was born and reared in Virginia, but in his early manhood he removed to Indiana, where he resided for some years, subsequently becoming a citizen of Ohio. There he engaged in farming, continuing to follow that occupation until his death, which occurred on his homestead near Oxford. The family of Mr. and Mrs. William Beckett consisted of five sons: Prestley, who died at the age of sixteen years; John, our subject; Arthur, who is living in Ohio; Zacharias, who is deceased ; and Edward.
    The education of John Beckett was obtained in the common schools, during that period much of his time being devoted to assisting with the work of the farm. Although he was only sixteen years of age when the war broke out he enlisted in the Eighty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry and went to the front for three months. At the close of his term he reenlisted, remaining in the service until the close of hostilities. He participated in many battles during that period but the greater part of the time he was stationed at Cumberland Gap. Upon receiving his discharge he returned to his home and entered a tailor shop, where he learned the trade. This vocation did not prove entirely to his liking, however, and he did not follow it after leaving Ohio in 1871. In the latter year he came to Illinois, settling in Monmouth, where he took up civil engineering. He enjoyed the work very much and continued to follow .it the remainder of his life, meeting with good success. Flis development was marked by rapid progress and he became connected with some of the important surveys of the state, having had the distinction of driving the first stake for the Iowa Central Railroad from Peoria to Keithsburg, Illinois. Mr. Beckett was a capable engineer and a good business man, but had hardly reached the zenith of his powers when death terminated his career on the 21st of August, 1889.
     On the 6th of March, 1882, he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Downard, who was born in Clinton county, Ohio, on the 14th of May, 1846, and is a daughter of Jesse and Sallie (Showalter) Downard. The birth of the father occurred near Uniontown, Pennsylvania, while the mother was a native of Westmoreland county, that state. In the early years of their domestic life they came to Ohio, where they spent the remainder of their lives. The father was a shoemaker by trade and having been given the advantages of a good education he also taught school for a time, but his latter years were devoted to farming. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Downard numbered thirteen, seven sons and six daughters: William Wallace, who was a veteran of the Civil war, having enlisted from Indiana, now deceased; Edwin, also a veteran of the war, now a resident of Oklahoma; Mary, the deceased wife of Robert Harland; Benjamin, a veteran of the Civil war, now living at London Mills; and Lafayette and William, who were also in the Union service, now deceased; Stephen, who was killed during the war; Jennie, the wife of Scott Snedeker of Dayton, Ohio; Mrs. Beckett; Emma, the wife of William Tyner, of Elk City, Kansas; Amanda, who is the deceased wife of Nelson Kennedy; Alice, also deceased; and Phineas, who lives in Iowa. Mr. Downard was one of the prominent citizens of Logan county, Ohio, where for several years he held the office of county surveyor. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Beckett there were born three children: Jesse, who is deceased; Frank, who is living in Knoxville; and Lysle, the wife of Stephen Smith, formerly of Knoxville but now Palm Beach, Florida, by whom she has had three children, Thomas, Matthew and Stepliena.
Mr. Beckett gave his political support to the Republican party. Lie was not identified with any religious denomination but always attended the Presbyterian church, of which Mrs. Beckett was a member. The early years of their domestic life they spent in Abingdon, but they subsequently removed to London Mills, where they resided until 1886 when they came to Knoxville, purchasing the residence, which has ever since been the family home. Mrs. Beckett is well known here and has many friends, whose esteem has been won through her many estimable qualities of both heart and mind.
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN SEATON.
     Benjamin Franklin Seaton came to Galesburg in the evening of life, but while he was never connected with business affairs here he brought with him the record of active and honorable service in business in his earlier years, and during the period of his connection with Galesburg, he won the respect and good-will of all with whom he came in contact. He was born in Port Hope, Ontario, Canada, on the nth of November, 1820, his parents being William and Mary (Adams) Seaton, the latter a cousin of John Quincy Adams, at one time president of the United States. The family is of Scotch descent, and in his life Benjamin F. Seaton displayed many of the sterling characteristics of his Scotch ancestry. His education was acquired in the schools of his native town and in the state of New York, whither he accompanied his parents on their removal to the vicinity of Winchester. Later he went to Massillon, Ohio, and became closely associated with the commercial interests of that place as a wholesale dealer in furniture. His next change of residence took him to Marion, Iowa, where he engaged in the live-stock business for ten years, and on the expiration of that period established an agricultural implement business. He was not only prominent in the commercial circles of the city, but also as a factor in public life and his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, called him to a number of offices. For five years he served as sheriff of Linn county and was also mayor of Marion for several terms, giving to the city a business-like and progressive administration that resulted in bringing about many needed reforms and improvements. At one time he was superintendent of the waterworks there and his influence was always a potent element for the benefit of the town. In 1903 he came to Galesburg and here made his home with his daughter, Mrs. Norman E.. Ives. He spent the last twenty years of his life in retirement and passed away April 27, 1911, at the advanced age of ninety years. For ten years he had survived his wife, who passed away at Marion, Iowa, March 2, 1901.
It was on the 14th of December, 1852, that Benjamin F. Seaton was united in marriage, in Ashtabula, Ohio, to Miss Ruth M. Hurlburt, who was born in Winchester, Connecticut, July 1, 1833. They were both loyal and devoted members of the Methodist Episcopal church and their well spent lives won for them the high regard and confidence of all who knew them. Mr. Seaton served as a trustee of the church for many years and did all in his power to promote its growth and extend its influence. He voted with the republican party and always kept well informed on the questions and issues of the day. While he came to Galesburg in his later years, he won many friends during the period of his residence here and received the respect and veneration which should always be given one who has traveled far on life's journey and whose record has ever been honorable and upright.
In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Seaton there were seven children: Carrie E., now deceased; May G., who became the wife of L. M. Lillis and has also passed away; Anna and Grace, both deceased; Fannie, the wife of Norman E. Ives, of Galesburg; Frank Hurlburt, deceased; and Grace Lillian, the wife of Leslie C. Bolton, of Missoula, Montana.
Of this family Mrs. Ives, to whom we are indebted for the history of her father, was born at Marion, Iowa, and supplemented her public-school education by a course in Cornell College at Mt. Vernon, that state. On the 9th of September, 1885, she gave her hand in marriage to Norman E. Ives, of Marion, who was born there on the 2cl of April, 1853, and is a son of Norman and Hannah (Gray) Ives. His father was a native of Connecticut, born July 30, 1819, and his mother's birth occurred in Kentucky, October 1, 1823. They were married October 12, 1843, in Marion, Iowa, the father, who was a farmer by occupation, having come to the west from Connecticut in 1841, at which time he settled in Linn county, Iowa, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits until his death on the 1st of March. 1890. His wife survived him for about twelve years, her death occurring March 23, 1902. Both were members of the Baptist church, in the work of which they were actively and helpfully interested, Mr. Ives serving as a deacon for several years. He voted with the democratic party and kept well informed on the questions of the day. Unto him and his wife were born seven children: Lucy A., now the wife of Morgan Bunting, of Marion, Iowa; Rachel B., who is the wife of John Booth, of Marion; Mary L., the wife of Joseph Lake, of Marion; Norman E.; John J., also of Marion; and Isadore and Isabel, twins, both deceased.
Of this family, Norman E. Ives was educated in the public schools of Marion and after leaving the high school, entered Cornell College at Mt. Ver-non. He studied law and after careful preparation was admitted to the bar. For several years while living in Linn county, he served as deputy sheriff and was also postmaster of Marion under President Cleveland during his first administration. After filling the office for two years, however, he resigned, and passing a civil service examination, was appointed special pension examiner, filling that office at Cleveland, Ohio, for a time, and later at Fort Wayne, Indiana; St. Joseph, Missouri; Springfield, Missouri; and Chicago, Illinois, where he continued for eight years. He also spent three years in the pension department at Washington, D. C., and in September, 1902, came to Galesburg, where he has since been located.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ives have been born two children: Haroldine C, who is a graduate of Knox College of the class of 1911, married December 14, 1911, to Lewis C. Hazen, of Galesburg, Illinois; and Norman Seaton, who is now attending high school. Mr. Ives has always been an advocate of democratic principles and is a member of the Baptist church, in which he has served as deacon. Mrs. Ives and her children are members of the First Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. and Mrs. Ives have been cordially received into the best social circles of the city and wherever known are highly esteemed. Mr. Ives has made a most creditable record as an official of the pension office, his capability being evenly balanced by his loyalty and trustworthiness.
JUDGE ALFRED M. CRAIG.
The life history of Judge Alfred M. Craig forms a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present and with the advancing years he ever remained a potent force in the progress that has brought the state to its present position in the galaxy of the nation. Fame came to him and honors were multiplied unto him yet he bore all with becoming modesty. However, he left the impress of his individuality in large measure upon the judicial history of Illinois and his activity in business fields as well constituted a factor in the progress and prosperity of Knox county and surrounding districts. His last illness was of short duration and therefore he remained an active factor in the world's work almost to the end, preserving the precious prize of keen mentality to the last. No history of Knox county would be complete without extended reference to Judge Craig who entered actively upon the work of development here when this was still a pioneer region and ever thereafter gave impetus to the labors that made this in time one of the richest sections of the Mississippi valley.
    Mr. Craig was born in Paris, Edgar county, Illinois, January 15, 1831. The family comes of Scotch-Irish, ancestry and the grandfather of the Judge was Thomas Craig, who came from the north of Ireland to America, settling in Pennsylvania where David Craig, the father of the Judge, was born. Having arrived at years of maturity he married Minta Ramey, who was a native of Kentucky and a daughter of Sinnet Ramey, who was born in Virginia and became one of the pioneer residents of Kentucky, associated to some extent with Daniel Boone in the work of exploration in what became known as the dark and bloody ground. Sinnet Ramey devoted his energies to farming in the Blue Grass state for a period and afterward became one of the pioneer settlers of Illinois, taking up his abode in Fulton county where he again carried on general agricultural pursuits until he passed away when well advanced in years. His daughter Minta was his only child. David Craig, however, was one of several children including two brothers, James and Joseph Craig. "When a young man David Craig removed to Kentucky and it was in that state that he was married. He was a millwright and that trade in connection with farming fully occupied his attention throughout his life. Like hundreds of other Kentucky citizens who did not depend upon the institution of slavery as a source of revenue he removed from Kentucky to Illinois and for a brief period was a resident of Edgar county, during which time his son, Judge Craig, was born. From that district they removed to the Military tract, settling in Fulton county, near Canton, and David Craig became a prosperous farmer as prosperity was rated at that day. As a millwright he erected many of the old mills along the Spoon river to provide the flour and feed for the early settlers. It was in 1832, the year of their arrival in Fulton county, that the Black Hawk war broke out and the women and children sought refuge and protection in a blockhouse pending the settlement of the war while the men of the neighborhood aided in fighting the Indians. The history of David Craig's family was like that of many other pioneer families living on the Illinois frontier. He there died when about sixty-five years of age, having for a few years survived his wife, who was also sixty-five years of age at the time of her demise. She was a devoted member of the Methodist church and Mr. Craig attended its services with her. His political allegiance in an early day was given to the whig party and he was a warm admirer of Henry Clay. In his family were ten children but only one is now living.; Mrs. Harriet Barnwell, of Los Angeles, California. The others were: Nancy, who became the wife of Perry Crosthwait; Madison ; Margaret, the wife of Enoch Crosthwait; Sinnet; Thomas, who died when twelve or fourteen years of age ; Alfred M.; Mrs. J. L. Miller; Mrs. Sarah Ash; and Mrs. Marilda Randolph.
Judge Craig was reared upon his father's farm in Fulton county, meeting every experience and hardship which fell to the lot of the early settler. His educational privileges were very limited in early youth but later he had the opportunity of pursuing a course in Knox College, becoming a member of the preparatory class in the fall of 1848, while in June, 1849, ne was admitted to the freshman class and in June, 1853, won his degree. Thinking to find the practice of law a congenial profession he began studying with that end in view, his preceptor being William C. Goudy, of Lewiston. A year later he was admitted to practice in the courts of Illinois and opened a law office in Knoxville which was
then the county seat.

      By close application and determination he built up a large practice in a few years' time, riding the circuit as was customary in those days in company with the judge, who held court in various places in the circuit. Lincoln, Douglas and scores of other pioneer lawyers of Illinois visited Knox county in this manner and were acquaintances and colleagues of Judge Craig, who frequently related most interesting experiences of those early days. It was not unusual for him to make the trip on horseback and on reaching Spoon river he would have to swim that stream astride his mount. In 1856 he was appointed state's attorney by Governor Mattison, the circuit then comprising the counties of Mercer, Henderson, Warren, Knox and Fulton. This appointment was for the unexpired term caused by the resignation of W. C. Goudy and in November, 1861, he was elected to the office of county judge, serving on the bench for four years. In 1869 he was elected to represent Knox county in the constitutional convention of 1870 which formulated the present organic law of the state. It was he who devised the present township organization plan whereby counties are governed by a combination of the old Virginia system and the New England town-meeting system, providing for a board of supervisors as the legislative body. Throughout the years of his private practice his clientage was large and of a very important character. He was employed to assist the late J. J. Tunnicliff, then state's attorney, in the prosecution of Osborn who was tried for the murder of Mrs. Mathews near Yates City, the trial resulting in conviction leading to the only reported legal execution in Knox county. He was also one of the lawyers for the defendant in the case of DeHague in a political murder case which was brought to Knox county on a change of venue and secured the acquittal of his client. He was likewise counsel in the county seat trials and such was his recognized ability that his practice not only covered Knox but also many adjoining counties. Many judicial honors were also conferred upon him—in fact he filled every judicial office in the state with the exception of circuit judge, nor was his fame confined to Illinois for he was favorably mentioned in connection with the position of chief justice of the United States in 1888, President Cleveland considering him as a candidate for the honor which was finally conferred upon Melville W. Fuller. At different times he was also mentioned in connection with the democratic nomination for the vice presidency. However, he continued in the strict path of his profession and the record which he made as one of the supreme court judges of Illinois made him the peer of the ablest members who have sat upon the bench of this court of last resort.
     Judge Craig was first elected to the office in 1873 and was again elected in 1882 and 1891, his reelections coming to him as the expression of popular approval of his previous course as supreme court judge. From the time that he took his seat on the bench until he left it he was known for his fidelity to the interests of the people. In several of his decisions he rendered not only the people of Illinois but the nation as well a conspicuous service. His decision in the case of the people of the state of Illinois against the Wabash, St. Louis & Pacific Railroad Company was particularly notable. At that time the Granger element was a strong one in the state and the farmers were complaining of the discrimination in railroad rates. The case in question came in 1882 from Ford county, resulting from a railroad charge of sixty-five dollars for the shipment of a carload of grain from Gilman to New York, whereas the charge on a carload from Peoria to New
York, a longer distance, was but thirty-nine dollars. In the trial the railroad company demurred on the ground that the law did not apply to it as it was incorporated in another state and Illinois had no jurisdiction over the rates. The question came before the supreme court on a writ of error and it fell to Justice Craig to write the clear and forceful opinion that gave him national fame. In this opinion, in which all but one of the judges concurred, it was set forth that the law did apply to rate fixed by companies incorporated outside the state but doing business over their lines in that state. The law was held not to be limited to home companies but to all with whom the people had relations inside Illinois. Judge Craig laid down the principle that a state has the right to regulate that part of interstate commerce directly affecting its citizens. The case was taken by the railroad company to the United States supreme court where Judge Craig's decision was upheld and the rule was firmly established that a state has power over the traffic inside of its borders even though carried on by an outside corporation. This important principle has since then been expanded to cover other than railroad companies. In the discussions in congress over the amendments to the interstate commerce bill much was said of this decision and its bearing on commerce inside states and on the decision of the United States supreme court the right of congress in the premises found substantial footing. Another noted case was that of the Illinois Central Railroad Company in 1898 against the city of Chicago. At that time Chicago was trying to prevent the railroad company from using the submerged land of the lake for railroad purposes. The company sought to enjoin the city from interfering, claiming its right to the submerged land under the provisions of its charter. The lower court overruled the application for an injunction and the company appealed to the supreme court. Justice Craig wrote the opinion, holding that the submerged land belonged to the state and that the state could not part with it for the purpose named but must conserve the interests of the public. Justice Craig maintained that the sole purpose of the company was to take the land for railroad purposes and that it had no right even as a riparian owner to fill up the lake. This great decision saved the lake for Chicago and kept it from being filled with roundhouses and other railroad structures and its announcement was hailed in Chicago with great pleasure. On this decision also rests the investigation now in progress with the view of restoring to the state filled-in lands taken by private persons without the knowledge or consent of the state. Judge Craig made a special study of land titles about which in those days there was much ambiguity, and his decisions along this line removed these doubts and established ownership, much to the relief of thousands of property owners in this state. Moreover, in one of his decisions he upset the contention of companies that employes were responsible for defects in equipment and machinery and that it was their business to ascertain whether these defects existed. Judge Craig held that it was the business of the companies to know about the condition of their equipment and keep the same in good repair. This decision has been the means of protecting multitudes of lives and has made companies responsible for damages in such cases. Judge Craig held railroad companies responsible for obstruction along the right-of-way that were a menace to the public; forced them to give viaducts a proper height and to provide necessary precautions to protect life; and in other ways while not hostile to the companies made them shoulder their responsibility in these matters. Another thing that is remembered here kindly is his attitude toward the case in which was involved the rights of colored pupils to attend the public schools. In this case he upheld this right. The last public work in which Judge Craig engaged was in connection with the state tax commission appointed by the governor. His business career was as notable in this way as its connection with the supreme court of the state which covered twenty-seven years. At the outset of his carer he was a poor man but as opportunity offered he made investments in farm land, predicting that the prairies of this section would one day be worth two hundred dollars per acre—a prediction which he lived to see realized. He was also the owner of large realty in Galesburg and erected a number of its leading business blocks. The present Bank of Galesburg building was purchased by him for the bank and for a considerable period he figured prominently in financial circles in this state, being at the time of his death president of the Bank of Galesburg, the Bank of Altona, the Farmers State Bank of Alpha, the Bank of North Henderson and the Bank of Prairie City, the two last named being private banking institutions. He has also been a director and heavily interested in the Farmers National Bank of Knoxville and the State Bank of Victoria. Those who have been associated with him in the local banks speak highly of his sound judgment in matters of a financial nature.
    Judge Craig was twice married. He first wedded Elizabeth P. Harvey, a daughter of Curtis K. and Hannah K. (King) Harvey. They became parents of four children: Carrie, who married William Bradford but both are now deceased; Harvey A., now a physician of Galesburg, who was engaged in the drug business here for a number of years; Charles C, a well known attorney of this city; and George H., deceased. He was a graduate of Notre Dame University of South Bend, Indiana, and then entered the banking business and became teller in the Bank of Galesburg. The death of Mrs. Craig occurred in 1901 and therein the Presbyterian church lost a faithful member, her family a devoted wife and mother, and her acquaintances a loyal friend. She was born in Knoxville, while her parents were natives of Vermont who became pioneer residents of Knox county, Illinois, where their remaining days were passed, her father there practicing law. Their children were: Curtis K.; Mrs. Sanborn; and Elizabeth, who became Mrs. Craig. Judge Craig was again married in 1908 when lie wedded Miss Mary Davis, a native of Galesburg where her parents, who were natives of Ireland, settled at an early period in the development of this city. Her father passed away but her mother is still living. Their children were Mary, Kate and Ellen. Mrs. Craig is a member of the Episcopal church and is widely known in Galesburg, where her entire life has been passed.
Judge Craig was a charter member of Pacific Lodge, A. F. & A. M., of Knoxville, but cared little for attractions other than his home offered. For ten or twelve years he served as a trustee of Knox College and at the time of his death was also serving on the executive committee of the board. From that college he had received the degree of Doctor of Laws. It was after a brief illness with pneumonia that Judge Craig passed away at his home in Galesburg, September 6, 1911. Throughout the period of his long service on the supreme bench he had continued to make this city his place of residence and there was none perhaps in all Galesburg who was better known or more highly respected. The public service of few men has continued over a more extended period and none has been more faultless in manner, fearless in conduct or stainless in reputation. Colonel Clark E. Carr, himself a veteran member of the Galesburg bar and long a colleague of Judge Craig said: "I knew him when he was a boy in Knox College. He was an earnest student and it was understood then that he intended to become a lawyer. He was, as every good lawyer is, rooted and grounded in the statutes. He was not what would be called a brilliant lawyer but was thorough and safe and no other Galesburg attorney was so successful in practice. As a member of the constitutional convention he proposed and carried into effect some of its best provisions. While there were other more scholarly men on the supreme bench scarcely any other jurist has left a greater impress upon their jurisprudence, and the opinions of scarcely any other judge are more often quoted and followed. Three times, although a democrat, he was elected in a republican district. When an enterprise commended itself to his judgment few men were more public-spirited, a fact indicated by his liberal donation of ten thousand dollars to Knox College when that institution needed money more than ever before in all her history."
     Judge J. D. Welsh said: "Judge Craig was noted for applying common sense to the legal problems that came before the court and was a great judge." Said Congressman Prince: "Judge Craig as a lawyer of the bar in Knox county was one of the most successful men that ever practiced here. As a judge on the supreme bench he took rank among the ablest judges in the United States. His decisions on real estate ranked unusually high and were commented on in the law schools like Harvard and Columbia. When there was a vacancy on the supreme bench of the United States his name was given careful and long consideration by President Cleveland before Chief Justice Fuller was appointed. The mere fact that the name of a judge or lawyer is considered by the executive of the nation for the exalted position of chief justice puts for all time such a judge or lawyer in the front rank of jurists." Others bore testimony of his fairness in business transaction, naming him as the soul of honor, and still others attested to his kindness to the younger members of the bar.     In fact in all the relations of life Judge Craig measured up to the highest standards of manhood and citizenship in the wise and able use which he made of his time and talents, in his recognition of his obligations to his fellowmen and of his duties as a citizen in his relations to the state and nation.
REV. GEORGE PRESTON Doubleday.
   
Rev. George Preston Doubleday, whose labors have been a potent factor in the moral and educational development of Knox county, is now serving as president of Corpus Christi College at Galesburg. I I is birth occurred in Pietermaritzburg, Natal, South Africa, on the 23d of June, 18(19, his parents being George and Mary (Curry) Doubleday, who were natives of England and Ireland respectively. The father. passed away in London, in 1902, when sixty-two years of age. Flis wife also lived to attain the age of sixty-two, being called to her final rest in 1897. Both were faithful communicants of the Catholic church. Their children were five in number, as follows: Rev. Arthur Doubleday, rector of the seminary in Guildford, England; Rev. George Preston, of this review Charles Edward, living in London, England; Mary, a nun in Streatham, London ; and one who died in infancy.
    Rev. George P. Doubleday was two years of age when'taken to England by his parents, who settled in Canterbury, where he received his common and classical education. In 1889 he entered the Order of Charity at Wadhurst, England, where he studied for three years, later spending five and a half years at Domodossola, Italy, in preparation for the priesthood. In November, 1898, he was ordained at Novara, Italy, and on the 24th of December of the same year arrived in America, making his way direct to Galesburg, Illinois. Here he acted as assistant to Rev. Father Costa for two years and then became pastor of St. Patrick's church, thus officiating for seven years. On the expiration of that period he became president of Corpus Christi College and has remained in that capacity to the present time. The institution has an attendance of one hundred and three boys, who are under the instruction of four professors, namely: Rev. Doubleday, Rev. John Phelan, Rev. James Lyons and Rev. Francis Baines.
CHARLES F. HURBURGH.
     Charles F. Hurburgh, state senator from Knox county and recognized as one of those who is close to the present administration, in an effort to secure the passage of meritorious measures and prevent the corruption and graft which have been entirely too prominent in the political history of the state, was born January 10, 1872, in Smaland, Sweden, a son of Gustav and Susanna (Johnson) Hurburgh, the latter a daughter of Yngakarin Johnson. The father died in Sweden in 1885, at the age of fifty-five years, and the mother passed away in 1909, when nearly seventy years of age. There were two children in the family but the elder, a sister, died in infancy. Charles F. Hurburgh was a little lad of four years when, owing to the illness of his mother, he went to live with his uncle, A. J. Johnson, who was born in Sweden, 'November 18, 1842, and came to America in 1868. He first located in Plymouth, Indiana, and in 1873 ne niar-ried Mrs. Louisa Christina Anderson, the widow of Swan Anderson. She also bore the maiden name of Anderson and was born in Sweden, May 18, 1830, a daughter of Samuel and Analine (Hansen) Anderson. She came to the new world when twenty-four years of age, making her way to Laporte, Indiana, where she lived until her marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Johnson established their home in Knox county and his energies were devoted to farming up to the time of his death, which occurred about 1907. His widow still resides upon the home farm. Her only child was David Anderson, who was born February 8, 1875, and is now a farmer of Walnut Grove township. He married Hannah Linderholm, a daughter of John and Hedda Linderholm, her father a merchant of Galesburg.
Spending his youthful days in the home of his uncle, Mr. Johnson, Charles F. Hurburgh, whose Swedish name was Frederick Carl Hurburgh but who adopted the simpler American name of Charles F. pursued his education in the district schools and afterward in the Swedish Lutheran school. He also attended the high school of Altona, from which he was graduated, and for a time was a student in the Abingdon normal school, in which he completed a course in 1892. He afterward entered Knox College and is numbered among its alumni of 1895. Taking up the profession of teaching, he was principal of the Maquon school from 1895 until 1900. During that period he took up the study of law in Galesburg, devoting his leisure hours to the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. All through his boyhood days he had worked when opportunity offered and had thus largely supplied the means for meeting the expenses of his education. At different times he worked at farm labor in the home neighborhood and assisted in threshing until an accident finally prevented his further work in that direction. His entire life has been one of unfaltering activity and his intelligently directed labors have constituted forceful factors in the accomplishment of what he has undertaken. In 1900 he withdrew from educational work to accept the position of deputy sheriff under R. G. -Mathews and after two years' service in that capacity was elected sheriff of Knox county, which position he filled until 1906, when he was elected to the state senate.
       Charles F. Hurburgh has made an excellent record as one of the Illinois legislators. He found the senate in the grip of a powerful combine and united with other men of high principles holding to high ideals of government to break the force of this combine and wrest the state from machine rule. History records the success of their efforts and indorsement of his course was given him in his reelection. When he entered upon his second term he was recognized as one of the senate leaders and all through the regular and special session was in close association with the governor in urging the passage of meritorious measures. His efforts were an effective force in promoting the passage of the two-cent-passenger-fare bill and he was made chairman of the committee on appropriations, one of the most important of the senate, doing much to keep the demands made upon the state treasury within the limit. His work on that committee disclosed his large grasp of details and his broad understanding of a multitude of situations which came up for discussion. When the facts developed regarding the scandal attached to the election of a United States senator Mr. Hurburgh, who had respected the vote of his district on the senatorship, was one of the foremost in the senate to urge an investigation and as the result of his position and that of a number of his colleagues a committee was named that brought out many facts relating to the case and helped purge the legislature. In all this he disclosed himself a foe to graft.
     In his home town of Galesburg and throughout the county, where he is very widely known, Mr. Hurburgh is popular. Fie is a member of the Trinity Lutheran church and his influence is always on the side of progress, reform and improvement. As a republican leader in Illinois he is today prominently before the state and his fellow citizens are strongly urging his candidacy for governor. In a recent meeting held in Galesburg the following resolutions were unanimously passed:
    We, citizens and residents of Galesburg and of Knox county, friends and neighbors of Charles F. Hurburgh, one of our leading citizens, distinguished member of the state senate of Illinois, having noted with a great deal of pride the favorable comment upon the announcement of his candidacy for the republican nomination for the governorship at the April primaries, Resolve tha.

     Whereas, Charles F. Hurburgh has grown up among us and in all his life has walked on the high plane of good citizenship, never swerving from right conduct, actuated by lofty motives, and has been untiring in his efforts to promote the material and moral welfare of this city and county in all its enterprises, and has been a public-spirited citizen whose aid has always been freely given to worthy undertakings; and,
     Whereas, both as county officer and state senator he has by his wisdom and courageous course reflected honor upon himself and credit upon the city and county and district; and,
Whereas, while a member of the senate, Charles F. Hurburgh has been one of the chief supporters and advocates on the people's side of legislative questions, always a foe to the spoils and to corrupt practices of all kinds, and in general always identified with all that is best in legislation; and,
    Whereas, he has shown himself in all his official acts a true believer in pro-gressivism in the sense that progressivism means the doing away with special privilege, the defeat and extinction of spoils politics, the conservation and development of natural resources and the restoration to the people of the essential powers of government;
Therefore, Be It Resolved, that as citizens vitally interested in the future welfare of this city and community and of this state, we hereby express the utmost confidence in Charles F. Hurburgh as a candidate for governor of Illinois and recommend his candidacy to the people of the state; that we aid his candidacy in every possible way and tender him our heartiest support in his efforts to secure the nomination at the primaries and to this end we pledge our loyal and active support and resolve that we will individually exhaust every honorable means to bring about the nomination and election of Charles F. Hurburgh as governor of Illinois.
     Whether elected to office or not, there is no question in the minds of his friends that Charles F. Hurburgh will ever stand, as he does today, for clean government and for the exercise of party strength in behalf of the entire people and not for the benefit of a coterie of politicians.
JOSHUA R. CROUCH.
The late Joshua R. Crouch, who for sixteen years prior to his death had followed the brick-mason's trade in Knox county, was born in Rising Sun, Indiana, on the 7th of April, 1828. His parents were Nehemiah and Mary (Clark) Crouch, the father a native of Pennsylvania and the mother of Rising Sun. The former passed away when our subject was a child of two years, but the mother lived to attain the venerable age of eighty-three years, spending her entire life in her native town. Of the marriage of Mr. and Airs. Crouch there were born two sons, both of whom are now deceased. The younger was Nathaniel C, who fought in the Indian wars with General Custer.
     Joshua R. Crouch attended the common schools of his native town until he had mastered the common branches and then began working at the mason's trade, first in Rising Sun and later in Covington, Kentucky. He continued to follow this occupation until the Civil war broke out, when he offered his services to his country. He enlisted at Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Company C, Eighty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and spent the three succeeding years on the battlefields of the south. He took part in many of the notable battles and was present at the siege of Vicksburg and was with Sherman when he made his famous march. He was mustered out at Washington, D. C, and returning to Rising Sun he joined a party of gold seekers, who were going to California. In 1892 Mr. Crouch with his wife and family came to Rio, this county, where for nine years he followed his trade and also did general contracting. At the expiration of that time they became residents of Knoxville, purchasing the property still owned and occupied by Mrs. Crouch. Here he continued to engage in brick masonry until the week before his death, which occurred on the 16th of August, 1908.
    Mr. Crouch was married in Switzerland county, Indiana, on the 27th of August, 1873, to -Miss Mary J. Wilson, a native of that county, her birth having occurred on the 8th of July, 1843. ^nc is a daughter of Alfred and Jane (Monroe) Wilson, the father a native of Kentucky, and the mother of Indiana. Mr. Wilson was an agriculturist and for many years engaged in farming in Switzerland county, and he also ran a flatboat from Lawrenceburg to New Orleans, conveying produce to the various markets along the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. Later he and his family, consisting of his wife and two daughters, removed to Kansas, where the parents both died, their last days being spent in Hutchinson, that state. They had each reached the age of seventy-four years at the time of their demise. Their other daughter, Mrs. Maggie Geary, has for many years been a resident of Hutchinson, Kansas. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Crouch there were born three daughters and one son. Maggie, who is the eldest, married James S. Hemphill, of Rising Sun, and they have two children, Joseph and Mills. Clara is the wife of LaVerne Bloom field, of Galesburg, and they have two children, Verna and Leona. Bessie married Clifton Weedin, a blacksmith of Burns, Missouri, and they have five children, Lyman, Nina, Flora, Joshua and Marion. Nathaniel W., who is the youngest of the family, resides in Knoxville and makes his home with his mother.
      Mr. Crouch was an honored member of the Grand Army of the Republic, having joined the post at Rising Sun after leaving the army, while at the time of his death he belonged to the one at Knoxville. His political allegiance he accorded to the republican party and in matters of faith he was a Methodist, holding membership in the church at Knoxville, with which his widow is still identified.
LUCIEN F. SENNETT.
Lucien F. Sennett, superintendent and headmaster of St. Alban's School at Knoxville, was born in Syracuse, New York, August 6, 1868, a son of Lucien and Elizabeth (Frank) Sennett. The father's birth occurred near Syracuse, while the mother was born in Schencctady, New York. The Sennett family comes of Irish lineage, the first American ancestors leaving Dublin preparatory toemigrating to the new world, and at a very early period the family was founded at Syracuse, New York, where the death of Lucien Sennett occurred in 1869. His widow still survives and now makes her home in Knoxville with her son Lucien.
      Professor Sennett of this review was only about a year old at the time of his father's demise. He spent his youthful days with his mother, who carefully reared him and stimulated in him that love of learning which has been the foundation for the successful work he has done as an educator. His youthful days were spent in Auburn, New York, where he pursued his education until graduated from the high school of that city. He afterward attended Trinity College of Hartford, Connecticut, and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1889, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts, while three years later the Master of Arts degree was conferred upon him by his alma mater. Determining to devote his life to educational work, he became master of St. Mark's School near Boston, Massachusetts, where he did excellent work for nine years. He then accepted a position at the head of the Pomfret School in Pomfret, Connecticut, where the succeeding four years were passed, after which he went to Lake Forest, Illinois, and was connected with the academy at that place for two years. On coming to Knoxville he accepted the position of superintendent and headmaster of St. Alban's School and under his guidance the institution has made continuous and substantial progress, promoting its standards of teaching and of scholarship. Professor Sennett holds to high ideals in his work and is never content until he has accomplished the task to which he has set himself. He belongs to two college fraternities, the Phi Beta Kappa and the Alpha Delta Phi, and is a member of the Episcopal church.
JOHN B. COLTON.
     When the history of Galesburg and her prominent men shall have been written its pages will bear no name better known than that of Colton, which has long been a potent factor in the activities and resultant prosperity of the city. It is not only compatible, but absolutely imperative, that mention be made of the Colton family if a true history to commemorate and perpetuate the lives of those men whose records have been intimately connected with the growth of Galesburg is to be made. He whose name introduces this review is today the eldest descendant of the family which has left its impress upon the progress and civilization of two states.
    He was born August 11, 1831, in the state of Maine. Quarter Master George Colton, who was the first of the family to settle in America, emigrated from Sut-ton, Coldfield, England, about 1640, settling at Long Meadow, Massachusetts. The family was especially prominent during the Revolutionary war, and Captain Thomas Colton, a son of George Colton, had previously been very active in the Indian wars. Since 1714 the name of Colton has frequently occurred in the civil list of representatives in the town of Long Meadow and in the Massachusetts legislature. The family traces its lineage from Quarter Master George Colton through the eldest sons down to the present time as follows: Quarter -Master George, Captain Simon, Captain Gad, Justin, Chauncey Sill, and John Burt, who is the subject of this sketch.
     On the prairies of Knox county, John B. Colton was reared to manhood under the parental roof. He acquired such education as the common schools and academy afforded, but his interest was always in the pioneer life, which was ever present before him. When a mere boy, he would lie in the high grass along the little creek which then ran through what is now the public square and always held his bow and arrow ready to shoot the deer or wolf that came across the prairie at sunset. At the age of eighteen years, after he had completed his education and while the spirit of adventure was still strong within him, he joined a train of '49ers, setting out for California. He spent five years in the camps in that state and on the trails in search for adventure and gold. His reminiscences of those days if they could be reproduced minutely would of themselves give a valuable account of the interesting experiences that the pioneers encountered in those early days on the frontier. He became personally acquainted with many of the most prominent western characters, such as Kit Carson, Jim Baker, and Jim Bridger, the latter of whom he was a personal friend. He assisted in building a monument to him at Kansas City and was one of his friends to exhume his body on December 4, 1904, when they removed the remains from the grave near Dallas, Missouri. At the present time, Mr. Colton has in his possession several small pieces of the old casket in which his friend was buried. Mr. J. B. Colton is one of the four surviving members of a party of thirty-six who undertook to shorten their journey to the mines by crossing the desert country between Little Salt Lake to the head of the San Joaquin valley. They were lost for three months, fifty-two days of which they were without provisions except their starved cattle and going at times live days without water, undergoing great suffering, four of the party died in the desert; they discovered Death Valley and arrived at a ranch on the Pacific coast, February 4, 1850. lie returned to Gales-burg in 1854 and was still residing here when the Civil war broke out. He assisted General Harding in raising the Eighty-third Regiment of Illinois Infantry and was an officer in this regiment. Later he was on the staff of General Grant. Although later in life he resided in Kansas City for several years, he has always maintained his interest in lllinios politically and otherwise. He is an extensive property owner of the state of Nebraska and his ranch is one of the most highly cultivated in the state. He is at present residing on North Broad street, Galesburg, Illinois, where he is surrounded by the comforts and luxuries which are the fitting rewards of the useful and industrious life which he has led.
    M'r. Colton has been twice married. His first union occurred in Chicago, where he was married on the 30th of March, 1857, to "Miss Elizabeth McClure, whose birth occurred in Philadelphia on the ifilh of September, 1835. To this union two children were born, both of whom are now deceased, Chauncey McClure and Elizabeth. The mother's death occurred in Galesburg on the 19th of January, 186r. "Col." Colton was again married on the 1st of December, 1868. at Galesburg, his second union being with Miss Mary A. Thomas, who was born May 8, 1849, at Homer, New York. To this union three children were born, John B., Jr., Chauncey S. and Edward T.
      A resident of Galesburg through much of the time during a period of over seventy-five years, his fellow townsmen have come to know him as a man of honor and worth and give him that tribute of respect and admiration which the world instinctively pays to him who uses his talents for the benefit of the community as well as for individual gain.
FRED L. REED.
      Fred L. Reed, a member of the firm of E. S. Willard & Company, with which he has been connected since 1910, was born in Knoxville, this county, on 1876. He is the eldest son of William and Mary A. (Heagy) Reed, the father a native of Monmouth, Illinois, and the mother of this county. In his early manhood, William Reed came to Knoxville and opened a meat market, which he successfully conducted for some years. He was living at Monmouth at the time of his death, however, which occurred when he was forty-two years of age. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Reed there were born three children, two sons and one daughter. The latter, Eva V., died at the age of four years, and the other son, William, is a resident of .Bioise City, Idaho.
     Knox county has always been the home of Fred L. Reed, who received his education in the public schools of Knoxville, terminating his student days upon his graduation from the high school. He subsequently turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, taking a position on a farm in Copley township. When he had become familiar with the practical methods of plowing, sowing and caring for the crops, as well as the other tasks connected with general farming, he purchased some land, which he operated on his own behalf, lie continued to follow this occupation until 191.0, and being a man of practical ideas and progressive methods he prospered in his undertakings. In the latter year he disposed of his farm, deciding that he preferred commercial to agricultural pursuits and, coming to Williams field, he bought the interest of the late E. T. Merry in the firm of E. S. Willard & Company. Financially this has proven to be a very successful undertaking, as the business has increased in a most gratifying manner during the two years he has been connected with it, and is steadily developing. This is the only company of furniture dealers in the town, and they also have a very good assortment of crockery, hardware, wall paper, musical instruments and carpets. i'esides their varied stock, of house furnishings, they have an undertaking department, which is unquestionably equal or superior to any maintained by a town of similar size in the state. They are located on Main street and have a very attractive store, every department of which is flourishing. They have an unusually good assortment of merchandise for a town of this size, which they offer at reasonable prices, the quality of their wares in every instance being fully commensurate with the amount charged.
     For his wife Mr. Reed chose Miss Doris A. Harmison and unto them has been born one child, Harold S.
     Mr. and Mrs. Reed both hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally he is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and
the Modern Woodmen of America, while his political support he gives to the republican party. As he has spent his entire life in Knox county Mr. Reed is widely known in the vicinity of Williamsfield, where he has a large circle of friends who accord him the esteem and respect his honorable business methods well merit.
N. E. OLSON.
N. E. Olson is the owner of a valuable farm of eighty acres on section 22, Galesburg township, the rich prairie land of central Illinois returning to him a substantial income for the care and labor which he bestows upon the fields. He has resided in this county continuously for more than a third of a century and during that period has become widely known as a representative of agricultural interests here. He was born in Broby, in the southern part of Sweden, November 7, 1857, his parents being Ola and Kama (Benson) Nelson, both of whom were natives of Sweden. The father was a farmer and brewer and built the first brewery in Sweden outside of the large cities. He devoted some time to general agricultural pursuits but brewing was his principal occupation and he continued in business at Broby up to the time of his death. He was well educated in music and was a man of liberal culture as well of good business ability. His widow still lives in Sweden and has now reached the advanced age of eighty-two years.
       N. E. Olson was the eldest of a family of three children and in the acquirement of his education attended the common and high schools of his native town, after which he took up the profession of teaching but was also employed by an uncle in business there. At the age of nineteen years, however, he bade adieu to friends and native country and sailed for the new world, making his way at once to Knox county. He arrived in Galesburg in 1877 and afterward went to Alexis, Illinois, but soon returned to Knox county where he has since lived. For five years he was connected with a second-hand store in Galesburg and then embarked in business on his own account, conducting a house-furnish-ing-goods establishment in which he continued until 1897. At length he withdrew from commercial pursuits to turn his attention to general agricultural pursuits and purchased his present farm of eighty acres, which is situated on section 22, Galesburg township. The land is unusually rich and productive, and the progressive methods which he follows in its cultivation enables him to annually gather substantial harvests. In addition to general farming he is engaged in feeding hogs and thus adds in considerable measure to his income.
In February, 1889, Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Helen Behrin-ger, a daughter of Michael Behringer, and they have two children, Edna and Florence, the former a pupil of Knox College. Mr. Olson is a republican in his political views and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day but has never sought nor desired public office. He has served, however, as school clerk of his district and is a stalwart champion of a high standard of education. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity in Galesburg and finds pleas-
ant relations with his brethren of the craft. He has always lived a busy, active and useful life and his energy, determination and honorable dealing have been the basic elements of success which has crowned his efforts.
CHARLES A. WHITE.
     Charles A. White, who has been engaged in the real-estate and insurance business at Galesburg since 1890, has built up an extensive clientage in these connections. His birth occurred in Greenville, Illinois, on the 26th of February, i860, his parents being Richard and Nancy (McAdow) White, both of whom were natives of Bond county, Illinois. The paternal grandfather, Wesley White, was born in North Carolina and became an early settler of Bond county, Illinois. He was an agriculturist by occupation and lived to attain the age of about eighty-seven years. He was three times married and reared a large family of children. Judge Samuel McAdow, the maternal grandfather of our subject, served at one time as county judge of Bond county. He was a native of North Carolina, followed farming as a life work and lived to attain a ripe old age. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Paisley, died when still a comparatively young woman. To them were born four daughters and two sons, namely: John, William, Emily, Elizabeth, Lucy and Nancy.
     Richard White, the father of Charles A. White, was a contractor and builder on an extensive scale. He erected the courthouse at Greenville, where his demise occurred in 1886, when he had attained the age of fifty years and five months. His first wife died when our subject was but two years of age, and for his second wife he chose Miss America Moss, by whom he had four children, as follows: Anna, who married a Mr. Kelly; Frank; Sarah; and Elsie.
     Charles A. White was reared on a farm at Elm Point, Bond county, Illinois, and obtained his early education in^ the country schools. Subsequently he attended the public schools at Newton, Kansas, and later pursued a course of study in a business college at Keokuk, Iowa. After putting aside his text-books he started out as an agriculturist on his own account, following farming near Greenville, Bond county, until 1882, when he removed to Newton, Kansas. In 1890 he came to Galesburg and embarked in the real-estate and insurance business, in which he has been successfully engaged to the present time, enjoying a large clientage. He has thoroughly informed himself concerning realty values and its appreciation or diminution in price and is thus enabled to assist his clients in making judicious investments and profitable sales. . He owns farm lands in Morgan county, Missouri.
     On the 20th of October, 1886, Mr. White was united in marriage to Miss Keziah McCulla, a native of Cincinnati and a daughter of Thomas and Mary (Abernathy) McCulla. The father passed away at Birmingham, Missouri, when about seventy-five years of age, but the mother is still living at the age of eighty-six and makes her home in Greenville, Illinois. They were the parents of four daughters and one son, as follows: Lillian, Harriet, Addie, Keziah and Thomas A. Mr. and Mrs. White had four children, namely: Edna B., Ruby
M., Frances and one who died in infancy. The family residence is at No. 752 North Cherry street.
     In politics Mr. White is a republican, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church, to which his wife and daughters all belong. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Vesper Lodge, No. 584, A. F. & A. M.; also Council No. 1, at Knoxville; and Gales-burg Chapter, No. 46, R. A. M. He is likewise a member of the Court of Honor and the Illinois Commercial Men's Association. He is alert and enterprising, possessing the progressive spirit of the times and accomplishing in business circles what he undertakes, while his geniality and deference for the opinions of others have made his circle of friends almost coextensive with the circle of his acquaintances.
DANIEL JUDSON GRISWOLD, D. D. S.
Dentistry may be said to be almost unique among occupations, as it is at once a profession, a trade and a business. Such being the case, it follows that in order to attain the highest success in it one must be thoroughly conversant with the theory of the art, must be expert with the many tools and appliances incidental to the practice of modern dentistry and must possess business qualifications adequate to dealing with the financial side of the profession. In all of these particulars Dr. Griswold is well qualified and therefore has attained prestige among the able representatives of dentistry in Galesburg, where he has practiced for the past seventeen years. His birth occurred in Jasper county, Indiana, on the 29th of September, 1865, his parents being Ames A. and Elizabeth (Adams) Griswold, who are natives of Vermont and Indiana respectively. The paternal grandfather was also born in the Green Mountain state and was a gentleman of English descent. He died when past middle life, while his wife lived to attain the age of about seventy years. Their children were four in number, namely: Ames A.; Abner; Mrs. Letitia Hall; and Abbie, the wife of Charles Long. The maternal grandfather of our subject was an agriculturist by occupation and both he and his wife passed away in Jasper county, Indiana, at an old age. Their children were as follows: William, Joseph, Marion, Henry, Mrs. Ann Hoover, Mrs. Milton Beal and Mrs. Elizabeth Griswold.
      Ames A. Griswold, the father of Daniel J. Griswold, was successfully identified with farming interests throughout practically his entire business career. He became an early settler of Marshall county, Illinois, and there resided for many years or until the time of his retirement, when he removed to Washburn, Illinois, where he now makes his home. In 1852 he made an overland trip to California and engaged in mining for a short time. Both he and his wife are Baptists in religious faith. Unto them were born twelve children, eight of whom still survive, namely: Ida, who is the widow of Thomas Lee Goodell and resides in Washburn, Illinois; Marcia, the wife of J. W. Rains, of Minnesota; Lillie, the wife of A. L. Kuhn, of Chicago; Daniel Judson, of this review; Florence, who gave her hand in marriage to L. L. Hester and now lives near Minonk, Illinois; Delia, who is the wife of Basil Tustin and lives near Washburn, Illinois;Nora Bell, who is the wife of Byron Stitt, of El Paso, Illinois; and Cora Bell, twin sister of Nora Bell, who is the wife of George Stauter and lives near Washburn, Illinois.
     Dr. Daniel J. Griswold was reared on his father's farm in Marshall county, Illinois, and obtained his early education in the district schools. He was graduated from the Washburn high school in 1885 and subsequently spent almost four years in Knox College, while later he prepared for the practice of his chosen profession by a three-years' course in the Philadelphia Dental College, being graduated from that institution in 1894. On the 19th of March of that year he opened an office at Galesburg, which city has since remained the scene of his professional labors and where he has been accorded an extensive and remunerative practice. Dr. Griswold has extensive property holdings, owning one thousand acres of land in the province of Alberta, Canada; farm lands in Finney county, Kansas; and also property in Lee and Van Buren counties, Iowa; Meade county, South Dakota; Otsego county, Michigan; and Iola, Kansas, as well as a house and lot in Galesburg. He likewise owns fruit land in Colorado and has mining interests in Gilpin county, that state.
On the 12th of September, 1899, Dr. Griswold was united in marriage to Miss Grace Agnes Ballard, a native of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and a daughter of Dr. J. A. and Henrietta (Sutor) Ballard, who were born in Maine and Canada respectively. They became early settlers of La Crosse, Wisconsin, and are now residents of Galesburg. Dr. J. A. Ballard served as a soldier of the Civil war. Dr. and Mrs. Griswold had three children: John Ballard, who died in infancy; Frederick Anthony, who passed away at the age of two years; and William Ballard.
     In his political views Dr. Griswold is a republican, while fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, belonging to Veritas Lodge, No. 478; he also holds membership in the Galesburg Club and the Young Men's Christian Association. Both he and his wife are devoted and consistent members of the Central Congregational church. His personal characteristics render him popular with many friends and he is much esteemed in social and professional circles of Galesburg.
AUGUST WERNER BERGGREN.
The name of August Werner Berggren is closely interwoven with the history of the industrial, commercial and financial enterprise in Galesburg and also with the political history of county and state, for he has been called to various positions of public honor and trust. At the present time, however, (1912) he is living retired, having with the incoming of the twentieth century given up all active business associations save for the supervision of his interests in property and investments. He was born August 17, 1840, in Amots Bruk, Ockelbo Socken, Sweden, his parents being Johan and Karin (Hanson) Berggren. The father was the third in a family of six children whose parents were Jan and Stina ( Person) Larson, who were married in 1787. The latter was a daughter of Anders and Maria (Hanson) Person and they were married in 1759. Johan Berggre was born in 1793 and he and two of his brothers adopted the surname of Berggren, which he afterward bore. It was in 1828 that he wedded Karin Hanson, who was born in 1800. He was a self-educated man and won his way to success by his shrewdness and native ability. He read broadly but learned his most valuable lessons in the school of experience. At different times he held minor offices and looked after cases in court, also administered estates and did other public service of similar character. For thirteen years he operated a flouring mill and afterward purchased a farm, on which he resided until he emigrated to America in 1856. His death occurred February 1, 1863, while his wife passed away in Sweden, February 24, 1845.
      August W. Berggren was a pupil in the village schools of Sweden until fourteen years of age, during which time he lived on the home farm. He also later attended the public schools of Galesburg for a short time, when not employed at his trade. In his fourteenth year, he was apprenticed in his native land to learn the tailor's trade, the contract, drawn by his father, providing that for the first three years he should work for his master without remuneration and for the fourth year he was to receive thirty-five riksdaler and for the fifth forty riksdaler, each coin of that denomination being equal to about twenty-seven cents in American money. His father was also to furnish the cloth for the tailor to make the apprentice's clothing. In case of the death of the boy during the first year of his apprenticeship, the father should pay the tailor fifteen riksdaler, and when Johan Berggren decided to emigrate to this country he was obliged to pay the master tailor fifty riksdaler for the release of his son.
   The family home was established in Knox county, and at Victoria August W. Berggren first found employment in the tailoring establishment of Jonas Hall-strom at eight dollars per month, in addition to which he was to receive his board and laundry for a year. In 1857 he came to Galesburg, where he followed his trade as opportunity offered and in i860 he went to Monmouth, Warren county, where he was employed by Captain Denman, a merchant tailor of that place. Before the close of the war he returned to Galesburg and became a solicitor of life insurance. During that period he devoted considerable attention to music, playing the violin and acting as leader of string bands in both Galesburg and Monmouth and arranging the music for these bands. For many years after the war his time and energies were largely devoted to public service and eventually he became closely associated with the important business interests of Knox county as an investor in the Galesburg Stoneware Company, the National Perefoyd Company, the Galesburg Paving Brick Company, the Galesburg National Bank, the Bank of Galesburg and the firm of Berggren & Lundeen, which was succeeded by the J. A. Lundeen Company and still later by the Berggren Clothing Company. In 1884 he was one of the petitioners for the charter of the Galesburg National Bank and has since been a member of its directory, while for several years he has served as its vice president, in which connection he still continues.
     Mr. Berggren's military experience had its beginning at the first call for volunteers to put down the Rebellion, at which time he went to Knoxville and joined the Swedish company commanded by Captain Holmberg. Two companies were there—one composed of Americans, the other Swedes—and the former was mustered into the service, while the latter was disbanded. He then went back to Monmouth, where he remained until returning to Galesburg in 1864. It was five years later that he was elected justice of the peace and while serving in that office he was appointed one of the supervisors for the city. His efficiency and fidelity in each position which he filled recommended him for other official service. In 1872 he received the republican nomination and was elected sheriff of the county, to which office he was reelected in 1874, 1876 and 1878. In 1880, while still the incumbent in that position, he was nominated and elected senator from the twenty-second district, composed of Knox and Mercer counties. Four years later he was reelected from the new district composed of Knox and Fulton counties, and when the senate was organized in 1887 he was chosen president pro tempore of that body. On the 1st of May, 1889, there came to him the appointment of warden of the Illinois state penitentiary at Joliet, which position he resigned in March, 1891, to take active supervision of the Covenant Mutual Life Association of Illinois, with principal offices in Galesburg. Fie had been president of the company from its organization and during the last three years prior to its consolidation with the Northwestern Masonic Association of Chicago, W. H. Smollinger served as its president, with Mr. Berggren as treasurer of the association.
     On the 8th of March, 1866, at Knoxville, Illinois, Mr. Berggren was married to Miss Christina Anderson, a'daughter of Olof and Brita Anderson, who with six of their seven children emigrated to this country in 1854, joining the Bishop Hill colony. Mr. and Mrs. Berggren became the parents of six children: Capi-tola Maud, the wife of the Rev. Franklin E. Jeffery; Guy Werner, who married Minnie Inlanders of New York; Ralph Augustus, who was run over by a train of cars and killed in 1887; and Claus Eugene, a bachelor, Jay Valentine, who married Bessie Sears, and Earl Hugo, who married Margaret Newton, all of Chicago.
         In politics Mr. Berggren has always been a republican and was for a long period a recognized leader in the ranks of his party in this county. Fie is an Odd Fellow and a Mason, having joined the former order in 1868 and the latter in 1869. ITe is now affiliated with the several Masonic bodies in Galesburg and in the Odd Fellows society has taken a very active interest, filling every office in the subordinate bodies and the principal offices of the grand lodge. Fie was grand master and presided over the deliberations of the grand lodge at Danville, Illinois, in 1880, and represented the grand lodge in the sovereign grand lodge at Baltimore, Maryland, in 1885. Through his influence the First Scandinavian Lodge, No. 446, of Galesburg, was organized in 1871. It was the first Odd Fellows lodge in the world composed exclusively of Scandinavians, as its name indicates. Mr. Berggren has also been a member of the Galesburg Club from an early period in its existence. He was confirmed in the Lutheran church in Sweden the year in which he emigrated to America and since coming to this country has affiliated with the Swedish Methodist church, in the work of which he has taken an active and helpful interest. He served as a lay delegate to the general conference of the Methodist Episcopal church in Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1880.
         Mr. Berggren has also been interested in educational matters and has on different occasions contributed liberally to Knox College when calls for aid have been urgent.
Thus his interests and activities have been broad and varied, his influence being always found on the side of progress, reform, improvement and advancement. In business his well formulated plans have brought him success, and his energy and determination have carried him into important relations, enabling him at length to put aside all business cares and enter upon a well earned rest. His official record, too, is most commendable, for over the record there falls no shadow of wrong or suspicion of evil. All through his life he has been actuated by high and honorable purposes and his labors, whether for the benefit of himself or for the community, have been fruitful of good results.
MARCUS T. PERRIN.
Marcus T. Perrin is a self-made man who as the architect of his own fortunes has builded wisely and well. His record is another proof of the fact that it is only under the stimulus of necessity and of opposition that the best and strongest in men is brought out and developed. From the age of sixteen years he has been dependent upon his own resources and his advancement marks the wise use of his time, talents and opportunities. He was born in Southbridge, Massachusetts, June 29, 1832, a son of Horace and Theresa (Richardson) Perrin, both of whom were natives of Massachusetts, the father engaging in business in Lee, that state, as a woolen manufacturer. He continued in that connection with the business circles of Lee until his death and his w7ife passed away in the same city, in August, 1890. Horace Perrin had given his early political allegiance to the democratic party but when Lincoln and Douglas became candidates for the presidency he supported the former and was ever afterward a stanch republican. He held membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and both he and his wife were members of the Congregational church. They had but two children, the younger being a daughter, Lucinda Josephine, who is now the widow of Manson P. Shaler and resides in Lee, Massachusetts.
      Marcus T. Perrin pursued his education in the district schools and in the Lee Academy, which he attended for one term. At the age of sixteen years he was apprenticed to a woolen manufacturer for a term of three years and followed that business until twenty-two years of age, when he came west to Illinois, traveling by rail to Rock Island, which was the terminus of the line and thence walking to Mercer county. He made his way to the home of an aunt about twelve miles east of Keithsburg, Illinois, but after a brief time left there and entered the employ of George W. Brown as a traveling salesman, spending five years upon the road. He next began farming in Warren county, where he carried on agricultural pursuits for six years, after which he sold his land and in the winter of 1871 engaged in dealing in corn. He was for a time connected with a corn-planter works and for a period of six years was identified with a bank in Creston, Iowa. On the expiration of that period he returned to Galesburg, where he was superintendent of the corn-planter works for several years, after which he was elected to the presidency of the company and continued as its chief executive head until his retirement from active business in 1904.
On the 27th of June, 1858, Mr. Perrin wedded Miss Elizabeth A. Brown, a daughter of George W. and Maria (Terpening) Brown, of Galesburg, who were natives of Saratoga county, New York, where they were reared and married. The father was a carpenter by trade and in 1833 made his way westward, settling in Warren county, Illinois, about seven miles from Galesburg, when the entire district was largely a wild and undeveloped region. He at once began the occupation of farming and later followed carpentering. Realizing the necessity of improved farm machinery, he called his inventive genius into play with the result that his skill and ingenuity brought forth a corn planter which he began to manufacture in Galesburg. The new machine filled a much felt want and he continued in its manufacture until five or six years prior to his death, when he retired. His life work was of value to the community as well as a source of profit to himself. It greatly facilitated the work of the farmer and his manufactory in Galesburg furnished employment to many workmen. He also figured prominently in many public connections, serving for one term as mayor of Galesburg. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and he was ever loyal and unfaltering in his devotion to its principles. Both he and his wife were lifelong members of the Methodist Episcopal church and he served on the official board of stewards for about half a century. He died on the 5th of June, 1895, a man honored and respected wherever known and most of all where he was best known. His Hfe was indeed of worth to the community in which he lived, as a factor in its material, political, social and moral progress. He made wise use of his time and opportunities and of his native talents and his well directed energies brought to him the material reward of his labor and the respect of his fellowmen as well. His daughter, Mrs. Perrin, was born March 21, 1839, in Warren county, and by her marriage became the mother of four children: George, who died April 1, 1901, at the age of forty years; Arthur E., of Chicago; Myra Theresa, the wife of Clarence A. Hurlburt, of Galesburg; and Genevieve Josephine, the wife of Herbert A. Smith, of this city. Both Mr. and Mrs. Perrin hold membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which he has taken an active and helpful part, serving for many years on the board of stewards and cooperating in all of the projects to promote the growth and extend the influence of the church. His political indorsement is given to the republican party. A well spent life has brought him the merited reward of labor and the respect and good-will of his fellowmen.
HERBERT ARNOLD SMITH.
Herbert Arnold Smith, who has remained a resident of Galesburg from his birth to the present time, is well known as an extensive dealer in lands and also devotes considerable attention to the insurance business. His natal day was August 12, 1871, his parents being Hiram C. and Harriet (Arnold) Smith, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The paternal grandfather was likewise born in the Empire state and both he and his wife lived to a ripe old age. They reared a large family of children, including John, William and Hiram C.
     The last named, who became the father of our subject, was reared in New York and took up his abode among the early settlers of Galesburg, Illinois. Here he was successfully engaged in the nursery business for a number of years or until his health failed. Subsequently he served as constable for about twenty years. His demise occurred at Galesburg in 1905, when he had reached the age of seventy-nine years. His widow still survives and is now seventy-five years old. In religious faith she is a Methodist. Her children were three in number, namely: Minnie L., a Latin teacher in the Galesburg high school; Herbert A., of this review; and Lillian, who died in infancy.
Herbert Arnold Smith was reared in the city of his nativity and completed the high-school course by graduation in 1889. He then worked in the offices of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company and subsequently secured a position as stenographer in the law offices of Williams, Lawrence & Bancroft. In 1893 he embarked in the real-estate business in partnership with his uncle, Seymour Arnold, the relationship being maintained for two years. For the past sixteen years, however, he has been in business alone, handling large land deals in the Saskatchewan country of Canada, where he also owns several farms. He is a stockholder and director in the Hope Abbey Mausoleum and likewise a director in the Fidelity Savings & Loan Association. In all of his business affairs his judgment is sound, his sagacity keen and his enterprise unfaltering.
On the 8th of December, 1903, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Genevieve Perrin, a native of Galesburg and a daughter of Marcus T. and Elizabeth (Brown) Perrin, who were born in Connecticut and Illinois respectively. They have remained residents of Galesburg since their marriage, which was here celebrated fifty-three years ago. Mr. Perrin was connected with the corn-planter works conducted by G. W. Brown until the business was closed out. To him and his wife were born six children, four of whom reached mature years, namely: George, who passed away in 1902 ; Arthur; Myra; and Genevieve. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Smith were George W. and Maria (Tur-pening) Brown. Our subject and his wife have one daughter, Harriet Elizabeth. The family residence is at No. 474 North Academy street.
Mr. Smith gives his political allegiance to the republican party, believing that its principles are most conducive to good government. Both he and his wife are devoted and consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He likewise belongs to- the Country Club and is a director in the Galesburg Club. In the city where they have spent their entire lives both Mr. and Mrs. Smith are well and favorably known, the circle of their friends being coextensive with the circle of their acquaintances.
JOSEPH GROSS.
       During the thirteen years of his residence in Galesburg, Joseph Gross has won recognition as a resourceful and enterprising business man and his manufacturing interests have constituted an important element in the commercial activity of the city. As a member of the firm of Gross Brothers he is now conducting a successful overall manufactory which was established in 1901.
     He has wisely used his time and opportunities and the splendid business concern which he has built up is a monument to his labors, his enterprise and his ability. He was born in Russia, March 16, 1866, a son of Isaac and Rachel Gross. As a boy he came to the United States, first settling in Omaha, Nebraska. He started in business by making a house to house canvass as a peddler in the sale of merchandise at Creston, Iowa, and in 1892 he opened a second-hand store in Creston. Four years later, in 1896, he established a branch business at Burlington and in 1898 sold out in Creston. In that year he removed from Burlington to Galesburg, disposing of his business in the former city to his brother, and in this city he established a retail general merchandise store, which he conducted successfully for about three years. In February, 1901, he began the manufacture of overalls on the second floor of the building on East Main street, where he continued for a year. Then in order to secure more commodious quarters he removed to the third floor of a building, where he continued for five years or until the 1st of June, 1906, when he came to his present location at the corner of Mulberry and Seminary streets. He erected the building here—a four-story structure, sixty-six by one hundred and twenty feet, having thirty-one thousand, six hundred and eighty square feet of floor space. Something of the rapid and gratifying growth of the business is indicated in the fact that while he at first employed only ten people, he now has one hundred and seventy-five names on the pay roll. The plant is thoroughly equipped with modern machinery and independent motors and the business is represented on the road by seven traveling salesmen who cover the territory of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Wisconsin, Minnesota, North and South Dakota, Iowa, Oklahoma and Kansas. The output is now very extensive, being shipped to nearly all of the middle west states, and the business has assumed proportions which make it one of the most important productive industries of the city. On the 20th of October, 1901, Mr. Gross was united in marriage to Miss Libby Oppenheim, a daughter of Max and Yetta Oppenheim, of Peoria, Illinois. Mr. Gross holds to the religious faith of the Jewish church and in politics is an independent voter. He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and to the Galesburg Club and is well known in the city socially as well as in business circles, where he is regarded as a most enterprising, progressive man, who with resolute spirit carries forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes.
S. W. MAY.
     S. W. May, who is living retired on his farm of five hundred and thirty acres in Rio township, has been actively connected with this district for many years both as an agriculturist and as a manufacturer. He was born March 20, 183^ in Genesee county, New York, his parents being Harvey H. and Delia Duwayne (Ray) May. The family comes of English and Dutch ancestry on the paternal side and is of German and French lineage on the maternal side. Harvey H. May was born in Washington county, New York, and his wife's birth occurred in the Empire state in 1806. The former was a son of Nathaniel May, a very prominent church worker of New York and a farmer by occupation. He owned four hundred acres of rich and valuable land and always continued his residence in New York.
    In that state Harvey H. May was reared and educated and in 1837 came to Illinois, accompanied by Dr. Gorham, to look over the country. They made horseback trips throughout this district, viewing the land with the idea of locating here in the near future. A year later H. H. May brought his family and household goods to Knox county, traveling by raft from the state of New York by way of Lake Erie and the Ohio river and bringing with him the lumber from which he built the first pine building in Log City. This he placed on skids and hauled it to Galesburg with ten yoke of cattle. He possessed marked mechanical skill and ingenuity and was proprietor of the first factory in Galesburg. For some time he prospered in business but during the financial crash in the '50s he lost nearly all that he had made. He is most entitled to honor and remembrance by reason of the fact that he was the inventor of the first steel plow which he made from two old mill saws, molding them to the shape desired. He applied for a patent for the use of steel in manufacturing plows so they would scour, in 1842 but it was not granted at that time. He had considerable difficulty in getting a plow that would scour bright but after much discouragement and many trials he finally succeeded in securing material that could be highly polished and would remain that way. Through political reasons he was never able to obtain a good patent but between the years 1867 and 1871 the case was decided by Judge Sidney N. Breese in the United States supreme court. In his decision Judge Breese said: "The history of the plow goes back to 1841." Later he said that "May of Galesburg manufactured a plow in shape nearly the form of that manufactured now." This is S. W. May's earliest recollection of seeing a steel mold board as referred to by Robert N. Tate in the testimony. The share and mold board were combined at that time and May was the first man that laid any claim to the improved steel plow. Later the judge referred to seven working models of plows " copied strictly after the May plow." and added: "I essentially consider May the sole constructor in the form of the western steel plow." By this decision Harvey H. May had the honor and credit of giving to the world this most useful implement. By this invention he demonstrated that a man could do two days' work in one day. In 1842 H. H. May began the manufacture of his plow and continued until about 1859. During the early '40s he had begun the purchase of land in this country and at one time had several thousand acres but through speculation and widespread financial panic in which the country became involved he lost nearly everything that he had. The little that remained was turned over to his son, Samuel W. May, who although a young man took up the work laid down by his father and assumed the task of regaining the fortune his father had lost. H. H. May continued to reside in Galesburg until the time of his death, which occurred in 1886, when he had reached the advanced age of eighty-four years. In politics he was independent, voting as his judgment dictated. In early life he attended the Presbyterian church but was afterward a member of the Congregational church for many years.
    In his youthful days Samuel W. May attended the public schools and at the age of thirteen assisted his father, going upon the road as a traveling salesman and selling the plows which the father manufactured. He continued successfully in this work for some time but afterward engaged in teaming between Galesburg and Peoria. Realizing his need and also the value of education, Mr. May when twenty-two years of age entered Knox Academy and diligently applied himself to the mastery of a course of study which prepared him to enter Knox College, where he remained as a student for two years. He next rented a farm in Henderson township which he cultivated for two years prior to his removal to Rio township in 1861. There he purchased farm land which was the nucleus of his present extensive possessions, now comprising five hundred and thirty acres. He has brought his farm under a high state of cultivation and as the reward of his fifty years of labor now has one of the finest properties in Rio township. He has always followed progressive and scientific methods, carrying out his plans with persistency and energy, his labors proving effective in developing the farm for general agricultural purposes. In former years in addition to the cultivation of the soil he also engaged in raising cattle and hogs which proved a profitable branch of his business, nor were his efforts confined to agriculture alone for he engaged in the manufacture of the May windmill which he invented. This has been very successful and has been commonly used in this county for more than thirty years. The first two hundred mills were manufactured on his farm in Rio township but afterward, in order to meet the increasing demands, he made arrangements for their construction with Candee & Company, at Oneida, with Nelson Latueratt & Company, at Bushnell, and with H. L. May, at Galesburg, there operating under the firm name of May Brothers, the business proving very profitable. Although Mr. May now rents his land, he still resides at the old home and is one of the prosperous agriculturists of the county.
On the 27th of November, 1870, occurred the marriage of Mr. May and Miss Elizabeth Hanan, a daughter of William and Eleanor (Handlen) Hanan. On the paternal side the family is of Scotch origin and was founded in America in colonial days, her great-grandfather serving as a soldier in the Revolutionary war. Her paternal grandfather, George Hanan, died in the war of 1812. In politics Mr. May has always maintained an independent attitude, voting for men and measures rather than for party principles. His fellow townsmen frequently called him to office and for ten years, beginning in 1880, he served as township supervisor. He is one of the oldest and most prominent residents of Rio township. His life has been spent in persistent and diligent labor for the improvement of his own interests and for the development of the community. In all his business and social relations he has never been neglectful of any duty whether of a public or private nature, and his conduct has always been in accordance with his high sense of citizenship.
SMILEY S. RICKORDS.
    Smiley S. Rickords, who for the past fourteen years has been en one of the rural mail routes of Knoxville, was born in Pike county, Ohio, on the 8th of February, 1842, his parents being Benjamin and Sabrina (Kilpatrick) Rickords. His father was born and reared in Maryland, of which state the family had been residents for several generations. He received a common-school education and subsequently learned the blacksmith's trade, but in common with many young men he decided to pursue his business career amid new environments. With this purpose in mind he came to Ohio, at that time termed the west, locating in Pike county, and there he met the lady who was destined to become his wife. She was a native of that county, of Irish extraction, her father, Brice Kilpatrick, having been born and reared in Dublin, Ireland. Benjamin Rickords established a shop and engaged in blacksmithing and horseshoeing and also manufactured wagons in Pike county until May, 1857. The lure of the west once more proving irresistible, he disposed of his interests and with his wife and family of eleven children started for Illinois, with Logan county as his destination. He settled in the vicinity of Lincoln and there resumed his trade, which he followed until 1874, when he and the mother made their home with their son John in Arkansas. There she passed away on the 27th of September, that year, and was survived only a few weeks by the father, his death occurring on the 14th of October. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Rickords consisted of six sons and five'daughters, as follows: Richard E., who is a resident of Belle Plaine, Kansas; William, who is living in Lincoln, Illinois; Sarah E., who is deceased and was the wife of Samuel Watts; Mary J., also deceased, who married Andrew Lawson; Eliza Ann, the deceased wife of John Lawson; Smiley S., our subject; John W., who was a member of Company H, Sixty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war, being discharged with the rank of corporal, now living in Kingfisher, Oklahoma; Joseph A., who is deceased; Samuel B., a resident of Seymour, Iowa; Druzilla, the deceased wife of Andrew Laswell; and Rebecca, the wife of Mahlon Lawson, of Williamsville, Illinois.
    Smiley S. Rickords was a lad of fifteen years when he removed with his parents to Logan county, in which public schools he completed his education. After leaving school he entered his father's shop and learned the blacksmith trade, following this occupation for many years in Logan county. From there he went to Hancock county, settling at Carthage where he spent several months before coming to Knoxville. In the late '90s Mr. Rickords withdrew from his trade in order to assume the duties of his present position. He is one of the soldier boys whom Illinois sent to the battlefields of the south during the Civil war, and first enlisted for three months in Company H, Sixty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and at the expiration of that period reenlisted in Company F, Fifty-eighth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, remaining at the front until the close of hostilities, receiving his discharge at Springfield, Illinois.
     On the 7th of June, 1864, Mr. Rickords married Miss Eliza J. Porter, who was born in East Liverpool, Ohio, on the 3d of August, 1849. She is a daughter of John Thomas and Mary (Hickey) Porter, natives of Maryland, whence they removed in early life to Ohio. Farming always engaged the energies of the father, who with his wife and family again started westward. He crossed the prairies of Ohio and Indiana to Illinois, settling on a farm in Logan county and there both he and the mother passed away. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Porter and beside Mrs. Rickords they are as follows: James H., who enlisted from Bloomington in Company H, Thirty-ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry and was wounded at the battle of Richmond, when last heard from residing at Edinburg, Illinois; John, who was killed at the battle of Hilton Head, South Carolina, during the Civil war; Rebecca Jane and Josephine, who are deceased ; and George, who is living at Galesburg. The children of Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Rickords are named below: Mary, married Louis Faass, a farmer at Billings, Oklahoma, and they have five children: Clarence, Raymond, Mabel, Donald and Walter. George T., who is living at Rnoxville, married Zona B. Miller and they are also the parents of five children: Elma, Spencer, Wesley, Edith and Mabel. Fred, who is a resident of Knoxville, chose for his wife Nora B. Way, and to them have been born three sons: Stanley, Charles and Harry. Gertrude is the wife of Jesse Ward of Oregon and the mother of seven sons: James, William, Roy, Harvey, Charles W., Owen, and Howard. Garfield B. married Lottie Foster, of Knoxville, where they continue to reside, and has two sons, Cecil B. and William Dean. The two next in order of birth are William B. and Lincoln Grant, both of whom are still at home. Bessie, who is the youngest member of the family, married Clyde Brown, a brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, and they live at Galesburg.
     His political allegiance Mr. Rickords has always given to the republican party, considering its policy best qualified to serve the highest interests of the nation. In matters of faith the family affiliate with the Methodist Episcopal church of which the mother is a member. Mr. Rickords is identified with the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, through the medium of which he maintains relations with his comrades of the war. The life of Mr. Rickords has been similar to that of hundreds of American citizens, who do their duty steadfastly to the best of their ability, discharging their obligations to their families and society, while at the same time they establish the nation's standard of citizenship.
HENRY ALONZO ALLEN.
Henry Alonzo Allen is a native son of Galesburg and has spent much of his life in this city, although at intervals he has resided elsewhere. In 1908 he erected a comfortable residence here and now divides his time between Galesburg and Tennessee, where he has important lumber manufacturing interests. His birth occurred December 10, 1842, his parents being Sheldon William and Fidelia (Leach) Allen.
            Sheldon W. Allen was born September 28, 1808, in Oneida county, New York, and was a son of Chester Ephraim Allen, who was born at or near New Haven, Connecticut. The latter married Eunice Baldwin, of Bethlehem, Connecticut, and removed to Augusta, Oneida county, New York, where they reared their family of nine children, namely, Sophia, Juliette, Sheldon, Algenia, Amanda, Adaline, Mary, Homer and Asahel. In the county of his nativity, Sheldon W. Allen was reared and after arriving at years of maturity he was married in January 1834, to Miss Fidelia Leach, who was born in the Empire state in 1812. Three years after their marriage they removed westward, settling in Galesburg, Illinois, in 1837. They were the parents of eight children, James Sherman, Sheldon Oberlin, Albert Herman, Henry Alonzo, Norman Taylor, Chester Ephraim, Mary Fidelia and John Stebbins. The wife and mother passed away November 23, 1855, and Sheldon W. Allen afterward married Nancy Shaver, by whom he had seven children, George, Frank, Alida, Fred, Ida, Minnie and Willie. Of these Frank, Alida and Fred are still living. Of the children of the first marriage all are yet living with the exception of Sheldon and Mary.
     Galesburg was but a tiny western town when the Allen family was established there and had not advanced far toward its present prosperous and progressive condition when Henry A. Allen was pursuing his education in its public schools. He afterward entered Knox College, wherein he continued his studies until the 15th of October, 1861, when he left the junior class to enlist as a soldier in the Civil war. Later he continued his education in Eastman's Business College at Poughkeepsie, New York, from which he was graduated on the 22d of March, 1866. In the meantime he had seen four years military service, having on the 15th of October, 1861, joined Company C, of the Eleventh Regiment of Illinois Cavalry. He was injured in action near Boliver, Tennessee, August 30, 1862, sustaining a gunshot wound through the left hand and left leg. On the 1st of June, 1863, he was promoted to the rank of commissary sergeant and was mustered out with his regiment October 18, 1865. He had participated in a number of important engagements and for four years had given tangible proof of his valor, his loyalty and his patriotism.
    After completing his education in Eastman's Business College of New York Mr. Allen became connected with the butchering business at Galesburg, where he remained until the spring of 1869. He then removed to Viola, Illinois, where he conducted a lumberyard until the spring of 1871. At that date he became a resident of Pettis county, Missouri, where he engaged in farming, but in December, 1873, returned to Galesburg, where he followed farming and butchering until the spring of 1877. He was then elected justice of the peace and served for four years, his decisions being strict and impartial so that his course won the approval of the public. On the 1st of August, 1881, he was appointed United States storekeeper and while discharging the duties of that position resided in Peoria until the 1st of February, 1886, when he removed to Russell county, Kansas, where he engaged in farming. In September, 1896, he returned with his family to Galesburg but in the spring of 1899 removed to Fayette county, Tennessee, where he again took up the occupation of farming. In 1904 he purchased a sawmill, which he operated in connection with his agricultural pursuits. In 1908 he returned with his family to Galesburg, erecting an attractive home here, and has since divided his time between this city and Tennessee, giving supervision to his agricultural and industrial interests in that state. In addition to his other interests Mr. Allen was a director and president of the Farmers Alliance Exchange Company of Russell, Kansas, for several years and was also a director and secretary of the Farmers Union Warehouse Company, of Somerville. Tennessee.
    On the 16th of September, 1867, at Denison, Iowa, Mr. Allen was united in marriage to Miss Sue Mcllhenny Cobean, a daughter of Robert and Nancy (McIlhenny) Cobean. Her father was a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Cunningham) Cobean. The latter was a daughter of Robert and Martha (Watt) Cunningham, whose parents were John and Elizabeth Cunningham and David and Mary Watt respectively. John Cunningham, the great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Allen, came to this country from the north of Ireland about the year 1748. His son Robert settled in Adams county, Pennsylvania, about 1770, and served in the Revolutionary war, being commissioned a lieutenant. David and Mary Watt, great-great-grandparents of Mrs. Allen, came to the new world from the vicinity of Glasgow, Scotland, in the decade between 1740 and 1750, settling near Oxford, Chester county, Pennsylvania. The tall monument to John Watt in the burial ground of Trinity church on Broadway, opposite Wall street, New York, and the Watt monument in Glasgow, Scotland, both indicate where ancestors of Mrs. Allen lie buried. Mrs. Nancy Cobean, the mother of Mrs. Allen, was a daughter of Victor and Agnes E. W. (Orr) Mcllhenny, the latter a daughter of George Orrand the former a son of Robert and Martha (King) Mcllhenny. This Robert Mcllhenny was a son of Robert Mcllhenny, Sr., and his wife, Martha King, was a daughter of Victor King. Both of these were great-great-grandfathers of Mrs. Allen and both came from the north of Ireland, settling in Adams county, Pennsylvania, in 1767. Her great-great-grandfather Victor King and her great-grandfather Robert Mcllhenny both served in the Revolutionary war and both were commissioned lieutenants.
     Unto Mr. and Mrs. Allen were born seven children. Sue Fidelia, the eldest, born August 25, 1869, was married February 14, 1889, to George W. Chew, and they had three children: Anna Grace; Mary Allen; and William Henry, who died in childhood. Harry Myrtle Allen, born October 4, 1874, wedded on April 15, 1896, Anna Melissa Bunner, and they have three children, Thomas Henry, Donald Ray and Harry Bunner. Nettie Cobean Allen was born April 15, 1877, and is at home with her parents. Bessie Leach, born December 7, 1879, is a missionary at Teheran, Persia. Ralph Chester, born April 15, 1882, was married January 3, 1904, to Pearl Lavinia Kolla, and they have three children, Chester Robinson, James Everett and Robert Cobean. Sheldon Robert, born April 18, 1884, was married July 12, 1906, to Edna Josephine Parnell. Willis Ray, born July 23, 1889, died February 17, 1893.
     Mr. Allen has always been regarded as a man of prominence and influence in the different localities in which he has lived and has done not a little toward molding public opinion. In politics he is a republican, always stanch in support of the party. While living at Viola, Illinois, he was elected village trustee in the spring of 1869. In April, 1877, he was elected justice of the peace in Galesburg and filled the position for four years. This was followed by his appointment to the position of United States storekeeper at Peoria, in which capacity he served from August 1, 1881, until February 1, 1886. In November, 1888, he was elected county commissioner of Russell county, Kansas, for a term of three years, and was reelected in November, 1891. During five of the six years of his service he was chairman of the board and he also served for several years as school director in the same county. As president of the Russell County Farmers Alliance he attended the meeting of county presidents at Topeka, Kansas, and voted against the formation of the populist party. He was a delegate to the sixth district republican congressional convention at Colby, Kansas, in 1892. There several ballots were taken yet no candidate received a sufficient number of votes to become the party nominee. Then his name was presented and he received so many votes on the first ballot as to alarm the regular candidates, who secured an adjournment and fixed up their differences, which resulted in the nomination of Webb McNall. He was urged by his friends in Russell county to allow his name to be presented as a candidate before the populist convention but declined.
He has been elected to various offices outside the pale of politics, serving as president of the Farmers Alliance at Russell, Kansas, and also as president of the County Alliance of Russell county, Kansas. He has likewise been secretary of the Fayette County Farmers Union at Somerville, Tennessee, and was president of the Farmers Institute at Russell, Kansas. In fact, he has been a very prominent worker in behalf of organized effort for the benefit of the agricultural class and his labors have been productive of much good. He is well known, too, in fraternal relations and has the highest regard of many of his brethren in the different lodges to which he belongs. In 1879 he joined the Masonic order and has since taken the degrees of the chapter and commandery. He has served as high priest of Russell Chapter in Russell, Kansas, and also as high priest of the chapter at Somerville, Tennessee. He was a charter member of the Grand Army post at Galesburg, served as its first officer of the day and its third commander, and he was also commander of the post at Russell, Kansas.
    His has been an extremely active, busy and useful life. His labors have been attended by substantial and gratifying results for the benefit of the different organizations with which he is identified, while in business affairs his well directed efforts have brought him a substantial and gratifying measure of success.
EDWIN NASH, M. D.
Dr. Edwin Nash, a physician and surgeon of Galesburg, has there practiced his profession since 1904 and has won an enviable reputation as a skilled representative of the medical fraternity. His birth occurred in Chicago, on the 21st of November, 1876, his parents being Orrin and Martha (Heald) Nash, who are natives of Massachusetts and Illinois respectively. The paternal grandfather, Hervey Nash, was born in the state of New York and became a railroad contractor. He and his wife, Mrs. Anna (Swift) Nash, settled in Chicago about 1856 and spent the remainder of their lives in Illinois, passing away in Gibson City at an old age. They had quite a number of children, including: Nicholas; Milton; James; Hervey; Orrin; Loraine, who gave her hand in marriage to John Carver; Marilla; and Marietta. Alexander Heald, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of New York and a contractor by trade. He and his wife, Mrs. Naomi (Pope) Heald, took up their abode among the early settlers of Lake county, Illinois, and passed away in Chicago when well advanced in years. Their children were four in number, namely: Martha, Mary, James and Nelson.
     Orrin Nash, the father of Dr. Nash, accompanied his parents on their removal to Illinois when a youth of thirteen, the family home being established in Chicago, where he grew to manhood and completed his education. In April, 1862, he joined the Union army as a private, serving until the cessation of hostilities with the Chicago Mercantile Battery, Artillery. After the close of the war he went to Louisville, Kentucky, and followed bridge building in partnership with his brother for a number of years^ After returning to Chicago he was elected to various county offices and acted as committee clerk of the board of commissioners for about thirty years. At the present time he makes his home in Boston. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity and both he and his wife are Universalists in religious faith. They have two sons: Wilmar, living in Boston; and Edwin, of this review.
The latter was reared in the city of his nativity and is a graduate of the Oak Park high school. After leaving that institution he entered the Chicago Homeopathic Medical College and was graduated therefrom in 1900. Subsequently he spent eighteen months as interne in the Cook County Hospital and then devoted another year to study in Rush Medical College, of which institution he is likewise a graduate. He first located for practice in Chicago but in 1904 came to Galesburg and has here since remained, his patronage steadily increasing as he has demonstrated his skill and ability in coping with the intricate problems which continually confront the physician in his efforts to restore health and prolong life. Through his membership in the Knox County Medical Society and the Illinois State Medical Society he keeps in close touch with the progress which is constantly being made by the profession.
On the 2d of October, 1902, Dr. Nash was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Scofield, a native of Rock county, Wisconsin, and a daughter of George and Sarah (Hurd) Scofield, who were also born in that state. The father passed away in Janesville, Wisconsin, but the mother still survives and makes her home at that place. They had seven children, namely: Mitta, Clara, Willis, Elma, Jessie, Bertha and Floy. Silas Hurd, the maternal grandfather of Mrs. Nash, was a native of New York, became a farmer and miller by occupation and took up his abode among the early settlers of Rock county, Wisconsin. Dr. and Mrs. Nash have two children, Edwin and Lois.
Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Dr. Nash has supported the men and measures of the republican party, believing that its principles are most conducive to good government. In religious faith both he and his wife are Universalists. Though yet a young man, he has already attained a creditable position in professional circles, while the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as have brought him the warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise associated.
EDISON P. METCALF.
    Edison P. Metcalf, deceased, who during his active business life was associated with farming interests in Knox county, was born in the state of New York on the 8th of July, 1838, his parents being Jonathan G. and Phoebe (Fountain) Metcalf, who were likewise natives of New York. There the father followed the occupation of farming until he removed westward with his family, settling in Knox county at an early period in its development and improvement. He took up his abode upon a tract of land east of Knoxville and continued to engage in the cultivation of the fields until his life's labors were ended in death. His diligence and reliability in business made him a valued citizen and one worthy the regard uniformly given him. In the family were the following children, but the only one now living is Mrs. Mary Ferry, of Knoxville. Sarah, Edison P., Rufus and Mrs. Harriet Vermillion are deceased.
     Edison P. Metcalf was a young lad when he accompanied his parents on their removal westward to Knox county. He pursued his early education in the district schools and afterward continued his studies in the schools of Knoxville. He was trained to the work of the farm and took up farming on his own account when a young man. He continued to engage in agricultural pursuits-throughout his entire life and became the owner of a well developed property, the fields being brought under a high state of cultivation, while substantial improvements were made upon the farm in the shape of substantial buildings and well kept fences.
      On the 18th of December, 1862, Mr. Metcalf was united in marriage to Miss Marion Gould, who was born in Adams county, Illinois, February 16, 1840, a daughter of William and Sallie Ann (Mapes) Gould, natives of New Hampshire and Vermont respectively. This section of Illinois was still largely undeveloped when they came to the state, taking up their abode in Adams county, where the father devoted his attention to farming. He was also a carpenter by trade and his skill with tools enabled him to keep everything about his farm in excellent condition. He remained in Adams county for some time and then removed to Knox county when Mrs. Metcalf was a small child but during the fall before she was thirteen the family went to Morgan county, Missouri, where the mother died and was buried. The family afterward returned to Knox county, Illinois, and here the father lived until called to his final rest. They were the parents of nine children, of whom five died in infancy, while four reached years of maturity, namely: John, now deceased; Mrs. Metcalf; William, who is living in this county; and Mrs. Samantha Metcalf, who resides northeast of Knoxville.
      Unto Mr. and Mrs. Metcalf there were born seven children. Marietta, the eldest, became the wife of Stephen M. Turner but is now deceased. In their family were eight children : Geneva ; Oran ; Eva ; Gertrude ; Lee ; Maude; and Merle and Pearl, twins. Melissa Ann, the second of the daughters of Mr. and Mrs. Edison Metcalf, is the deceased wife of Charles A. Ramp, of this county, and of their five children two died in infancy, the others being Alice G., Inez L. and Lavon. Emma Metcalf is the wife of Charles M. Hawley, a resident farmer of this county, and they had seven children, of whom Robert C. and Lessie are deceased, the others being Sylva S., Selma M., Ray, Roy and Allie. Ellen Mae became the wife of William Armstrong but both have passed away. They are survived by three living children: Bessie R., Minnie J. and Aileen M. Charles W. Metcalf makes his home near London Mills, Fulton county. Alma A., the next of the family, died in infancy. Alice G. is the wife of Franklin Sargent and they reside in Knoxville, Illinois. They have four living children : Charles E.; Celia Mae and Cecil Merle, twins; and Vivian. They have lost their first daughter, Catherine M. Geneva Turner married Frank Howalter, of Knox county; and Eva Turner became the wife of Thomas Davidson.
     The death of Mr. Metcalf occurred in 1906 when he had reached the age of sixty-eight years. He was a member of the United Brethren church and his wife holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church. His political allegiance was given the republican party and he was always loyal to his honest belief. Those who knew him, and he had a wide acquaintance, entertained for him warm regard. He was devoted to the welfare and happiness of his family, was progressive and public-spirited in citizenship and loyal in friendship, and because of his many sterling traits of character he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name.
EDWARD RICHMOND ADAMS.
Almost three decades have passed since Edward Richmond Adams was called to his final rest, and yet his memory is enshrined in the hearts of many who knew him and who entertain for him the warmest regard because of his individual traits of character and the important part which he played in the public life of Galesburg. He figured prominently here for many years as a merchant and in matters of citizenship his influence was always given on the side of progress, reform and improvement. He was born in Stoughton, Massachusetts, February 5, 1809, and traced his ancestry back to Henry Adams who, on coming from England in 1632, settled in Braintree, Massachusetts, where the family home was maintained until the Rev. Jedediah Adams was called to a pastorate in Stoughton after 1733. Dr. Peter Adams, the father of Edward R. Adams, was born in Stoughton, June 3, 1756, and was graduated from Harvard College in 1778. He studied medicine and was the first regularly settled physician in Stoughton. In 1805 he wedded Sarah Johnson, a daughter of Lewis and Mary (May) Johnson of that place. The father died in 1832 and the mother passed away the following year.
     Edward R. Adams pursued his education in the common schools, but remained throughout life a broad reader of the best literature and kept well informed upon all topics of general and vital interest. After leaving his native town he engaged in business in Boston until 1836 when he removed westward to Illinois, settling first in Henderson county where he engaged in buying all kinds of produce which he shipped to New Orleans. In 1854 he came to Galesburg and about 1855 he established a business that constituted the nucleus of the present saddlery and hardware establishment of Adams & Johnson Company. About 1855 he built the stores at Nos. 1 and 3 Main street, and throughout the period of his residence in Galesburg, covering almost three decades, was prominently, closely and honorably associated with its business activities and its upbuilding. He always followed constructive methods, never taking advantage of the necessities of another, and his enterprise, diligence and honorable dealing brought him well merited success. He was one of the original incorporators of the Farmers' & .Merchanics' Bank, and served as a member of its board of directors until he resigned in September, 1882.
    Mr. Adams was married twice. He first wedded Miss Mahala Choate, of Lowell, Massachusetts, in 1842. Her death occurred the following year and on the 12th of August, 1846, he wedded Miss Nancy Gilbert Thomas of New Haven, Connecticut, a daughter of Lewis and Mary (Gilbert) Thomas. There were seven children of this marriage, of whom four died in infancy or in childhood, while three survived their parents. They are: Edward Quincy, who was married in 1885 to Miss Helen L. Gay, of Easton, Massachusetts, and has two children; Katherine Amelia, the wife of Wallace S. Johnson, whom she married in 1884 and by whom she has two children; and Harriett Marsh, living at Galesburg. The death of Mr. Adams took place on October 2, 1883.
     Mr. Adams was the possessor of an unusually fine tenor voice and was a member of the two oldest musical societies in the country, the Stoughton Musical Society, which was formed in 1756 and of which his father, Dr. Peter iVdams was a charter member, and the Handel & Hayden Society of Boston which was founded in 1815. While not a member, Mr. Adams was a generous contributor to and constant attendant of the services of the Congregational (brick) church and the Universalist church in which he had been reared, his grandfather, the Rev. Jedediah Adams having been the first regularly settled minister of that faith in Stoughton. Mr. Adams was recognized as a man of high moral character whose devotion to his duty was unquestioned, and who ever sought those influences and aids which are of the most value in promoting individual and community progress. He was devoted to his home and family, was always a generous friend and gave freely of his means to those who needed assistance. Many testify as to his generosity and his kindly spirit, and the name of Edward Richmond Adams is yet an honored one in Galesburg where he so directed his labors as to make his work of lasting benefit to the city.
GEORGE FREEMAN CONLEY.
George Freeman Conley, who for the past fourteen years has been representing the fourth ward in the city council, is one of the well known residents of Galesburg. He was born on a farm in the vicinity of Wataga, Knox county, on the 22d of July, 1853, tne on^y child of Linzley and Catherine (Anderson) Conley. The father was born in Glasgow, Barren county, Kentucky, on June 16, 1827, while the mother's birth occurred in Hancock county, Indiana, May 6, 1830. When he was a lad of three years Linzley Conley came to Illinois with his father, Levey P. Conley, who had been given a grant for one hundred and sixty acres of land in Knox county, eighty for services rendered in the Black Hawk war and eighty on account of the war of 1812. For many years Levey P. Conley devoted his entire time and attention to the further development and improvement of his farm, and there he passed away on January 4, 1870, at the age of seventy-eight years, while his wife died November 10, 1864. His son, Linzley Conley, was reared and educated on the old homestead, where he also received his agricultural training. When he had attained his majority he left the parental home and began working for himself, continuing to follow farming. At the breaking out of the Civil war, in 1861, he enlisted in Company K, Forty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry as a private and went to the front where he remained for nearly three years. The hardships and privations incident to army life completely undermined his health, and he returned to the old farm practically an invalid. He again turned his attention to the cultivation of the fields, devoting his energies to agricultural pursuits until 1868. In the latter year he gave up farming and came to Galesburg, and from that period until his death on the 13th of February, 1899, engaged in sinking artesian wells. The mother had passed away many years before on the farm, her demise occurring on April 27, 1854. They were married, June 22, 1851. They were members of the Baptist church, and the father also belonged to the Grand Army of the Republic. In his political views he was a republican and while residing at Galesburg served as constable.
     The early years in the life of George Freeman Conley were spent on the old farm, in the work of which he assisted while pursuing his studies in the common schools of Wataga. On the 10th of June, 1870, at the age of seventeen years, he began work as a section hand on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He had higher aspirations, however, and on October 13, 1872, began braking on a freight train. In the discharge of his services he was both efficient and satisfactory and on the 20th of June, 1876, he was promoted to the position of conductor. He continued in this capacity for twenty years, at the expiration of which period he was given a passenger train. He is now and has been for some time on the Peoria and Galesburg division of the road. In years of continuous service he is one of the oldest men in the employ of the company, having been with them for over forty-one years.
On the 20th of March, 1875, Mr. Conley was married to Miss Mary Matthews, a native of Scott county, Iowa, who passed away on February 25, 1885. One daughter was born unto them, Grace W., who is at home with her father. On October 19, 1889, Mr. Conley married Mrs. H. IT. McSkinnens, whose death occurred on June 12, 1908.
     Mr. Conley has ever been loyal to the principles of the republican party and for fourteen years has been alderman from the fourth ward. That he has discharged his duties in a highly satisfactory manner is evidenced by the length of his period of service. Fraternally he is a Mason, belonging to the Blue Lodge, council and commandery, and he is also a member of the Fraternal Reserve, Court of Honor, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and the Elks Club. He is a member of the legislative committee for the state of Illinois, of the Order of Railway Conductors and has held all of the chairs. Mr. Conley possesses a high sense of honor, and always discharges any duty assigned him with a conscientious appreciation of his responsibility.
S. A. WAGONER.
    Persistence of purpose and unfaltering energy have been strong forces in winning success for S. A. Wagoner and thorough training in his especial line has also constituted a feature in the establishment of his present prosperous business which is conducted under the name of the Wagoner Printing Company at Galesburg. The business was established in 1897, and since that time Mr. Wagoner has been active in its control and management. He is one of Wisconsin's native sons, his birth having occurred near Viroqiui, March 25, 1863, his parents being Alexander and Hannah (Bahr) Wagoner. The father was born near Watertown, Jefferson county, New York, and when a young man came to Wisconsin. He was a farmer by occupation and at one time engaged in the conduct of a meat market in Laporte City, Iowa. He afterwards spent six years as a minister in connection with the Evangelical Association and then returning to commercial life became manager for a lumber company in Duluth, Minnesota, and now resides at Tower, Minnesota.
     It was in 1861 that he married Hannah Bahr, who was born near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and they became parents of two children, Simon Alvey and William E., both residents of Galesburg. The father is a republican in his political views and in his fraternal relations is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Simon A. Wagoner was educated in the public schools in his native state and also in the high school at Red Oak, Iowa. He was only fourteen years of age when he began learning the printing business at Anita, Iowa, where he remained for two years. He then returned to Laporte City, Iowa, where he followed his trade for nine years, and during his residence in that place established the Laporte City Review in connection with a partner with whom he remained for nine years. While there he made the acquaintance of A. D. Thurston, night telegraph operator, and they formed a partnership for the publication of the monthly paper called the Railroad Telegrapher. These two men called a meeting of the telegraph operators of the United States at Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in July, 1886, and one hundred delegates from a number of different states assembled in convention there and established the Order of Railroad Telegraphers, Mr. Thurston becoming the first grand chief telegrapher of the order. Mr. Wagoner remained the editor and manager of the paper which was printed at Laporte City, Iowa, until 1888, when he removed to Vinton, Iowa, where he remained for three years and in November, 1891, he came to Galesburg as superintendent of the printing plant of the Brotherhood of Railroad Trainmen, of which he was in charge until it was removed from Galesburg five years later. At the same time he conducted a small fruit farm near the city, and in 1897 he established his present business in which he was joined by W. E. Wagoner and G. H. Mehler. They began business in a small way on the third floor of the Bank of Galesburg building on Main street where they continued until 1901 when they consolidated their interests with the job-printing department of the Evening Mail, called the Mail Printing Company. The business was incorporated for thirteen thousand dollars with S. A. Wagoner, as president, F. H. Sisson, vice president, E. S. Tobey, secretary and C. H. May, treasurer. They removed to the Mail building on Cherry street, and there continued until 1909 when the business was reincorporated under the style of the Wagoner Printing Company and capitalized for twenty thousand dollars, with S. A. Wagoner as president and manager, H. W. Lass, vice president and E. S. Tobey secretary and treasurer. They employ thirty-five people and conduct a general printing business, a complete system of direct-connected individual motors to all machines forming a part of the equipment of the plant. The business has steadily grown until it amounts to seventy-five thousand dollars annually, two thirds of which comes from outside the city. They make a specialty of college and fraternity printing and keep in touch with the most modern and advanced styles of the printing art.
     On the 25th of November, 1885, Mr. Wagoner was married to Miss Emma R. Fischer, a daughter of Henry Erhardt and Catherine (Freiberger) Fischer, of Laporte City, Iowa. Her parents were natives of Darmstadt, Germany,and came to the United States in the '50s, settling in Ondaga county. New York, where the father followed the occupation of farming and also as a representative of the ministry of the Evangelical Association engaged in preaching in Utica and in Troy, New York. He died in Manlius, New York, in 1868, after which his widow came to the west, settling in Cedar Falls, Iowa, while later she became a resident of Laporte City, Iowa, where she married the Rev. George Eckhard. He died November 28, 1910. Mrs. Eckhard still survives and now makes her home in Cedar Falls. Her daughter, Mrs. Wagoner, was born in Utica, Ondaga county, New York, March 28, 1865, and by her marriage has become the mother of two daughters but the younger, Helen R., who was born in Galesburg, died when but eighteen months old. The elder daughter, Nora M., was born in Laporte City, Iowa.
      Both Mr. and • Mrs. Wagoner are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they take active and helpful part. Mr. Wagoner is now serving on the board of stewards, is secretary of the building committee, is one of the trustees of the church and is teacher of the men's bible class in the Sunday school. He is greatly interested in Sunday-school work and is serving on the executive committee and finance committee of the Knox County Sunday School Association. He is also an exemplary member of Vesper Lodge, No. 584, F. & A. M.; Camp No. 667, M. W. A. He is also a member of the Galesburg Club and is president of the Retail Merchants' Association. He has made an excellent record in business, wisely used his time and opportunities, and as the years go by, has steadily progressed, winning success along the legitimate business lines. He has ever recognized the fact that satisfied customers are the best advertisement, and the excellent work which he has done has been the chief factor in his enviable and well merited success.
FRANK SEARS BARTLETT.
Frank Sears Bartlett, a representative of an old and prominent family of Knox county, is successfully engaged in business as a member of the real-estate and insurance firm of Bartlett & Robbins and is likewise the secretary of the Mutual Loan & Building Association of Galesburg. His birth occurred in this county, on the 4th of December, 1855, his parents being Erasmus Almon and Helen J. (Sears) Bartlett, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The paternal grandfather, John D. Bartlett, was born in Vermont and when four years of age was taken by his parents to Genesee county, New York, where he grew to manhood and conducted a hotel in Alexander. In 1842 he visited Illinois on horseback and two years later brought his family here, purchasing land in Rio township. He passed away at the age of seventy-eight years, while his wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Pryor, was about eighty-two years when called to her final rest. Their children were five in number, namely: Livona, who gave her hand in marriage to E. C. Field ; Loamma M.; Erasmus A.; Sarah, who became the wife of E. R. Rhoades; and John D., Jr. William Sears, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of Cortland county, New York. He and his wife, Mrs. Caroline (Vaile) Sears, became pioneer settlers of Knox county, Illinois, locating at Henderson, where Mr. Sears conducted a hotel, a flouring mill and a sawmill and also engaged in farming. In 1869 he removed to Iowa, settling in Harrison county, where his demise occurred when he was past eighty years of age. His wife was also past that age when called to her final rest. They had thirteen children, including the following named: Helen J.; Frank W.; Crandall; Lottie, who married a Mr. Baird; Charles; and LeGrand.
Erasmus A. Bartlett, the father of Frank S. Bartlett, followed general agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career. In 1844 he was brought to Knox county, Illinois, by his parents, the family home being established in Rio township, where he grew to manhood and began farming. At the time of his demise he owned one hundred and thirty acres of rich and productive land in Rio township. He died in 1908, when seventy-eight years of age, passing away in the faith of the Universalist church. The period of his residence in this county covered more than six decades and he was well known and highly esteemed within its borders. He served as a school director and held various township offices. His first wife, the mother of our subject, passed away in 1869 at the comparatively early age of thirty-six. She was the mother of eight children, of whom Frank Sears is the only one now living. For his second- wife Erasmus A. Bartlett chose Mrs. Elizabeth A. Edwards, by whom he had two children: Charles E., of Rio township; and Sarah A., who died at the age of thirty-two years.
     Frank S. Bartlett remained on his father's farm until eighteen years of age, first attending the district schools and later continuing his education in Knox College. After putting aside his text-books he began clerking in the storehouse of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. He remained in the service of that corporation for eighteen years and three months and was steadily promoted as he demonstrated his capability and trustworthiness, holding the position of division storekeeper when he resigned. Subsequently he embarked in the real-estate and insurance business, which has claimed his time and energies continuously since. In 1906 he admitted William A. Robbins to a partnership in the business, which has since been conducted under the firm style of Bartlett & Robbins. Their efforts have been attended with gratifying success and their clientage is of a most extensive and important character.
     On the 10th of January, 1877, Mr- Bartlett was united in marriage to Miss Sarah A. Fleharty, a native of Rio township, Knox county, Illinois, and a daughter of William L. and Elizabeth (Terrell) Fleharty, who became pioneer settlers of this county, taking up their abode in Rio township. The father served as a soldier of the Civil war. Mr. and Mrs. Fleharty passed away at Galesburg in middle life. They had six children, namely: Stephen T., Sarah A., William H., Elizabeth, Belle M. and Vinnie May.
     William and Amelia (Kirkpatrick) Fleharty, the paternal grandparents of Mrs. Bartlett, were early settlers of Knox county and passed away here, the former when about eighty-four years of age and the latter when about fifty years old. Unto them were born five children: Jesse J.: William L.; John and Henry, twins; and Stephen F. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Bartlett were also born five children, as follows: Alice Helen, living in Aurora, Illinois, who is the wife of M. T. Brnner, by whom she has two daughters, Lois and Helen; John D., a physician and surgeon by profession, who wedded Miss Ethel Booker and has one son,
John D.; William A., who married Miss Maude Shussler and is engaged in the real-estate business at Galesburg; Walter L., who died when a youth of thirteen years; and Winfield Franklin, who is attending school.
     In politics Mr. Bartlett is a republican and his fellow townsmen, recognizing his worth and ability, have called him to several positions of public trust. He served as a member of the board of education for twelve years, was alderman of the fourth ward for one term and acted as a member of the board of supervisors for two terms. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Vesper Lodge, F. & A. M.; Galesburg Chapter, No. 46, R. A. M.; and Galesburg Commandery, No. 8, K. T. He serves as trustee and treasurer of the Universalist church, to which his wife also belongs. They have spent their entire lives in Knox county and enjoy an extensive and favorable acquaintance within its borders.
GEORGE CHURCHILL.
An enumeration of the residents of Galesburg who have won honor and distinction and at the same time whose records have been an honor to the city, would be incomplete and unsatisfactory were there failure to make prominent reference to George Churchill. His work in behalf of public education would alone entitle him to distinction and yet in other relations of life his labors were equally commendable and were crowned with far-reaching and beneficial effects. Progress and patriotism might well be termed the keynote of his character, prompting his active cooperation in every movement for the public good and his loyal support of the salient features of good citizenship.
     Dr. Churchill was born in Herkimer county, New York, April 2, 1829, a son of Norman and Ann (Eggleston) Churchill. The father first visited Illinois early in the fall of 1836, at which time he purchased ten acres of land on West Main street in Galesburg which is still known as the Churchill home. To this he removed in 1839 and remained thereafter an active and honored resident of this city where he passed away on the 20th of September, 1886, at the age of eighty-seven years. He was born in Hubbardton, Vermont, November 5, 1799, the son of the Rev. Jesse Churchill. •
      George Churchill was a lad of only ten years when the family home was established in Galesburg and from that time until his death he was an interested witness of the changes which here occurred and the growth that wrought the present prosperity of the city. He entered Knox College as a student in the preparatory department in the first year of its history and when other preparations had qualified him for advanced study, he entered the college class and was graduated in 1851. He then crossed the threshold of the business world, spending a year as civil engineer in connection with the construction of the Central Military Tract Railroad, which later became a part of the main line of the Burlington. However, his interest in the cause of education had been aroused and he was giving much time and thought to the study of the public-school system. He recognized the fact that the schools in Galesburg and vicinity were inadequate to the needs of a community that was growing rapidly and he desired to supplant that system by an improved one. This desire took him to Europe in order that he might make a most thorough inspection of the schools of Prussia. He carried with him letters from the United States secretary of state which enabled him to gain an accurate knowledge of the system of instruction of the country which he visited. He gained many valuable ideas which his practical ability enabled him to adapt to the needs of the Galesburg schools and upon returning to this city he at once undertook the task of arousing public sentiment in favor of an improved school system. He not only gave generously of his time and energies but his work also made large inroads upon the small salary that he received as a teacher. He did not hesitate, however, in the accomplishment of his purpose and called to his assistance the Hon. Henry Barnard, of Connecticut, who afterward received the first appointment as commissioner of education for the United States. His determined perseverance finally resulted in procuring a special charter by which the former district schools were consolidated and the foundation of the present system was laid. The board of education has shown a just appreciation of Dr. Churchill's services by naming one of the grammar schools in his honor and by adopting, on the 14th of January, 1896, special resolutions commending him for his work. He may well be termed the father of the public-school system of Galesburg, for it received its impetus toward improvement from his untiring labors and practical, far-reaching methods. For thirteen years he was a member of the board of education and labored untiringly to arouse the standard of the schools.
    This by no means comprised the extent of Dr. Churchiirs public service or indicates the limit of his usefulness. For twenty-two years he served as city engineer and in other public offices labored for the welfare and up-building of the city. For two terms he was alderman, for eight years was a member of the board of park commissioners and for twenty-three years or until the time of his death held a position on the library board. For forty-four years he was one of the professors of Knox College, and that institution, ever regarded as one of the strong and stable educational forces of the state, owes to him a debt of gratitude which can never be paid. Far beyond any pecuniary recompense that could be made him were his labors in behalf of the college. He never lowered the high standard which he set up but sought ever to work toward it and his own enthusiasm and zeal constituted an inspiration to fellow teachers and pupils. Of him it was written: "He was born to be useful; he was born to be good; he was born especially as an educator of the youth." While he always strove to attain high ideals his methods were ever practical and he proved his worth and force in business circles as well as along professional lines. He became one of the directors and the just president of the Mechanics Homestead & Loan Association, occupying this position from its organization in 1882. Its assets and disbursements in 1899 amounted to two and a half million dollars.
Dr. Churchill was married three times. He first wedded Clara A. Hurd and to them was born a son, Milton E., who is now professor of Pomona College at Claremont, California. His second wife was Ada H. Hayes and they had one daughter and two sons: Mary H., now deceased; Charles E., an attorney of Montclair, New Jersey; and George B., of Galesburg. For his third wife Dr. Churchill chose Ellen Sanborn Watkins, who died five years ago, and they had one son, William David. By a former marriage Mrs. Churchill also had a daughter, Mrs. Nellie Sanborn (Watkins) Wetherbee. It was in 1851 that Mrs. Churchill came with her parents from Bronfield, Illinois, to Knox county. Previously they had been residents of Vermont. Her father, David Sanborn, after coming to Galesburg, was engaged in the dry-goods business and later became president of the Second National Bank. He was also prominently connected with public affairs, at one time serving as postmaster of Galesburg, and was active in the establishment of the Burlington railroad. He married Sophie A. Ramsey and continued his residence in Galesburg until his death, which occurred April 9, 1883. Their daughter, Mrs. Churchill, was first married to Albert T. Watkins, who removed from New York to Illinois when twenty years of age and died at the age of thirty years. He was engaged in the grocery business in Galesburg and also owned and operated one of the first presses for baling hay, selling his product to the army during the Civil war. He afterward aided in organizing the Second National Bank and was a very prominent and influential business man and citizen here, but death terminated his career at an early age.
    The death of Dr. Churchill occurred in September, 1899. As a man and citizen he was very popular, readily winning the friendship of those with whom he came in contact while his sterling traits of manhood enabled him to retain their high regard. Added to his keen intelligence and strong manhood was a most amiable and cordial disposition. He was reported as a man of strong character and marked individuality and it was known that his position was never an equivocal one. He was always a friend to the poor and gave generously of his means where assistance was needed. At the age of sixteen years he became a member of the First Congregational church and later placed his membership with its successor, the Central Congregational church. He was a member of the building committee of the new church. From the time that he identified himself with a religious organization he took an active part in church work, serving for fourteen years as deacon, for twenty-five years as superintendent of the Sunday school and for more than a half century as leader of the choir. One of the local papers said: "There is scarcely a department inaugurated for the improvement of the city or for the betterment of the conditions of its people without a trace of his handiwork. He has been part and parcel of the city of Galesburg and of Knox College almost from their inception and his life record is inseparably interwoven with their history." A review of his life indicates that he was ever faultless in honor, fearless in conduct and stainless in reputation.
WILLIAM ALLEN ROBBINS.
William Allen Robbins, who has maintained his residence in Knox county for forty-five consecutive years, is one of the prominent and esteemed citizens of Galesburg and since 1906 has been engaged in the real-estate and insurance business as a member of the firm of Bartlett & Robbins. His birth occurred in the old town of Oxford, Henry county, Illinois, on the 10th of April, 1851, his parents being Edward S. and Temperance (Allen) Robbins, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The paternal grandfather, Levi Robbins, was a native of Massachusetts. Both he and his wife, Mrs. Dinah (Good-enough) Robbins, passed away in Copenhagen, Lewis county, New York. He was an agriculturist by occupation and enjoyed an enviable reputation as a prominent, popular and highly esteemed citizen of his community. At the time of his demise he was one hundred years and five months old. His first wife, the grandmother of our subject, was more than seventy years of age when called to her final rest. Their children were as follows: Austin, Edward, Levi, Orrin and Chloe. The maternal great-grandfather of our subject was Ebenezer A. Denison, son of Daniel, and was born on the 26th of January, 1760. In 1784 he wedded Mrs. Elizabeth (Spencer) Jones, with whom he resided in Berne, Albany county, New York. The founder of the Denison family in the United States was William Denison, who came to America in 1631, settling at Rox-bury, Massachusetts. The maternal grandparents of William A. Robbins were William and Catharine (Denison) Allen, the former born at Groton, Connecticut, on the 31st of October, 1782, and the latter in 1786. Both died in Lewis county, New York, William Allen passing away in the '70s and his wife at the age of eighty-seven years. Unto them were born eleven children who lived to maturity and had families; Avery, Eliza, Temperance, Ebenezer, Ephraim. Elizabeth, Ira, Hannah, Orpha, Paulina and Lydia.
     Edward S. Robbins, the father of Mr. Robbins of this review, was reared on a farm in Lewis county, New York, and in 1836 located among the earliest settlers of Knox county, taking up government land near Log City, where he began farming. Subsequently he spent a number of years in Sparta township and later removed to a farm in Henry county. Disposing of the property, he took up his abode in Galesburg, on the 8th of March, 1866, and here passed away at the age of seventy-eight years. The death of his wife occurred when she was eighty-two years old. They were originally Baptists in religious faith but at the time of their demise and for many years prior were identified with the Second Adventists. Edward S. Robbins successfully practiced medicine for a number of years. Unto him and his wife were born five children, as follows: Edward C. D., who died while serving as a captain in the Civil war and was buried in the Vicksburg National Cemetery; Mildred E., who first wedded Albert T. Boyd and is now the wife of George H. Hotaling, of Grant City, Missouri; Orpha C, who is the widow of Joseph Pine and resides in Galesburg; William A., of this review; and Levi, who died in infancy.
     William Allen Robbins, whose name introduces this review, remained on his father's farm in Henry county until fifteen years of age and then came to Knox county, within the borders of which he has since resided. He began his education in the country schools and later spent two years in the public schools of Galesburg. When a youth of seventeen years he put aside his textbooks and entered the grocery store of Dunn & Kingsbury, serving as a clerk for three years. He then spent about a year, in 1871, with the Frost Manufacturing Company and next became an employe of George D. Crocker, whom he served in the capacity of clerk for about seven years. On the expiration of that period he became a partner of his employer and the relation was maintained with mutual pleasure and profit for twenty-six years. In 1893-4 Messrs. Crocker and Robbins erected the Arlington Hotel. Mr. Robbins was the pioneer in the pure-food movement in this section. In 1906, one year after severing his business connection with Mr. Crocker, he became a partner of Mr. Bartlett in the real-estate and insurance business and has since enjoyed a gratifying clientage as a member of the firm of Bartlett & Robbins. He owns farm lands in Cass and Steele counties, North Dakota, and has followed general agricultural pursuits there for six years, maintaining his residence, however, in Galesburg.
     On the 13th of October, 1874, Mr. Robbins was united in marriage to Miss Nettie E. Carr, a daughter of Dr. M. S. and Susan M. (Espy) Carr. They had two children, namely: Elizabeth, who gave her hand in marriage to E. L. Tilden and resides in Buffalo, New York; and Elmer A., who died at the age of ten years.
     In politics Mr. Robbins is a stanch republican, loyally supporting the men and measures of that party. He was a deacon of the First Baptist church for twenty-seven years and acted as chairman of the board for seventeen years. His wife is likewise a devoted and faithful member of that church. His career has been one of continuous activity, in which has been accorded due recognition of labor and today he is numbered among the substantial and representative citizens of his county.
CHARLES A. MALCOLM.
Charles A. Malcolm, an agriculturist now residing in Ontario township, was born on the 226. of April, 1866, in Safsjo, in the central part of Sweden, his parents being John and Johanna (Charlotta) Malcolm, both of whom are natives of Sweden, the former having been born there on the 29th of January, 1837. In his native land John Malcolm was engaged in farming until he set out. for America, in 1868, with his family, locating first near Andover, Henry county, Illinois. The trip across the country from Genoa to Andover was made with teams in a heavy hail and rain storm, this being but one of the many hardships which the travelers in those early days encountered. Because of his lack of experience Mr. Malcolm was forced at first to accept inferior employment, his first work being plowing corn at fifty cents per day. But earnest and persistent labor always leads to better fortunes and Mr. Malcolm was soon ready to undertake the cultivation of a small tract of land and later purchased a small piece of property for himself. After fourteen years he added twenty acres and subsequently purchased forty acres of timber land, which he cleared and started to farm. Disposing of the various holdings, he bought one hundred and sixty acres of valuable land, upon which he resided for twenty-seven years before removing to his present farm. At one time he held three hundred and twenty acres of land in the county and eighty acres in Henry county, but he is now living retired, having sold all of his property to his children. His home is now called Malcolm-ville and the other farm which he at one time owned was called Malcolm Dandy. Mrs. Malcolm passed away on the 23d of February, 1909, in Knox county, at the age of seventy-two years.
    Charles A. Malcolm received his education in the common schools and spent much of his youth in assisting his father on the home farm, here having his first experience in the occupation he was to make his life work. Desiring to start out independently, he farmed for six years in Henry county and then for seven years just south of his present location. In January, 1909, he removed to his present farm and has since been engaged in general farming and raising hogs. His property is known as "Fairview farm."
     On the 25th of December, 1895, Mr. Malcolm was married to Miss Delphia C. Walgreen, a daughter of John P. and Anna (Fredericks) Walgreen, who have been connected with the agricultural interests of Knox county for many years. At present Mr. Walgreen is residing in Altona, where he is living retired. He is one of the oldest settlers of the county, having come here over fifty years ago. To Mr. and Mrs. Malcolm seven children have been born, Violet E. J., Germaine I. W., Weslye W., Ludella V. G., Curtis C, Myrna A. C, and Pauline 1. M.
     In politics Mr. Malcolm gives his support to the republican party, taking an active interest in all the measures proposed for political welfare. He also holds membership in the Swedish Lutheran church and is interested in the incorporated bank of Galva and in the elevators at Oneida and Nekoma. In connection with the development of his property he has exercised good judgment and under his management it is yielding profitable crops in return for the labor expended upon it, and as a citizen he is highly estemed in the community where he has always resided.
WILLIAM LORENZO BELDEN.
William Lorenzo Belden is a retired farmer of Galesburg, who for many years was associated with general agricultural pursuits in Orange township and also engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery. The success which crowned his labors enables him at the present time to enjoy the comforts of life without further recourse to business activity. He was born at Cayuga Lake, New York, in 1836, a son of Alonzo and I-Iannah (Swartz) Belden, who were also natives of the Empire state. They removed to Ohio when their son William was a lad of seven years and in 1850 came to Knox county, Illinois. The father was a plasterer by trade and spent his last years in this county, while his wife died in Nebraska, where she had gone after the death of her husband. In their family were seven children, of whom William L. and a brother, George C, are the only ones now living. Two of the brothers served as soldiers in the Union army during the Civil war, George C. and Charles, who was killed by the notorious Rand at Gilson.
     After spending the first seven years of his life in the state of New York, William L. Belden accompanied his parents to Ohio and for about seven years was a resident of Marion county, that state. Lie came to Knox county, Illinois, when a lad of fourteen years and for more than six decades has resided within its borders, witnessing the many changes which have occurred as the work of development and improvement has been carried forward. Settling in Orange township, near Knoxville, he began farming and from a timber tract developed a richly improved farm of eighty-eight and three-fourths acres. He made all of the improvements upon the place, set out an orchard, erected substantial buildings and built good fences. Year after year the work was carried steadily forward and, as the result of early spring plowing and planting, good crops were gathered in the autumn. The methods which he pursued in the development of his land were both practical and progressive and his crops found a ready sale on the market. He continued to make his home upon his farm until 1911, when he left the care of the property to others and took up his abode in Galesburg, where he is now living. He still owns the old home place and while residing thereon he engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery.
    In 1865 Mr. Belden was united in marriage to Miss Emily Hawley, who was born in Orange township, this county, and is a daughter of Henry and Sarah (Westerfield) Hawley. Her father came to Illinois from New York and established his home in Orange township, where he carried on farming throughout his remaining days. To him and his wife were born eight children, of whom two sons and two daughters yet survive, all being residents of Knox county. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Belden are: Henry A., who follows farming in Kansas; Nellie, the wife of Charles Miller, of Iowa; Loretta, the wife of Milo Brown, also of Kansas  Mrs. Mattie Bowhay, who likewise makes her home in the Sunflower state; and Zenana, yet at home.
      On attaining his majority William L. Belden proudly cast his first vote for republican candidates and has since stanchly supported the party. He has served as road commissioner and in other local offices but has not sought or desired political preferment. From the age of fourteen years he has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and has guided his life by its teachings, ever endeavoring to follow the Golden Rule. Undoubtedly he has made mistakes—as who has not—but they have been of judgment rather than of intention, for at all times he has sought to do to others as he would have them do unto him. He has now reached the advanced age of seventy-five years and during sixty-one years of this time has been a resident of Knox county, so that he has witnessed much of its progress and improvement, aiding at different times in work that has contributed to its growth and development. He has personal knowledge of many things which are to others matters of history and his memory recalls many interesting events of the early days.
LOREN STEVENS.
Loren Stevens had for seven years occupied the responsible position of cashier in the First National Bank when he retired to private life to enjoy the fruits of his labor. He now gives his supervision only to his investments which include loans and real-estate interests. He was born in Chittenden county, Vermont, May 25, 1845, tne younger of the two sons of Cassius P. and Clamentia (Smith) Stevens, both of whom were natives of Vermont. He comes of ancestry represented in the Revolutionary war, his great-grandfather having been Abram Stevens, who was born in Killings worth, Connecticut, and at the age of sixteen years joined the Continental army under the valorous leader of the Vermont troops, General Seth Warner. He afterward became colonel under Montgomery and for many years lived to enjoy the fruits of liberty, his death occurring in 1830. He was a native of England and had come to the new world with two brothers. His son, Alonzo Stevens, was born in Vermont and served his country as a soldier in the war of 1812, while later he became colonel in the state militia. He devoted his life to farming and died at the age of seventy years, having long survived his wife. They were the parents of two sons and six daughters, Cassius P., Alonzo J., Lucia, Mary, Almira, Louisa, Cornelia and Rosamond. The maternal grandfather of Loren Stevens was Thomas Smith, who was born on November 10, 1765. He spent his entire life in the Green Mountain state, devoting his time and energies to farming. His death occurred May 17, 1837, and his wife, Mrs. Mollie Smith, who was born July 24, 1768, died on the 13th of January, 1834. Their family numbered ten sons and a daughter, Repline, Hiram, Philemon, Loren, Orrin, Roswell, Sidney, Ceylon, Loyal, Loudon and Clamentia.
    Like others of the family Cassius P. Stevens devoted his life to farm work, owning and cultivating a tract of land in Chittenden county, Vermont, where his worth as a business man and citizen was widely acknowledged. Both he and his wife were consistent and faithful members of the Methodist church, closely following its teachings. His death occurred in 1892, when he was seventy-seven years of age and his wife passed away in 1876 when sixty-one years of age. Their eldest son, Byron A., died in 1895, leaving Loren Stevens the only surviving member of the family.
     During the first twenty years of his life Loren Stevens remained a resident of Vermont, residing on his father's farm until seventeen years of age. During that period he attended the district school and for a short time pursued an academical course. After leaving home he engaged in driving a team for one summer and during the following fall entered the employ of the Central Vermont Railroad Company but gave up that position to attend business college when eighteen years of age, recognizing how necessary is educational training for success in life. After completing his course he was offered and accepted the position of teacher in the same institution, there remaining for a year and a half, but thinking that the west offered better and broader opportunities he made his way to Ohio, where he spent the fall and winter of 1865. In the spring of 1866 he came to Galesburg, where he has now lived for more than forty-five years. Here he entered the office of the Brown Cornplanter Works with which he was connected for a year and later spent two years in the office of Benjamin Lombard, Jr., as bookkeeper. The head man of the Brown Works died in the meantime and Mr. Stevens was then offered the vacant position, remaining there as secretary of the company for seventeen years, or until 1886. He then turned his attention to buying and selling real estate and making loans and that business together with traveling occupied his time for ten years. He next entered the First National Bank as cashier, continuing in the position for seven years, when he retired from active business save that he still makes loans, his keen discrimination and sound judgment largely preventing the possibility of loss in that direction. He also owns a large orange orchard at Riverside, California.
     Mr. Stevens was married, May 25, 1870, on his twenty-fifth birthday and exactly four years after his arrival in Galesburg, to Miss Lizzie C. Simmons, who died on the 26th of March, 1911, when nearly sixty-three years of age. She was a member of the Universalist church. Mr. Stevens has traveled quite extensively, visiting every state in the Union, as well as the West Indies, old Mexico and the Hawaiian islands, besides various parts of Canada from Vancouver to Quebec. He was a charter member of the Galesburg Club and is also a member of the Country Club. His political allegiance has ever been given to the republican party and for two years he served as mayor of the city, having been elected in the spring of 1889. He has ever been recognized as a public-spirited citizen whose aid and cooperation can be counted upon to further progressive public measures. A review of his life indicates that he has made wise use of his time and opportunities, has utilized the chances for careful and remunerative investment and now as a result of his labors, intelligently directed, he stands among the prosperous residents of his adopted city.
OLEY C. NELSON.
Oley C. Nelson, who owns a farm adjacent to Knoxville that he is now operating, has been a resident of this county for fifty-nine years. He was born in Sweden, on the 14th of November, 1836, and is a son of Carl and Hannah (Ingamonson) Nelson, for some years numbered among the farming people of this county. Carl Nelson, who was born in 1813, engaged in agricultural pursuits in his native land until 1852, when he disposed of his interests there and together with his wife and family took passage for the United States. They landed in New York city seven weeks later and came from there directly to Knox county, which was their destination. Here the father subsequently bought some land, to the further cultivation and improvement of which he devoted his attention until his death in September, 1854, at the age of forty-two years. The mother survived until 1885. Their family consisted of three sons and one daughter, of whom our subject is the eldest, the others being as follows: Swan, who is deceased; John, who is living in Knoxville; and Sarah, the widow of Ola Peterson, who was living in Essex, Iowa. Oley C. Nelson was a youth of sixteen years when he emigrated to the United States with his parents and acquired his education in the schools of his native land, the course there pursued being later supplemented by one term's study in the district schools of Knox county in the winter of 1855, for the benefit of his English. Long before leaving Sweden he had begun to assist his father in the fields, his energies ever since having been devoted to agricultural pursuits with the exception of ten years, when he prospected in Colorado. At the expiration of that period he returned to Knox county and again engaged in farming, locating on the place where he now resides. Mr. Nelson has met with a fair degree of success in his undertakings, being an industrious and enterprising man of practical ideas and thrifty habits.
Knoxville was the scene of Mr. Nelson's marriage, on the 6th of October, 1867, to Miss Hannah Erickson, who was born in the southern part of Sweden, on February 3, 1851. She is a daughter of Ola and Ellen (Johnson) Erickson, who emigrated to the United States in 1852, locating on a farm a mile and a half from Knoxville, where they passed the remainder of their lives, the father passing away in 1904, at the age of ninety-two years and the mother in 1908, eighty-three years of age. By a former marriage Mrs. Erickson had one son, John Nelson, who now lives in Knox county, and Mr. and Mrs. Erickson had in their family beside Mrs. Nelson, their eldest daughter, the following in order of birth: Emma, the deceased wife of Michael E. Schuck, of Pennsylvania; Erick, who is living in Kansas; Joseph, who passed away in that state; Jacob, who is also a resident of Kansas; Olaf, who lives in Knoxville; Emanuel, living in Kansas and one who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Nelson have become the parents of eight children, three of whom are now deceased. August, who is living in Knoxville, married Mary Anderson and they have four children: Naomi,      Howard, Sterling and Lorenz. Rosie, who is the only living daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, is the wife of William Carlson of Knoxville and the mother of two sons, Laverne and Francis. Albert, who is a resident of Wataga, chose for his wife Mattie E. Foster and they have two children, Alberta and Oliver, and eight grandchildren. Oscar and Joseph, the two youngest members of the family, are living at home with their parents.
     The family are all members of the Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church, and number among its congregation many friends. Mr. Nelson, who is now seventy-five years of age, is one of the highly esteemed citizens that Sweden has contributed to Knox county, where his energy and application has numbered him among the successful agriculturists.
HENRY EMRICH.
Henry Emrich, president of the Plaindealer Printing Company, was born January 26, 1844, in a little village in Hesse-Darmstadt, five miles from Bingen-on-the-Rhine, Germany. His mother died in 1850 and two years later Mr. Emrich, with his father and brother, came to the United States, living in New York city until 1856, when with his father he came to Galesburg. In December, 1858, he entered the Free Democrat printing office as an apprentice and in 1862, when just eighteen years of age, he enlisted in Company H of the Thirteenth Illinois Cavalry, participating with his regiment, or on special duty, in nearly every campaign in southeastern Missouri, northeastern Arkansas, the capture of Little Rock and the operations in and around central and southeastern Arkansas. After the capture of Little Rock in September, 1863, and some special duty as orderly at the headquarters of Major General Eugene A. Carr, Mr. Emrich was permanently attached as orderly at the headquarters of the First Brigade, First Division, Seventh Army Corps, General Samuel A. Rice commanding, and in that capacity took part in what is known as "the Camden trip," during which General Rice was twice wounded, the second wound proving fatal, while Captain Townsend, one of General Rice's aids, was killed and another aid's horse and Adjutant John F. Lacey's horse were wounded. Mr. Emrich's horse was struck twice in the same moment by canister shot on April 2d and his eyes injured by an exploding shell on the 10th of April, 1864. The death of General Rice dissolved the "headquarters family," Major Lacey being attached to the headquarters of Major General Fred Steele, commanding the Seventh Army Corps, and a few days later Mr. Emrich was attached to the same headquarters for special duty, thus serving to the end of his enlistment.
Being mustered out of the service in 1865, Mr. Emrich returned home and resumed the
printer's trade in the office of the Quincy Herald, but a few months later returned to Galesburg and took a position in the office of the Free Democrat, in which he had learned his trade some years before.
In 1867 Mr. Emrich was married to Miss Caroline Rulf and to them five children were born. In 1870, in connection with Joe Prior, Mr. Emrich began the publication of the Galesburg Republican and in 1872 he went to Quincy, where he again entered the Herald office, remaining there until December, 1879, when he returned to Galesburg and purchased an interest in the Plain-dealer, which paper is mentioned elsewhere in this volume.
     In politics Mr. Emrich has always been a republican, taking an active part personally and editorially in every campaign during the past thirty-three years. He and the Plaindealer presented General P. S. Post to the republicans of the then tenth congressional district as a candidate for congress in 1886, the General being elected and remaining in congress until his death in 1893, when Mr. Emrich and the Plaindealer presented the Hon. George W. Prince as his successor and he has represented the district ever since. In city affairs Mr. Emrich has also taken an active part, always striving -for good municipal government and the advancement of the material prosperity of the city. He is a member of the Central Congregational church, taking an active interest in the conduct and work of that institution. As a citizen and business man he stands well in the community and his personal friends are many. He is a member of the Galesburg Club and of Post No. 45, G. A. R., having been commander of that post and junior vice commander of the Department of Illinois and a frequent delegate to the national encampments.
JOHN C. FAHNESTOCK.
John C. Fahnestock is well known in the business circles of Galesburg, having handled land and immigration interests for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad and at present conducting a general insurance and real-estate business. He is now in the seventy-fourth year of his age but is yet very active, and such a record should put to shame many a man of much younger years who has grown weary of the struggles of life and wishes to relegate to others the burdens that he should bear. Mr. Fahnestock was born October 20, 1838, in AVarren, Chester county, Pennsylvania, his parents being William and Ann Elizabeth (Ernst) Fahnestock. He traces his ancestry back to Diedrich and Margarette Fahnestock, who emigrated from Prussia in 1726 and settled near Ephrata, Pennsylvania, where representatives of the name have since been found.
     John C. Fahnestock was educated at Blair Hall in his native county and, entering business life, became connected with the sale of books and stationery. He has been a resident of Galesburg since 1865, conducting a book and stationery business for several years, after which he acted as land and immigration agent for the Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad for ten years. His time is now fully occupied by his real-estate and insurance business, and these different lines are well managed by reason of his sound judgment, his earnest purpose and his wise use of opportunities.
     On the 7th of November, 1878, in Galesburg, Mr. Fahnestock was married to Miss Grace D. Carr, a daughter of Clark M. and Fanny L. Carr, of this city. She is the only sister of General Eugene A. Carr, now deceased, Colonel B. O. Carr, Rev. Horace M. Carr, Hon. Clark E. Carr and Captain George P. Carr, whose early death by accident, occurred in 1871. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fahnestock were born two children: Fanny E., who married Alfred Williams and died May 12, 1906; and Grace, the wife of Dr. Thomas F. Birmingham, of Galesburg.
Mr. Fahnestock gives his political allegiance to the republican party and, while never an aspirant for office, has always been loyal to its principles and a supporter of its activities. His social connections are with the Galesburg Club and his religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church. He is well known in this city, where sterling traits of character have placed him in a high position in public regard.
HENRY P. BURGLAND.
In a history of the successful men of Galesburg mention should be made of Henry P. Burgland, who is now living retired. Industry, unfaltering and persistent, has been the basis of hi<. success, enabling him to work his way gradually upward. He was born in Sweden, April 20, 1834, and was reared and educated there, after which he entered business circles as a dealer in live stock and sold meat from a market place, as was the custom at that time. He came to America in 1854, then a young man of twenty years, hoping that he would here find better business opportunities than could be secured in the old world. He did not tarry on the Atlantic coast but made his way at once into the interior of the country with Galesburg as his destination. Afterward he resided for a time in Bishop Hill, Avon and Monmouth but returned to this city where he has since made his home, living here for more than half a century, during which period he has witnessed much of its growth and development and to a considerable extent, in a quiet way, has aided in its progress. Embarking in business here, he opened a meat market which he conducted for many years, carrying always a good line, which in combination with his straightforward and honorable dealing, brought to him constantly growing success. He likewise bought and shipped live stock and both branches of his business proved profitable. He early recognized the fact that energy and determination are the basis of advancement, and by reason of these qualities he has worked his way steadily upward. On account of illness years ago he retired from business for a time and made two trips to Sweden for the benefit of his health, there visiting the friends of his youth and the scenes among which his boyhood days had been passed. For a quarter of a century he has lived retired, enjoying the fruit of his former toil. After ceasing to carry on the meat market, he continued to buy stock for some time but ultimately withdrew from all trade connections.
       December 23, 1856, Henry P. Burgland was united in marriage to Miss Matilda Nelson and they became the parents of six children, of whom three are now living: Jennie B., who is the widow of Charles A. Peterson, who for many years conducted a shoe store; Amanda, at home; and Edward O. The parents are both members of the First Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church and for a long period Mr. Burgland was regarded as one of its leading representatives, serving for many years as a trustee and taking an active and helpful interest in all of the church work. His religious belief has fostered those principles which constitute the basis of honorable manhood and citizenship, and while he has never sought to figure prominently in public affairs, his life, ever straightforward in all its relations, has commended him to the respect and good-will of those with whom he has come in contact. In looking back over his past he can experience no great feeling of regret that he left his native land. He found a welcome on the free soil of America and in her avenues of commerce he found a field for his abilities that the old country might not have afforded.
He was succeeded by the firm of Burgland & Johnson, Edward O. Burgland, who has been associated in the conduct of the business with his cousin, Erick M. Burgland, since 1893, conducting the market. They have one of the oldest markets in the city and do a large business.
     Edward O. Burgland was married September 14, 1899, to Miss Minnie Esther Fredericks, a native of Galesburg township, Knox county, and a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis F. Fredericks, who were natives of Sweden but became early residents of this county and are now living in Calesburg. For some years her father was identified with agricultural interests in this part of the state. In the Fredericks family were but two daughters, the younger, Julia, being the wife of Forrest L. Hallin, a prominent merchant of Kewanee, Illinois. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Edward O. Burgland has been born a son, Frederick Henry. Like his father, Edward O. Burgland has always given his political allegiance to the republican party, supporting its principles continuously since age conferred upon him the right of franchise. He possesses much natural musical talent and his ability in that direction has brought him many pleasant hours. For some years he was connected with the Galesburg Military Band and for the past two years has had charge of and directed the orchestra of the First Swedish Evangelical Lutheran church of this city. He has followed closely in the footsteps of his father in relation to church work as well as in other lines and is serving as one of its trustees. The name of Burgland has ever been an honored one in Galesburg since Henry P. Burgland came from Sweden to try his fortune in the new world.
GEORGE CRAIG.
George Craig, of the firm of Craig & Harris, monument manufacturers, located at 132 East Simmons street, Galesburg, was born in Quincy, Massachusetts, on the 1st of February, 1865. He is a son of Robert and Janet (Smith) Craig, natives of Scotland, the father having been born in Edinburgh, on March 22, 1823, and the mother in Glasgow, on Christmas day, 1834. Robert Craig remained in the country of his birth until he was twenty-four years of age. After completing his education he learned the granite cutter's trade and also served for a time in the English army. In 1847, he took passage for the United States, and upon his arrival located at Quincy, Massachusetts, where about three years later he was married to Miss Smith. He followed his trade there for many years, but subsequently removed to Richmond, Virginia, where he resided for a year or two, when he returned to Quincy, where he passed away at the age of sixty-three years. The mother is still living and continues to make her home in Quincy. In matters of faith they were both conformists in the old country, and always affiliated with the Episcopal church after coming here. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Craig numbered twelve, as follows: John E. and William Wallace, both of whom are deceased; Isabella, the widow of William Jones, of Quincy, Massachusetts; Robert Alexander, who is deceased; James, who is living in Quincy; Janet, who married Henry Wilson, also of Quincy; George, our subject; Angus Grant, living in Buffalo, New York; Charles Henry, of Newark, New Jersey; Walter, who is living in Batavia, New York; Arthur, who is deceased; and Frank D., who is a resident of New York city.
      In the acquirement of his education George Craig attended the public schools of his native city until he had mastered the common branches. He then laid aside his text-books and entered his father's shop for the purpose of learning the stone-mason's trade. When he attained his majority he left the parental home and began working for himself. His first position was in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he followed his trade for a time and then went on the road, selling monuments. He made Philadelphia his headquarters for five years thereafter, when he removed to St. Louis, continuing to sell monuments until the spring of 1891. In June of the latter year he located in Kewanee, Illinois, and went into business. In April of 1893 they first came to Galesburg to do the stone work on the Baptist church, for which they had been awarded the contract. Although they employed twelve men in the work, the building was some time in the course of construction, and during that period they became quite familiar with conditions here and felt convinced that there was a good opening for a business such as they are now conducting. They continued their establishment at their present stand, still continuing to take building contracts. During the eighteen years that have elapsed since then, they have practically withdrawn from contracts of this nature and now give their entire attention to the manufacture of monuments and ornamental stone work. They have a spacious building, which they erected for the purpose, fully equipped with pneumatic tools and all modern inventions and conveniences required in the business. At the present time they have five men in their employ, all first-class, skilled mechanics, and are being favored with a very good patronage. Each piece of work that leaves their factory is passed upon by both Mr. Craig and Mr. Harris, his partner, who give their personal supervision to every detail of the business. They have a high standard to which they rigidly adhere, and no order is ever permitted to leave their shop unless they feel that it reflects credit upon the industry. Thus they have established a reputation for high-class work as well as trustworthiness and reliability, and both as a firm and
individually are accorded the respect of all with whom they have had transactions. Their enterprise has prospered from the first and they are now firmly established with a constantly increasing patronage, and every assurance of success.
     On the 27th of September, 1894, Mr. Craig was united in marriage to Miss Alice Broadbent, a daughter of William and Martha (Prince) Broadbent, of Kewanee, Illinois. Six children have been born unto Mr. and Mrs. Craig, as follows: Robert Sidney and Leonard George, both of whom are deceased; Wilbur and Kenneth, both of whom are at home; Martha, who is deceased; and Alice Janet.
     Both Mr. and Mrs. Craig hold membership in the Episcopal church, and fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. He also belongs to the Galesburg and Country Clubs, and politically he is a republican. In local elections, however, he casts an independent ballot, giving his support to such men and measures as he deems best qualified to protect the interests of the majority. Mr. Craig is a business man of sagacity and foresight, as he has demonstrated during the period of his residence in Galesburg, and in matters of citizenship he is progressive and enterprising, taking an active interest in all matters pertaining to the welfare of the community.
JOHN L. BRADBURG.
     John L. Bradburg, connected with the W. O. Houghton Lumber Company, was born in Sweden, October 20, 1855, and is a son of Lewis H. Bradburg, also a native of that country. The father was engaged in construction work on the railroads and remained a resident of Sweden until 1869, when he bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for the United States. He at once came to Galesburg and began working for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy ¦Railroad Company, after which he entered the employ of Ben Huff. His capability won him advancement to the position of foreman, in which capacity he continued until his death. His wife had died when her son John was ten years old. The father later married a Mrs. Heddendahl, also deceased, and one daughter, now Mrs. Nels Samuelson was born by this marriage. The father died at Galesburg, a victim of a railroad accident, in 1889. After coming to America and taking out naturalization papers Lewis H. Bradburg gave his political support to the republican party and his religious faith was that of the Swedish Lutheran church to which his wife also belonged. They were the parents of but two children, the younger being August Bradburg, now a resident of Soperville, Illinois.
      John L. Bradburg spent the first fourteen years of his life in his native country and during that period pursued his education in the schools of Sweden while later he continued his studies in Galesburg. He afterward worked in the nursery of Hunt & Mason for a time and later was employed by L. L. Gibson for five years. On the expiration of that period he began working in the lumberyard of Sargent & Lewis, with whom he continued for two and a half years, when they sold out and he spent the succeeding year with C. H: Bogue. He was afterward connected with Anthony & Myers for seven years and continued with Mr. Anthony for four years after the dissolution of the firm. Later he entered the employ of Mr. Myers with whom he continued for several years and is now with the W. O. Houghton Lumber Company. He has thus long been connected with the lumber trade in this city and is widely known in business circles.
     On the 5th of April, 1894, occurred the marriage of Mr. Bradburg and Miss Lottie Peterson, a daughter of A. P. and Mathilda Peterson, of Galesburg, who were natives of Sweden and on coming to the new world, in 1857, first settled in the east but several years ago they came to this city. Here the father was employed in the freight house of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad until his death. His wife still survives and is now making her home with Mr. and Mrs. Bradburg. Mr. Peterson was a republican in his political affiliations and he belonged to the Swedish Methodist Episcopal church. Mrs. Bradburg was born in Sweden and was brought to the United States with her parents when but a year and a half old, so that she was reared and educated in this country. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bradburg are loyal in their relations to the English Lutheran church, in which they hold membership, and politically he is well known as a republican although he has never sought nor desired office. Fraternally he belongs to both the subordinate lodge and encampment of Odd Fellows and has passed through all of the chairs.
JOHN BRANDT.
    
John Brandt was born in Sweden, December 8, 1817, and departed this life in Knoxville on the 20th of October, 1899, when almost eighty-two years of age. During his active connection with business affairs he had devoted many years to the painting and decorating business and in trade circles as in other relations of life had commanded the confidence and good-will of his fellowmen. His parents were Swan and Bengta (Swanson) Brandt, who were likewise natives of Sweden, in which country the father passed away. John Brandt was connected with the Royal Swedish army in his native land, serving for thirteen years as an officer in the same. His education had been acquired in the military schools and his wise home training qualified him for the practical and responsible duties which later devolved upon him. In 1853, accompanied by his mother, he came to America, attracted by the broader business opportunities of the new world. They made their way direct to Knoxville, where Mrs. Brandt continued to reside until her death, which occurred in 1872, when she had reached the age of eighty-five years. The family numbered five sons and two daughters, namely: Mrs. Inga Larson, who died in Sweden; Swan, who has also passed away; John, of this review; Hakon and Andres, both now deceased; Xilla A., the wife of John Holcomb, of Altona, this county; and Peter, who came to America and died in Minnesota.
In his native land John Brandt learned the trade of painting and decorating and after coming to Knoxville followed that pursuit, remaining for a time in the employ of others and later engaging in contracting along that line on his own account. His excellent workmanship and honorable dealing won for him a substantial return for his labors, a liberal patronage being accorded him so that he was enabled to provide his family with all of the comforts of life.
   Ere leaving his native land Mr. Brandt was united in marriage in 1853 to Miss Bengta Swanson. Her parents never came to America, spending their entire lives in Sweden. In their family were seven children, five sons and two daughters, namely: Swan, deceased; Mrs. Hannah Basser, of Knoxville, now deceased; Nels and Jens, both of whom have passed away; Mrs. Brandt; Ola, deceased; and John, who is the twin brother of Ola and is living in Elsmore, Kansas. To Mr. and Mrs. Brandt were born three children but the eldest, Franz G., died at the age of two years. The daughter, Carrie, is the wife of Alexander Peterson, of Knoxville, and the second son, Frank August, died at the age of seven years.
In his political views Mr. Brandt was a republican, always voting for the men and measures of the party yet never seeking nor desiring office for himself. He lived a busy and useful life, being ever an industrious, painstaking and thoroughly reliable man who merited success by reason of the good work which he did and his straightforward dealings. These qualities, too, won him the regard of those with whom he was associated and he had a wide acquaintance in Knoxville and this part of the state.
ROBERT E. ERVIN.
Robert E. Ervin is now living retired in Galesburg, his activity and enterprise in former years bringing him a comfortable competence that enables him at this time to rest from further labors in the enjoyment of the fruits of his previous toil. He lived for a long period in Wenona, Illinois, before his removal to the city which is now his home. He was born, however, near Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1841, a son of Newton S. and Jane (Jones) Ervin, both of whom were natives of Virginia. They lived for a time in Ohio and when their son Robert was seven years of age removed to Illinois, where the father engaged in farming until 1868, in which year he became a resident of Missouri.
     Robert E. Ervin has spent the greater part of his life in this state and in its public schools acquired his education, while his vacation periods were devoted to work in the fields. He had but recently attained his majority when, on the 9th of August, 1862, he offered his services to the government, enlisting as a member of Battery A, of the Third Illinois Light Artillery. He was enrolled at Wenona and went into camp at Camp Butler, from which point the regiment proceeded to the front. The first battle in which he engaged was at Little Rock, Arkansas, and later he participated in the battles of Prairie Dam and Oklahoma, after which he returned to Jenkins Ferry. In the spring of 1865 he was again at Little Rock and on the 30th of June of that year was mustered out at Springfield. He had held the rank of sergeant all through the war and had proved himself a loyal soldier, never faltering in the performance of any duty whether it called him to the firing line or stationed him at the lonely picket line.
     After the war was over Mr. Ervin engaged in farming near Wenona and also made stock raising an important branch of his business. Year by year he carefully tilled the fields, which responded readily to the care and labor which he bestowed upon them, yielding to him rich crops. In 1882, however, he left his farm and took up his abode in Wenona, where at different times he was connected with various business enterprises, conducting an implement business, later a livery stable and afterward engaging in the manufacture of cultivators. Whatever he undertook he carried forward to successful completion and as the years passed by, he added annually to his capital until he felt that the sum was sufficient to provide him through his later years with the necessities and comforts of life. Accordingly, he put aside business cares, removed to Galesburg and has since lived retired. He traces his genealogical record back to 343 and a work is now being published which will contain his branch of the family and will be in print in about a year.
     In Wenona in the fall of 1865 Mr. Ervin was united in marriage to Miss Marietta A. Howe, a native of Missouri, who removed to Illinois when six years of age, accompanying her parents, Peter and Arvilla (Park) Howe, who were natives of Vermont and who settled at Wenona. Her father followed farming in that district for a considerable period and later turned his attention to financial interests, becoming owner of the Bank of Wenona, which is now being conducted by his son. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Ervin have been born two children but the daughter, Ella Irene, died when only six years old. The son, Newton Howe, is now engaged in the stock and dairy business at Galesburg. Mr. Ervin has ever been devoted to the welfare and happiness of his family. He is preeminently a home man and yet he has never neglected his duties in other relations of life. He is a valued member of Shields Post, No. 45, G. A. R., and has served as its commander. Politically he is a stalwart republican and was mayor of the city of Wenona in 1888 and 1889, his administration being businesslike and progressive. His religious faith is that of the Presbyterian church, to which Mrs. Ervin also belongs. She is descended from the same ancestry as Martha Washington and the Rebecca Park Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution was named in honor of one of her maternal ancestors. Mrs. Ervin is a prominent member of this chapter and has served on a number of its important committees. She was also junior vice in the Grand Army of the Republic Circle of Abingdon and she is a prominent worker in the Women's Relief Corps. Both Mr. and Mrs. Ervin occupy a prominent position in the regard of many friends and are widely known in Galesburg and throughout this part of the state.
    Their son, N. H. Ervin, was born in Wenona, August 9, 1875, and there pursued his education until 1891. In the following year he came to Galesburg and entered Knox College, where he remained as a student for four years, pursuing the scientific course. After leaving college he went abroad and traveled for three years, gaining that comprehensive knowledge and culture which only find their source in travel. After living in various places for a time he returned to Galesburg and established a suburban home at No. 1264 West Main, known as Ervindale. He has here thirteen acres, upon which are found substantial and commodious buildings, erected in attractive modern styles of architecture, while the equipments and the improvements of the place in every particular are most pleasing. He now makes a specialty of raising Jersey cows, having some fine specimens of that breed, and in this branch of his business is very successful. He also conducts a dairy, which is likewise a source of gratifying profit.
    On the 14th of September, 1902, N. H. Ervin was united in marriage to Miss Lula H. Hicks, of Bushnell, Illinois, who was born and educated there. Mr. Ervin belongs to the Knights of Pythias and to the Dramatic Order of the Knights of Khorassan. He also holds membership in the Presbyterian church and he gives his political support to the republican party, keeping at all times well informed on the questions and issues of the day, yet never seeking nor desiring public office.
JOHN WILLIAM SMITH.
     John William Smith resides at No. 1688 North Broad street, where he has a well developed and highly cultivated tract of land of six acres. He was born in Wythe township, Hancock county, Illinois, November 19, 1863, his parents being* John W. and Eliza (Yenawine) Smith, both of whom were natives of Kentucky, as were the paternal grandparents, Denton and Rebecca (Landers) Smith, born in 1800 and 1801 respectively. Mr. Smith died in 1884, while his wife had preceded him in death in 1882. The maternal grandparents, also natives of Kentucky, were Jacob and Ann Maria (Bence) Yenawine. Mr. Yenawine's birth occurred in 1795 and his demise took place in 1863, while his wife had been born in 1803 and died in 1859. John W. Smith, Sr., made farming his life work and at an early day became a resident of Hancock county, Illinois, where he lived for many years, his time and energies being devoted to general agricultural pursuits. He died in Keokuk, Iowa, in July, 1906, at the age of seventy-one years, and is still survived by his wife, who is making her home in Keokuk, at the age of seventy-four. For many years they were devoted and loyal members of the Christian church and Mr. Smith held various township offices, the duties of which he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. Unto him and his wife were born twelve children, of whom nine are now living: George W. and Benjamin F., both of whom are residents of Keokuk; Sadie, who is married and lives in Andover, Kansas; Charles H., of Galesburg; John W.; James E., also of this city; Lou, the wife of Will Dooley, of Keokuk, Iowa; Homer D., also of Keokuk; and Maude, the wife of Burt Clark, of that city.
John W. Smith spent his boyhood in the usual manner of farm lads, remaining through the period of his youth upon his father's farm in Hancock county, during which time he attended the district schools in the winter months and in the summer seasons aided in the work of the fields. He lived at home until he had attained his majority and then rented land, after which he engaged in cultivating the soil in this manner for several years in Hancock county. In 1900 he came to Galesburg, where he was engaged in the grocery business for a little more than seven years. On the expiration of that period he sold out and returned to farming. He now has six acres of land in his home place, rents other land and likewise owns some town property.
     Mr. Smith was married November 1, 1887, to Miss Ella McCracken, a daughter of Benjamin and Jane (Hendricks) McCracken. Mrs. Smith died eight years later and on the 7th of December, 1898, Mr. Smith wedded Miss Cora Ethel Dodge, who was born in Hamilton, Hancock county, Illinois, a daughter of Thomas and Caroline (Atwater) Dodge, who were natives of Fulton county, Illinois. The father was a son of Henry and Lorana (Jolly) Dodge and her mother was a daughter of Charles and Jane (Dawson) Atwater. The death of Thomas Dodge occurred at Quincy, Illinois, in 1891, when he was fifty-one years of age, but his widow, who still survives, makes her home in Hamilton. They were the parents of thirteen children, of whom eleven are now living: Laura, who is the wife of William Kirkpatrick; Sherman Dodge; Charles; Howard; Ola, the wife of John Miller; Jefferson; Bert; Cora E.; Daisy, the wife of John Curtis Taylor; Julian; and Gertrude. The two who died in early childhood- were Edward and Winona.
     Mr. and Mrs. Smith have become the parents of two children, Lucile and Edwin. The parents are members of the Christian church and Mr. Smith gives his political support to the democratic party. He has worked hard and his life of industry and perseverance has brought him a substantial measure of success. At all times he has commanded the respect and good-will of his fellowmen because in every relation he has been honorable and straightforward.
JOHN MICHAEL BOHAN, M. D.
    
John Michael Bohan is one of the younger representatives of the medical profession in Galesburg but has become established in practice in a way that many an older member of the profession might well envy. The college training is so far in advance of what it was even a quarter of a century ago that the young man of today enters upon his professional duties with an equipment that the older generation had to gain through years of experience. Moreover, Dr. Bohan brings to bear sound judgment in all of his professional service, combined with a ready sympathy that enables him to quickly understand both the physical and mental condition of his patients. He was born in Henderson county, on the boundary line of Mercer county, Illinois, March 13, 1881, his parents being John and Bridget (Haney) Bohan. The family name indicates the ancestral line to have had its root in Ireland. The father was born in County Mayo, that country, in 1830, and the mother's birth occurred in the same county, on the 12th of January, 1839. In 1851 John Bohan, then a young man of twenty-one years, bade adieu to friends and native land and sailed for the United States, settling in the state of New York, where for a time he was employed at various occupations. In 1854 he went to Keithsburg, Illinois, where for ten years he engaged in teaming. He next turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, settling upon a farm about eight miles east of Keithsburg, his remaining days being devoted to the development and cultivation of the soil in the production of the crops best adapted to climatic conditions. His political indorsement was given to the democratic party and he held membership in the Catholic church. He died February 13, 1903, and his wife, who is now living in Keithsburg, still survives him. They were married in that place on the 21st of October, 1863, and became the parents of ten children, as follows : John, who is deceased; John, the second of the name, who has also passed away; Anna, the wife of William Callahan, of Mercer county, Illinois; William P., living in Alexis, this state; Margaret, deceased; Mary, twin sister of Margaret, who is now the wife of Mark Humphrey, of Keithsburg, Illinois; Peter T., a practicing physician of Kansas City, Missouri; Bertha, at home; James A., residing on the old homestead place; and John Michael, of this review.
    The last named pursued his education in the public schools until he had completed a high-school course at Seaton, Illinois. He afterward entered Knox College and eventually matriculated in the medical department of the Northwestern University at Chicago, Illinois, from which he was graduated with the class of 1907. In December of the same year he came to Galesburg, where he has since continued in general practice, and the work that he has done indicates his thorough understanding of the profession and the scientific principles which underlie his labors.
    Dr. Bohan proudly cast his first vote for the candidates of the democratic party and has always adhered to that political faith. He is a Catholic in religious belief, holding membership in Corpus Christi church, and his fraternal relations are with the Knights of Columbus, the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Modern Woodmen and the Mystic Workers.
WILLIAM LARSON.
     William Larson is the owner of five hundred and ten acres of fine land in Knox county, his home farm, comprising one hundred and twenty acres, being situated in Copley township, near the Persifer township line. He was born in Gefle, Sweden, April 25, 1830, the oldest of three children in the family of Larson and Eliza (Anderson) Oleson. His father spent all his life in Sweden, where he died at the age of forty-seven. His mother, after the death of her husband, came to America and lived for a number of years with her son William in Knox county, Illinois, later making her home with her daughters in Minnesota, where she died at the age of seventy-five. William had one brother, Andrew Bourgelon, who died in Sweden, and one sister, Eliza, who was the wife of John Beckus and lived in .Minnesota, where she and her husband both died.
     William Larson was reared and educated in Sweden and was there married in 1855 to Miss Annie Shustrom, a daughter of John and Annie Shustrom, both of whom died in Sweden. Mrs. Larson was born June 29, 1829, in that country and was also reared and educated there. For one and one-half years after their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Larson resided in their native land, where their first child was born, then coming to America, settling in Knox county, Illinois. Looking around for a location they moved at first to various places, but after four or five years located on their present farm, on section 36, Copley township, Knox county, where they built a one-room log house and Mr. Larson began on a small scale to raise cattle. Mr. Larson paid an enormous price for the first team he ever owned, having earned the purchase money by digging coal and mixing lime. From these meager conditions Mr. and Mrs. Larson by thrift, honesty and prudent management have come to their present good financial circumstances. Gradually Mr. Larson has increased his cattle-raising business until it has become very extensive. He has added to his holdings until he now owns five hundred and ten acres of some of the most valuable land in the county and he has on his home farm a very fine residence.
      Mr. and Mrs. Larson have become the parents of five children. The eldest, Lewis, who resides in Copley township, married Miss Emma Samuerson and they have five children: Mrs. Mabel Scandland; Elmer, who lives in Chicago; and Effie, Charles and Hattie, at home. John and William, the second and third sons, are unmarried and live at home with their parents. Annie, who died at the age of one year and seven months, is buried in the Victoria cemetery. Emma, who is the wife of Emil Carson, resides on the old home farm. She has two sons, Floyd and Charles, both of whom are in school.
In politics Mr. Larson is independent and in religion he strictly adheres to the faith of the Lutheran church, of which church his entire family are earnest and devoted members. He was at one time pathmaster of Copley township. Mr. Larson has attained the advanced age of eighty-one years and in every relation, whether as a business man, friend or citizen, has commanded the confidence and regard of those with whom he has been brought in contact. He has never regretted his determination to seek a home in America, for he here found the opportunity he sought, and by his well managed business affairs has gained a handsome competence, which supplies him in his advanced age with the necessities, comforts and some of the luxuries of life.
LLOYD H. DENNISON.
Lloyd H. Dennison, whose successful operations in the field of real estate indicate his thorough knowledge of the business and his sound judgment in investment, was born in Warren county, Illinois, May 22, 1876, a son of John and Elizabeth (Buck) Dennison, the former a native of New York and the latter of Ohio. The grandfather likewise bore the name of John Dennison and was a native of the Empire state. Unto him and his wife were born the following children: Daniel, George, Mary, Samantha and John. The last named was reared to farm life in the Empire state and always devoted his energies to the work of tilling the soil. On coming to Illinois he settled in Warren county among its earliest residents and worked out by the month as a farm hand until he was able to save from his earnings a sum sufficient to enable him to engage in business on his own account. Later he bought a farm of one hundred and eighty acres, which he cleared and improved and to it added until he had eight hundred acres near Gerlaw, although the town was not established when he first located there. His industry and determination were the basis of his success and he became in time one of the foremost agriculturists of his community, his prosperity being visible evidence of his life of well directed energy and thrift. He died upon the old homestead farm in 1889, at the age of fifty-two years, while his wife passed away in 1899, at the age of sixty years. She was a daughter of Norman Buck, a native of Vermont and a farmer by occupation. He married a Miss Murray and they removed westward to Illinois, becoming pioneer settlers of Rushville, in Schuyler county. Subsequently they removed to Warren county, where their remaining days were passed. They were the parents of six children, all daughters, namely: Adeline, Ann, Lou, Elizabeth, Emily and Ellen. Of these Elizabeth became the wife of John Dennison and the mother of Lloyd H. Dennison. Her family numbered two sons and three daughters: Harriet, the wife of Henry Clayton, now of Monmouth; Lulu, the wife of N. I. Waters, of Millington, Illinois; Ray W., who is living on the old home place in Warren county; Florence, the wife of I. 0. Robison, of Monmouth; and Lloyd H., of this review.
The last named was reared in Warren county upon his father's farm and attended the district schools, remaining at home until he had attained his majority. The father left each of his children a farm and Lloyd H. Dennison came into possession of one hundred and sixty acres in Monmouth township, Warren county, which he still owns and which he cultivated with success until 1902. He then rented the property and removed to Galesburg, purchasing a fine home on North Broad street, which he still occupies.
On the 25th of September, 1901, Mr. Dennison was married to Miss Frances E. Kiernan, a daughter of Thomas and Ann (McGraw) Kiernan. Her mother died in 1903, at the age of forty-five years, but her father is now living, spending much of his time in Galesburg. In their family were three children, Mary, Frances and John. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Dennison was Francis Kiernan, a native of Ireland, who became a pioneer settler of Warren county. Her maternal grandfather was also born on the Emerald isle and became an early settler of Knox county. Mr. and Mrs. Dennison have but one child, a son, John R. The mother is a member of the Catholic church. Mr. Dennison belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks; politically he has always been a republican and while living in Warren county he filled the office of supervisor. Since removing to Galesburg he has engaged in real estate deals, having an office at No. 118 East Main street. His work here has been crowned with substantial success and he is now thoroughly conversant with realty values and knows the property that is upon the market and what it can be bought for. As a valuator of real estate it is seen that his judgment is sound and at all times he is watchful of opportunities, which enables him to promote his individual interests and to safeguard the interests of his clients.
SWAN H. PETERSON.
   Swan H. Peterson has reached the venerable age of eighty-five years. Nature seems to have intended that man should enjoy a period of rest in the evening of life for in youth he possesses vigor, energy and hopefulness which in time develops into habits of industry and perseverance. If his labor is directed by sound judgment he may at length reach success, enabling him to spend his last days in retirement from business. Such has been the record of Swan H. Peterson who for a long period was connected with agricultural pursuits in Knox county but now makes his home in the village of Knoxville. He was born in Sweden, December 3, 1826, a son of Peter and Nellie (Benson) Peterson. His parents never came to America, passing away in Sweden after attaining an advanced age. In their family were four sons and two daughters of whom Swan H. is the eldest, the others being Peter, Nels, Mons, Elsie and Hannah.
     In the schools of his native country Swan H. Peterson pursued his education and at the age of twenty-one years became connected with the military service, remaining in the army for five years. In his youthful days he worked at farm labor under the direction of his father and in 1854 when about twenty-eight years of age he sought a home in the new world, thinking that better business opportunities might be secured on this side of the Atlantic. Accordingly he landed in Quebec, after a voyage of six weeks upon the ocean, and from that point made his way direct to Illinois, settling in Knoxville. Here he engaged in farming, working out, first by the day, but as soon as his labors had brought him sufficient capital, he purchased land and continued to engage extensively in farming until advanced years compelled his retirement. He brought his fields under a high state of cultivation in raising the cereals best adapted to soil and climate, and at all times his farm work was characterized by practical and progressive methods.
In August, 1854, Mr. Peterson was united in marriage in Knoxville to Miss Truen Olson, who was born in Sweden, August 29, 1828. Her parents never came to America, spending their entire lives in Sweden. In their family were four sons and three daughters, Peter, Swan, Hannah, Andrew, Bengta, Truen and Nels. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Peterson were born three sons and two daughters, Mons, Ellen, Anna, John and Otto. Of these John married Miss Betty Nelson and they have two children, Hattie and John. In 191 o Mr. Peterson was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died on the 12th of June, of' that year. They had traveled life's journey together for more than fifty-five years, their love and confidence increasing as time passed on. Mrs. Peterson belonged to the Swedish Lutheran church, in which Mr. Peterson still holds membership. His entire life has been in harmony with his religious professions and has been characterized by faithfulness to duty, by strict integrity, by charity and kindliness.
JOHN NEIL COX, M. D.
   Dr. John Neil Cox, who has been engaged in the practice of medicine in Galesburg for the past four years, was born in Mercer county, Illinois, on the 20th of January, 1851. He is a son of Richard R. and Sarah L. (Epperson) Cox, the father having been the first male white child born in Crawford county, Indiana, while the mother was a native of Virginia. Richard R. Cox was reared and educated in his native state, where he later engaged in agricultural pursuits until he had attained the age of twenty-six years. He then came to Illinois, acquiring some land in Mercer county, near Oxford, that he developed during the remainder of his active life. His efforts in this direction proved so lucrative that he was able to withdraw from active farm work and spent his latter days in retirement in Oxford, where he passed away on the nth of September, 1877,
    He had long survived his wife, who died on the old homestead on February 14, 1863. Mr. Cox, who was a veteran of the Black Hawk war, at the time of the Rebellion was a lieutenant colonel in the Illinois National Guards and was offered the rank of colonel if he would go to the front with the Ninth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, but was compelled to decline because of physical infirmities. His political support he always gave to the republican party and was chairman of the first board of supervisors in Mercer county. Mr. and Mrs. Cox were married in Crawford county, Indiana, and there spent the early years of their domestic life. Seven children were born to them, as follows: Charles E., who is living in Pittsfield, Illinois; Joseph R., who passed away in 1869; Mary, the wife of William L. Thomas, of Clarinda, Iowa; Augustus B., who died at xAjidersonville prison; Hiram S., who is living in Plainview, Texas; John Neil, our subject; and Julia Etta, the deceased wife of Thomas Pike, of Sioux City, Iowa. The religious views of the parents accorded with the tenets of the Baptist church in which they held membership.
The youthful years of Dr. Cox were spent on his father's farm in the work of which he assisted while pursuing his studies in the public schools of Oxford. He was a very ambitious young man and desired a better education, aspiring to a professional career. It was necessary that he earn the money for further study and with this aim in view at the age of sixteen he began teaching. Thus he acquired the means to pay for his tuition in the Northern Indiana Normal, at Valparaiso, from which he was graduated with the class of 1878, with the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He subsequently attended the University of Wooster, Ohio, graduating from that institution in 1889, while his professional course was pursued in the Chicago Medical College. Teaching engaged his attention for practically twenty-one years, or until he was thirty-seven, except when he was in college. He completed his medical course in 1889, and immediately thereafter established an office at Lakefield, Minnesota, and engaged in practice. At the end of a year he removed to North ITenderson, Illinois, where he remained until 1907, when he came to Galesburg, where he still engages in general practice, but makes a specialty of diseases of the chest. Although he has resided here but four years, Dr. Cox has met with good success, and numbers among his patients some of the leading people of the town. Intelligent and practical in his ideas, those who seek his advice are always favorably impressed and inspired with confidence in his abilities.
     On the 26th of September, 1889, Dr. Cox was united in marriage to Miss Bettie Dalhouse, a daughter of William and Bettie (Bruington) Dalhouse, of Trenton, Missouri, and they have become the parents of three daughters: Cella and Gladys, who are at home; and Mabel, who is deceased.
        Dr. Cox is a deacon in the Baptist church, with which his family are also affiliated, and fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Masonic order, having attained the rank of Knight Templar in the latter. He keeps in touch with the other members of his profession through his connection with the City and Knox County Medical Societies, and the Illinois State and National Medical Associations. His membership in organizations of a more purely social nature is confined to the Galesburg Club, (while in politics he is independent. He is interested in all questions that vitally affect the municipality, but his ballot is always cast for the man or measures he
considers best adapted to meet the exigencies of the situation, irrespective of party affiliation. He has never aspired to public honors or the emoluments of office but served as county superintendent for one year, while living in Henry county, Illinois. Dr. Cox is a man whose influence is freely exercised in advancing the welfare of the community through the highest standards of citizenship.    submitted by Anne who calls herself  Ancestor Seeker which she had  Thanks Anne. submitted by Anne who calls herself  Ancestor Seeker which she had  Thanks Anne.

SWAN A. ANDERSON.
     In the years of his connection with the active business interests of Gales-burg Swan A. Anderson conducted a tailoring establishment and a furnishing-goods store and by reason of his excellent workmanship and honorable dealing made for himself a most creditable name in commercial circles. Success at length crowned his labors, enabling him to retire from active business some time prior to his death, which occurred on the 7th of July, 1900. He was then in the sixty-ninth year of his life, his birth having occurred in Sweden on September 26, 1831. His father, Andrew Anderson, was also a native of that country and there followed farming and merchandising, continuing a resident of Sweden until his life's labors were ended. In his family were seven children of whom Andrew, Nels, Swan and Oliver are all now deceased. Caroline is still living in Sweden, but the other daughters of the family, Celia and Annie, have also passed awav.
Swan A. Anderson was educated in Sweden and at the age of twenty-three years came to the United States. He desired to make the best possible use of his time and opportunities and believed that better returns could be secured for labor in the new world than in the old. Accordingly in 1854 he crossed the Atlantic and made his way at once from the coast to the interior of the country, settling at Galesburg. That was before the railroad had reached this city and he walked here from Geneseo. He first worked as a painter and followed this trade for several years. Later he engaged in the tailoring business in company with John Peterson and had in the course of years several partners, the last of whom was Frank Brown. He then established an independent business under his own name, carried on in connection with a furnishing-goods store, which he conducted until eight years prior to his death, when he retired. He was an excellent workman and had built up a good business owing to the fact that he always carried a well selected line of dependable goods, kept up with all the changes in style and turned out most attractive garments.
Mr. Anderson was most pleasantly situated in his home life. On the 5th of January, 1861, he married Miss Betsy Erickson, a daughter of Eric and Anna (Peterson) Erickson, of this city. Her parents, however, were natives of Sweden and on coming to the United States in 1854, first located in Chicago and Michigan, making their way to Galesburg in 1856. Mr. Erickson had been reared to the occupation of farming and continued to make it his life work, owning and cultivating a tract of land which he transformed into productive fields and upon which he made various substantial improvements. Year after year his labors were crowned with good harvests and the sale of his crops brought him a substantial financial return, that enabled him at length to put aside business cares and live retired for several years prior to his death. In his political views he was a republican, interested in the success of the party yet never seeking office. He. held membership in the Swedish Lutheran church and at all times lived an upright, honorable life that gained him the favorable regard and good-will of his fellowmen. Unto him and his wife were born seven children, of wrhom Oliver, Peter, John and William are now deceased. Mrs. Anderson was born in Sweden July 18, 1842, and was the next in the family. Elsie is the widow of Andrew Hedburg, of this city, and Mathilda is the wife of Matt Gibson, of Monmouth, Illinois. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Anderson there were born three children but they lost their first two, Emma and Andrew Edward. The only surviving child, Frederick, is at home with his mother.
The death of Mr. Anderson occurred July 7, 1900. He was a republican in politics, loyal to the party because he believed that its principles would best conserve good government. He belonged to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and to the First Lutheran church, from its organization, and his life was in strict conformity with his professions. He was a quiet man, of good judgment and kindly ways, thoughtful and of well balanced nature, of good habits and an upright life. He never had occasion to.regret his determination to come to America. His hope of finding improved business conditions was realized and he found that better returns were secured for his endeavor.
HON. JAMES PADEN.
      A well spent life established the Hon. James Paden in a most enviable position in public regard and throughout the years of his connection with Knox county he was prominently connected with its development and progress and at the same time carefully conducted his business affairs so that success finally rewarded his labors, making him one of the men of afliuence of this part of the state. He was born June 17, 1827, in Crawford county, Pennsylvania, and was the second son of Isaac Paden and Celia (Fish) Paden. The family is of Scotch origin but has been represented in America throughout several generations. Isaac Paden was born in the Keystone state, while his wife was a native of New York. In 1843 they removed westward, establishing their home in Knox county, Illinois, on a farm southeast of the city of Galesburg. There Isaac Paden resided for many years and was well advanced in life when called to his final rest. Pie remained a continuous resident of Illinois to the time of his death, save for a brief period which he spent in Minnesota. He returned then to Henry county, Illinois, where he tilled the soil for a considerable period, but his last days were spent in Knox county, where he passed away at the advanced age of ninety-five years.
     James Paden was a lifelong farmer and always kept in touch with the most progressive methods of agriculture. His labors, too, were of a very practical character, as shown in the excellent results which attended his work. Year by year he plowed and tilled his fields, and in the autumn gathered rich harvests. As time passed on he became one of the substantial residents of the county, acquiring a very gratifying reward for his labors, and he also became well known in financial circles as a director of the First National Bank of Galesburg, and in every relation of life he maintained a high standard of integrity. From the time of his arrival in Knox county, in 1843, until his death he continued a permanent resident here save for a single year passed in Minnesota prior to his marriage.
    On the 1st of January, 1851, he wedded Mrs. Martha (Edgar) Fuqua, who was a native of Kentucky and for a few years was a widow prior to her marriage to Mr. Paden. They traveled life's journey together most happily for more than a half-century and were then separated by the death of Mrs. Paden on the 26th of July, 1904. Their only child, Alonzo F. Paden, owns the old homestead farm and with him the father resided after the death of his wife.
     Mr. Paden was a most public-spirited man, always deeply and helpfully interested in the welfare of the city and county. He served for several terms on the board of supervisors, representing Galesburg in that body, and was filling that position when the present courthouse was erected. He acted on various important committees and his labors were a most effective and beneficial element in the progress and upbuilding of the county during his long connection with the office. He also labored earnestly to promote the best interests of the agriculturists and cooperated in every project which tended to work for the permanent benefit of the farming class. In politics he was a stanch Republican and was a warm admirer of Abraham Lincoln, whose debate with Douglas he heard in antebellum days.     In his death, which occurred in 1908, Knox county lost one of its most honored pioneers and valued citizens. For more than six decades he had resided in the county, thus witnessing almost its entire development. He had seen its wild lands converted into productive farms, its tiny villages grow into thriving towns and cities, had seen churches and schoolhouses built and in every possible way had aided in advancing the work of civilization. He was thoroughly reliable in business, bearing an untarnished reputation in all of his transactions, and thus he left to his family the priceless heritage of a spotless name as well as a substantial fortune, which was the reward of his years of earnest and unremitting toil.
ALADINE CUMMINGS LONGDEN, A. M., PH. D.
      Aladine Cummings Longden, professor of physics and astronomy in Knox College since 1901 and recognized as one of the able educators of the state, was born in Leesville, Ohio, February 19, 1857. His parents were Samuel and Adaline (Cummings) Longden, the former born near Manchester, England, while Leesville, Ohio, was the birthplace of the latter. The paternal grandfather of Professor Longden was an architect in England and died in that country when well advanced in years. Unto him and his wife were born several children, the family including John, Thomas, George, James and Samuel, of which number George was a captain in the Crimean war. The maternal grandfather of Professor Longden was Dr. James Cummings, who for many years successfully engaged in the practice of medicine in Leesville, Ohio. He wedded Mary Margaret Moore and both lived to be past middle life, the latter dying when seventy-five years of age. Their children were Thomas, James, Edwin, Adaline, Edy, Mary and Annie M.
     Samuel Longden was reared in England and became a preacher of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was born July 24, 1815, and on attaining his majority came to America in 1836, settling in eastern Ohio, where he became a member of the Erie Conference. He was an itinerant preacher and rode horseback through the newly developed country of eastern Ohio and Pennsylvania, preaching the gospel to the pioneer residents of that section. He also had various charges in that country and his labors proved a potent force for good. He was married in Ohio to Miss Adaline Cummings and they were residents of Leesville at the time of the birth of Professor Longden. The mother there died April 2, 1857, when her son was but six weeks old. He was the youngest of six children, four of whom reached years of maturity: Thomas E., now a resident of Philadelphia; Mary S., deceased; Rev. Wilbur C, a Methodist Episcopal missionary, now at Chinkiang, China; and Professor Longden of this review. The other two died in infancy. Having lost his first wife the Rev. Samuel Longden married Miss Sarah E. Boyer and unto them were born three children: Henry B., now professor of German in De Pauw University, Greencastle, Indiana; Martha, who was librarian of De Pauw University for a number of years; and James Albert, who died of typhoid fever at the age of twenty-one. Rev. Longden closed a most active and useful life in his eighty-fourth year, passing away at Greencastle, Indiana, in 1898.
      Professor Longden, owing to his mother's early death, spent the first ten and one-half years of his life with his aunt, Annie M. Cummings, in Poland, Ohio. He then resided for a part of a year with an uncle, Edwin B. Cummings, in Cattaraugus, New York, and at the age of eleven years joined his father in Indiana, where his later boyhood and early manhood were spent. His preliminary educational advantages were supplemented by a course in De Pauw University, from which he was graduated A. B., in 1881, while in 1884 his alma mater conferred upon him the degree of Master of Arts. He won his Ph. D. degree in Columbia University in the city of New York, in 1900 but in the meantime had entered the educational field and had done excellent work therein. He presents clearly and cogently the knowledge he has acquired. He occupied the professorship of physics and chemistry in the State Normal school of Westfield, Massachusetts, from 1888 until 1897, and in the latter year he became a graduate student in physics and chemistry in the University of Chicago, spending a scholastic year there, and in 1898 he was appointed assistant in physics at the University of Chicago, there remaining for a year. He became a graduate student of Columbia University in 1899, pursuing his studies there through the ensuing year, while in 1900-1 he was an instructor in physics in the University of Wisconsin. In the latter year he was called to Knox College as professor of physics and astronomy and has occupied that position to the present day, his ability as an educator making his classes most attractive and constituting him one of the forceful factors in the success of the school.
Professor Longden was married December 24, 1884, to Miss Jeanie Humble, a daughter of John and Mary (Campbell) Humble, of Buffalo, New York. In that city Mrs. Longden was born, her parents having removed there immediately after their marriage.' Her father was a ship architect, builder, and owner and for a number of years superintendent of one of the largest dry docks in Buffalo. He designed and built the Erastus Corning, at that time the largest freighter on the Great Lakes. He and his wife still reside in Buffalo and there they reared their family of three children, of whom Airs. Longden is the eldest. Her sister Mary Ella, who is now deceased, became the wife of Charles W. Wells, president of the Republic Metalware Company, and her brother, Fred W. Humble, is a well known architect of Buffalo.
      Both the Professor and Mrs. Longden were reared in the Methodist faith but are now identified with the Presbyterian church. They have been residents of Galesburg for ten years and their home, at No. 643 West North street, is attractive by reason of its warm-hearted hospitality. Professor Longden votes with the republican party but while he has never sought office, has always been a great student of the sociological, political and economic questions which engage the attention of the thinking men of the age. Something more of the nature of his interests is indicated in the fact that he is a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science; a member of the American Physical Society and of the Belgian Astronomical Society. His reading has been broad, his research extensive, and his intellectual progress has placed him in a position where association with him means inspiration and elevation.
JOHN FRANCIS CORBIN, M. D.****
Dr. John Francis Corbin, successfully engaged in the practice of medicine and surgery in Galesburg, with offices in the Holmes building, was born near Dahinda, Illinois, on the banks of Spoon river, on Christmas Day of 1869. He represents one of the old pioneer families of this state. His grandfather was Henry J. Corbin, a native of Ohio, who became an early settler of Truro township, Knox county, there taking up his abode when the district was largely wild and undeveloped. He secured land, began the development of property and in course of time became an extensive and prosperous farmer. He died of typhoid fever upon his homestead when about fifty-eight or fifty-nine years of age. Among the children born to him and his wife, Mrs. Olive Corbin, was Edwin A. Corbin, the Doctor's father, his birth occurring on the old homestead farm in Truro township. At an early day he began farming on his own account. Subsequently, however, he removed to Knoxville, where he engaged in the practice of law for a quarter of a century, having previously prepared for the bar as a student in the office of Z. Cooley, a well known attorney of an early day. Edwin Corbin has served as city attorney of Knoxville for a number of years and still makes his home there. He married Miss Lucinda Beatty, also a native of Illinois, her parents being farming people of this state. Of that marriage there were born five children, four sons and a daughter, namely: Henry Butler, of Galesburg; Dr. John F., of this review: George Clement, of Toledo, Ohio; Mary Etta, the wife of Charles A. Johnson, of Galesburg; and Al E., of Peoria. For his second wife Edwin Corbin chose Elizabeth Utter and unto them were born four children, as follows: Lucinda, the wife of Charles Ferguson, of Chicago; Lee and Harold, also of Chicago; and Hortense, who married Kenneth Hawkins, of Galesburg.
     Dr. Corbin, whose name introduces this record, was reared in Knox county and completed his public-school education by graduation from the high school with the class of 1888. He then entered Knox College, from which he was graduated in 1895. During his college course he devoted one year to teaching school and later took up the study of medicine, matriculating in the University of Illinois where he completed the full course in the medical department and was awarded his M. D. degree. He then began practice in Galesburg in 1898 and has since been a representative of the profession in this city, building up a business that has increased annually, both in extent and importance. Many who came to him as casual patients have continued as patrons when the need for professional service has been felt.
   On the ninth of November, 1903, Dr. Corbin married Miss Marian Saywright, who was born near Toronto, Canada, as were her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Saywright, who still reside in that locality. She was the eldest of their four children, the others being James, Norman and Cora. Dr. and Mrs. Corbin have an interesting little daughter, Maxine Frances, who wras born on the 17th of July, 1905. Mrs. Corbin belongs to the Episcopal church. Dr. Corbin is a republican in his political views and is a member of the pension board but has never sought nor desired office outside the strict path of his profession, for he prefers to concentrate his time and energies upon his chosen life work and his broad reading and continued study have given him comprehensive knowledge of the science of medicine and added to experience have continuously promoted his efficiency.
SAMUEL MICHAEL HUGHES.
    
Samuel Michael Hughes, who since August, 1906, has been successfully engaged in the real-estate business at Galesburg, was born in Fall Creek township, near Quincy, Adams county, Illinois, on the 20th of December, 1868, his parents being Michael William and Cynthia Anna (Thompson) Hughes. The father's birth occurred in New Ross, County Wexford, Ireland, on the 7th of January, 1837, while the mother was born in Fall Creek township, Adams county, Illinois, on the 30th of May, 1845. The paternal grandparents, Henry and Catherine (MacDonald) Hughes, were likewise natives of the Emerald isle, the former having been born in County Cavan and the latter in County Carlow. Henry Hughes was an agriculturist by occupation. Unto him and his wife were born four children, as follows: Katherine, the wife of a Mr. Ormsby, of Dublin, Ireland; Harriet, who is deceased; Michael William, the father of our subject; and Mary Anna, the widow of a Mr. Dickinson, who made his home in Evanston, Illinois.
    Michael W. Hughes acquired his education in a Catholic college near Dublin, Ireland, and emigrated to Canada when a youth of seventeen, thence making his way, via the St. Lawrence river and the Great Lakes, to Washington county, Ohio, where he began the manufacture of pumps. In the latter part of i860 he began the overland journey to California and had reached St. Joseph, Missouri, when the Civil war broke out. He enlisted as a private in the Thirteenth Missouri Volunteer Infantry and was captured at Lexington, Missouri, in 1861. On the expiration of his term he reenlisted as a private of Troop I, Third Missouri Cavalry, winning promotion to the rank of captain. In the fall of 1864 he was discharged because of physical disability due to wounds and went to Quincy, Illinois, having charge of a sawmill south of the city for a few years.     Subsequently he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits, being busily engaged in the work of the fields until the time of his retirement in 1905. He is still numbered among the honored and respected residents of Quincy, Illinois. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he still maintains pleasant relations with his old war comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. It was on the 8th of January, 1865, in Fall Creek township, Adams county, that he wedded Miss Cynthia Anna Thompson, who was educated in the public schools of Adams county and in a seminary at Quincy. Unto them were born five children, as follows: Harriet Evelyn, the wife of Almond D. Stratton, of Plain-vine, Illinois; Samuel Michael, of this review; Josiah Henry, living in Quincy, Illinois, who is engaged in the real-estate business in association with his brother Samuel; Katherine Priscilla, the wife of Jacob Blauser, of Payson, Illinois; and William Terrence, an advertising agent of St. Louis, Missouri.
    Samuel Michael Hughes obtained his early education in the public schools of Adams county and later entered Knox College, in which institution he finished the sophomore year with the class of 1891. Subsequently he followed farming and also taught school in Adams county for six years and during the next two years served as deputy county recorder of this county. He was then employed by T. C. Poling, a mortgage banker of Quincy, Illinois, for four years and on the expiration of that period embarked in the real-estate business on his own account at that place. In August, 1906, he came to Galesburg,. Illinois, and has here conducted his real-estate interests to the present time, dealing in Illinois and Iowa corn-belt lands.
    On the 17th of May, 1894, Mr. Hughes was married to Miss Mary Campbell Robbins, whose birth occurred in Payson, Illinois, on the 8th of October, 1869, her parents being Daniel and Anna C. (Thompson) Robbins, likewise natives of that place. Jonathan Robbins, the great-great-grandfather of Mrs. Hughes, served in the Revolutionary war with the rank of captain, enlisting from Massachusetts. Daniel and Mary (Prince) Robbins, the paternal grandparents, were natives of New Hampshire and Massachusetts respectively. Daniel Robbins followed the profession of teaching after coming to Payson, Illinois, in the early '30s but later devoted his attention to the work of the fields. Both he and his wife passed away at Payson. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Hughes were Philo and Ellen (Wallace) Thompson, both natives of Connecticut. They also came to Payson, Illinois, in the early '30s and were there married. Philo Thompson followed farming as a life work and was a devoted member of the Congregational church. Daniel Robbins, Jr., the father of Mrs. Hughes, joined the Union army at the beginning of the Civil war as a private of Company D, Seventh Illinois Volunteer Cavalry, remaining with that command for four years and being promoted to the rank of captain. He is an agriculturist by occupation and gives his political allegiance to the republican party, having served as school trustee for a number of years. His religious faith is that of the Congregational church, in which he acts as deacon. He also belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Anna C. Thompson and whom he wedded at Payson, Illinois, was called to her final rest on the 8th of June, 1904. They had five children, as follows: Ellen R., who married a Mr. Arnett, of Fresno, California; Mrs. Hughes; Grace Prince, the widow of Albert T. McCrory, of Okmulgee, Oklahoma; Ernest T., of Chicago, who is assistant editor of the Breeders Gazette; and Edith Anna, at home.
     Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Hughes has supported the men and measures of the republican party. He is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity and also belongs to the Congregational church of Quincy, to Phi Delta Theta, a college fraternity, Delta Chapter of Knox College and the Galesburg Club. His life has been one of well directed effort and enterprise, resulting in the attainment of a creditable and gratifying measure of success. In all its relations he has enjoyed the respect and confidence of his fellowmen because he is honest, upright, persistent and determined.
JOHN E. ERICSON.
    John E. Ericson, who with his father is the owner of three hundred and twenty acres of land on sections 9 and 10, of Victoria township that he is devoting to general farming, was born on the place, where he now resides, on the 27th of May, 1866. Eric Ericson, his father, was born in Sweden and there he passed the first fourteen years of his life. At the expiration of that period he emigrated to the United States, locating in Wisconsin. There he met and subsequently married Miss Christina Bloom, the mother of our subject, likewise a native of Sweden, who came to the United States the same year as her husband. During the early years of their domestic life they removed to Illinois, settling in Knox county, which was thereafter their home. Mr. Ericson subsequently purchased the farm that his son John E. is now operating and settled there with his family. This was an improved place and was under cultivation, but he ¦energetically applied himself to bringing it into a higher state of productivity and during the period of his operation wrought many changes that added greatly to the value of the property. Here the mother passed away, in 1897, at the age of fifty-nine years and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Victoria. The father is still living, however, and continues to make his home on the farm with his son. He is a member of the Swedish Methodist Episcopal church, to which the mother also belonged and in the faith of which they reared their family. Mr. and Mrs. Ericson were parents of one son, John E., our subject.
    The entire life of John E. Ericson has been passed amid his present environments. When old enough to begin his education he attended the district schools, later supplementing his elementary knowledge by a commercial course in a college at Galesburg, thus qualifying himself for the practical duties of business life. While still a small lad he was assigned light duties about the home, thus early instilling in him lessons in the value of industry and patience as well as thrift. As his strength and sense of responsibility increased with the passing years his duties became heavier, and after laying aside his text-books he gave his undivided attention to the work of the fields and care of the stock. By the time he had attained his maturity he was thoroughly proficient in the practical methods of agriculture and fully qualified to assume the management of the farm. This he ultimately did, so advantageously directing his activities, that he later came in possession of a half interest in the property. Mr. Ericson operates his farm along general lines, but as he is a man of progressive ideas quite closely adheres to modern ideas in his methods. During recent years he has installed various appliances and conveniences deemed essential to the agriculturist of today but unknown a generation ago, and now has one of the most completely equipped farms in the community.
     Mr. Ericson established a home of his own when he married Miss Amanda Johnson, who was born in Sweden, but was brought to America by her parents at the age of three years. She is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John A. Johnson, well known residents of Victoria township. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Ericson numbers six, as follows: Edna, the wife of Henry Linderholm, of Victoria township; Alice, who became the wife of John L. Jarnigan, of Gales-burg; and Earl, Carl, Willard and Wendell. After his marriage Mr. Ericson brought his bride to the old home farm, and here his children have been born, reared and educated.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Ericson hold membership in the Swedish Methodist Episcopal church. He votes with the republican party and, despite the fact that his personal interests require nearly all of his time, has always taken a deep interest in local politics and has assumed his share of the governmental duties of the township. He is a public-spirited man and has high standards of the responsibilities of citizenship and strives to live up to them. For the past eight years he has been road commissioner, the length of his term attesting his efficiency in this capacity. He was school trustee for twelve years and for one he was assessor, discharging the duties of both offices in a highly capable and satisfactory manner. Mr. Ericson has become one of the substantial citizens of Victoria township; he is one of the popular and highly esteemed men of the community, where his ideas have much weight in influencing public opinion, owing to his recognized capabilities as a business man and his common sense as a politician.
ALVAH ISOME SARGENT, D. D. S.
     Dr. Alvah Isome Sargent, a successful practitioner of dentistry, has followed his profession in Galesburg for the past fourteen years and has built up an extensive and profitable patronage in this connection. His birth occurred in South Wayne, Wisconsin, on the 26th of April, 1870, his parents being Charles Edward and Nancy (Riggs) Sargent. The father was born near Springfield, Illinois, on the 25th of December, 1834, while the mother's birth occurred at Wiota, Wisconsin, in 1840. Charles E. Sargent removed to Wis-
consin when a lad of twelve years and was successfully identified with general agricultural pursuits throughout his active business career. For the past few years he has lived in honorable retirement, now making his home at Warren, Illinois. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is a devoted and consistent member of the United Brethren church. His wife was called to her final rest on the ioth of March, 1882. Their children were five in number, namely: Lewis, who is a resident of Huron, South Dakota; John, living in Warren, Illinois; Mary, the wife of H. J. Smith', of Warren, Illinois; Frank, who makes his home at South Wayne, Wisconsin; and Alvah L, of this review.
The last named is a graduate of the high school at Warren, Illinois, and also spent one year in college at Beloit, Wisconsin. Subsequently he entered the Chicago Dental College and was graduated from that institution with the class of 1896. Opening an office at Huntington, West Virginia, he there remained for a year and a half and on the expiration of that period came to Galesburg, Illinois. As a practitioner of dentistry he enjoys an enviable reputation among the members of the profession as well as with the general public, having built up a gratifying patronage and also acting as secretary of the Knox County Dental Society at the present time.
     On the 25th of June, 1896, Dr. Sargent was joined in wedlock to Miss Mary Bates, a daughter of Madison C. and Emma (Latimer) Bates, of Oberlin, Ohio. They have two children: Constance L., who was born at Huntington, West Virginia, on the 29th of September, 1897; and Hubert Drennan, whose birth occurred in Galesburg, on the 13th of March, 1904.
     Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Dr. Sargent has supported the men and measures of the republican party, being convinced that its principles are most conducive to good government. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Central Congregational church, of which he acts as deacon and has acted as trustee. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is a director in the Young Men's Christian Association. His salient characteristics are such as are worthy of emulation and have gained for him the respect and good-will of a large circle of warm friends.
PROFESSOR WILLIAM FREDERICK BENTLEY.
     William Frederick Bentley, director of the Knox Conservatory of Music and professor of singing in Knox College, has been a potent factor in the development of the musical taste of this section for many years. His native talent in this direction was soon manifest and after laying the foundation of a general education in a mastery of the fundamental principles of knowledge, he concentrated his efforts more and more largely upon the study of music, and thorough training in this land and abroad has qualified him for the position of responsibility that he has filled in connection with Knox College for more than a quarter of a century.
    Professor Bentley was born at Lenox, Ohio, September 12, 1859, and is a representative of an old New England family. His paternal grandfather, Arnold Bentley, was a native of Massachusetts and a blacksmith by trade, but for some years conducted a general store in Pittsfield, Massachusetts. He married Lois Beach and both lived to an advanced age, rearing several sons and daughters, including Anna, Mary, Lucy, Cyrus and Emily. The only son, Cyrus Bentley, the father of Professor Bentley, was born January 4, 1822, at Pittsfield, Massachusetts. The family soon after moved to East Otto, Cattaraugus county, New York, where the boy grew to manhood. He became a singing teacher and conductor of musical conventions, and when a young man removed to Ohio, settling in Ashtabula county, where he spent the greater part of his life. For three years he engaged in teaching music in Marietta, Ohio, and for about ten years was a professor of music in Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Among his pupils were: the late Charley Williams, the famous Evangelist singer; George W. Andrews, the distinguished organist, and many other people of renown in musical circles, including Professor Rice, now deceased, who was the former director of the Oberlin Conservatory of Music. Professor Cyrus Bentley was married in Harpersfield, Ohio, October 16, 1851, to Miss Harriet Prentice, a native of that state and a daughter of Daniel Prentice, who was born in Stonington, Connecticut, August 25, 1773, and as a young man came to Ohio and carried on business as a farmer and cattle buyer. He married Mary Atwater Hotchkiss, who was born June 21, 1779, at Cheshire, Connecticut, and they had several children, including John, Noyce, Henry, Eunice, Salina, Lucinda and Harriet. The marriage of Cyrus and Harriet (Prentice) Bentley was blessed by three children: Alice, now deceased, who was the wife of Corydon Sexton; Ralph Prentice, of Dorset, Ohio; and Professor Bentley of this review.
     The last named spent his youthful days upon his father's farm in Ashtabula county, Ohio, where he mastered the branches of learning taught in the district schools and later attended the public schools of Marietta, Ohio, the Normal school at Geneva, Ohio, and the high school of Oberlin. His father's recognition of his musical talent led to his education along that line and he was graduated from the Conservatory of Music of Oberlin College. He then went abroad for further study, spending three and one-half years in the musical centers of the old world, including Leipsic, Berlin, Paris and London, where he had the benefit of instruction from some of the ablest masters. In the meantime he had engaged in teaching music for two years and after his return from Europe he came to Galesburg, to accept the position of director of the Knox Conservatory of Music, in which capacity he has continued since 1885, making this one of the popular and well patronized departments of the college.
     Professor Bentley was married, November 28, 1883, to Julia Asenath Webster, a native of Geneva, Ohio, and a daughter of Dennis and Mary A. (Sampson) Webster, who were natives of Ohio and New Hampshire, respectively. Her father is now.deceased, but her mother still resides at Geneva, Ohio. In their family were four children, George, Julia, Mary and Harriet. Professor and Mrs. Bentley have a daughter, Florence May, who is now attending Knox College. The parents are members of the Central Congregational church and are well known in the city where their residence covers a period of twenty-six years. Their home has ever been a hospitable one and the center of a cultured circle of society. Professor Bentley has held to high ideals in his profession and his ability, based upon technical training and natural talent, and has well qualified himself to uphold the standard of his department and to stimulate his pupils with much of his own zeal and interest in and devotion to the work.
WILLIAM A. BARTLETT.
     William A. Bartlett, a well known and prosperous young citizen of Gales-burg, has here been engaged in the real-estate business since 1907. He was born in Galesburg on the 25th of October, 1882, his father being Frank Sears Bart-lett, a sketch of whom appears on another page of this volume. After acquiring his education in the schools of his native city he went to Winnipeg, Canada, there spending one year in the employ of the Deering Harvester Company. He next acted as a clerk in the stock house of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad for one year and then became engaged in the hardware business at Monmouth, Illinois, in association with his father-in-law, George A. Schussler, this relation being maintained for three years. On the expiration of that period he went to Racine, Wisconsin, as purchasing agent for the J. I. Case Plow Works, but resigned at the end of a year and removed to Colorado for the benefit of his health, remaining in that state for two years and having charge of a lumber concern. In 1907 he came to Galesburg, Illinois, and has since devoted his attention to real-estate interests here with excellent results, selling Red River lands in North Dakota.
        On the 30th of June, 1903, Mr. Bartlett was united in marriage to Miss Maude Frank Schussler, a daughter of George A. and Mary J. (Barnes) Schussler, of Monmouth, Illinois. In politics Mr. Bartlett is independent, supporting men and measures rather than party for party principles. He is a devoted and consistent member of the Universalist church and also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Elks Club, the Galesburg Club and the Country Club. His nature is social and his disposition cordial, and while he has at all times commanded the respect and admiration of his business associates, he has also enjoyed the warm friendship of those who have come within the closer circle of his acquaintance.
ANGUS MOOR.
     Angus Moor, who is now living retired on his farm on section 36, Rio township, was for many years successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising in this county. His birth occurred at Anson, Somerset county, Maine, on the 8th of February, 1835, his parents being Eber S. and Lydia T. (Daggett) Moor. The parents were also natives of Maine, the father's birth occurring on the 15th of October, 1807, and that of the mother on January 8, 1805. The paternal ancestors came from Massachusetts, the great-grandfather, John Moor, was a veteran of the Revolutionary war, having participated in the battle of Bunker Hill, but the mother was of English extraction. Mr. and Mrs. Moor were married in Maine, in November, 1830, and there they passed the early years of their domestic life. In 1844 they came west, Illinois at that time being considered the frontier, and in April of the following year they located on the farm, where our subject is now living. Mr. Moor devoted his energies to the further improvement and cultivation of this property and also raised and fed stock for the market during the remainder of his active life. He passed away on the homestead on the 4th of March, 1879, having attained the age of seventy-one years. Although he was not a professed Christian, nor affiliated with any church, he lived in the Christian spirit and exemplified many most estimable qualities of character. Of a kindly, generous nature, he was always ready to assist the unfortunate, being charitable in his criticism and lenient in his judgment. In politics he was a whig, but was never an office seeker, although he served very efficiently as road commissioner. He was survived for some years by his widow, who died on the 27th of December, 1889, at the venerable age of nearly eighty-five years. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Moor numbered six.
A lad of nine years when he came to Illinois with his parents, Angus Moor had begun his education, which he completed in Knox county. He shared with his people the hardships and privations incident to pioneer life, and although he was only a boy assisted much in the operation of the farm and the care of the stock. After leaving school he gave his entire time and attention to the tilling of the fields and the performance of other duties about the homestead until he had attained has majority. Confidence in himself and his acquirements induced him to launch upon a career as an independent agriculturist, and leaving home he engaged in farming for himself. He forsook his labors two years later, in 1859, and joined a party of gold seekers going to California. They made the trip in a prairie schooner and it was a long, hard journey, occupying several months. He remained on the coast prospecting for about eight years, meeting with but indifferent success, and then returned to Knox county, by the way of the Missouri river in a row boat. Upon his return in September, 1866, he again turned his attention to agricultural pursuits, ultimately acquiring the old home place, containing one hundred and thirty-seven acres, where he now lives. He has ever since made this place his home, but is now living retired, leaving to his son the operation of the farm. Mr. Moor always directed his undertakings along practically the same lines as his father, engaging in general farming and stock-raising, and met with gratifying success in both.
     On the 23d of December, 1882, Angus Moor was united in marriage to Mrs. Lydia F. Stevens, who was born at Atkinson, Maine, on the 17th of June, 1844. She was a daughter of George Daggett, a farmer of Maine, where he passed his entire life and Mrs. Moor was reared. In her early womanhood she was married to a Mr. Stevens and they removed to Winnebago county, Illinois, and there he died in 1878. Six children were born to them, five of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Moor became the parents of one son, Don Angus. He married Ethel Knox of this county, a daughter of Charles Knox, formerly of Wataga, but now of Iowa, and is living on his father's farm. In 1911, they made a visit to Maine and there Mrs. Moor passed away very suddenly of apoplexy, on August 31.
     In his political views Mr. Moor has always stanchly adhered to the principles of the republican party, but he has never aspired to public honors or the emoluments of office, although he meets the requirements of good citizenship by going to the polls on election day. The greater part of his life has been passed in the immediate vicinity of his present home, where he is widely known and has many loyal friends.
GEORGE D. AMENT.
George D. Ament, proprietor of the Galesburg Steam Laundry, was born in Pontiac, Illinois, July 23, 1871, a son of William T. and Harriet B. (Baker) Ament, both of whom were natives of the state of New York. The paternal grandfather was there also born and was a farmer by occupation but removed to Illinois with his family and both he and his wife died in La Salle county at an advanced age. They were the parents of four sons and a daughter, Oscar, Cyrus, Jutt, William T. and Catherine. William T. Ament was but a boy when he accompanied his parents on their removal from the Empire state to Ottawa, Illinois, where he was reared to manhood and obtained his education as a public-school student. He afterward removed to Pontiac, Illinois, where he engaged in the practice of law for many years. In this state he married Harriet B. Baker, whose parents were early settlers of La Salle county, Illinois, where they lived until called to their final rest. Her father was killed in a runaway accident when driving a young team. Her mother lived to be more than ninety years of age. Their children were James E., Joseph E., Cyrus, Charles and Harriet B. Unto Mr. and Mrs. William T. Ament there were born seven children, as follows: William L., deceased; Mabel, the wife of Sidney Herzberg, of Chicago; Charles, who has also passed away; Lou, the wife of Dr. W. L. Tallman, of Chicago; Joseph B., residing in Las Vegas, New Mexico; George D., of this review; and Harriet, the deceased wife of Glenn Martin. The father passed away when sixty-four years of age and the mother died two years later. He was a Presbyterian in religious faith while she held membership in the Episcopal church. He ranked high as a member of the bar and, in addition to the large private practice accorded him, he served as prosecuting attorney and was also at one time county judge of Livingston county.
     George D. Ament spent his youthful days in Pontiac, Illinois, in the manner of most boys who receive the stimulus and encouragement of good home training. He attended the public schools there and made his initial step in industrial circles as an employe of Henry Foster in the electrical business in Pontiac. Subsequently he became connected with the General Electric Company of Chicago, but afterward turned his attention to the laundry business in Pontiac and subsequently continued in the same line at Joliet, Illinois. He also spent one year in the laundry business in Los Angeles, California, and for four years was identified with real-estate interests and mining in that section of the country. He then returned to Joliet, where he again conducted a laundry until 1907, when he came to Galesburg and purchased the laundry business of E. J. Cowan of which he has since been proprietor, conducting an establishment under the name of the Galesburg Steam Laundry at Nos. 151-153 North Cedar street.
      Mr. Ament was married to Miss Analla Booth, a native of Logan county, Ohio, and a daughter of Thomas C. and Elizabeth (Young) Booth, natives of New Jersey and Pennsylvania respectively. Leaving the east they removed to Ohio and the mother died in Marion county, that state, but the father is still living. They were parents of the following children: Lorenzo W., Keokuk B., Harrison O., Osceola and Analla. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Ament was a native of England, who lived for a time in America but returned with his wife to their native land, where they spent their last days. They had three children, John, Thomas and Hester.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ament are identified with the Christian Science church and his political views connect him with the republican party. He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, to the Galesburg Club and to the Soan-getaha Country Club. He is thus well known in the social circles of the city where attractive personal qualities and a genial manner have gained him many friends. He also occupies a creditable position in business circles as a reliable, enterprising man and whatever success he has achieved is attributable to his own efforts, for he started out empty-handed and has worked his way upward through energy, determination and the improvement of the opportunities that have come to him.
WILLIAM BURNSIDE.
William Burnside, formerly prominently associated with the agricultural interests of Knox county but now living retired, still derives much of his income from his interests in farm property. He has passed the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey and the rest which he is enjoying is well merited for it has been won through the close application, unfaltering energy and unassailable integrity which he manifested when conducting his agricultural pursuits. He was born in Ohio, August 13, 1833, and was one of the eight children of William and Margaret (Callison) Burnside, who were natives of Virginia, the latter a daughter of Thomas Callison, who was a farmer of the Old Dominion. William Burnside, Sr., was reared in Virginia and, following his removal to Ohio, there engaged for a number of years in farming. Subsequently, however, he went to Indiana, but in the fall of 1850 came to Illinois, settling in Chestnut township, Knox county, where he purchased ninety acres of land, to which he added as opportunity offered and his financial resources permitted, until his farm embraced two hundred and forty acres of rich land. He died on the old homestead, at the age of eighty-four years, and his wife passed away at the age of seventy. She was a devoted member of the Methodist church and most carefully and conscientiously reared her family. The children were as follows: John, Anthony and Isaac, all now deceased; Elizabeth, the widow of John Hed-ley, of Kansas; William ; Mary, the widow of Samuel Coffman, of Chicago; and George, who is living in Abingdon, Illinois.
     William Burnside was three years old when his parents went to Indiana and was a youth of seventeen when the family came to Illinois. Here he was reared to manhood upon his father's farm in Knox county, attending the district schools in the winter seasons, and in the summer months aided in the cultivation of the home farm. The occupation to which he was reared he determined to make his life work and started out on his own account by renting a farm in Chestnut township. He carefully saved his earnings during that period and was at length enabled to purchase ninety acres, to which he added from time to time until he became the owner of fifteen hundred acres or more, thus winning a place among the most extensive landowners of central Illinois. The rapid settlement of this part of the state and the improvements which he placed upon his land greatly enhanced its value and won for him a position among the most prosperous agriculturists of Knox county. He engaged in farming and in raising and shipping stock until the fall of 1892, when he removed to Galesburg and purchased a fine home at the corner of Seminary and Grove streets. This he occupied until 1907, when he removed to his present residence, at No. 1078 North Broad street.
In 1861 Mr. Burnside was united in marriage to Miss Julia Terry, a daughter of John Terry. Mrs. Burnside was born in Knox county while her parents were natives of Virginia. The children of this marriage were six in number. Marcus T., who is now a farmer of Chestnut township, married Maude Cranston and has three children, Roy, Pearl and Orpha. Nellie is the wife of D. E. Meeks, of Galesburg, and they have two children, William and Fay. Charles S., a farmer living at Maquon, Illinois, married Jennie Clark. Fannie died in early childhood. Albert Guy, who is proprietor of a hotel at Spirit Lake, Iowa, married Mabel Ackerman and has one son, Carl. The youngest of the family is Carl S., who is operating one of. his father's farms in Chestnut township. The mother died in 1895, at the age of fifty-three years, and on the 24th of February, 1897, Mr. Burnside wedded Mrs. Lydia Edgerton, widow of Dr. R. C. Edgerton, and a daughter of John and Cordelia (Clark) Tiffany. She was born in Harpersfield, Delaware county, New York, June 8, 1842, and her parents were also natives of the Empire state although their ancestors came from Connecticut. Her grandfather, Horace Tiffany, was a native of Connecticut and of English descent. He married Martha Osborn and they had eight children, Hiram, John, Peter, Nathan, Eliza, Olive, Sallie and Charles. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. Burnside was John Clark and unto him and his wife, who died when a comparatively young woman, there was born a son and four daughters. John Tiffany, the father of Mrs. Burnside, was a soldier in a New York regiment in the Civil war and died from illness while in the service. His wife lived to be sixty-three years of age and reared their family of five children, Louise, Hiram, Lydia, Mary and Peter. By her former marriage Mrs. Burnside had one son, Hubert C. Edgerton, who is married and lives in Burley, Idaho. Mrs. Burnside belongs to the Universalist church. Mr. Burnside votes with the republican party and has filled the office of road commissioner but has not taken an active part in politics because of the demands made upon him by his extensive business interests. His real-estate holdings are the visible evidence of a life of well directed energy and thrift. Starting out empty-handed, he made the best possible use of his time and opportunities, and by honorable and straightforward methods, coupled with unflagging industry, gained a position among the prosperous and honored residents of this section of the state. His life may well serve as an inspiration and an example to others who desire to attain success and an untarnished name.
JOHN DONNINGTON BARTLETT, M. D.
     Dr. John Donnington Bartlett, an able physician and surgeon of Galesburg, is numbered among the worthy native sons of that city, his birth having there occurred on the 30th of July, 1880. A sketch of his father, Frank Sears Bartlett, appears on another page of this work. He pursued his early education in the public schools of Galesburg and was graduated from the high school in 1897. Subsequently he entered Lombard College and wras graduated from that institution with the class of 1901, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts. Having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he matriculated in Rush Medical College of Chicago, Illinois, and completed the prescribed course in 1905. Following his graduation he spent six months at the Lying-in Hospital as interne and during the next year and a half was associated with Dr. Nicholas Senn as interne at St. Joseph's Hospital. He acted as surgeon of the Chicago police department for three years and was also examining physician of the Police Benevolent Association, while for two years he served as physician at the Riverview Emergency Hospital. Dr. Bartlett was appointed by examination to the rank of first lieutenant in the Medical Reserve Corps of the United States army and was commissioned by President Taft on the nth of September, 1911. He maintained his office at No. 823 Sheridan road, Chicago, for three years, and on the 1st of January, 1911, came to Galesburg, having here been engaged in general practice to the present time. As a representative of the medical profession he has won a gratifying measure of success, enjoying an extensive practice that has come to him in recognition of his skill and ability in the application of remedial agencies. He acted as university marshal of the medical department of the University of Chicago in 1902 and in the line of his profession is connected with the Chicago Medical Society, the Physicians Club of Galesburg, the Physicians Club of Chicago, the Knox County Medical Society and the American Medical Association.
     On the 4th of September, 1904, Dr. Bartlett was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Letitia Booker, who was born in Helena, Montana, on the 3d of October, 1880, her parents being George C. and Martha Elizabeth Booker. The father's birth occurred in St. Louis, Missouri, on the 7th of February, 1838, while the mother was born in Jefferson City, Missouri, on the 23d of January, 1855. George C. Booker journeyed westward in 1865, finally locating in Helena, Montana, where he became identified with mining interests. At the present time he is living retired at Helena, enjoying the fruits of his former toil in well earned ease. In Masonry he has attained high rank, now acting as secretary of the Helena and state Masonic bodies. Unto him and his wife were born three children, as follows: Mrs. Bartlett; Clinton Talbott; and Lester Harry. Mrs. Bartlett was graduated from the high school of Helena with the class of 1898 and subsequently pursued a special course of study in the University of Chicago. She had charge of the kindergarten department of the Helena public schools for four years and is still a member of the kindergarten board at that place. She now belongs to the Mosaic and Tourist Clubs of Galesburg and has already won many friends in this city. By her marriage she has become the mother of one son, John Donnington, Jr., whose birth occurred in Chicago, Illinois, on the 10th of March, 1909.
In politics Dr. Bartlett is a republican, while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Universalist church. His wife is a member of the Episcopal church. His fraternal relations are with Chicago Lodge, No. 4, B. P. O. E., and Vesper Lodge, No. 584, A. F. & A. M. He is likewise a valued member of the Galesburg Club, the Sigma Nu fraternity and Phi Rho Sigma, a medical fraternity. Dr. Bartlett is a popular young man, making steady progress in his profession and gaining steadily in the friendship of those with whom he comes in contact.
MRS. FREDERICKA GOLDQUIST.
    One of modern philosophical trend of thought has written "in the good that comes to us, by the good that comes to the world through us, is the measure of our success," and judged in this way the life of Mrs. Fredericka Goldquist was a most successful one. Her labors were a continuous element for good in the community in which she lived and her life was, indeed, a serviceable one for she was continually holding out a helping hand, or speaking a word of encouragement, or kindly advice. She held closely to the high standards of Christian living and it has fallen to the lot of but few women in Galesburg to fill so large a sphere of genuine usefulness as did Mrs. Goldquist, who passed away on the 27th of March, 1889.
    Fredericka Peterson was a native of Sweden, born in the parish of Haggersda, November 20, 1824, and was, therefore, twenty-three years of age when in 1848 she accompanied her father's family to the new world, their destination being Knox county, Illinois. This was the year of the terrible cholera scourge. The little band of emigrants first contracted the disease while passing through the Erie canal. As they proceeded on their journey by way of the Great Lakes and across the prairies of Illinois in lumber wagons, victim after victim was buried by the way. The mother and a brother of Mrs. Goldquist were of the number. Strange as it may seem, Mrs. Goldquist, although a constant caretaker of the dying and the dead, experienced no touch of the disease. The travelers proceeded to Andover, Henry county, where a heroic physician, Dr. Calhoun, came and ministered to them, but he too fell ill and passed away. After the scourge had spent its force the family moved to Knoxville, where they lived for two years. They then moved to Galesburg. Mrs. Goldquist was thus one of the first Swedish residents of the county.
    Soon after taking up their abode in Galesburg she was married to Claus Olofson Goldquist, who died June 5, 1864, leaving her with five children. One of the local papers in writing of her and her .experiences at this period in her life said,"the quality of her nature and her strength of character are seen in the spirit with which she assumed the burden thus imposed by death upon her, and the complete manner in which she met this responsibility." All the children were given a public school education and had the joy of living in a cheerful and inspiring home atmosphere.
     In spite of the responsibilities and cares of home, Mrs. Goldquist found time to take an active part in good work for the benefit of others. Her life was an illustration of interested unselfishness. During the war she was an active member of the Soldiers' Aid Society and met often with Mrs. T. L. Clark, Mrs. Clement Leech, Mrs. D. C. Raymond and others of the good women of the city, in the basement of the First Congregational church, where boxes were filled with articles for the soldiers. When, after the war, this organization became the Dorcas society, Mrs. Goldquist remained a member and was for over ten years a ward visitor for the Seventh ward. There are scores of people in that ward who can recall her kindnesses. When the Dorcas society was merged in the Free Kindergarten Association, Mrs.. Goldquist retained her connection, and took a deep interest in this institution. It is said that, being unable to attend the last meeting of the association, she sent an order for some shoes for the little folks in need of them. She was seventh ward visitor also for the association.
    In addition Mrs. Goldquist was at the head of an industrial school at the First Baptist church and one afternoon every week met twenty-five or thirty girls in one of the rooms at that edifice. In this work she had the help of several of the church women. She made her old age bright with helpful and beautiful deeds.
    When one attempts to analyze the secret of Mrs. Goldquist's usefulness, he finds it in her sincere faith in Christ and in her desire to serve Him by ministering through every possible, accessible channel, to mankind. She was a member of the First Baptist church for nearly forty years, and all through was active and interested. For a long time she was a busy member of the various women's societies. For thirty-five years she was a teacher in the Sunday school. Her class was composed for over twenty years of young ladies, who as the years went by gave place to others many of these being pupils of the high, school. She was a successful and inspiring teacher, so much so that at times her class room was crowded. .While she was obliged on account of her failing health to relinquish some of her church work, she continued her labor of love in the Sunday school. The last time that she met her class was on Sunday previous to her illness, and that she could not be present the following Sabbath was to her a cause of sincere regret. Her heart was in the work. Owing to her kind, loving and helpful influence many of the lives of those belonging to her class have been moulded along Christian lines. She was regarded with affection by these pupils and they will never forget her.
     Mrs. Goldquist, until her illness, was a constant attendant at the church services. She appeared in close touch with divine things. She was always ready to serve. But she also took a keen interest in the affairs of the city and was a faithful reader of current events. It is said of her that her nature was kind and deeply sympathetic and that any case of distress or suffering appealed strongly to her. At the time of the Chicago fire and of the Kansas famine she was a zealous solicitor for contributions for relief. It is said of her that as a ward visitor when she heard of a case of need she would go to the house, not send some one else. With her sympathy was combined a bright and cheerful disposition that made her presence welcome. All through she has also felt concern in all efforts to better the community. In the early days of the W. C. T. U. she was a member of that organization.
     If lives are to be measured by kind acts, by sympathetic words and by good influences, then Mrs. Goldquist's life deserves the warmest praise and the loving tribute. Her career can be said to be worked like golden threads into the better natures of hundreds of men and women here. When death called Mrs. Gold-quist the Rev. W. H. Geistweite, of Chicago, delivered a most earnest and impressive address upon the text, "She hath done what she could." Hers was the history of a life of responsibility, of toil and of sacrifice; a life that was one long labor of love in which she wrought not for herself but for others. She left her impress for good upon the city in which she long made her home and the memory of such a one can never die while living monuments remain, upon which were imprinted the touch of her noble soul.
FRANK E. ROGERS.
Frank E. Rogers, who has been in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company continuously for the past thirty-six years, was born in Warren, Trimble county, Ohio, on the 30th of March, 1848. His father, Pitt D. Rogers, was born and reared on a farm in the vicinity of Norwich, Connecticut, whence he removed in the early '40s to Trimble county, Ohio. There he met and subsequently married Miss Effie Ewalt, a native of that state, who passed away when our subject was in his first year. Pitt D. Rogers engaged in buying and selling stock in Ohio, where lie resided until about 1845 or 1846, when he came to Knoxville. He there conducted the old Hibbard House, of which he subsequently became the proprietor, until his death in 1896. For his second wife he chose Miss Lavina P. Hibbard, whose father was one of the pioneer settlers of Knoxville, where he built the hotel that bore his name. Air. Rogers was a member of the Episcopal church and while residing in Connecticut he belonged to the state militia.
    The only child born unto his parents, after the death of his mother, Frank E. Rogers was taken to the home of his paternal grandparents in Connecticut. There he passed his boyhood and early youth, pursuing his studies in the common schools. He subsequently joined his father in Knoxville, completing his education in the old college at Abingdon, this state. After leaving school he returned to the hotel, where he assisted his father until January, 1875, when he ¦became a freight brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He was later promoted to the position of conductor, but is now and has been for some time in the block office of this company at Galesburg.
    On the 10th of November, 1878, Mr. Rogers was united in marriage to Miss Ella C. Sipherd, a daughter of Jacob and Mary (Webb) Sipherd, farming people residing three miles north of Knoxville. Four children have been born of this marriage, as follows: Harry E., who is in the railway passenger servicein Chicago; George E., who is engaged in the real-estate business in New York city; Clara, the wife of H. W. Caldwell, of Galesburg, by whom she has had one daughter, Winifred; and Ralph Van, in the government irrigation service in the state of Washington.
    In matters of faith Mr. and Mrs. Rogers are Presbyterians, and his political support he gives to such men and measures as he deems best qualified to protect the interests of the majority. Fraternally he is identified with no organization save the Order of Railway Conductors, his local connection being with Division No. 83 of Galesburg. Mr. Rogers is one of the oldest men in the company's employ, in years of continuous service, and is well known to all of the local trainmen among whom he numbers many stanch friends of long standing.
STEPHEN A. INGERSOLL.
     Stephen A. Ingersoll, president of the Galesburg Coulter-Disc Company, is at the head of one of the important industrial and manufacturing enterprises of the city, contributing substantially to its business development. In the management of this undertaking he displays characteristic energy, determination and foresight, qualities which have enabled him to overcome obstacles, meet competition and so control his activities that success in substantial measure has resulted. He was born in Sullivan county, New York, near Barryville, April 27, 1858, a son of Abraham and Sarah (Swartont) Ingersoll, who were likewise natives of the Empire state. The paternal grandfather, however, Avas a native of Pennsylvania and was of English lineage. Unto him and his wife were born a son and five daughters, including Mrs. Sarah Kent and Abraham Ingersoll. The latter was reared in Sullivan county, New York, and for many years engaged in the lumber business but afterward turned his attention to farming. Coming to Illinois in January, 1867, he settled near Wenona, Illinois, where he purchased land, devoting his attention to its development and improvement until the death of his wife, after which he made his home with his children. He had married Sarah Swartont whose father, a native of New York, followed farming near Port Jervis, Orange county. New York. To Mr. Swartout and his wife were born a son and five daughters, including Peter, Sarah, Eliza, Jane and Mrs. Abraham Ingersoll. As stated, the last named passed away on the old homestead, near Wenona, Illinois. Mr. Ingersoll died at Sandoval, Illinois, in 1895, at the age of ninety-five years. He was remarkable in that his eyesight remained good through his entire life, never requiring the use of glasses. He was a democrat in politics and while living in the east filled several minor offices. Both he and his wife were members of the Congregational church and were ever loyal to their professions. Their family numbered the following children: Matilda, deceased, who was the wife of Frederick Nodine; Susan, who became the wife of John Knight and is now deceased; Eliza, the wife of Thomas B. Kent, of Kalispell, Montana; Emma, the wife of Charles Allen, of Forrest, Illinois; Naomi, the wife of Peter Marker, of Rutland, Illinois; Sarah, who died unmarried; and Stephen A., of this review.
     The last named was eight years of age when the family came to Illinois, so that he was reared upon the old homestead farm in La Salle county. The summer months were devoted to the work of the fields and the winter seasons to the acquirement of an education in the district schools until he entered the high school of Wenona. Later he spent the greater part of four years as a pupil in the Northern Indiana Normal College of Valparaiso, after which he took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for a time, as he did also the occupation of farming. He then removed to Marion county, Illinois, where he engaged in the lumber business from 1881 until 1905, living at Sandoval. In the latter year he came to Galesburg. In the meantime he had turned his attention to manufacturing interests and on coming to this city removed the plant to this place. They now manufacture agricultural specialties, disc blades, plow discs, and kindred articles. They employ from fifty to one hundred people, according to the season. Their building is located at the western edge of the city and is one hundred and forty-four by two hundred and sixteen feet. It is thoroughly equipped with modern machinery and everything necessary to facilitate the business and produce an output that will find a ready and profitable sale on the market. The officers of the Galesburg Coulter-Disc Company at present are: Stephen A. Ingersoll, president; R. C. Ingersoll, vice president; H. A. Nelson, secretary; and L. P. Wertman, treasurer.
     In November, 1884, Mr. Ingersoll was married to Miss Cordelia L. Gaylord, a native of Illinois and a daughter of Perry B. and Cordelia (Cowles) Gay-lord, who were natives of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Ingersoll had a family of five children. Roy C, the eldest, married Lulu Hinchliff. Winifred has spent seven years in Knox College, pursuing the musical, scientific and classical courses and is now in the senior year of the regular course. Harold G. was graduated from Knox College in June, 1911, and now has charge of his father's ranch in Judith Basin, Montana. Jennie was drowned in August, 1909, when seventeen years of age. Stephen, who completes the family, is a pupil in the high school. The parents are members of the Central Congregational church and Mr. Ingersoll's views upon the temperance question are indicated in the fact that he votes with the prohibition party. His influence is always found on the side of right, progress, truth, reform and improvement, and his cooperation may always be counted upon to further any movement or measure calculated to advance the general good. His long life has ever been honorable and upright in all of its phases and he sustains an unassailable reputation for business integrity as well as for enterprise and careful management.
PROFESSOR WILLIAM BLAKE CARLTON.
William Blake Carlton, teacher of voice and head of the musical history and sight-singing department of the Knox Conservatory of Music at Galesburg, was born at Versailles, Tennessee, November 15, 1873. He was a son of William and Nancy Virginia (Williams) Carlton and a grandson of Blake and Mary (Walker) Carlton. The family comes of English ancestry and the name was originally spelled Carleton. Blake Carlton, a native of North Carolina, was a farmer by occupation and met an accidental death when about forty Thomas and Minos. The maternal grandparents of William Blake Carlton were James G. and Phoebe (Spence) Williams, the former born in Brunswick county, Virginia, May 2, 1812. He was of German descent and during his active life followed farming and blacksmithing. He reached the venerable age of eighty-six years while his wife was seventy-eight years of age at the time of her death. They had five children, who lived to maturity, as follows: Nelson, Elizabeth, Nancy Virginia, Adna and Enoch.
    Both William and Nancy Virginia Carlton were natives of Tennessee and the former, who was reared in Rutherford county of that state, still makes his home there, having devoted his entire life to general agricultural pursuits. At the time of the Civil war he espoused the cause of the Confederacy and went to the front as a private of Company A, Twenty-fourth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry. Following the cessation of hostilities he took the oath of allegiance to the United States government. In community affairs he has been somewhat active, serving for one term as tax assessor and for many years as a member of the school-board, the cause of education finding in him a stalwart friend. He is a member of the Primitive Baptist church while his wife holds membership in the Presbyterian church. Of their family of seven children three were sons and four were daughters, as follows: Mary, the wife of Andrew Jackson, of Murfreesboro, Tennessee; Adna, the widow of Charles H. Hale, residing near Versailles, Tennessee; Elizabeth, who married Jasper W. Jackson, of Nashville, Tennessee; William Blake, of this review; Nelson Clay, of Springfield, Tennessee; Ella, the wife of W. Freeland Jackson, of Eagleville, Tennessee; and Dr. John D., of Union City, Tennessee. William Carlton was twice married, his first wife having been Sarah Spence, by whom he had two children, of whom one reached adult age, James F., now of Brownwood, Texas, while the other died in infancy.
     William Blake Carlton was reared in Rutherford county, Tennessee, spending his youthful days upon his father's farm, in the vicinity of which was received his English education in the district schools of that county and at Haley, Tennessee. When eighteen years of age he started out in the world on his own account by clerking in a general store and later was connected with a grocery house in Springfield, Tennessee, for seven years in the capacity of salesman. He then became one of the proprietors of that establishment in partnership with his brother Nelson Clay, under the firm style of Carlton Brothers, which business association was maintained for five years. On the expiration of that period he came to Galesburg and pursued a course in Brown's Business College. He recognized the fact that nature had endowed him with a good singing voice and he was ambitious to develop his talents in that direction, so that he entered the Knox Conservatory of Music, pursuing the full course and graduating with the class of 1908. He taught for a year and a half, instructing such pupils as could not be accommodated in the college, beginning this work in 1907. In September, 1908, he became a regular teacher of voice in Knox College and the following year was made head of the department of musical history and sight reading. In this connection he is proving not only that he has musical talent himself, but that he also has ability as an instructor, his pupils making rapid and substantial progress under his direction in proportion to their talent.
  On the 18th of June, 1902, Mr. Carlton was married to Miss Ellen Kendall Avery, who was born in Galesburg, March 9, 1881. Her parents, Robert I. and Sarah (Ayers) Avery, were also natives of Illinois and in this state her father died in 1892 and her mother in 1898. They were the parents of six children, Minnie, Fred, Sarah, Cornelia, Ellen and Elizabeth. The paternal grandfather of Mrs. Carlton was George Avery, one of the pioneer residents of Knox county and a charter member of the Congregational church of Galesburg. Her maternal grandparents were Thomas N. and Sarah Ayers, whose family numbered the following, named: Cornelia, Sarah, Jessie, Abbie, Fannie, George, Henry, James and Nelson. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Carlton have been born three daughters, Margaret E., Esther A. and Sarah Jean. The parents are both members of the Congregational church and in Galesburg they are widely and favorably known, Mrs. Carlton having spent her entire life here, while Professor Carlton has gained an extensive acquaintance during the period of his residence in this city. His work is recognized as a valuable factor in upholding the standard of the departments with which he is connected, and his own love for and enthusiastic interest in music does much to inspire his pupils and to promote musical culture and taste in this city.
WILLIAM LUCAS STEELE.
William Lucas Steele, superintendent of the city schools of Galesburg and prominently known in educational circles throughout the state, was born in Adams county, Ohio, July 22, 1854, a son of William Lucas and Anna (Johnston) Steele. The father was born near Londonderry, Ireland, in which city he acquired his education. ITe came to America when about twenty years of age and devoted his life to farming. His wife was born near Chillicothe, Ohio, but her parents were natives of Scotland and resided for a time in Nova Scotia before coming to the United States.
During his early boyhood William L. Steele accompanied his mother on her removal to Randolph county, Illinois, where he attended a country school during the winter months until fourteen years of age. Lie afterward spent a year as a public-school student in Monmouth, Illinois, and obtained his advanced training in Monmouth College, from which he received the degree of Master of Arts, while Knox College has since conferred upon him the Ph. D. degree. Difficulties and obstacles have at times beset his path. His father died when he was but a year old and his mother was left with three small children, her property inheritance consisting of a farm, which she continued to manage after her husband's death. It was in 1859, when her son, William L. Steele, was five years of age, that she removed with her family from southern Ohio to a small farm in southern Illinois, where the succeeding ten years were passed, at which time the mother removed to Monmouth in order to educate her children, and Mr. Steele was given the opportunities hitherto indicated. He early knew what it was to labor and to meet the heavy responsibilities of life. At eight years of age he worked in the fields with a team and when twelve years of age was doing a man's regular work. He was ambitious to learn and made good use of his opportunities in that direction and while pursuing his college course engaged in teaching in the rural schools for three winters. Following the completion of his collegiate work in 1876 he was elected principal of the schools at Yates City, Illinois, which position he held until January, 1883, when he resigned to .take up the duties of county superintendent of Knox county, to which position he had been elected in November, 1882. He thus served until September, 1885, when he resigned to accept the superintendency of the city schools of Galesburg. He has since been at the head of public instruction in this city, covering a period of twenty-seven years, and the present efficient school system is largely the monument to his indefatigable energy and ability in the field of his chosen profession. He has cooperated in many movements which have stimulated intellectual progress, always doing everything in his power to disseminate that knowledge which constitutes the basis of a higher civilization. When principal of the schools at Yates City he founded the Yates City School and Public Library, which contained over two thousand volumes when he removed to Galesburg. While serving as county superintendent of schools he prepared the first course of study or outline of school work for the country schools of the county. This was published by the board of supervisors and ten copies placed in each district. During his incumbency as superintendent of schools in Galesburg the high school has made remarkable development. It was the first public high school in the state to introduce manual training and the first high school in the country to adopt the elective system in studies. He is continually seeking out new methods to promote the work of the schools, rendering it of practical A^alue as a preparation for life's responsible duties.
    In addition to filling the office of county superintendent of schools of Knox county from December, 1882, until September, 1885, Professor Steele has filled other positions of trust and prominence. He has been honored with the presidency of the Central Illinois Teachers' Association, the Schoolmasters' Club of Illinois and also the Illinois State Teachers' Association. He is at present a member of the state commission of education, to which position he was appointed by the governor. His efforts have done much to stimulate coworkers with much of his own zeal and enthusiasm and while working toward high ideals his methods have always been of a most practical and resultant character. In addition to his labors in the field of education he has since 1909 been president of the Fidelity Savings & Loan Society, an institution whose assets are over eight hundred thousand dollars. He has also been a member of the board of directors of the First National Bank since 1905 and has been a member of the board of Hope cemetery association since 1894. He has been the secretary of the board of trustees of the Presbyterian church for over twenty years, of which church he is a member.
     On the 20th of October, 1887, in Chicago, William L. Steele was united in marriage to Miss Helen Carter Benedict, a daughter of the late Rev. Thomas N. Benedict. For several years prior to her marriage Mrs. Steele was a successful teacher in the Galesburg schools. She died May 3, 1893, survived by her two daughters, Gertrude H. and Helen B. Her death was the occasion of deep regret to many friends as well as to her immediate family, for her many excellent traits of character had endeared her to all who knew her Mr. Steele's political allegiance has always been given to the republican party, though he has not taken an active part in politics since leaving the county superintendency in 1885. In manner he is quiet and unassuming, yet is constantly working with a definite purpose in view and seldom fails in its accomplishment.
AUGUST RINELLA.
August Rinella, who for the past thirteen years has been engaged in the wholesale and retail fruit and confectionery business in Galesburg. was born in Termini, Italy, on October 19, 1869. He is a son of Samuel and Josephine (Cardarone) Rinella, natives of the same place, the father's birth occurring on the 3d of June, 1846, and that of the mother on the 25th of September, 1856. Samuel Rinella resided in his native land, engaging in farming, until 1890, when with his wife and family, all except our subject, he emigrated to the United States, having located in Chicago, where he successfully conducted a fruit market for fifteen years. At the expiration of that period he retired and removed to Kewanee, this state, and there he and the mother and five younger members of their family continue to live. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rinella, as follows: August, our subject; Joseph; Anthony; James; John; and Angelo. The parents are communicants of the Roman Catholic church, and his political support the father gives to the democratic party.
The first twenty-four years in the life of August Rinella were spent in Italy, to whose schools he is indebted for his education. After laying aside his text-books he assisted his father in the work of the farm until he had attained his majority. He then entered the Italian army, as is customary in that country, serving for three years as a musician. At the expiration of his period of enlistment, in 1893, he took passage for the United States to join his people, who came to this country about the time he joined the army. During the first two years of his residence in America he worked for his father, but at the end of that time he started a business of his own that he conducted for three years. As competition was very keen in Chicago, he looked about for a location elsewhere, deciding in favor of Galesburg, where he located in 1898. Here he established a wholesale and retail fruit and confectionery business, that has prospered from the very first. Mr. Rinella is a business man of unusual capabilities, and although he had only lived in the United States for five years when he removed to Galesburg, he early manifested his ability to successfully compete with merchants, who had been born and reared in this country and were thoroughly familiar with its commercial conditions and methods. He has built up an extensive local patronage and also enjoys an excellent country trade, increasing so rapidly that it now requires the services of four salesmen to call upon his customers.
In Chicago on the 2d of November, 1894, Mr. Rinella was united in marriage to Miss Josephine Caruso, a daughter of Philip and Josephine (Purpera) Caruso. Mrs. Rinella was born in Termini, on November 1, 1873, and there she was reared and educated. Her parents, who were farming people, were natives of the same place, the father being born in 1829 and the mother ten years later. There the father passed away in 1891. The mother and family remained in Italy until 1893, when they emigrated to the United States, locating in Chicago, but Mrs. Caruso now makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. Rinella, at Galesburg. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Caruso numbered ten children, as follows: Antonema, the wife of Anthony Guiffre, of Chicago; Frank, who is living in Galesburg; Gidia, who died in Italy; Philip, whose death occurred in Chicago; Marie and Gustie, who both died before leaving their native land; Carmila, who passed away in Chicago; Josephine, now Mrs. August Rinella; August, living in Chicago; and Joseph, who died in that city. Mr. and Mrs. Rinella have had the following children, namely: Josephine, born October 7, 1895; Samuel, born March 9, 1897; Gustie, born January 17, 1900; Philip, born July 4, 1902; Joseph, born March 13, 1906; Mary, born October 8, 1908, and who has passed away; and August. Jr., born May 19, 1910.
     Mr. and Mrs. Rinella are Roman Catholics and belong to Corpus Christi parish, and he is a member of the Knights of Columbus. As one of the enterprising and progressive business men of the city Mr. Rinella belongs to the Retail Merchants Association. In matters politic he is a democrat, having given his unqualified support to that party ever since granted the right of franchise through naturalization. During the period of his residence in Galesburg he has shown himself to be in every way a most desirable citizen, possessing many substantial personal qualities. His integrity in all business transactions has always been found to be above questioning and he is thoroughly loyal to the country of his adoption.
AARON BOWERS.
Aaron Bowers is a retired farmer living with his sister, Miss Elizabeth Bowers, at No. 371 West North street in Galesburg. He was born in Highland county, Ohio, March 21, 1829, and is a son of Silas and Phoebe (Lewis) Bowers, who were natives of Virginia or Pennsylvania. The maternal grandparents were Jonathan and Elizabeth (Feasel) Lewis, both of whom lived to old age and reared a family of several children, namely: Isaac, Phoebe, Aaron, John, Christina, Nancy and Barney. Silas Bowers, the father of our subject, became a farmer of Highland county, Ohio, and afterward, removing westward, was an early settler of Parke county, Indiana. He passed away in Vermilion county, Indiana, when about sixty years of age. His wife survived him and passed away in 1876 at the advanced' age of eighty-two years and eight months. She was a consistent member of the Methodist church. In their family were ten children, namely: Mary Ann, who is the widow of John Wilson and resides in Sigourney, Iowa; Aaron, of this review; Elizabeth, living in Galesburg; Sarah, the wife of J. H. Griggs, of Wheaton, Illinois; Christina, the deceased wife of William Redford; Lucinda, the deceased wife of J. A. McCoy; and four who passed away in early life.
     Aaron Bowers spent a part of his youthful days in Ohio and also remained for a time in Indiana. He pursued his education in one of the old-time, log-cabin subscription schools. He was a particularly fine speller and knew the old elementary spelling book by heart. In 1855 he came to Illinois, settling in Warren county, where he purchased a quarter section of land in Coldbrook, for which he paid twenty-five dollars per acre. Later he bought a farm in Floyd township, where he now owns four hundred and one and a half acres, in addition to his one hundred and sixty-acre tract in Coldbrook township and a farm of two hundred and forty acres in Iowa. He lived in Coldbrook and Floyd townships for forty-five years but has made his home in Galesburg for the past eleven years and in this city owns a fine home where he lives retired, he and his sister Elizabeth living together. While his life was devoted mainly to general agricultural pursuits, in which line of business he won substantial success, he has also done some public service, acting as road commissioner for twelve years and also as school director for one term.
    Elizabeth Bowers was born in Parke county, Indiana, October 31, 1833, and has always remained with her brother, acting as his housekeeper. She is a very devoted member of the Methodist church and takes a most helpful part in its work. Mr. Bowers was formerly a member of the Masonic fraternity and still holds his Masonic papers. He is yet a member of the Odd Fellows lodge at Cameron. He is now more than eighty-two years of age and his life has been that of a successful farmer and stockman. He began as a poor boy without money and has made all of his property himself, placing his dependence upon energy, industry and determination. He certainly well deserves the prosperity that came to him. He has been a resident of this part of the state for fifty-six years and its history is therefore largely familiar to him, while in the work of its agricultural development he has borne an important part.
CHARLES S. CLARK.
One of the most extensive landowners and successful agriculturists of Victoria township is Charles S. Clark, who in addition to the duties connected with the operation of his extensive acreage is officially connected with a number of the leading banking institutions of Knox county. He is a native of New York, his birth occurring in Roxbury, Delaware county, on the 4th of June, 1835, and the eldest son of Job W. and Hepsey (Woods) Clark, while his paternal grandfather was Hazard Clark. The father was born in Berkshire, Massachusetts, on the 7th of July, 1812, while the mother was a native of Roxbury, her birth occurring in 1815. In his early manhood Job W. Clark came to New York, locating in Roxbury, where on the 13th of July, 1834, he was united in marriage to Miss Woods. There they spent the early years of their domestic life, but in 1855 they came west, and in December of that year settled in the village of Victoria. Mr. Clark subsequently purchased a quarter section of land west of there, known as the Mound farm. Later he and his wife removed to an eighty-acre tract in Victoria township, and there he passed away on the 24th of January, 1884, his wife surviving until the 13th of October, 1886, when her death occurred on the home farm. Both were laid to rest in the cemetery at Victoria. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Clark there were born six children, the eldest of whom is Charles S., of this sketch. William Perry, who was born on June n, 1839, now residing in Talmage, Nebraska, married Adaline Hines, a native of Victoria, from whom he was subsequently divorced. Of this marriage there were born three children: Carrie Augusta, who is deceased; Charles Perry; and William Bird, who is also deceased. On the 12th of March, 1887, he was married to Mary Peterson, also of Victoria, and they have three children: Marion Caroline; Ella May; and Mary Louise. Marian A., whose birth occurred on February 14, 1846, married Charles D. Sornborger, who was born in Victoria on the 26th of October, 1843. Their marriage occurred on the 12th of April, 1870, and on the 5th of March, seven years later, she passed away and was buried in the cemetery at Victoria. Unto them there were born three sons: Clifford Ford, whose natal day was the 12th of June, 1871; Clyde Wilson, born on July 24, 1874; and Earl Charles, who was born on August 1.3, 1877, and died on the 8th of April, 1878. Judson E., the fourth in order of birth of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Job W. Clark, was born in February, 1848, and died in 1850. Sarah Ella was born on Christmas day, 1850, and on the 29th of March, 1871, she was married to Elmer C. Powell, of Springfield, Ohio, whose natal day was November 1, 1849. Unto them were born the following children: Osborne Wayne, Augusta, Maurice Clark, Mabel Marion, Mildred Bell, Reed McKinley and Sybil Marie. Luman Reed was united in marriage on the 23d of May, 1884, to Matilda R. Cummings, who was born on the 14th of June, 1859, and she died in Kansas on the 20th of March, 1894. Of this marriage there were born five children, Arthur Wilcox, Nellie Belle, Charles, John Gilmore and Luman Reed, Jr.
   Charles S. Clark was educated in the common schools of his native state, where he spent the first twenty years of his life. After the family removed to Victoria he began his independent business career, and for two years thereafter clerked in Whitting & Copley's mercantile establishment. Much of his life having been spent on a farm, he was thoroughly familiar with agricultural pursuits, and as this vocation seemed to afford better opportunities of advancement than commercial lines he left the store and the succeeding two years devoted to farming. In i860 he made a trip to the mining sections of Colorado, making the journey with a team and wagon. There he secured a gold claim and spent eight months in prospecting. At the expiration of that period he returned to Victoria and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres a mile east of town. He subsequently disposed of this property and bought the place where he is now living, located on the east side of the north and south road in section 7, Victoria township, containing one hundred and thirty acres of fertile land, that is well improved and carefully kept up. In the operation of his fields Mr. Clark has always manifested the intelligence and capability that characterizes the successful business man in any line of activity, and as a result he has been unusually prosperous. Well tilled and carefully cultivated land, where all other conditions are favorable, invariably responds to the attention bestowed upon it by yielding abundant harvests, and such has been the experience of Mr. Clark, who annually realizes a handsome dividend from his fields. In connection with diversified farming he raises stock, and this branch of his business has also proven to be very remunerative. As his means have warranted he has added to his holdings until he now owns eleven hundred acres of land, all of which is under cultivation. With the exception of two eighty-acre tracts that are located in Copley township, all of his land is in Victoria township. All of the buildings now standing on his homestead have been erected during the ownership of Mr. Clark, with the exception of the residence. He has large, substantially constructed barns and outbuildings for his stock, which is of a good grade, and ample provision is also made for the protection of his grains and farming implements.
     On the 21st of March, 1861, Mr. Clark was married to Miss Almina C. Hedstrom, who was born at Farmington, Illinois, on the 12th of October, 1840, and passed away on the farm, where Mr. Clark now resides on November 5, 1887, of typhoid fever. She is buried in the cemetery at Victoria. Her father was a Swedish minister and her mother a sister of Anson Sornborger, formerly of Worcester, Oswego county, New York. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Clark there were born five children. Irwin J., who is the eldest, was born on the 23d of September, 1862, and died on October 5, 1888. Mary Lois, who was born on the 19th of May, 1864, married Newton C. Robbins, of Copley township, and they have nine children, Glenn, Maurine, Edith, Eva, Reuben, Stewart, Howard, Jean and Lucille. Charles Delbert, who was born on November 14, 1866, and died in April, 1898, married Nettie Doak, this event occurring on the 5th of November, 1895. Unto them were born two sons, John Stewart and Charles Doak. On the 24th of April, 1900, Mrs. Charles Delbert Clark passed away and was laid to rest beside her husband in the cemetery at Victoria. She was a daughter of John and Janet Doak, of Oneida, Illinois. Both Mr. and Mrs. Charles D. Clark were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. He always took an active interest in all political affairs, his allegiance being given to the republican party, and he held a number of township offices. Jennie Becker was born on the 29th of September, 1869, and makes her home with her father. She is a member of the Congregational church. John Perry, whose natal day was the 17th of September, 1871, married Eva Gordon, a daughter of Harry and Mary Gordon, and is a resident of Victoria. Of this marriage there have been born five children, Gordon Wilder, Ralph Perry, Fred Richard, Helen Janet and Jean Almina. The Victoria cemetery, where so many members of the Clark family are buried, originally belonged to the farm now owned by our subject, but was deeded away, for the purpose it is now used, before he bought the place.
     In matters of faith Mr. Clark is a Methodist, as was also his wife, while his political views accord with the principles of the republican party. Although he has for many years had extensive business interests, that claimed the greater part of his attention, Mr. Clark never neglects his civic duties. Lie takes an active arid helpful interest in the political affairs of the township, and served for twelve years as school trustee and director and for three terms as township supervisor. In the administration of his official duties he manifested the same sagacity and discretion as characterizes his transactions in business life, his service being marked by rare efficiency. Mr. Clark possesses not only unusual business acumen but great versatility, as anything that he has undertaken has been so capably directed, that it has proven a success from every point of view, and the methods used in its achievement have at all times been above question. He has the rare faculty of recognizing opportunities ignored by the man of less foresight, that he ably directs to his own advantage, and to this can be attributed his unusual success. In addition to his valuable realty holdings he is a stockholder and director of the State Bank of Victoria, and a stockholder of the Oneida State Bank of Oneida, and of the State Bank of Altona, while he is also a director and vice president of the latter institution. Through the entire period of his business career, Mr. Clark has at all times given evidence of possessing the qualities that would have won him recognition as a man of unusual mental powers and judicious discernment in any vocation he might have elected to follow. All of his transactions evidence the clear judgment, careful regard for details, keen discrimination and above all else the determination of purpose that characterize the successful man and give him the power wherewith he dominates conditions.
JOHN C. OBERG.
John C. Oberg, a well known railroad man of Galesburg, where he has resided for over forty years, was born in Sweden, on October 19, 1849. ^s parents were John and Christine (Hanson) Oberg, who were born, reared and married in Sweden. The father, as is customary in that country, served in the army during his early manhood and subsequently worked as a laborer, never having learned a trade. In 1855 with his wife and family he emigrated to the United States, first locating at Altona. There he worked as a laborer for a few months, but in 1856 he removed his family to Wataga, where he and the mother passed away. They were members of the Swedish Lutheran church, and his political allegiance was accorded to the republican party. Eight children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Oberg, of whom our subject is the eldest, the others in order of birth are as follows: Christine, who is deceased; Annie and Andrew, twins, the former a resident of Lake Forest, Illinois, and the latter deceased; Mary, who is also living in Lake Forest; and Oliver, Louise and Carrie, residents of Wataga.
     As he was only a child of four years, when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United States, John C. Oberg acquired his education in the common schools of Wataga, where he was reared to manhood. On the 14th of February, 1871, he came to Galesburg and obtained employment as a brakeman on a freight train. He was an efficient and reliable employe, and two and a half years later was promoted to the position of conductor. Ten years later, in 1893, he was again promoted, this time being assigned a passenger train. He is now on the Galesburg & Quincy division of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, on which he has been detailed for some time. He has two million, five hundred thousand miles to his credit, and during the forty years of his service with this company has never had an accident of more than a minor nature.
     On September 24, 1879, Mr. Oberg was united in marriage to Miss Mathilda Jacobson, a daughter of John and Anna Jacobson, of Galesburg. Mrs. Oberg was also a native of Sweden, her birth having occurred on May 6, 1849, while she passed away in Galesburg in 1905. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Obergnumbered five children, of whom three died in infancy; the others are Lilly L. and Sophia A., both of whom are at home.
     Mr. Oberg is a member of the Swedish Lutheran church, with which his wife was also affiliated, and fraternally he belongs to the Order of Railway Conductors, being identified with Galesburg Division, No. 83, in which he has held the various offices. He is independent in his political views, giving his support to such men and measures, he deems most lkely to subserve the best interests of all of the people. Mr. Oberg's life has not been distinguished by any unusual events, but has been passed in the unobtrusive manner that characterizes the thrifty and industrious citizen, who discharges his duties to his family and society at large to the best of his ability.
JOHN HJERPE.
    
John Hjerpe, identified with the building interests of Galesburg for twenty-eight years, during the greater portion of which period he has been engaged in contracting, is one of the leading representatives of his line of business in the city. One of Sweden's enterprising sons, his birth occurred in Wermland, on December 5, 1862, and there his parents, Carl and Martha (Haney) Hjerpe, were also born and reared. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Hjerpe, as follows: Carl, who is a resident of New Britain, Connecticut; Tilda, the widow of John Anderson, of Upsala, Sweden; Ullrika, the wife of John Anderson, of Kewanee, Illinois; Eric G., who is a minister, now a resident of Chicago; John, our subject; and two who died in infancy. Carl Hjerpe during the entire period of his active life followed the blacksmith's trade in his native town and there he died in 1892, at the age of about ninety years. The mother survived for three years thereafter, her death occurring after she had passed the seventy-third anniversary of her birth. In matters of religious faith both were Lutherans.
     Reared in the land of his birth, after completing his schooling, John Hjerpe was apprenticed to the mason's trade. He was a thoughtful and ambitious youth and it was early brought to his realization that conditions prevalent in his own country, practically precluded any possibility of a rapid rise and the prosperity to which he aspired, which decided him to try his fortune in the new world. In 1883 he took passage for the United States, proceeding directly to Galesburg and here he has ever since lived. During the early years of his residence he worked under the direction and supervision of others, thoroughly mastering his trade and being a mechanic of more than average ability, who creditably performed every duty assigned him, he soon established a reputation that made it possible for him to work independently. After about seven years in the service of other contractors, he decided to found a business of his own, having established a reputation for excellent workmanship and trustworthiness; that he felt assured of his success. Thoroughness and reliability have been the principal factors m the upbuilding of Mr. Hjerpe's business and he is now numbered among the foremost contractors in the city. He is conscientious in the execution of his work, feeling that whatever is worthy of his attention is deserving of his best efforts and this guiding principle has attained for him enviable prosperity. During the long period of his connection with the building interests of Galesburg he has been awarded the contracts for some of the principal business buildings and private dwellings, and in every instance his work has been performed in a manner to bring him recognition as an efficient craftsman and capable business man.
   On the 3d of July, 1886, Mr. Hjerpe was married to Miss Hanna Peterson, who was born in this city, on July 13, 1867. She is a daughter of Gustavus and Johanna (Johnson) Peterson, both natives of Sweden, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1852. Upon their arrival in this country they came directly to Illinois, first locating in Princeton, where they resided for a year. At the end of that time they removed to Galesburg, which was thereafter their home. Gustavus Peterson was identified with various activities until age compelled his retirement, having been janitor of Knox College for fourteen years and sexton of the cemetery for fifteen, while for ten years he worked as a gardener. He passed away in 1907, at the age of eighty-four years and the mother was eighty-three at the time of her death, in 1906. They were members of the Swedish Evangelical Mission, regularly attending its various services. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Peterson numbered eight, five of whom lived to attain maturity, as follows: Caroline, the wife of the Rev. George Wiberg; Josephine, who married E. G. Hjerpe; Joseph; Joshua, who died in 1905; and Hannah, now Mrs. John Hjerpe, whose paternal grandparents were Peter and Charlotte (Stonewall) Sangren, and to them were born three children : Gustavus, the father of Mrs. Hjerpe; Aaron; and Sander. Mr. and Mrs. Peter Johnson, Mrs. Hjerpe's maternal grandparents, had but one child, Johanna, who became the wife of Gustavus Peterson. Mr. and Mrs. John Hjerpe have had nine children: Harold, who is now attending high school; L islie, Eric and Stanley, who are at home; Carl, who died at the age of fifteen; Edna, whose death occurred when she was thirteen; and three who died in infancy.
     The family attend the Swedish Evangelical Mission, in which the parents hold membership, Mr. Hjerpe having been one of the trustees of this organization for twenty-one years. His political endorsement he has always accorded the republican party since granted the full rights of citizenship, but he does not approve of their attitude toward the liquor traffic, his views in that regard conforming strictly to those of the prohibition party. Mr. Hjerpe has many friends in Galesburg, as has his wife, who is a woman of culture and refinement and graciously presides over their pleasant home, the hospitality of which is freely extended to their large circle of friends.
CHARLES H. CHAMBERLAIN.
     Charles H. Chamberlain is a prominent factor in industrial circles as treasurer of the Purington Paving Brick Company, one of the most important productive enterprises of Galesburg and the most extensive establishment of its kind in the United States. His birth occurred in Pratts Hollow, Madison county, New York, on the 12th of September, 1851, his parents being Orason and Lucinda C. (Lewis) Chamberlain. The father was born at that place on the 21st of February, 1819, while the mother's birth occurred in Morrisville, Madison county, New York, on the 15th of May, 1823. Orason Chamberlain, who was one of the proprietors of a woolen mill at Pratts Hollow, New York, removed to Dubuque, Iowa, in 1858 and was there engaged in the commission business throughout the remainder of his life, his demise occurring on the 5th of August, 1865. He gave his political allegiance to the republican party and was a valued member of the Universalist church, acting as one of its trustees It was at Morrisville, New York, that he wedded Miss Lucinda C. Lewis, who still survives him and makes her home with our subject. They became the parents of three children, as follows: Annette and Dwight L., both of whom are deceased; and Charles H., of this review.
     The last named obtained his early education in the schools of Dubuque, Iowa, and later continued his studies in the high school at Englewood, Illinois. After putting aside his text-books he entered the First National Bank of Chicago as a messenger boy, winning gradual promotion as he demonstrated his worth and ability until he was given charge of the country books. In 1886 he left that institution and went to Kansas for the benefit of his health, riding the range for six years. On the expiration of that period, in 1892, he came to Galesburg, Illinois, as secretary of the Purington Paving Brick Company, which position he held for some time. He is now serving as treasurer of this important concern and his efforts have contributed in no small degree to its continued growth and success. He is likewise a stockholder in the Farmers & Mechanics Bank and has long held a leading place among the representative business men and citizens of Galesburg.
      On the nth of May, 1876, Mr. Chamberlain was united in marriage to Miss Helena Gorton, a daughter of Truman and Elizabeth (Searle) Gorton, of Rock Island, Illinois. Unto them were born three children, as follows: Lewis Gorton, who is deceased; Ethel, the wife of Gail Porter, of East Orange, New Jersey; and Ruth Helen, at home.
Mr. Chamberlain gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has served as alderman of the third ward for four years. His religious faith is that of the Universalist church and his official position therein is that of chairman of the board of trustees. He also belongs to Englewood Council of the National Union and is a valued member of the Galesburg Club. Mr. Chamberlain is a thoroughgoing business man, improving his opportunities for the attainment of financial success, and his diligence has been the source of his prosperity.
JOHN C. M. REDMON.
For almost a quarter of a century John C. M. Redmon has continued his residence upon the farm which is yet his home, and during that period his close application and well directed efforts along agricultural lines have brought to him a competence which now ranks him among the successful residents of Cedar township. He has long since passed the Psalmist's allotted span of three score years and ten, for his birth occurred on the 9th of April, 1832, the place of his nativity being Adair county, Kentucky. His parents, Thomas Jefferson and Harriett M. (Booher) Redmon, were also natives of that county and there the father followed farming for a number of "years. His death occurred in the Blue Grass state, while the mother's death occurred suddenly at Belle Plaine, Kansas. In their family were eleven sons and three daughters but only three of this number survive.
     In the schools of Adair county, Kentucky, John C. M. Redmon acquired his education, while his practical training came to him through the assistance which he gave to his father in the operation of the home farm. He remained with his parents until the outbreak of the Civil war, when, putting aside all personal interests, he enlisted from Mount Vernon, Kentucky, on the 31st of July, 1861, becoming a soldier .in Company I, Third Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, for three years' service. At the expiration of this term he reenlisted at Loudon, Tennessee, on the 1st of January, 1864, and his second term continued until a severe wound caused his retirement from the army. He participated in many important battles and was four times wounded; in the head at the battle of Chick-amauga, Georgia, in October, 1863; and in the leg during the battle fought near Big Shanty, Georgia, on the 18th of June, 1864, when he also received a breast wound. The fourth wound, which was received in battle in June, 1864, caused his withdrawal from the ranks and he was mustered out at Jeffersonville, Indiana, on the 8th of September, 1865.
      After the close of a most honorable and creditable military service Mr. Redmon went to Gosport, Indiana, to which place his parents had removed in 1865, and later he accompanied them to Kansas. For twenty-two years he continued to make his home in the Sunflower state and then, in 1887, he came to Knox county, Illinois, where he has since remained, his residence here covering a period of almost a quarter of a century.      Throughout this entire period the farm upon which he now lives, located on section 33, Cedar township, has remained the scene of his activities, and under his capable management has become one of the valuable properties of the region. His attention has ever been given to agricultural pursuits and his close application thereto and his comprehensive knowledge concerning the best methods of plowing, planting and harvesting, have been salient qualities in the acquirement of a success which is today both substantial and creditable.
     Mr. Redmon was married, on the 14th of February, 1886, to Miss Minerva Ellison, who was born in Knox county, October 3, 1842, a daughter of Thomas and Nancy Ellison. He>^parents, the father a native of Kentucky and the mother of Indiana, came to Knox county at a very early day, at which time they settled upon the place which is now the home of their daughter, Mrs. Redmon, and which has long been known as the old Ellison family homestead. Mr. and Mrs. Ellison both passed away in Abingdon, where the former was familiarly known as Captain Ellison. Their family consisted of ten children. A brother of Mrs. Redmon, James Milton Ellison, now resides in Colorado, while a sister, Mrs. Mary Jane Andrews, makes her home in Helena, Montana.
    In religious faith Mr. Redmon is a Seventh Day Adventist, while his wife belongs to the Methodist church and is also identified with the Ladies Circle of the Grand Army of the Republic. He maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership with Post No. 58, G. A. R., of Abingdon, while in politics he is a republican. Although numbered among the older residents of Cedar township he is still active in the world's work and takes a deep and public-spirited interest in all matters relative to the up-building and progress of the locality. His life has been one of continuous activity in which his industry and perseverance have won their just reward in material success, while upright principles and worthy purposes have won the regard and esteem that crown honorable old age.
FREDERICK R. HAZLETT.
Frederick Russell Hazlett, secretary and treasurer of The Lake W. Sanborn Agency of Galesburg, makes his home at No. 827 North Cedar street. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, May 17, 1878, and is a representative of old pioneer families of this state.
His grandfather, Dr. Thomas Jefferson Hazlett, was a native of Pennsylvania, and became a physician, devoting his life to the practice of medicine and surgery, when he was called to his final rest in Freeport when he had but passed middle life. He married Cornelia Russell, who at the time was preceptress of Mt. Morris Seminary, this state. She long survived him, her final resting place being Freeport, Illinois. They had a family of four children of whom the following are still living: Russell Jefferson, Frederick Buckley and Fannie.
Of these, Frederick B. Hazlett, father of Frederick R. Hazlett, was born in Iowa, moving to Freeport later, where he was reared and educated, becoming an electrician immediately after leaving school. About 1881 he moved to Galesburg as manager for the Bell Telephone Company. Shortly after this he became interested in the electrical business and secured the first franchise rights granted in the city to operate an electric light and power plant. In 1876 he married Clara L. Pollard, a native of Coventry, England, and a daughter of George and Sarah (Taylor) Pollard, who were likewise natives of Coventry, where the father learned and followed the watch-maker's trade. They came to America just prior to the Civil war, settling in Brooklyn. After the outbreak of hostilities Mr. Pollard enlisted for active duty at the front, serving between two and three years during which time he participated in the hotly contested battle of Bull Run. After the war he located at Grand Crossing, Illinois, and subsequently went to Elgin, where he died when well advanced in years. His wife lived to be eighty-nine years of age and passed away in Galesburg. Their only child was the mother of our subject. As before mentioned she became the wife of Frederick B. Hazlett, two sons being born to them, Frederick R. and George T. Both parents are members of the Baptist church and are well known socially, their many good qualities of heart and mind endearing them to a large circle of friends.
Frederick R. Hazlett has lived in Galesburg from the time he was four years of age and passing through the consecutive grades of the public schools was at length graduated from the high school in the spring of 1897. He then
HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 399
became fireman and later engineer for the Galesburg Electric Light and Power Company, having become familiar with this work during vacation months of previous years. In this capacity he continued until the 1st of October, 1898, when he began working in the office of Lake W. Sanborn, thus entering into active connection with the insurance business. He thoroughly acquainted himself with every phase of the business during the time that he remained in the office as an employe. On the first day of January, 1906, he was admitted to a partnership in the business under the firm name of The Lake W. Sanborn Agency. They conduct the largest general insurance business in this part of the state and their success has its root in close application, fairness to both their clients and the companies they represent, and a thorough understanding of the work which claims their attention.
Mr. Hazlett is pleasantly situated in his home life. He was married, October 22, 1902, to Miss Zora Aldrich, a daughter of Percy and Emma (Pierce) Aid-rich, who were natives of Illinois. Her father, however, after spending five years in California, moved to Chariton, Iowa, where he died in early age, and her mother's death occurred in Galesburg in 1900, when she was thirty-eight years of age. They had six children, Zora, Ralph R., Elmer W., Lloyd L., and two who died in infancy. The only daughter became the wife of Mr. Hazlett and is now the mother of two interesting children, Janet P. and Doris A.
Both Mr. and Mrs. Hazlett hold membership in the First Baptist church, in which he served for a number of years as church treasurer and later trustee. He exercises his right of franchise in support of men and measures as he thinks best although he has always been identified with the republican party, and fraternally he is an Elk. He is likewise prominent socially and for several years has been secretary of the Galesburg Club and vice president of the Soangtaha Country Club, which at once gives evidence of his standing among his fellow-men. Conspicuous to the eye of the writer as he sat down by Mr. Hazlett's desk for a little talk, was two group pictures of his wife and children and a motto by Elbert Hubbard:
"Live Every Day So That You Can Look Any Damn Man In The Eye And Tell Him To Go To Hell."
His record needs little comment for he has practically spent his entire life in Galesburg and the high mark he has made is indicated by the fact that many of the comrades of his youth remain as the friends of his youth.
MICHAEL MOUNT. Confederate Soldier buried in Knox co., IL
     Michael Mount, who is the oldest conductor in point of years of continuous service now running out of Galesburg, on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, was born in Jefferson county, Tennessee, in the vicinity of Knoxville, on January 22, 1841. He is a son of William T. and Alzaria (Cates) Mount, the father a native of Virginia, his birth occurring in 1799, and the mother born and reared in Jefferson county, Tennessee, where they were married. In his early youth William T. Mount left his native state and went to Tennessee, settling in Jefferson county, where he engaged in farming until his death in 1857. The mother survived him for many years, her death occurring in the county where she had passed her entire life in 1896. They were both members of the Baptist church, and his political support the father accorded to the whig party. He was a public-spirited man and took much interest in local politics, always assuming his share of the governmental responsibilities and for some years served as justice of the peace. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mount, all of whom are now deceased with the exception of three, numbered nine, as follows : Margaret, the widow of Joseph Bailey, of Jefferson county, Tennessee ; John, who is deceased; Humphrey, a soldier in the Confederate army who died at Vicksburg in 1863; Martha and Nancy, both of whom are deceased; Michael, our subject; Mattie, the widow of Joseph Miles, of Knoxville, Tennessee  and William and James, who are deceased.
     Having been reared on his father's farm, in the acquirement of his education Michael Mount first attended the district schools of the vicinity and later the college at New Market, Tennessee. He remained at home assisting his father and brothers in the cultivation of the fields until 1861. In the latter year he enlisted as a private in the Confederate army, going to the front as a member of Company A, First Tennessee Light Artillery. He participated in some of the most sharply contested battles of the war, being present at Shiloh, Corinth, Columbus and the siege of Vicksburg, and was mustered out in 1863 with the rank of corporal. After the close of his period of enlistment he returned home. remaining1 there until December, 1863, when he came to Illinois, locating at Quincy. Soon thereafter he obtained employment on a farm in that vicinity, where he worked until the 1st of August, 1864, when he came to Galesburg, and entered the service of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company as brakeman on a freight train. In 1869 he was promoted to the position of conductor, and on the 1st of March, 1884, was assigned passenger duty. During the first four years of his connection in this capacity, he was on the Galesburg and Peoria division, and the succeeding two years he ran from here to Chicago. He was next transferred to the Galesburg and Quincy division, where he was retained for ten years and at the end of that time he was detailed on the Peoria line, his present run.
       Fowler, Illinois, was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Mount and Miss Annie Virginia Mitchell, the event being celebrated on the 28th of April, 1868. Mrs. Mount was born at Fowler, on the 2ist of December, 1851, and is a daughter of Wylie J. and Nancy (Ballard) Mitchell. The father was born at Wheeling, West Virginia, on the 13th of January, 1805, and the mother at Lynchburg, Virginia, on January 28, 1814. Wylie J. Mitchell came to Iowa during the pioneer days, locating at Burlington when it contained but fourteen houses. There for many years he conducted a hotel and among his guests were the first governor and the Indian chief. Black Hawk. Later he removed to Missouri, but subsequently located on a farm in the vicinity of Fowler, and there he passed away on October 3, 1870. He was survived for more than thirty years by his widow, whose death occurred on May 1, 1902. In politics he was a republican, but he never held any office save that of school director.
and reared in Jefferson county, Tennessee, where they were married. In his early youth William T. Mount left his native state and went to Tennessee, settling in Jefferson county, where he engaged in farming until his death in 1857. The mother survived him for many years, her death occurring in the county where she had passed her entire life in 1896. They were both members of the Baptist church, and his political support the father accorded to the Whig party. He was a public-spirited man and took much interest in local politics, always assuming his share of the governmental responsibilities and for some years served as justice of the peace. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Mount, all of whom are now deceased with the exception of three, numbered nine, as follows : Margaret, the widow of Joseph Bailey, of Jefferson county, Tennessee ; John, who is deceased; Humphrey, a soldier in the Confederate army who died at Vicksburg in 1863; Martha and Nancy, both of whom are deceased; Michael, our subject; Mattie, the widow of Joseph Miles, of Knoxville, Tennessee and William and James, who are deceased.
     Having been reared on his father's farm, in the acquirement of his education Michael Mount first attended the district schools of the vicinity and later the college at New Market, Tennessee. He remained at home assisting his father and brothers in the cultivation of the fields until 1861. In the latter year he enlisted as a private in the Confederate army, going to the front as a member of Company A, First Tennessee Light Artillery. He participated in some of the most sharply contested battles of the war, being present at Shiloh, Corinth, Columbus and the siege of Vicksburg, and was mustered out in 1863 with the rank of corporal. After the close of his period of enlistment he returned home. remaining1 there until December, 1863, when he came to Illinois, locating at Quincy. Soon thereafter he obtained employment on a farm in that vicinity, where he worked until the 1st of August, 1864, when he came to Galesburg, and entered the service of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company as brakeman on a freight train. In 1869 he was promoted to the position of conductor, and on the 1st of March, 1884, was assigned passenger duty. During the first four years of his connection in this capacity, he was on the Galesburg and Peoria division, and the succeeding two years he ran from here to Chicago. He was next transferred to the Galesburg and Quincy division, where he was retained for ten years and at the end of that time he was detailed on the Peoria line, his present run. Fowler, Illinois, was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Mount and Miss Annie Virginia Mitchell, the event being celebrated on the 28th of April, 1868. Mrs. Mount was born at Fowler, on the 2ist of December, 1851, and is a daughter of Wylie J. and Nancy (Ballard) Mitchell. The father was born at Wheeling, West Virginia, on the 13th of January, 1805, and the mother at Lynchburg, Virginia, on January 28, 1814. Wylie J. Mitchell came to Iowa during the pioneer days, locating at Burlington when it contained but fourteen houses. There for many years he conducted a hotel and among his guests were the first governor and the Indian chief. Black Hawk. Later he removed to Missouri, but subsequently located on a farm in the vicinity of Fowler, and there he passed away on October 3, 1870. He was survived for more than thirty years by his widow, whose death occurred on May 1, 1902. In politics he was a republican, but he never held any office save that of school director.
     Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell had seven children, the youngest of whom is Mrs. Mount. The others are as follows: Thomas B., who is deceased; Mary Margaret and Sarah Jane, twins, who are also deceased; James W., who died on the 28th of March, 1904; Susan E., who is deceased; and Nancy, the wife of John Watson, of'Aberdeen, Washington. The parents were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and for many years the father was one of the official stewards. Four children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Mount. Charles H., who is an engineer on the "Q" running out of Galesburg, is married and has one daughter, Annie Adelia. Alzaria Virginia married E. J. Ross of Chicago, and they have one daughter, Virginia Helen. Rolla, who is also a resident of Chicago, is married and has three daughters: Alzaria Catherine, Ruth Roberta and Mary Ann. James, who is the youngest, has passed away.
Fraternally Mr. Mount is a worthy exemplar of the Masonic order, being a member of the blue lodge and the commandery of Galesburg. In his political views he is independent giving his support to such men and measures as he deems best adapted to serve the highest interests of the municipality. Having been a resident of Galesburg for over forty-seven years, Air. Mount is widely known in the community, where he has many friends, who accord him the respect his many fine qualities justly merit.
GEORGE SMITH GATES.
   
Dr. George Smith Gates, who for the past five years has been engaged in the practice of veterinary surgery in Galesburg, was born in Morristown, Lamoille county, Vermont, on the 15th of July, 1839, a son of George W. and Betsey (Smith) Gates. The father was also a native of Morristown, where his birth occurred on the nth of October, 1810, and the mother was born in Elmore, Vermont, on September 22, 1814, and there passed her girlhood. They were married at Elmore in October, 1837, and began their domestic life in the vicinity of Morristown, where the father engaged in farming until his death, on the 26th of January, 1890. The mother passed away on May 26, 1901. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Gates consisted of four children of whom our subject is trie eldest, while the others, in order of birth, were as follows: Elizabeth M., who is deceased; one who died in infancy; and Emma Alary, the wife of E. W. Smith of Wellsriver, Vermont. The parents were Methodists, although the father was superintendent of the Congregational Sunday school for twenty-five years. He was a supporter of the republican party and took an active interest in all matters of a political nature and for a number of years discharged the duties of justice of the peace.
     In the acquirement of his education Dr. Gates first attended the district schools in the vicinity of his home, subsequently becoming a student of the People's Academy of Morrisville, Vermont. After laying aside his school books he engaged in teaching for nine terms, the last three years in Ontario township, Knox county, where he located in 1866. Having grown up on a farm, he received a thorough training in the practical methods of agriculture. When he came to this county he settled upon a farm, devoting his energies to
its operation until 1894. During that period he was also studying veterinary surgery with a view of adopting it for a vocation, and in 1894 was awarded his degree from the Ontario Veterinary College at Toronto, Canada. Immediately thereafter he removed to Blandinsville, McDonough county, this state, where he established and maintained an office until 1906, when he came to Galesburg. Dr. Gates has met with success in his profession, his long experience in raising stock proving of invaluable assistance to him in his practice.
     On the 9th of March, 1864, Dr. Gates was united in marriage to Miss Helen Louise West, who was born in Waterbury, Vermont, on April 13, 1835. She was a daughter of J. P. and Louise West, both natives of Orange county, Vermont, where the father passed away. The mother subsequently came to La Crosse, Wisconsin, and there spent her latter days. They were both members of the Universalist church. In politics he was a republican and at one time occupied the position as justice of the peace. Four children were born to Dr. and Mrs. Gates. Ernest William, who is married and lives at Morrisville, Vermont, has four children: Harold Cortez, Madeline Hattie, Raymond Smith and Catherine. Carroll Levi, who lives at Costello, New Mexico, is also married and has two children, Erroll and Helen. Lulu Anna, the only daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Gates, passed away. Harry Washington, who resides in Galesburg, is married and has one daughter, Florence. On the 2d of October, 1883, the family was called upon to mourn the loss of the wife and mother. Dr. Gates married, on the 28th of September, 1884, Mrs. Allie Walter, a daughter of Jesse and Jerusha (Stire) Everitt, of Prairie City, Illinois. Mrs. Gates is a native of New Jersey, her birth having occurred on September 28, 1843, and *wo children have been born to Dr. ^and Mrs. Gates: Marion Ethel, who is living at La Junta, Colorado; and Vernon Fitch, who will graduate trom Knox College with the class of 1914.
     Dr. Gates is a deacon in the East Main Street Congregational church, in which Mrs. Gates also holds membership, and in his political views he is a republican. When residing in Vermont in 1862, Dr. Gates was a member of the state militia, being sergeant in Company I, Second Regiment, which was organized to protect the northern border of the United States from Canadian raiders. Forty-five years have elapsed since he first became a resident of Knox county, and during that time he has been an interested observer of its marvelous development as pioneer conditions have passed with the advent of a newer and higher civilization.
JOHN R. YOUNG.
One of the representative agriculturists of Knox county is John R. Young, whose enterprise and progress is manifested through the attractive appearance of his highly cultivated and improved farm, located on section 32 of Persifer township. Foresight and sagacity have always characterized Mr. Young, who has so intelligently directed his activities as to become one of the extensive landowners of the county, his holdings now aggregating six hundred acres.
       His birth occurred on the old family homestead on section 31, Persifer township, on the 23d of May, 1852, his parents being Robert and Mary F. (Johnston) Young. Robert Young was a native of Warren county, Ohio, and there he was also reared and educated, receiving his agricultural training on his father's farm. In his early manhood he left his native state and came to Illinois, engaging in farming in this county during the remainder of his active life. He subsequently settled in Persifer township, acquiring the title to three hundred and twenty acres of land on section 31, that upon his death was equally divided among his children. He was an extensive stockman and met with lucrative returns from both this and his agricultural pursuits, becoming one of the substantial citizens of the community. He was one of the prominent settlers of the pioneer period, his efforts having contributed much toward promoting the development of this section of the county. Although he withdrew from the active work of the fields during his later days, he continued to make his home on the farm and there passed away at the venerable age of eighty-one years. He was buried in the cemetery at Knoxville, as was also the mother, who was seventy-five when she died. She was a native of New Jersey and a daughter of Edward and Elizabeth Johnston, who came to Illinois during the pioneer period settling in Knoxville, where they both passed away. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Young, four of whom are residents of this county, as follows: Edward J., who lives in Galesburg; Hannah E., the wife of E. M. Collins, of Knoxville; John R., our subject; and Robert L., who is a resident of Knox township. In matters of faith the parents were Methodists and politically the father was a republican, but never held any office save that of school director, the duties of which he discharged efficiently for several years.
     Persifer township has always been the home of John R. Young, who completed his education at Heckling College. He subsequently returned to the farm and has ever since diligently applied himself to agricultural pursuits. In the direction of his activities he has used as much discretion and has as carefully adhered to a definite system of operations as he would have followed in any industrial pursuit, and to this fact unquestionably can be attributed much of his success. Mr. Young is a practical man, at the same time he is progressive in his ideas, and is always ready and willing to adopt a new method if it appeals to him as being practicable. In the cultivation of his fields he has closely followed the most highly approved methods of the modern agriculturists, and his efforts have been well rewarded by abundant harvests. He has six hundred acres of land, four hundred and ninety-one of which is embraced in his homestead and is tilled under his personal supervision. His farm is fully equipped with all modern appliances and conveniences that will reduce the labor or expedite the work, while his large commodious barns and outbuildings provide ample shelter for all the stock and farming machinery and implements. He has thoroughly tiled his land wherever necessary, having eight miles of tiling on one quarter section, and the soil is carefully watched and studied being supplied with such fertilizer as is deemed essential to promote its productivity. One hundred and ten acres of his land, located on section 13, of Knox township, is used exclusively for pasturage. Here he also has a sawmill that was called into requisition when he was clearing the timber away preparatory to placing the land under cultivation. During the long period of his ownership Mr. Young has erected some very fine buildings on his farm, which are kept in good repair. From time to time he has also installed various modern conveniences and improvements, consistent with the spirit of progress he has at all times manifested in his undertakings. His fields are well fenced and under high cultivation, the grounds about his residence are neat and attractive in appearance and everything about the place evidences the close supervision and careful regard for details that are indicative of capable and efficient management.
     Mr. Young has been married twice. His first union was with .Miss Samantha Lotts, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Milton Lotts, and they became the parents of four children: Earl L., who married Pearl Adams, and is now living at home; John R., Jr., who married Marie Wolf, a daughter of John Wolf, of Haw Creek, residing on one of his father's farms; Merrill, who married Marie McClure ; and Trella, the wife of Robert J. Tarpy, who is living on section 32, Persifer township. The mother of these children passed away at the age of thirty-seven years and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Knoxville. In 1891, Mr. Young married Miss -Mary England, a daughter of George and Susan England, and they have two children, Leon D. and Margie, both of whom are still at home.
In matters of faith Mr. Young has no strongly pronounced views and has never identified himself with any organization. He is in hearty sympathy with all church and Christian work, however, and liberally contributes toward the maintenance of the various denominations and has generously assisted in erecting a number of edifices for religious purposes in this vicinity. His fraternal relations are confined to his membership in the Modern Woodmen of America, his affiliation being with the camp at Gilson. Politically he is a stanch advocate of the principles of the republican party and casts his ballot in support of their candidates. He has assumed his share of the governmental responsibilities in the township and has efficiently served in various capacities. For twenty years in succession he discharged the duties of supervisor, while for three he served as road commissioner and as assessor for one, and he was likewise school director for a time. He is interested in various local enterprises, and is now president of the Knox County Farmers' Mutual Fire & Lightning Insurance Company, having been identified with this office for six years, while for twelve he was a director. He also owns stock in the Gilson Farmers' Telephone Company and is one of the directors of the Farmers' & Mechanics' Bank at Galesburg. Mr. Young is one of the estimable citizens of his community, where he has passed his entire life and numbers among his many friends the comrades of his boyhood, whose regard is a high tribute to his character, as it covers a period of more than fifty years of close acquaintanceship.
WILLIAM HENRY WILLCOX.
     William Henry Willcox is a retired farmer now living at No. 940 North Prairie street in Galesburg. He was born in Moriah, Essex county, New York, January 9, 1836, his parents being Henry and Mary K. (Meacham) Willcox, the former a native of Bridgeport, Vermont, and the latter of Poultney, Vermont. The Willcox family comes of Saxon origin and was seated at Bury St. Edmunds, in the county of Suffolk, England, before the Norman conquest. James Willcox, the grandfather of our subject, was born at Bridgeport, Vermont, and was a son of Giles Willcox, of Killings worth, Connecticut. He joined a band of immigrants from Connecticut towns for the "New Hampshire grants" and bought a tract of land on the Vermont shore of Lake Champlain, in Bridgeport township. On the memorable morning of May 10, 1775, he acted as one of the guides to Colonel Ethan Allen, who was bent upon the capture of Fort Ticonderoga. He served as a soldier in the Revolutionary war, participating in the movements of the Green Mountain boys in that district. The maternal grandfather of William H. Willcox was William Meacham, who was born at North Adams, Massachusetts, September 20, 1771. He married Keziah Howe, whose birth occurred at Poultney, Vermont, May 25, 1775. They were married August 14, 1796, and both passed away in the state of New York when well advanced in years. Their children were William H., Laura M., Martha J., Jemimah C, Mary K. and Lorain E.
     Henry Willcox, father of W. H. Willcox, was reared upon a farm and in Moriah, New York, wedded Mary K. Meacham. He afterward worked in a woolen mill on Lake Champlain until he decided to come to the west and with his wife and family made his way to Knox county in October, 1836. He then located on the present site of Galesburg, just north of what is now Henderson street, owning a ten-acre lot there and purchasing a farm of eighty acres just west of the town. He afterward removed to his farm and improved it, also extending its boundaries until it comprised one hundred and twenty-seven acres. Upon that place he reared his family, but in 1866 again took up his abode in Galesburg, where he died in 1872 at the age of seventy-five years. His wife, who was born in 1803, lacked but ten days of being eighty-five years of age when she passed away in 1888. They were both charter members of the Congregational church, in which Mr. AVillcox served as an elder. In their family were two sons and two daughters: Erastns, who acts as librarian in Peoria; Mary Helen, who gave her hand in marriage to William T. Bartle and passed away when about twenty years of age; William H., of this review; and Clarissa Adeline, the deceased wife of Edwin R. Willcox, a cousin.
    William Henry Willcox was reared upon a farm adjoining Galesburg and is one of three of the original colony who are still living in this city, the others being Mrs. Charles Hinckley and Mrs. Henry Sanderson, whose husband was the first mayor of Galesburg. Mr. WTillcox spent his youth in the usual manner of farm lads and attended the first school in Galesburg. its site being on what is now the public square. He was afterward a student in Knox Academy and when he had completed his education he purchased his father's farm of one hundred and twenty acres, to which he added seven acres. There he continued to engage in general farming until the spring of 1879, when he removed to Trego county, Kansas, where he operated a ranch for eleven and a half years. At that time he returned to Illinois and engaged in farming in the northwestern part of Peoria county for another eleven years. He next removed to Wyoming, Stark county, where he lived for. six years and in 1907 he returned to Galesburg, where he has since made his home, now enjoying a well earned rest, made possible through the success which he won while he followed farming.
      On the 3d of October, 1866, Mr. Willcox was married to Miss Eliza P. Kellogg, who was born August 3, 1838, and died March 6, 1905. She was originally a member of the Presbyterian church but afterward joined the Congregational church of Galesburg with her husband. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Willcox were born five children. Elizabeth, the eldest, is the wife of Dr. Alvin F. Sherrill, of Atlanta, Georgia, who is dean of the theological seminary there. Edward K., who is a farmer of Wyoming, Stark county, Illinois, married Ella Jane Austin and they have four children: Dorothy A., Lawrence A., Marion E. and Charles F. John IT., who follows farming near Billings, Montana, married Hattie Jaques and has three children: Marjorie I., William J. and Lois E. Caroline is the fourth member of the family. Maurice M., who is the youngest, is a graduate of the state university and now follows the profession of civil engineering1 in Minneapolis, Minnesota. He married Eve I. Dills and they have three sons: Henry K., Philip M. and John T.
     In his political views William H. Willcox has always been a republican, having attained his majority soon after the party was organized. He is entitled to wear the Grand Army button, for on the 5th of August, 1862, he enlisted as a member of Company A, Seventy-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was mustered in as duty sergeant and was mustered out July 10, 1865, as second lieutenant. Among the battles in which he participated were those that occurred in the vicinity of Vicksburg leading to the capture of that city. Mr. Willcox was made a prisoner of war at Sabine Crossroads, April 18, 1864, and was sent to Camp Ford near Tyler, Texas, where he was held until the close of hostilities. After the war he followed farming successfully for a number of years but eventually retired to enjoy a rest which he has truly earned and richly deserves. Fie has ever commanded the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens and has a very wide and favorable acquaintance in Knox county.
N. H. GOODSPEED.
  N. H. Goodspeed, a well known agriculturist and stockman of Victoria township, owns one hundred and seventy acres of land on section 15, that he devotes to general farming. He was born in Athens county, Ohio, on the 14th of May, 1849, but the Goodspeed family originally came from Massachusetts. H's grandfather, Nathan Goodspeed, came to the Buckeye state in his early manhood and engaged in farming. There he was subsequently married and passed the remainder of his life. The father of our subject, Daniel FI. Goodspeed, was born and reared in Ohio and there he later married Miss Martha Wingett who was a native of the same state. They spent the early years of their domestic life in the vicinity where they had always resided, but they later disposed of their interests there and, in 1855, came to Illinois. Upon their arrival in the state they located on the farm where their son, N. IF, now lives and there the mother passed away in 1856 and was laid to rest in the cemetery at Victoria. The father survived her for many years, his death occurring in Victoria, in 1891, at the age of seventy years. They always attended the Congregational church and his political support Mr. Goodspeed gave to the republican party. He was a public-spirited man and always took much interest in township affairs, serving for several years as road commissioner. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Goodspeed numbered six, all of whom were born in Ohio. They are as 'follows: Elizabeth, the wife of J. B. Cochran, of Lynn township; Georgiana, who married G. W. Short, residing in Lynn township; John Oliver, who makes his home with his brother, N. H.; he, whose name stands at the head of this sketch; Eunice, the widow of Orlando Short, of Galva, Illinois; and Eleanor, who is deceased.
     N. H. Goodspeed was only a lad of six years when he came to Victoria township with his parents and he has since passed practically his entire life on the farm where he is now residing. His early years were not unlike those of other lads reared in the country during the pioneer period. He attended the district school until he had mastered the common branches, during which time,he also assisted with the work about the farm. He subsequently gave his entire attention to agricultural pursuits and after attaining his manhood took over the management of the homestead, to the further cultivation and improvement of which he has ever since devoted his energies. He engages in general farming but makes a specialty of raising horses, cattle and hogs, and has met with success in his undertakings. His farm is well improved and under high cultivation and is fully equipped with all modern conveniences and appliances, deemed essential to the successful pursuits of agriculture.
Mr. Goodspeed married Miss Ruth Young, a native of Knox county and a daughter of John Young, and to them was born one son, Fred N., who is now living in California. He married Emma Strom, who is deceased, and they had three children: Gladys, Wayne Stodard and Vance, who are living with Mr. and Mrs. Goodspeed.
     The political allegiance of Mr. Goodspeed is given to the republican party, but he has never held any township office. He is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has held all of the chairs in the Victoria lodge; he also belongs to the Masonic order, being affiliated with the lodge at Victoria. In addition to his fine farm and other interests, Mr. Goodspeed is a stockholder in the Victoria Mutual Telephone Company. He has applied himself intelligently and industriously to the development of his undertakings and his efforts have been rewarded correspondingly, his prosperity being recognized by his friends as the well merited dividend from his long years of toil and self-denial.
PROFESSOR ISAAC AUGUSTUS PARKER.
    
Professor Isaac Augustus Parker, - emeritus professor of Greek of Lombard College, ranked throughout the period of his active connection with educational interests as one of the foremost educators of Illinois. He is now enjoying a well merited rest at the age of eighty-six years. His has largely been the ideal age that grows stronger and better mentally and physically as the years go by and gives out of the rich stores of its wisdom and experience for the benefit of others. He was born in South Woodstock, Vermont, December 31, 1825, a son of Isaac and Lucia (Wood) Parker, who were also natives of Woodstock. Their family numbered but two children, the elder being a daughter, Elvira, who became the wife of Loyal M. Wood and died in South Woodstock at an advanced age. Professor Parker is a descendant of James Parker, who came from England and finally settled at Groton, Massachusetts. The paternal grandfather was Eleazer Parker, who lived in Mansfield, Connecticut, whence he removed to Vermont, settling in South Woodstock. He was a farmer by occupation and a soldier of the Revolutionary war, responding to the Lexington alarm, at which time he left the plow and gave valued aid to the country in her struggle for independence. He wedded Mary Royce and they reared a large family, including: Eleazer; Isaac; Elizabeth, who married Charles Mc-Kenzie; Ruth, who became the wife of William Prior; Mary, who gave her hand in marriage to Humphrey Rood; Lydia, who married David Aiken and lived in Chautauqua county, New York; Lavina, who first became the wife of William Benton and subsequently married Platt Benedict, who was the founder of Norwalk, Ohio; Sarah, who married Elias Smith; and Lucy, who gave her hand in marriage to Oliver Kendall. Eleazer and Mary (Royce) Parker, the parents of this family, lived to the ages-of seventy-three and eighty-one years respectively. In tracing the ancestry of Professor Parker in the maternal line it is found that he had four ancestors who were passengers on the Mayflower, namely: John Tilley and his daughter, Elizabeth Tilley; John Howland; and George Soule. The Wood family originated in England but Henry Wood, the first of the ancestors in that line, came from Holland, as did his wife, who bore the maiden name of Abigail Jenney.
      The maternal grandfather of Professor Parker was Joseph Wood, a native of Middleboro, Massachusetts, who made farming his life work. He lived for some time at South Woodstock and his death occurred at that place. He served in several campaigns during the Revolutionary war. He married Mrs. William Gray, a widow, who bore the maiden name of Bethiah Palmer. His death occurred when he was sixty-five years of age, while his wife lived to be more than eighty years of age. Their children were Joseph, Jr., Benjamin Palmer, Samuel, Ira, Ora, Erastus and Lucia. The last named became the wife of Isaac Parker and the mother of Professor Parker of this review. Isaac Parker was reared to farm life and also learned the trades of a shoemaker and tanner, in early life but afterward withdrew from those trades and devoted the greater part of his days to general farming. He held the office of selectman and was also justice of the peace. Lie likewise served as captain of a company of the state militia and was in command of the company that escorted General Lafayette into Woodstock when he made his visit to America more than a quarter of a century after the Revolutionary war. Both he and his wife were members of the Universalist church. He died in South Woodstock when about eighty-six years of age and his wife survived him for a time, passing away at the age of eighty-seven.
Professor Parker was reared in South Woodstock, Vermont, and attended Dartmouth College, from which he was graduated in 1853. Lie received the degree of Master of Arts from Dartmouth College in 1855 and the honorary degree of Doctor of Philosophy from Buchtel College in 1892. He took up the profession of teaching and for five years was principal of the Orleans Institute at Glover, Vermont. On the expiration of that period he came to Galesburg as professor of ancient languages in Lombard University and such was his ability as an instructor that his services were retained by the college until 1908, when he resigned because of the weight of years. He contributed much to the success of Lombard, his instruction being an important element in the upbuilding of the school.
    On the 18th of February, 1856, Professor Parker was married to Miss Sarah A. Labaree, a daughter of William and Parthena (Whitmore) Labaree. Mrs. Parker was a great-great-granddaughter of Peter Labaree, who was taken captive by the Indians at Charlestown, New Hampshire, and sent to Canada, where he was afterward released. The Rev. Benjamin Labaree, for many years president of Middlebury College, was a cousin of her father, William Labaree. The latter was born in New Hampshire and devoted his life to general agricultural pursuits. He married Parthena Whitmore and their children were* John Wesley: Ralph; William H.; Charles K.; Benjamin Franklin; Sarah Ann; Harriet; Adeline; and Louisa, who became the wife of Ira Thompson and died many years ago. Of these, Sarah Ann became the wife of Professor Parker. She was born in Weathersfield, Vermont, in 1827, and died in Galesburg, in 1889, when sixty-two years of age. She held membership in the Universalist church and was a lady of many admirable characteristics and qualities. By her marriage she became the mother of two children but the daughter, Izah Tenney, died in Banning, California, in 1891. She had been a teacher in the public schools of Galesburg and also in Lombard College. The son, William Augustus, a civil engineer by profession, is now chief engineer of the St. Joseph & Grand Island Railway and has his office in St. Joseph, Missouri.
     Professor Parker's lite record is largely a familiar one to the residents of Galesburg, for he has so long made his home in their midst. Well descended and well bred, his tastes are innately those of refinement and culture and his influence has always been given on the side of progress and advancement. He has stood for the highest ideals in educational work and while instructing pupils in the "dead" languages he has also kept before them the living issues of the day in his efforts to prepare those under his instruction for the practical and responsible .duties of life. His influence, exerted consciously or unconsciously, has ever been a force for good in the lives of those with whom he has come in contact.
WILLIAM S. WILLIAMSON, M. D.
  
Dr. William S. Williamson, a well known and successful representative of the medical profession in Knox county, has continuously practiced at Galesburg for more than two decades. His birth occurred in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on the 21st of August, 1848, his parents being Hiram and Lydia (Pierce) Williamson. The father was born in Virginia, on the 12th of May, 1800, while the mother's birth occurred in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, on the 4th of May, 1810. The paternal grandparents of our subject, Hiram and Martha (Mc-Clellan) Williamson, were planters of Virginia and were representatives of old families of that state. Hiram Williamson, Jr., the father of Dr. Williamson, was engaged in business as a lumber contractor and also owned large timber tracts in western Pennsylvania. In 1856 he came west and took up his abode in Henry county, Illinois, there devoting his attention to general agricultural pursuits with excellent success. The last few years of his life were spent in honorable retirement at Orion, Henry county, Illinois, where his demise occurred on the 18th of July, 1884. He gave his political allegiance to the republican party and while living in the east served as justice of the peace and also as a member of the school board. In early manhood he was a member of the Society of Friends but after locating in the west affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church, acting therein as class leader and also as a member of the board of stewards. It was on the 4th of May, 1828, in Indiana county, Pennsylvania, that he had wedded Miss Lydia Pierce, who passed away in May, 1900. Unto them were born ten children, as follows: Jacob, who was killed in the battle of Vicksburg while a member of the Union army, serving in Company D, Thirteenth Illinois Infantry; Eliza Jane, who is also deceased; Hiram F., living at Central City, Nebraska; Sarah and Joseph, both of whom have passed away; Lydia, the wife of Smith F. Purely, of Abingdon, Illinois; James, deceased; William S., of this review; F. Nettie, who gave her hand in marriage to Samuel McGee and resides in Aurora, Nebraska; and Sevena C, the wife of, Aaron Elder, residing in Indiana county, Pennsylvania.
      William S. Williamson obtained his early education in the public schools of Henry county, Illinois, later attended Prairie Home Academy and subsequently continued his studies in Grinnell College of Iowa. He next read medicine under the direction of Dr. John N. McKelvey, of Orion, Illinois, and afterward entered the University of Michigan, from which he was graduated with the class of 1875. Locating for the practice of medicine at Rio, Knox county, Illinois, he there remained for eight years and then removed to Aurora, Nebraska, where he followed his profession for six years. On the expiration of that period he entered the Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, completing the full course in 1889. In that year he opened an office at Galesburg, Illinois, and this city has since remained the scene of his professional labors, his success in the administration of remedial agencies and the restoration of health insuring him a constantly growing and highly remunerative patronage.
   There is also a military chapter in the life history of Dr. Williamson, for at the time of the Civil war he enlisted as a member of Company B, Sixty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, remaining with that command as a private for three years.
     On the 29th of April, 1875, Dr. Williamson was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Burns Cook, who was born in Glasgow, Scotland, on the 4th of August, i860, her parents being Alexander and Mary (Burns) Cook, of Mercer county, Illinois. The father was a native of the Isle of Arran, off the coast of Scotland, while the mother was born in the Scotch highlands. They were married in Glasgow, Scotland, and emigrated to the United States in 1862, locating in Lynn, Henry county, Illinois, where Alexander Cook followed farming. His last days were spent in honorable retirement at Swedona, Illinois, where both he and his wife passed away. In politics he was a republican, while his religious faith was that of the Presbyterian church, in which he served as a deacon, elder and trustee. Unto Dr. and Airs. Williamson were born four children, namely: Win-field Howard, who is a resident of Desmet, Idaho; Jean Burns, the wife of Dr. John C. Murchison; Nellie, deceased; and Bessie, who is at home.
      At the polls Dr. Williamson supports the men and measures of the republican party, believing firmly in its principles. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias, the Woodmen and the Red Men. Both he and his wife belong to the Central Congregational church and take an active and helpful part in its work. Genial in disposition, unobtrusive and unassuming, he is patient under adverse criticism and in his expressions concerning brother practitioners is friendly and indulgent.
DAVID B. EDWARDS.
   
David B. Edwards, who for fifteen years has been a conductor on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, his run being from Galesburg to Quincy, has throughout his entire life been connected with railway service and his efficiency and faithfulness are indicated in the fact that he has always remained with the one road. He was born in Henderson county, Illinois, three miles south of Kirkwood, on the ist of May, 1862, a grandson of John Edwards, who was of Welsh birth and lineage and came to the United States at the time of the Revolutionary war with the British army but deserted from its ranks and joined the colonial forces, his sympathy being with the troops who were struggling for independence. He located in Belmont county, Ohio, where his remaining days were passed.
     The parents of David B. Edwards were Thomas R. and Susan (Cook) Edwards, both of whom were natives of Belmont county, Ohio, the father having been born on the 29th of November, 1820, and the mother on the 21st of August, 1827. Both were educated there and their marriage was celebrated in their native county on the 25th of February, 1854. The father was a blacksmith by trade and in the fall of i860 came to Illinois, driving across the country to Henderson county, where he secured a tract of land and engaged in farming. Year after year he devoted his attention to the cultivation of the fields until his death which occurred June 5, 1895. His widow survived him for eleven years and passed away October 27, 1906. They were both consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in the work of which they were actively and helpfully interested, Mr. Edwards serving as one of the church trustees. In politics he was a republican and served as township trustee, as road commissioner and as school director, faithfully discharging his duties and also giving active and helpful support to every measure and movement intended for the public good. Unto him and his wife were born six children: John Walter, a railway conductor on the Rock Island Railroad, now living at Cedar Rapids, Iowa: Orloff D., a farmer of Sumner county, Kansas; Stephen C, who also follows farming in Sumner county; David B.; Charles H., living on the old homestead in Henderson county; and Emma F., a twin sister of Charles, and now the wife of John W. Gordon, of Hooker, Oklahoma.
     David B. Edwards has spent his entire life in Illinois and is indebted to its public-school system for the educational privileges he enjoyed. In starting out in life on his own account he secured a position as brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, serving in that capacity until promoted to the position of conductor on the 2d of February, 1896. He has since served in that capacity, his run being from Galesburg to Quincy, and his loyalty, capability and faithfulness are indicated in his long retention in the position.
On the 15th of July, 1885, Mr. Edwards was united in marriage to Miss Augusta Ervin, who was born August 23, 1866, at Statesville, North Carolina, a daughter of Claude P. and Jane (Morrison) Ervin, of Biggsville, Illinois. Her father was born June 16, 1843, in Iredell county, North Carolina, and enlisted for service in the Confederate army under Colonel Vance, serving as a private in the cavalry for three years and six months. He removed with his family to Biggsville during the early girlhood of Mrs. Edwards, who was there educated. By her marriage she has become the mother of two children: Walter Earl, who was born in Biggsville, October 4, 1886, and died August 27, 1887; and Gertrude May, who was born in Biggsville, February 17, 1888, and is living with her parents. It was in 1885 that Mr. Edwards removed to Galesburg and in 1907 he erected the residence which he and his family now occupy. He still holds membership in the Odd Fellows lodge at Biggsville and belongs to the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen, Lodge No. 24, at Galesburg. His political indorsement is given to the republican party but he has no desire or aspiration for public office and its rewards. His wife is a member of the Baptist church and during the twenty-six years of their residence in the city they have made many friends.
ALBERT W. TAPPER.
Albert W. Tapper, a successful and representative agriculturist of Ontario township, was born in Osco, Henry county, Illinois, on the 5th of December, 1871, his parents being Erick G. and Christina (Carlson) Tapper, who were natives of Tjarstad, Estergetlan and Hoena, Sweden, respectively. The father was born on November 13, 1831, and at the age of twenty-six years came to the United States to seek his fortune in the agricultural district of the Middle West, heretofore having spent his time in military training and agricultural pursuits. He settled first at New Sweden, Iowa, where he remained until 1863, when he removed to An dove r, Illinois, and located upon a farm near Osco. At this place he became the owner of two hundred acres of valuable land, which he successfully cultivated until 1889, when he removed to Ontario township, Knox county, settling upon the farm, on which his son, A. W. Tapper, now resides. This farm, which consisted of two hundred and seventy-one and a half acres, was his home until his death, on the 23d of July, 1902, at the age of seventy years. In politics he was a stanch and enthusiastic republican and he held membership in the Swedish Lutheran church at Andover, Illinois. In 1867 he was married to Christina Carlson, whose birth occurred on the 1st of January, 1840. She left her native land for the United States in 1854 and resided with an aunt near Orion, Illinois, until her marriage. She is now residing at Woodhull, Illinois.
     Albert W. Tapper spent his early years at home, assisting his father and attending the common schools in the acquirement of an education. At twenty-one years of age he began attending Brown's Business College at Galesburg during the winter months, although he still spent much time working on the farm. He began his independent career in the spring of 1897, when he went to Monmouth and engaged in the laundry business, which he conducted during the following four or five years. After this, for a similar length of time, he was in the employ of the Kingman Plow Company at Peoria, before again engaging in agricultural pursuits, at first for three years, on an eighty acre tract owned by Joe Cox, Sr., and later, in the spring of 1908, on the homestead where his mother needed his assistance. He has the entire farm under cultivation and is carrying on general farming most profitably in addition to feeding cattle and hogs. In the few years in which he has been thus engaged, he has given his attention almost exclusively to his farm and has shown his ability to equip it and operate it scientifically and profitably. Among the later improvements which he has added is the silo, which has a capacity of one hundred and twenty tons.
      In September, 1898, Mr. Tapper was married to Miss Millie Samuelson, a daughter of Olaf and Christina Samuelson, both of whom were natives of Sweden and are now deceased. Mrs. Tapper was born March 15, 1871, in Woodhull and spent the greater part of her childhood in that town, where she was prominent socially and in the Lutheran church. Her death occurred on October 21, 1907, when she was thirty-six years and seven months of age. To Mr. and Mrs. Tapper two children were born, namely: Elsie Marie, who is thirteen years of age and who is residing with her father and attending school; and Ruby Emelia, whose death occurred on the nth of March, 1909.
    In politics Mr. Tapper is a republican and takes an active interest in public affairs, having served for the last few years as district clerk of Ontario Township Centennial School District No. 22. He holds stock in the Woodhull and Oneida grain elevators and is also a stockholder in the Woodhull State Bank. His fraternal affiliations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of Woodhull and the Modern Woodmen of America, of that place, associations which indicate much of the nature of his interests and the rules which govern his life.
WILLIAM ALBERT GEBHART.
William Albert Gebhart has been engaged in teaming in Galesburg for forty years and during half of that time has conducted a wholesale and retail hay and straw business. He is a native of Knox county, where he was born on a farm in Henderson township, on the 27th of August, 1855. The father, Allen Gebhart, a son of Kentucky, where he was reared, engaged in agricultural pursuits after concluding his schooling. At Pleasant Hill church, Taylor county, that state, on the 12th of February, 1849, he was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Feather, also a native of the Blue Grass state, in which they continued to reside until 1850, when they came to Illinois, settling on a farm in Henderson township, this county. Mr. Gebhart devoted his energies to the improvement and cultivation of this place until 1869, when with his wife and family he removed to Galesburg. Here he followed the occupations of lathing and plastering during the remainder of his active life, passing away in 1889, at the age of sixty-three years. The mother is still living and is now in her eightieth year, having been born in Taylor county, Kentucky, on February 20, 1832. Mr. Gebhart was a veteran of the Mexican war, in which he fought as a member of one of the first regiments that left Louisville. In politics he was a stanch republican. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Gebhart numbered eight children, as follows: Mary and John, both of whom are deceased; Henry, who was killed in a railroad accident; William Albert, of this review; David, who is a resident of McDermott, Idaho; Edward, deceased; Lulu, the wife of Henry Hunt, of Kearney, Nebraska; and Richard, who is a resident of Ogden, Iowa. The paternal grandparents were Thomas and Nellie (Robbins) Gebhart, natives of Virginia and of Campbellsville, Taylor county, Kentucky, respectively. They were among the early settlers of Knox county, passing away in Henderson township at a ripe old age. He was a blacksmith by trade, and continued to follow this occupation until age compelled his retirement from regular work. They had three daughters and four sons: Rachel; Jane; Sarah; John; Allen, the father of William Albert Gebhart; Thomas and William. The family is of German extraction, the great-grandfather of William Albert Gebhart having emigrated to the colonies when he was a lad of fourteen years, prior to the Revolution. He grew to manhood in this country and gave his services to the land of his adoption in its struggle for independence. In the maternal line, William Albert Gebhart is descended from old colonial southern families. His grandparents, John and Polly (Harp) Feather, removed from Niles, North Carolina, to Kentucky, locating in Taylor county, where they died at the ages of ninety-four and eighty-three years respectively. They were the parents of ten children, the eldest of whom, Eliza, was the mother of our subject, the others being: Catherine, who died when young; Elvira ; Albert; John ; Reuben ; William; Mary; Louisa ; and Rial.
     The education of William Albert Gebhart began in the district school, in the vicinity of his father's farm, until he was ten years of age, and was completed in the public schools of Galesburg. In his sixteenth year he laid aside his textbooks and began earning his own living. The first work that offered happened to be teaming, and now for forty years he has continued to be identified with this business. About twenty years ago he began dealing in hay and straw, and as this venture proved to be remunerative he has ever since followed it in connection with his teaming business. Mr. Gebhart is a practical man, enterprising and industrious, and has met with good success in his undertakings, owing to his close application, unceasing effort and good judgment.
    On the 4th of March, 1883, he was united in marriage to Miss Mary Feather, a daughter of Albert and Diema (Wilson) Feather, and a native of Kentucky, her birth having occurred in Taylor county, on the 25th of February, 1862. Her parents were also natives of the Blue Grass state, whence they moved to Illinois in 1883, locating in Knox county. They are now residents of Galesburg. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Feather: Mary, now Mrs. Gebhart; Ermine; Emmett, who is deceased; Olive; John; and Timothy. The paternal grandparents of Mrs. Gebhart were John and Polly (Harp) Feather, and in the maternal line she is descended from Robert and Nellie (Colvin) Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Gebhart are the parents of five children: Leroy, who died in infancy; Charles, who was eleven years of age at the time of his death; Harry, who graduated from the high school and Knox College and is now studying medicine at the University of Michigan, at Ann Arbor; Erminie, a graduate of the high school and Brown's Business College, who is now employed as stenographer in the Farmers' and Mechanics' Bank in this city; and Bessie, who died when she was eleven years of age.
     His political franchise Mr. Gebhart exercises in support of the men and measures of the democratic party. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America and both he and Mrs. Gebhart hold membership in the Baptist church, and number among its congregation many close friends. Mr. Gebhart has always led a rather unobtrusive life, but he is a man of tireless energy, clear judgment and foresight and has quietly advanced his interests during the long period of his business career, until he is now numbered among the substantial citizens of the community.
JOHN B. McAULEY.
    John B. McAuley, a well known civil engineer and contractor of Galesburg, who has twice been city engineer, was born here, on the 18th of November, 1863. His parents are Thomas and Margaret (Mulqueney) McAuley, natives of Ireland, the father's birth having occurred in County Antrim, on the 2d of February, 1832, and that of the mother in County Clare. When a young man Thomas McAuley emigrated to the United States, locating in Galesburg in 1854. Here he entered the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad in the capacity of foreman of track construction. He subsequently went to Iowa, settling on a farm in Lee county, to the further development of which he devoted his energies until 1884. In the latter year he disposed of his property and returned to Galesburg, again entering the service of the "Q." He continued in that employ as assistant foreman of the yards until 1904, when he withdrew from active work and is now living retired at No. 649 South Academy street. The mother is also living. They are both communicants of the Roman Catholic church and belong to the parish of St. Patrick. Ever since granted the right of franchise Mr. McAuley has given his support to the democratic party and although he never aspired to public office, has always taken an active interest in all political affairs. To Mr. and Mrs. McAuley there have been born six children, the eldest of whom is our subject. The others are as follows: Thomas Francis, who is living in Chicago: Mary, the wife of W. G. Mathews; Margaret, who is at home: Charles H., of Galesburg; and Grace, who is also at home. The parents were married in Galesburg.
    The education of John B. McAuley was obtained in the public school and also a private school conducted by Mr. and Mrs. Hennessey. Upon attaining his majority in 1884 he entered the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. He was first assigned duty on the tracks and in the switch yard, his first promotion being to the civil engineer department, and in October, 1884, he was appointed assistant to F. J. Allen, division engineer, in the capacity of chain and rodman in the engineer department. Subsequently he was placed in charge of the division engineer's office, remaining in this position until March, 1891, when he resigned to assume the responsibilities of city engineer. He was appointed to this office by Mayor Forrest F. Cooke, his term expiring in 1893, and in May of that year he went to Canton, this state, where he was engaged until the following May as city engineer for that city. Upon his return to Galesburg he established an office and took contracts for construction work of various kinds, principally brick pavements, sewers, waterworks and also in both concrete and brick masonry. In 1901 he was again appointed city engineer by Mayor William O. R. Bradley, but upon the expiration of his term of office he once more gave his undivided attention to his private interests. Mr. McAuley has laid, or has had direct charge of construction, as engineer, of the greater portion of the pavement in Galesburg and has contracted for and laid all of the better class of pavement such as that to be found on Mary street, Chamber street, E. Losey street, Seminary street and Prairie street. He has also built the brick and steel bridges and the reinforced concrete bridge over Cedar Fork creek. His building operations and concrete work have been of a most important character and indicate his position as a prominent representative of industrial activity in Galesburg. In 1895 he completed and published a new map of the city and he also has received at different times contracts on the city waterworks plant. Mr. McAuley has become quite well known in this portion of the state through his contracts on pavements, sewers, waterworks, railroads and bridges, and in addition to the work already mentioned he paved a number of streets and alleys in Kewanee, Illinois. He is a practical man and does his work thoroughly and efficiently, giving his close personal supervision to every contract assigned him.
    On the 17th of November, 1897, Mr. McAuley was married to Miss Elizabeth Frances Connolly, a daughter of Terence and Ellen Connolly of this city. Mrs. McAuley was born May 28, 1867, and departed this life at her home at No. 649 South Academy street, on the 2d of September, 1901. She was a consistent member of St. Patrick's Catholic church to which Mr. McAuley also belongs. To them were born twin sons, John Thomas and Robert Francis, whose birth occurred on the 3d of July, 1900. Mr. McAuley belongs to the Galesburg Club and the Elks Club and has most cordial relations with many of the members of those organizations. In his political views he is a republican and while he has firm faith in the party, he has never sought nor desired office save the one which he held and which was in the strict path of his profession. His support of progressive municipal affairs, however has been a factor in general progress and improvement. The steps in his orderly progression are easily discernable. Since starting out in life in a humble capacity he has made continuous advancement, wisely utilizing his time, talents and opportunities and correctly judging of life's contacts and experiences. Early in his business career he recognized the fact that there is no royal road to wealth, but that advancement and success must depend upon the worth of an individual's work to his fellowmen. He has always held to high standards and whether in the execution of public or private contracts has ever given adequate return for value received. Moreover he has cultivated skill and efficiency which have won for him a leading place among the prominent representatives of his profession in this part of Illinois.
WALTER D. DELONG.
   
Walter D. DeLong, who has been conducting a transfer and storage business in Galesburg for the past nine years, was born on a farm at Center Point, three and a half miles northeast of this city, on the 29th of July, 1865. His parents were Marshall and Mary (Harding) DeLong, the father a native of Vermont and the mother of the state of New York. Three children were born to them as follows: Walter D., our subject; Mary, the wife of C. R. Neeley of Sparta township; and Harriet, who married Addison Hasty, of Seattle, Washington. At the age of ten years, Marshall DeLong accompanied his parents on their removal from Vermont to Illinois, their destination being Knox county. The family arrived late in the fall of 1836 and spent their first winter in old Henderson, but in the spring they located on a farm in Sparta township. There Marshall DeLong completed his education and was reared to manhood. Always having had his energies directed along agricultural lines, when old enough to choose a vocation, naturally he adopted the one in which he felt he was most likely to succeed. He subsequently purchased a farm at Center Point that he operated until 1886, when he was appointed superintendent of the county poor farm. He continued to discharge the duties of this office until his death on the 29th of January, 1892, at the age of sixty-six years. The mother survived for five years thereafter, passing away at the same age. Mr. DeLong always took an active interest in all public affairs, and was for many years postmaster at Center Point, and he also efficiently served as justice of the peace and was at one time a member of the board of supervisors.      All matters of an agricultural nature interested him and he was one of the enthusiastic members of the county agricultural board for several years, of which he was president. The paternal grandparents were Julius and Juliana (Sanford) DeLong, also natives of Vermont, who died on the old homestead in Sparta township, at an advanced age. They had one son and two daughters: Marshall, Mary and Harriet. The maternal grandparents were also pioneers of Knox county, having located on a farm in the vicinity of Cherry Grove, near Abingdon, in the early days. She passed away in middle life, but the grandfather, James Harding, was ninety-nine at the time of his death. Six children were born to them: the mother of our subject; Ann; Roderick, who was a captain in the Civil war; Luanda and Nett.
     The boyhood and youth of Walter D. DeLong were passed on his father's farm in Sparta township, where the family had then resided for nearly forty years. In the acquirement of his early education he attended the district school, but he later supplemented this by a business course in one of the commercial colleges. He subsequently returned to the home place in the operation of which he assisted until his father became superintendent of the poor farm in 1886, when he took over the management of the homestead. He continued to operate the entire farm until after the death of his father in 1892, when he inherited one hundred and one and a half acres, that he cultivated together with some land he rented from the other heirs. In 1902, Mr. DeLong disposed of his property and came to Galesburg and embarked in the business he is still conducting. He was first associated with Ralph Belden, but for the past six years he has been in partnership with E. B. Ogden.
     On the 5th of June, 1889, Mr. DeLong was united in marriage with Miss Genevieve Ferris, who passed away on January 12, 1902. She was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Lorenzo D. (Carpenter) Ferris, the former of whom was a native of the state of Ohio. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. DeLong, as follows: Earl, Harold, Clarice and Lorenzo. The mother was a most estimable Christian woman and held membership in the Congregational church. On the 27th of April, 1904, Mr. DeLong married Mrs. Margaret Wilson, whose maiden name was Riley, the widow of Elliott Wilson, by whom she had four children: William; James, who died at the age of fifteen years; Elliott; and Kenneth.
     Mr. DeLong is a member of the Congregational church, and he is also affiliated with the Galesburg Club. He was a member of the executive board of Knox county agricultural association for thirteen years, and its treasurer for one year. His political support he gives to the republican party, but he has never held any office save that of school director while he was residing in Sparta township. He is one of the capable business men of Galesburg, where he has conducted his transactions in a highly creditable manner and is in every way regarded as a worthy representative of one of Knox county's estimable pioneer families.
C. W. ROE.
     C. W. Roe successfully operates a finely equipped farm of three hundred and forty-two acres on sections 16 and 17 in Indian Point township, Knox county, nor far distant from his birthplace, section 20 of this township. The date of his birth was March 1, 1867. He is the son of T. H. and Lucinda (Stephenson) Roe. His early education C. W. Roe received in the Hunt district schools after which he attended Hedding College and the Dixon Normal school at Dixon, Illinois. When twenty-four years old he left home and began farming for himself on section 16, where he bought one hundred and seventy acres of land. This remained his home until January of the present year, when he removed to the farm on which he is now residing. The home is handsome and well constructed and thoroughly modern in all its appointments and the farm buildings also are substantial and equipped with every needed device for efficient farming and stock-raising, since Mr. Roe is extensively engaged in both of these occupations.
    Mrs. C. W. Roe, who was formerly Miss Eva May Shaw, was married to Mr. Roe, February 22, 1900. She was born in Cedar township, Knox county, a daughter of Philip and Selecta (Morse) Shaw. Her parents, who are both dead, were among the New England settlers of Knox county, her father having
     MR. and MRS. C. W. ROEbeen a native of Maine and her mother a native of Massachusetts. They were married in the east and later settled in Indian Point township, where Mr. Shaw followed agricultural pursuits until his death on March 20, 1905. His wife's death occurred seventeen years earlier, on February 2.7, 1888.
    To Mr. and Mrs. Roe were born four children, as follows: Lucile V., born December 11, 1901; Mildred S., born May 11, 1902; Marjorie, born February 26, 1905; and Delwyn Truman, born July 13, 1911. Mr. Roe votes the republican ticket but has never been an aspirant for office. He belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of Abingdon. Both Mr. and Mrs. Roe are, loyal supporters of the Congregational church and possess a large circle of friends in Abingdon and the neighboring communities.
ANDREW F. McCORNACK.
While living retired in Galesburg, Andrew F. McCornack is still interested in agricultural pursuits as the owner of three hundred and twenty-five acres of valuable land in Knox county, from which he derives a substantial annual income. While an active factor in the world's work he engaged in general farming and his diligence and intelligently directed industry were manifest in the excellent results that attended his labors, bringing him the handsome competence that now enables him to live retired. He was born in Knox county, August 14, 1839, and is, therefore, one of its oldest residents in years of continuous connection with this part of the state. His parents were Samuel and Jeannette (Tait) McCornack, who were natives of Scotland and were three months in making the trip from that country to Illinois, spending two months on the sea and the remainder of the time in crossing the country, journeying by canal and by wagon. The father was from Kirkcudbrightshire and it was in the year 1839 that he brought his family to the new world. He was a son of John McCornack, who also came to Knox county with his son and passed away here a short time afterward. He made his home with his son Andrew and died at a very advanced age. His wife, Mrs. McCornack, has long since passed away. The maternal grandfather of our subject was a lifelong resident of Scotland and following his death, his widow came to the new world, spending her last days in Knox county, her remains being interred in the John Knox cemetery. She had a small family, including Mrs. McQuie, Jeannette and William. In the family of John McCornack, the paternal grandfather, were the following children: Samuel, Robert, Andrew, John, William, James, Elizabeth, Mary, Margaret, and Helen.
        After crossing the Atlantic and making the long journey overland to Illinois, at a period when there were no railroads in this state, Samuel McCornack settled in Persifer township, where he took up the occupation of farming, purchasing thirty acres of land. Subsequently he removed to Copley township, establishing his home near Oneida, in 1852, and there he died when seventy-two years of age. His wife survived him for two or three years and was eighty-four years of age at the time of her demise. Both were Presbyterians in religious faith and he became a charter member of the John Knox church, in which he long served as elder, taking an active and helpful part in promoting the church work. He also held various township offices and for many years filled the position of supervisor. In his family were four children, William, Margaret, James L. and Andrew F.
    The last named was reared in Persifer township, amid the wild scenes and environments of pioneer life, for Knox county was then a frontier district, in which comparatively little settlement had been made. He, therefore, became a factor in the early progress and improvement here and until his fifteenth year spent his time upon his father's farm, attending the district schools and also pursuing his education for a short period in Monmouth College. He then resumed the occupation of farming, which he has followed throughout his entire life and in which he is still engaged although now seventy-two years of age. He continued to assist in the cultivation of the old place until his marriage, when he established his home on one hundred and sixty acres of land in Copley township. This he improved and cultivated year after year, making his home upon that farm until 1895, when he removed to Galesburg, to occupy the present fine residence which he had erected the previous year. From here he has since supervised his agricultural interests and is now the owner of three hundred and twenty-five, acres of rich and valuable land, which returns to him a gratifying annual income.
       On the 24th of May, 1876, Andrew F. McCornack was united in marriage to Miss Ella B. Brown, who was born in Greene county, Ohio, November 26, 1845, a daughter of Robert and Jean (Carruthers) Brown. Her paternal grandfather was David Brown, who was married in Scotland, November 20, 1812, to Euphemia Fletcher. He was then twenty years of age, having been born in Berwickshire, Scotland, October 6, 1792, while his wife was born in Selkirkshire, June 1, 1788. Their children were Agnes, Robert, Walter and Magdalene. The maternal grandfather of Mrs. McCornack was John Carruthers, who wedded Mary Bell. They lived in Chillicothe, Ohio, coming there from Scotland with their children, and later were residents of Greene county, Ohio. They died when well advanced in years. Their family included Thomas, Sarah, Jean, William, James, Mary and Robert.
        The parents of Mrs. McCornack were natives of Scotland and the father was only four years of age when brought by his parents to the United States, while the mother came in her teens. They were reared in Chillicothe, Ohio, and were married there, and their last days were passed in Greene county, the father dying in 1885, when seventy-four years of age, and the mother passing away in 1849. They had six children, of whom three reached maturity: John C, who is' now living in Jamestown, Ohio; Thomas, of Coshocton, Ohio; and Ella, now Mrs. McCornack. Following the death of the mother the father afterward married again, his second wife being Margaret McCornack. They had a family of six children, of whom two reached adult age; Euphemia A., the wife of Warren Garrett, of Santa Cruz, California; and Andrew M. Brown, of Los Angeles.
      To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew F. McCornack have been born two sons: Walter Roy, who is a graduate of the school of Technology in Boston, where he now follows the architect's profession; and Clyde, who is a civil engineer for the Phoenix Bridge Company of Phoenixville, Pennsylvania. The elder son married Lillian Amsden, and they have one son, Donald Amsden McCornack. The younger son wedded Mabel Robinson.
Both Mr, and Mrs. McCornack are members of the Presbyterian church, in which he is serving as an elder. His entire life has been passed in harmony with his professions, and principles of integrity and honor have shaped his career and made him one of the representative citizens of this county. It would be difficult to find one who has more intimate knowledge of its history, for he has lived to witness the many changes which have been wrought and which have brought the county from a wild condition to its present state of development and prosperity. Those who know him—and he has a wide acquaintance throughout this section of the state—entertain for him the highest regard because his life has been well spent in devotion to duty of both a public and private character.
GEORGE H. GRAHAM.
George H. Graham, a railway conductor living in Galesburg, was born at Savannah, Georgia, July i, 1867, and is a son of Elisha J. and Marietta (Enochs) Graham. The father was born in Lexington, Kentucky, and the mother's birth also occurred in the Blue Grass state, the natal year being 1837. Elisha Graham learned the trades of coopering and carpentering in early life and about 1866 removed to Savannah, Georgia, becoming owner of a plantation in that locality, which he conducted for three years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Henderson, Kentucky, where he followed the carpenter's trade for a number of years. In 1899 he became a resident of Peoria, Illinois, where he again engaged in carpentering, being thus identified with building operations up to the time of his death, which occurred in March, 1894. His widow still survives him and is now a resident of Chicago. She holds membership in the Southern Methodist Episcopal church, of which Mr. Graham is also a member. His political views accord with the principles of the democratic party. This couple was married in Lexington, Kentucky, and unto them were born six children of whom George H. is the eldest. The others are: Carrie, Lucretia and Minnie, all now deceased; Jennie, who is living with her mother; and Thomas, who has also passed away.
George H. Graham was educated in the schools of Evansville, Indiana, and began learning dentistry with Dr. Morris of that place, with whom he continued for a year. Finding the practice of the profession not congenial, he accepted the position on the Peoria, Lincoln & Decator Railway as a brakeman, serving in that capacity for a year. He then entered the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company as brakeman and after two years was promoted to the position of conductor, in which capacity he has since served, now making the run between Galesburg and Quincy.
   On the 23d of March, 1892, Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Miss Delia Briggs, a daughter of Joshua and Mallay (Flowerree) Briggs, of Hannibal, Missouri. Mrs. Graham was born in Center, Missouri, September 27, 1872, was educated in the Louisiana (Mo.) Seminary and died on the 24th of March, 1911, leaving a son, Le Roy, who was born at Llannibal, Missouri, August 1, 1894, and survived his mother for only seven days, passing away on the 31st of March, 1911. Mr. Graham belongs to the Brotherhood of Railway Trainmen and to the Order of Railway Conductors. His political allegiance is given to the democratic party and he is a member of the Southern Methodist Episcopal church. Practically all of his business experience has been in the line of railroading and that he is capable and trustworthy is indicated in the fact that he has long been retained in the service of the company which he now represents. Perhaps no corporate interest demands greater faithfulness and loyalty on the part of its employees than do the railroads, knowing that they must safeguard the interests and lives of their patrons and long continuation in railway service is therefore incontrovertible proof of efficiency and loyalty on the part of an employee.
FRANK B. MOTT.
Frank B. Mott, one of the well known members of the state labor commission, who has been in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company for twenty-eight years, was born in Galva, Henry county, this state, on the 24th of September, 1861. His parents were William Henry and Jane Elizabeth (Hill) Mott, both natives of Dutchess county, New York, the father's birth having occurred at Poughkeepsie, on the 15th of March, 1836, and that of the mother at Lafayette, September 18, 1836. William H. Mott, who was a blacksmiith, came west in 1853, locating at Wethersfield, Illinois. He remained there for a few months then returned to Dutchess county, where he and Miss Hill were married on the 20th of January, 1854. Very soon thereafter he and his bride came to Illinois settling at Galva. There he established a shop and followed his trade during the remainder of his active life. When the call came for troops during the early days of the war he enlisted as a member of the band of the Forty-seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry, remaining at the front until the close of hostilities. After receiving his discharge, he returned to Galva and there resided until his death on April 10, 1904. The mother is still living and now makes her home in Brooklyn, New York, where her three youngest sons reside. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Mott numbered five, as follows: William Irving, who was born on March 24, i860, and died on the 9th of May, 1890; Frank B., our subject; Oscar H., who was born on the 3d of December, 1863; Walter H., whose birth occurred on June 6, 1867; and Valentine E., whose natal day was the 17th of June, 1871. In matters of religious faith the father was a Baptist and the mother a Congregationalist, while fraternally he was affiliated with the Grand Army of the Republic and the Masonic order. He was a stanch republican in his political views, and one time served as deputy sheriff of Henry county. In the paternal line the Motts trace their family back to the early colonial days. William Henry Mott was a son of Henry, who was born in Dutchess county, New York, on February 8, 1812, and married Margaret Denton. His father was William Mott, whose natal day was the 4th of December, 1787, and he in turn was descended from William* Mott, who was born July 4, 1753, and married Letitia Lasee, whose birth occurred on the 25th of May, 1755.
     It was in the public schools of Galva, this state, that Frank B. Mott received his education, his student days being terminated at the age of thirteen years. He began to work out as a farm hand, but later gave up this vocation and went to work in a drug store, in Galva, where he learned the trade. On the 17th of January, 1883, he came to Galesburg and obtained employment as a freight brakeman on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He discharged the duties of this position until 1887 when he was promoted to that of conductor, and he is now, and has been for some time, running to Mendota.
O     n the 28th of November, 1888, Mr. Mott was married to Miss Dora Morgan, a daughter of Joseph and Harriet (Dunn) Morgan, of Gladstone, Illinois. The parents are both natives of Kentucky, the father's birth having occurred in Bracken county, that state, in the vicinity of Louisville. Mr. and Mrs. Mott have one daughter, Vera M., who was born at Gladstone, Illinois, October 8, 1889.
          Fraternally, Mr. Mott is affiliated with the Brotherhood of Rail Trainmen, being a charter member of Galesburg division, No. 24, in which he has held all of the offices. He also belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, Galesburg Lodge, No. 894, and the Modern Woodmen of America, Galesburg Camp No. 667; and Mrs. Mott is a member of the Advent church. His political support is given to the republicans, and he is a member of the board of supervisors. All matters affecting the welfare of the working classes engage the interest of Mr. Mott, who is a member of the Illinois State Labor Commission, and as such devotes much time and attention to those vital questions pertaining to the conditions that surround the laborer and involve society generally;
AARON GORDON HUMPHREY, M. D.
In the long years of his residence in Galesburg Dr. Aaron G. Humphrey has engaged in the practice of medicine and has also become well known in connection with his activities along horticultural lines. He resides at No. 325 Division street, in the midst of a twenty-acre fruit farm, on which he has made his home since 1890. He was born in Lancaster county, Ohio, about fourteen miles north of Columbus, July 19, 1832. His parents, Aaron Gordon and Betsey (Starr) Humphrey, were natives of Connecticut and the former when a lad of about six years accompanied his parents on their removal from the Charter Oak state to Ohio and grew to manhood in the vicinity of Columbus. There he was married and engaged in farming. He also became a local minister of the Methodist church and during the greater part of his life divided his time between agricultural pursuits and the preaching of the gospel. In 1840 he removed westward to Iowa, settling in Cedar county upon a farm two miles south of Tipton. That district was then comparatively new and unsettled and, while taking an active part in its agricultural development, he also contributed to its moral progress through his teachings as a minister of the Methodist church. Later, however, careful study led him to embrace the doctrines of the Universalist church and he was ordained as a minister of that faith in Iowa City, Iowa, preaching his own ordination sermon. He became well known as a representative of that denomination in eastern Iowa, preaching the gospel as he interpreted it to the time of his death, which occurred when he was seventy-seven years of age. His wife passed away when about sixty-five years of age. Politically he was a radical whig and several times served as chairman of the conventions of his party. He also delivered many public addresses in support of the principles which he advocated and was a recognized party leader in his adopted state. Unto him and his wife were born ten children, four sons and six daughters, Lurinda, Philo D., Chester C., Aaron G., Lucinda, John W., Sophronia, Laura, Emily and Eliza.
     Of this family Dr. Humphrey, the fourth in order of birth, was a young lad when he accompanied his parents on their removal to Jowa, where he continued his education as a pupil in the Congregationalist school at Davenport and afterward in the Baptist Seminary of Mount Carroll, Illinois. He also engaged in teaching for about three terms in Iowa. With his first wife he went to New York city, where both studied medicine and surgery in the Hygio-therapeutic College, from which both were graduated. They afterward opened a health institution at Lancaster, Ohio, where they practiced for several years, and then came to Galesburg, opening a similar institution in this city in the northern part of the town. About fifty years ago Dr. Humphrey removed to the Lombard fruit farm in the southeastern part of Galesburg and in connection with the conduct of his health institute also engaged extensively in horticultural pursuits, conducting his fruit farm until 1890, when he removed to his present residence—a comfortable, two-story frame dwelling, standing in the midst of a twenty-acre tract of land devoted to the raising of vegetables and fruits. Here he conducted his health institute for about ten years but since that time has practically lived retired, giving his attention only to the raising of fine fruits and fine poultry, which work he carries on through the aid of an assistant. He has. ever been a close student of the scientific methods of fruit-raising and is a life member of the State Horticultural Society. His broad reading and study and his practical experience have made his opinions largely an authority upon the production of various kinds of fruit in this section. In the course of years he accumulated an extensive library on horticulture, which he has now given to two colleges.
More than a half century ago Dr. Humphrey lost his first wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarah R. Randall and was a daughter of Richard Randall. On the 16th of February, 1868, he married Lovina Swartzendruver, a daughter of Christian and Catharine (Berges) Swartzendruver. Mrs. Humphrey was born in Wayne county, Ohio, October 11, 1844. Her maiden name indicates her German ancestry. Her paternal grandparents were Vincent and Mary (Brennemann) Swartzendruver, who spent their entire lives in Germany. Her maternal grandparents were Christian and Christina (Gingerich) Berges. The parents of Mrs. Humphrey were natives of Wai deck, Germany, and in early life came to the new world. In 1861 they removed to Davis county, Iowa, Avhere her father died at the age of eighty-three years, while her mother reached the advanced age of eighty-eight. They were the parents of ten children, all of whom lived to adult age, namely, Susan, John, Elizabeth, Fanny, Mary, Daniel, Solomon, Rebecca, Christian and Lovina. As previously stated, the last named became the wife of Dr. Humphrey in 1868 and they have one son, Albert S., who is teaching the art of expression and public speaking in the Westport high school of Kansas City, Missouri. He is a graduate of the Columbia School of Oratory, now the Columbia College of Expression of Chicago, and for seven years was at the head of the department of expression in Knox College at Galesburg. Dr. and Mrs. Humphrey attend the Universalist church and for many years he has been affiliated with the Odd Fellows society and is a past grand of Galesburg lodge. His political allegiance has been given the republican party since its organization and in former years he was somewhat active politically, serving as alderman of the city, also as a member of the board of health for a number of years and as city physician for some time. In past years he has been a frequent contributor to the press, writing numerous articles for medical journals, free-thought magazines and agricultural papers, as well as for the local press. His articles have always shown originality, careful investigation of the subject discussed, and a breadth of vision that has awakened the interest and attention of many readers.
CHARLES M. HAWKINSON.
   Charles M. Hawkinson, who has been a resident of Galesburg for twenty-one years during which time he has been identified with the building interests, first in the capacity of a carpenter, later as a contractor and now as the owner and operator of a planing mill, was born in Kronoberg (laen), Sweden, on the 24th of April, 1872. He is a son of Hoken and Bertha (Anderson) Nelson, also natives of Sweden, whence they emigrated to the United States in 1887. Upon his arrival in this country Hoken Nelson, who is also a carpenter, came directly to Galesburg, and very soon thereafter obtained work in the lumber yard of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. Tie continued in their employ for twenty years, but is now living retired in Galesburg. The mother passed away in March, 1911, at the age of seventy-one years. She was an earnest member of the Swedish Lutheran church, with which the father is also affiliated. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Nelson, three of whom are still living as follows: Charles M., John A. and Jennie. The paternal grandparents were Mr. and Mrs. Nels Tjell, both of whom passed their entire lives in Sweden, his death occurring at the age of eighty-three years and hers at eighty-two. Five children were born to them, among them: Hoken, the father of our subject; Carl and Jans.
     Having remained a resident of his native land until he had attained the age of eighteen years, Charles M. Hawkinson obtained his education in the common schools, which he attended until he was fifteen. He then laid aside his text-books and began his apprenticeship as a carpenter, continuing to serve at this trade until he took passage for America in 1890. Upon his arrival in this country he came directly to Galesburg to join his parents and here he has ever since resided. When he first came here he obtained employment at his trade and for some years thereafter worked under the supervision and direction of others. He is a skilled mechanic, however, efficient and capable and as he applied himself painstakingly and conscientiously to any task assigned him, soon established a reputation for trustworthiness and reliability as well as good workmanship, that is a most valuable asset to any craftsman. Thus he was subsequently able to begin working independently and for six years successfully engaged in contracting. In 1910 he decided to extend his activities along another line and established a planning mill that he has now been operating for more than a year. Although he has been identified with this industry for but a brief period, it has been of sufficient length for him to make some estimate of the probable development of the undertaking, and judging by present indications he has every reason for feeling most encouraged and hopeful regarding the future of his business. Mr. Hawkinson has the advantage of knowing the local conditions from first hand, and he also enjoys a wide and favorable acquaintance among workmen, which has been of inestimable assistance to him in the up-building of his factory. At the present time it requires the services of from two to five employees to fill the orders and his trade is constantly increasing in a most gratifying manner.
    On the 24th of September, 1902, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Hawkinson and Miss Ellen M. Nelson, who was also born in Sweden, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nels Erickson. At the age of twelve years Mrs. Hawkinson emigrated to the United States, locating in Galesburg, where she was joined four years later by her parents and the other members of the family. Mr. and Mrs. Erickson, who are still residents of this city, are the parents of six children, as follows : Amanda, who is deceased; Sophie; Carl Oscar; Hannah; Swan; and Ellen M., now Mrs. Hawkinson. Two daughters and one son have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Hawkinson: Alice Sophie, Carl Wilfred and Marion Irene.
     In matters of faith both Mr. and Mrs. Hawkinson are Lutherans and hold membership in the Swedish church of this city, and in politics he is a Republican. He has never sought official honors, preferring to concentrate his energies upon the development of his own undertakings, in which he is meeting with a goodly measure of success. Mr. Hawkinson possesses the perseverance and determination and also the capability to attain prosperity and is so intelligently directing his present industry that it gives every assurance of becoming one of the well established and flourishing enterprises of the city.
DAVID WILLARD BRADSHAW.
    On the long list of Galesburg's honored dead appear the names of a number who rendered valiant service to their country in the darkest hour of its history,— men who faced the enemy's fire under conditions which tried the stoutest hearts. Among this number was David Willard Bradshaw, and through his valor and loyalty he rose from the ranks to become captain of his company. He afterward lived for many years in Galesburg, where he was known as a worthy and respected citizen. He was born in Montgomery county, Kentucky, December 26, 1836. His education was acquired in the schools of his native state and when seventeen years of age he became a resident of Farmington, Illinois, where he learned the carriage-maker's trade. In 1855 he removed to Abingdon, Knox county, settling upon a farm, and to the cultivation of the fields he devoted his energies until after the outbreak of the Civil war, when his patriotic spirit was aroused and on the 10th of August, 1861, he enlisted, joining the boys in blue of Company D, Seventh Illinois Cavalry. He left Knoxville on the 2d of September for Camp Butler and was soon promoted to the rank of first sergeant and in the spring of 1862 became a lieutenant of his company. Further promotion followed and in the spring of 1863 he was chosen captain, with which rank he served until honorably discharged on the 17th of November, 1865. His own bravery and loyalty inspired and encouraged men who served under him and made his military record a most creditable and worthy one.
     When the war was over, Mr. Bradshaw returned to Knox county and his fellow townsmen, appreciative of his worth and ability, and feeling that a loyal soldier would also make a loyal officer in private life, elected him sheriff in 1866. He removed to Knoxville, where he resided until his term of office expired and then came to Galesburg, where he engaged in the livery business. In this connection he secured a liberal patronage, because of his earnest effort to please his customers and his straightforward dealing. The years brought him success as the reward of his industry and close application to business and with a comfortable competence he retired, spending his remaining days in the enjoyment of well earned rest.
     On the 29th of May, 1868, Mr. Bradshaw was united in marriage to Miss Ella Cooley, a daughter of Zelotes and Julia Ann (Hanks) Cooley of Knoxville, Illinois. Her father was born in East Windsor, Connecticut, November 10, 1808, and was a son of Aaron and Chloe (Bidwell) Cooley, of whose four children he was the eldest. In 1816 the family removed to Glastonbury, Connecticut, and Zelotes afterward learned the carpenter's trade in Hartford that state. Later he engaged in carpentering in Westfield, Massachusetts, but eventually abandoned industrial pursuits to enter commercial circles and established a grocery store in Poughkeepsie, New York. There he resided until September, 1837, when he left the east and came to the middle west, settling in Carthage, Illinois, where he formed a partnership with Alva Wheeler and again took up carpentering and contracting. They built the courthouse at Carthage, Illinois, and in 1839 came to Knoxville, erecting the courthouse of Knox county. Mr. Cooley continued in the contracting business until 1846, when, by the board of county commissioners, he was appointed treasurer of the county, which office he filled until the following year, when he was elected county clerk thus serving until December, 1852. He retired from office as he had entered it, with the confidence and good-will of all concerned. In the meantime he had taken up the study of law, which profession he practiced until his death. He became a resident of Galesburg in 1890 and needed no introduction to the people of this city because of his long previous residence in the adjoining village of Knoxville. In his political views he was a democrat, somewhat active in the work of the party, and in its councils his opinions carried weight. After seven years of residence in Galesburg, he passed away in 1897, having for a long period survived his wife, who died in 1868. They had been married, in December, 1833, and their family included Mrs. Bradshaw, who was born in Knoxville, March 14, 1844. Her education was acquired in St. Mary's Academy of that place and in 1868 she gave her hand in marriage to David W. Bradshaw. To them were born four children: Nellie, who was born in Galesburg and is now deceased; Cooley R., living in this city; Vera Margaret, who is now the wife of Presson Waverly Thomson, of Los Angeles, California; and Fred, deceased.
        Mr. Bradshaw always maintained pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army post. He belonged also tothe Masonic fraternity, which found in him an exemplary representative, loyal to its teachings, concerning mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness. In his political views he was a republican but cared nothing for the honors or emoluments of office. He was always loyal in matters of citizenship, manifesting the same faithfulness to his country that he displayed when he followed the old flag on southern battlefields. He died February 12, 1893, when in the fifty-seventh year of his life, and the community lost a worthy and representative citizen, who throughout the long period of his residence here had enjoyed the friendship and high regard of those with whom he had been associated.
W. H. MONTGOMERY.
     W. H. Montgomery, who is engaged in the operation of a fine farm of eighty acres on section 13, Persifer township, has the distinction of having served for thirty years as a school director in his district. He was born in Knox township, this county, on the 13th of December, 1849, and is a son of Zadok and Sarah (Church) Montgomery. His father, who was left an orphan in his early boyhood, was a native of Indiana, whence he came in 1837, at the age of twelve years, to Knox county with his brother. Here he completed his education in one of the subscription schools, subsequently turning his attention to agricultural pursuits. Immediately after his marriage he located on eighty acres of land in Knox township, that he had previously purchased, and "there he engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He met with excellent success in both undertakings and ultimately became the owner of four fine farms in Iowa. In his political views Mr. Montgomery was originally a republican, but in his later years he preferred the policy of the populist party. He passed away at the age of seventy-five years and was laid to rest in Van Gilder cemetery in Knox township. The mother was a native of West Virginia and a daughter of Cyrus and Margaret Church, who were also born in West Virginia. They came to Knox county during the pioneer days and located on a farm in Knox township, where they spent their last days. Mrs. Montgomery was sixty-six at the time of her death and she is buried in the family lot in Van Gilder cemetery. She was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal church, with which she had long been affiliated. Her grandfather in the maternal line, John Williams, was a veteran of the Revolution, while her grandfather, Church, participated in the war of 1812. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Zadock Montgomery there were born three sons and seven daughters, nine of whom are now living. In order of birth they are as follows: Margaret, the wife of James Coburn of Iowa; W. H., our subject; David and John, twins, the former a resident of East Galesburg, and the latter formerly of Gales-burg, now deceased; Martha, now Mrs. Moser, of Dahinda; Sabina, the wife of Henry Wyman, of Oneida, Illinois; Mary, who married Walter Beaver, of Kansas; Jennie, the wife of George Gilbert, of Oklahoma; Clara, who married Allen Ramble, of the state of Washington; and Letta, now Mrs. Daniel Doan, of Iowa.
    As he was the eldest boy in a large family, where the income was limited, W. H. Montgomery's schooling was confined to a few terms in the districts of Knox and Persifer townships, his text-books early being laid aside in order that he might assist in the support of the other children. Agricultural pursuits have always engaged his attention, and soon after his marriage he settled in Bureau county, Illinois, but later removed to Persifer township, where he has now resided for many years. He purchased the farm he now owns from his brother, David L. Montgomery. He has made extensive improvements in the place during the period of his ownership, having erected all of the buildings now standing, in addition to which he has effected many minor changes. His fields have always been devoted to the raising of such cereals as were best adapted to the soil and climate in connection with which he also raises stock.
     For his wife Mr. Montgomery chose Miss Dora E. Dawson, who was born in this township and is a daughter of James and Margaret Dawson, both of whom are now deceased. Of this marriage there have been born two children: Stella May, who died at the age of three months; and James Isaac, who was nine years at the time of his death.
    In all national elections Mr. Montgomery votes the straight democratic ticket but locally he gives his support to the man he deems best qualified to meet the reqrirements of the office, regardless of party affiliation. He has always taken an active and helpful interest in governmental affairs in his township, and is now serving his second term as supervisor, having been elected on the people's ticket. He has also served for four years as justice of the peace, was the township assessor for two terms, road commissioner for one and served on the school-board, the cause of education ever having found in him an ardent supporter.
WILLIAM BURDETTE .MOORE.
William Burdette Moore is classed with the enterprising business men of Altona where he is engaged in dealing in harness and saddlery. He was born in the town, December 10, 1867, and comes of English ancestry. His father, William Moore, was born in England, July 4, 1833, and was only a child when he came with his parents to America, the family locating in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, where the grandfather and his wife spent their entire lives. Their son, William Moore, took up the trade of harness making and when a young man came to Altona, arriving in this county in 1857. He then abandoned his trade and engaged in farming for several years but afterward returned to the harness-making business. On the 25th of May, 1861, only a few weeks after the outbreak of the Civil war, he enlisted for service as a private, joining Company D, Seventeenth Illinois Infantry, at Altona for a period of three years. Later he reenlisted as principal musician of the One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment, on the 28th of January, 1865. He had been ruptured during the period of his first enlistment so that at his second enrollment in the service he was assigned to less arduous duty as drum major. Following the war he returned home and engaged in the harness business in Altona up to the time of his death, which occurred May 13, 1907. He was a prominent Mason and was a citizen whose military service, was indicative of the loyalty which he always displayed to his adopted country and her welfare. He married Mrs. John Bemis, who is now living at the age of seventy-nine years. She was married twice, her first husband having been John Bemis, who died, leaving one son, J. L. Bemis, who is now in the mail service and resides in Galesburg. Unto Mrs. Moore's second marriage there were born three children: William Burdette; Abbie, the wife of C. E. Linney; and Daisy, the wife of W. Alexander, master mechanic with the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad Company, at Milwaukee, Wisconsin.
     After acquiring a public-school education William B. Moore assisted his father in the harness business until 1888, when he left Illinois for Concordia, Kansas, where he engaged in clerking in a dry-goods store for two years. He afterward spent four years in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, devoting two years of that time to service as bill clerk for the North Western Railway Company. He afterward became fireman on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad and later returned to Altona and joined his father as a partner in the harness-making business. This association was maintained until 1900, when Mr. Moore purchased his father's interest, the latter retiring at that time. William B. Moore still continues his harness and saddlery establishment and enjoys a good trade. He has worked up a satisfactory business as the owner of an extensive apiary and is one of the prominent representatives of bee culture in this part of the state. That he is regarded as authority upon the subject and is prominent in this field of activity is indicated by the fact that he is now first vice president of the Illinois State Bee Keepers Association.
Mr. Moore was united in marriage to Miss Mary O. Bigger, who was born August 17, 1870, in southern Illinois, a daughter of Robert and Angeline (Cut-right) Bigger. Her father is a Civil war veteran and is now at the Soldiers' Home, in Quincy, Illinois. Unto <Mr. and Mrs. Moore have been born five children, Donald Chase, Faith Angeline, Harriet Inez, Hazel Mary and Abbie Bell.
    Mr. Moore is a member of the Methodist church, in the work of which he is actively interested, serving at the present time as one of the church trustees. He also belongs to the Masonic lodge and the Maccabees at Altona and is a prominent and influential worker in the ranks of the republican party. Since 1904 he has served as village clerk and his worth, fidelity and capability in office was indicated by the fact that he has served in this position for seven years. He has a wide acquaintance in this part of the county and is accounted one of the leading and representative citizens because of his business activity and progress and his devotion to the political and religious principles in which he believes.
HEBER GILLIS.
Heber Gillis, who for more than half a century has been a resident of Knox county, is now living retired on his farm, which is situated in Rio township. He was born in Argyle, Washington county, New York, September 8, 1837, his Parents being Dr. George and Mary (Shepard) Gillis, the father a native of Argyle, born November 6, 1798, and the mother of Clinton county, born in September, 1809. The family originally came from Scotland, the grandfather, Alexander Gillis, being a native of that country, who was allotted by the British government a tract of land in New York, where he settled in a community of people of his own religious faith. Dr. Gillis was reared in his native state and received his professional education in the New York City Medical College, after which he practiced in his native state until 1858. In that year he removed to Illinois, settling near the village of Rio, in Rio township, where he intended to live retired, but his calls were so numerous that he continued in practice until his death, which occurred March 1, 1871. He had thus been in active practice over forty-five years. The mother, Mary (Shepard) Gillis, belonged to a family that originally came from Connecticut. Her father, who was a merchant, was killed in the war of 1812. After his death she and her mother resided with an uncle, who was a prominent lawyer in his time. He was also an extensive slave owner but later became an" abolitionist. His son was the founder of Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio.
    Heber Gillis, who was reared in his native state, began his education in an academy there, later attended Union College and subsequently began farming. In 1856 he came to Knox county, where he purchased his present farm of one hundred and sixty acres and has resided on the same ever since. He engaged in general farming and also raised quite extensively thoroughbred Shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs. He has been very successful in his farming interests and is now living retired.
    In October, 1872, Mr. Gillis was married to Miss Medora Milton, who- was a daughter of George and Mary A. Milton, of Ontario township. The father was a fanner by occupation and came from Indiana to Knox county, Illinois, in the early '30s, settling in Ontario township. His daughter, a sister of Mrs. Gillis, was the first white child born in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Gillis have become the parents of three children: Nellie; James; and Myra, who is now the wife of Dr. Arthur '£. Gammage, of Chicago.
Mr. Gillis is a republican in politics and has taken an active interest in local party work. He has now resided in Rio township on his present farm for over fifty-five years and has been an interested witness to the growth and development of this section of the country. He has here, both in the business and social world, a host of friends to whom his life record is well known and who regard him as a man of genuine worth and sterling integrity.
ANDREW BORLAND ANDERSON.
    Closely associated with the financial interests of Knox county is the name of Andrew Borland Anderson, senior member of the firm A. B. Anderson & Son, of Oneida. Of Scotch ancestry he was born in Ayrshire, Scotland, September 10, 1832. His father, James Anderson, a son of John Anderson, was a blacksmith by trade, following this occupation all his life in his native country. In i860 he came to America and made his home with his son in Knox county. He died here in 1865. Mr. Anderson was married to Miss Mary Borland and they were the parents of nine children.
     Andrew Borland Anderson was educated in Scotland in the common schools and in a private institution. He was trained at the forge and became a blacksmith but did not work at this occupation long before he resolved to go to America and seek larger opportunities for making his fortune and wider fields for his activities. In 1850 he landed on this side of the Atlantic and settled in Paris, Ontario, Canada. In the spring of 1853 he crossed the border and found his way to Illinois, locating in Victoria, Knox county, where he followed his trade for a few years. In 1857 he purchased a building in Oneida and twenty years later engaged in the banking business here in partnership with Frank Murdoch. Good judgment in financial matters and in investments as well as a liberal business policy soon proved Mr. Anderson and his partner efficient business managers, who were successful in building up a banking institution that is a great credit to Oneida. In 1908 Mr. Murdoch died and thereupon Mr. Anderson's son John, who had been a bookkeeper up to this time, was taken into the company and the firm style became A. B. Anderson & Son. Besides this chief business interest Mr. Anderson owns six hundred acres of land in Knox county and other holdings in various counties, and he is a stockholder in the Galesburg National Bank. He is an enterprising man and despite his advanced years is energetic and keen in business transactions.
The marriage of Mr. Anderson and Miss Mary McQuie occurred in December, i860. Three children were born of this union: William H., who lives on his father's farm, is married and has six children; John H., who is married and is in partnership with his father in the bank; and Mary Ella, the wife of Dr. Stewart of Oneida, who lives with her father and has one boy.
     In his political views Mr. Anderson is a democrat, believing in the principles of that party and voting for its men and supporting its measures. He served in the office of treasurer of the township for twenty years. Fraternally he is connected with the Odd Fellows of Oneida and with the local lodge of the Masonic order, in which he has held all the offices. Those who know Mr. Anderson—and his acquaintance is a wide one, extending beyond the confines of Knox county— esteem him for his lofty sense of honor and his unfailing integrity.
JOHN R. PARKINSON.
     John R. Parkinson, cashier of the Bank of Wataga, is one of the enterprising young men of Sparta township, of which he is a native, his birth having here occurred on June 19, 1893. He is the only child born of the union of Samuel R. and Elizabeth (Campbell) Parkinson, prominent in Knox county and a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume.
Reared amid the environments of a good home, in the acquirement of an education John R. Parkinson was sent to' the public school at the usual age, remaining a student there until he completed his course at sixteen. From his earliest boyhood principles of thrift and industry were inculated in his youthful mind, and while yet a young lad he began preparations for a useful business career by assisting his father, who in addition to his various other interests was engaged in the general mercantile business. After completing his education he entered the bank as clerk and general bookkeeper, in which capacity he served with such efficiency that he is now cashier. He is an industrious, enterprising young man, whose abilities and opportunities should enable him to become one of the foremost business men of this section of the county.
      Mr. Parkinson lives at home. He is not yet old enough to cast a ballot, while his church connection is that of the Roman Catholic. He represents the third generation of his family in this township, in the up-building of which they have been important factors.
CARL WARNER MERRILL.
Carl Warner Merrill, manager of the Terry Lumber Company was born in La Porte, Indiana, on the 9th of October, 1865, the youngest child of Joseph H. and Nancy J. (Wadsworth) Merrill. They were both natives of the state of New York, the father's birth having occurred at Lebanon Springs, Columbia county, February 17, 1828, and that of the mother in Randolph, Cattaraugus county, on the 24th of August, 1832. Joseph H. Merrill, who was a son of John Merrill, a native of Connecticut, and the fourth child in a family of ten, was reared in the town of his birth, where he received a meager education, after which he apprenticed himself to the carpenter's trade under an uncle for three years for the sum of one hundred dollars. He completed his period of service in 1844 and immediately thereafter went to La Porte, Indiana, entering the employment of the Lake Shore & Michigan Southern Railway Company, with whom he remained for six years. Later he engaged in contracting in connection with which he also conducted a meat market for a time, continuing to reside in La Porte until 1868. On the 26th of March of that year he located in Wataga, where he resumed his contracting, this business engaging his attention until 1900. During that time he became associated with W. H. Wood in the lumber business, of which enterprise he subsequently became the sole owner. In 1880 he purchased and removed to the present location of C. L. Tomkins, where he continued to be engaged in the lumber business until 1905, when he sold his interests to Terry & Lewis, now W. E. Terry & Company, living retired until his death on the 24th of March, 1910. Joseph Merrill was twice married", his first union having been with Miss Rena J. Wadsworth, who died in 1851. She was a daughter of Samuel Fenn Wadsworth, while her mother prior to her marriage was a Miss Wheeler. For his second wife Mr. Merrill chose his sister-in-law, Miss Nancy J. Wadsworth, who passed away on the 12th of October, 1906. Three children were born of this union: Leroy, who is deceased; Cora, of Wataga; and Carl Warner, our subject. Fraternally Mr. Merrill was a member of the Masonic order, belonging to Wataga Lodge, No. 291, A. F. & A. M. and the Order of the Eastern Star. He was also affiliated with the Odd Fellows, holding membership in Wataga Lodge, No. 598, I. O. O. F. and the Rebekah Lodge. Both he and his wife were united with the Baptist church, and politically he was a republican. He always took an active interest in all municipal affairs and served for eight years as president of the village board.
     Wataga has been the home of Carl Warner Merrill since he was a child of three years. At the usual age he entered the public schools, where he mastered the common branches, until seventeen years of age. For three years thereafter he worked as a laborer, during which time he also assisted his father about the lumberyard. In 1892 he engaged in painting and paper hanging, following this vocation continuously for eleven years. Mr. Merrill assumed the management of the Terry Lumber Company in October, 1906, and has ever since been identified with this position.
     On the 15th of June, 1892, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Merrill and Miss Alice E. Milroy, whose birth occurred on the 10th of January, 1868. Mrs. Merrill is a daughter of John E. and Rachel (Waffle) Milroy, the former a native of Scotland and the latter of the United States and of English descent. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Merrill has been born one child who died in infancy.
     His allegiance in matters politic Mr. Merrill gives to the republican party and has always been a prominent factor in the government of the municipality, having long been a member of the board of aldermen, while for thirteen years he was village clerk. Fraternally he is identified with the Masonic order, holding membership in Wataga Lodge, No. 291, A. F. & A. M.; and Oneida Chapter, No. 173, R. A. M. He also belongs to the Woodmen of America, being affiliated with Wataga Camp, No. 3229, and the Odd Fellows, his local connection being with Wataga Lodge, No. 598. Mr. Merrill is widely known in and about Wataga, where he has many friends, the majority of whom were the comrades of his boyhood, their loyalty being a tribute to his character.
ALBERT HERMAN ALLEN.
Albert Herman Allen is now living retired, save that he is financially interested in some business projects, a life of well directed energy and thrift having brought him to his present substantial position, which renders further active labor unnecessary as a means of support and comfort. He is one of Galesburg's native sons, his birth having here occurred, June 9, 1841. His parents, Sheldon William and Fidelia (Leach) Allen, were both natives of Oneida county, New York, and the former was a young man when he removed westward to Knox county, Illinois, making the journey across the country with a team and wagon, accompanied by his wife and their one child, James S. Allen, who was then a year and a half old. At length they arrived in Log City, Knox county, in June, 1837, and there resided until 1838, when they came to Galesburg, the father erecting a house at the corner of Mulberry street and Allen avenue, which residence is still the property of his son Albert. The father was a farmer by occupation and also followed the butchering business but retired several years prior to his death. In all of his business affairs he was very successful, never allowing difficulties or obstacles to bar his path if they could be overcome by honorable and persistent effort. He donated to the city the land which is now called Allen avenue. He was the owner of twenty acres between Main and South streets and also of forty acres at the corner of Main and Farnum streets. He platted this land into city lots, calling it the S. W. Allen addition, and through HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 451

the sale of real estate added materially to his income. He was always a stanch republican in politics but never aspired to office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, which ultimately brought him a gratifying return. Both he and his wife were members of the old First church and their influence was a substantial factor in the moral development and progress of the community. They were married in Oneida county, New York, in 1834, and became the parents of eleven children: James Sherman, now living in Gales-burg; Sheldon Oberlin, who died in 1901, leaving a widow, who resides at No. 1416 North Broad street; Albert Herman; Henry Alonzo, who is living in Sum-merville, Tennessee; Norman T., of Galesburg; Chester Ephraim, who makes his home at the corner of Mulberry and Pearl streets; Mary Fidelia, the deceased wife of John H. Wyckoff, of Canton, Illinois; John Stebbins, a practicing physician of Keithsburg, Illinois; Frank S., a resident of Los Angeles, California; Lida, the wife of Adam Kiefner, of.Aspen, Colorado; and Fred S., who is living in St. Augustine, Florida.

When he had mastered the branches of learning taught in the public schools of Galesburg, Albert H. Allen continued his education in Madison University, at Hamilton, New York. He worked upon his father's farm until 1867 and then engaged in the butchering and live-stock business for twenty years, meeting with success in that undertaking whereby he was enabled at length to live retired. He was diligent and determined and carried forward to completion whatever he undertook. In his trade transactions he was always thoroughly reliable yet watchful of the details of his business, while sound judgment was brought to bear in the management of his affairs and ultimately won for him a handsome competence. He is still a stockholder in the Galesburg Telephone Company, the First National Bank and also in the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy railroad.

Mr. Allen has been married twice. On the 1st of April, 1861, he wedded Miss Mary Agnes Leach, a daughter of Daniel and Agnes (Baird) Leach, of Marine City, Michigan. The children of that marriage are: Rose Agnes, who first became the wife of Felix M. Katar, her second marriage being with Captain J. R. Basiger, of Auburndale, Florida; Jennie Leach, at home; and Daniel Ephraim, of Galesburg. The wife and mother passed away, January 19, 1876, and on the 26th of December, 1899, Mr. Allen was married to Miss Lillian Goddard, a daughter of George C. and Agnes (Friend) Goddard, of Larned, Kansas. Her father was born in New York city, February 7, 1824, and his wife's birth occurred in Washington county, Maryland, July 27, 1829. He came to Illinois in the early '40s, settling in Fulton county, where he followed farming, but in 1863 he removed to Canton, Illinois, in order to better educate his children. In 1884 he removed to Larned, Kansas, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits for ten years and then retired, still making his home in Larned. He is a stanch advocate of republican principles and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, his religious belief having been the guiding factor in his life. His wife, who died February 12, 1906, was also a member of that church. Their daughter, Mrs. Allen, was born January 25, 1861, near Canton. Mr. Allen also has several grandchildren, namely: Lillian Leah Katar, born January 15, 1894; Violet Josephine Allen, born April 25, 1896; Glenn Hubert Allen, born May 10, 1898; and Herman Meeks Allen, born March 20, 1903.

452 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

Throughout the entire period of his residence in Galesburg and this part of the state Mr. Allen has been deeply interested in public projects and those movements which have direct bearing upon the welfare and progress of the community. He has always voted with the republican party yet has never been an aspirant for public office. For three years he was a member of the Galesburg Fire Department and served as its chief. He attends the First Methodist Episcopal church and at all times has been interested in those projects which have contributed to the material, intellectual, social and moral welfare of the community. His life record proves that success is not a matter of genius, as held by some, but is rather the outcome of clear judgment, experience and indefatigable energy, for those qualities have been salient factors in the success which has crowned his labors, enabling him now to live retired in the enjoyment of comforts won by his former toil.

ANDREW OLIVER LINDSTRUM.

Andrew Oliver Lindstrum needs no introduction to the citizens of Galesburg, for he is well known in its business circles as a prominent representative of insurance and commercial interests, being at the head of the Lindstrum Insurance Agency, secretary of the Provident Savings Association and president of the Lindstrum-West Drug Company. His record as an enterprising, progressive and reliable business man is a credit to Illinois, his native state. He was born, twenty-six miles northeast of Galesburg, at Bishop Hill, May 29, 1873, and is a son of Erick and Breta (Oleson) Lindstrum. The father was born in Westmanland, Sweden, December 24, 1822, and the mother's birth occurred in Llelsingland, Sweden, August 5, 1827. Both were members of the Bishop Hill Colony. The former came to the United States in 1850, and was a farmer by occupation. After the dissolution of the colony he engaged in tilling the soil until his death, which occurred at Bishop Hill, March 8, 1889. His wife had passed away on the 27th of December, 1887. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church and took active and helpful part in its work. Mr. Lindstrum serving on the board of trustees and as treasurer of the board. His political views were in harmony with the principles of the republican party and he capably filled a number of township offices. His wife had come to the United States in 1845, and at Bishop Hill the parents of our subject were married. Unto them were born five children: Caroline, Eric, Charlotte, Albert and Andrew, of this review.

The last named pursued his early education in the schools of his native town and afterward entered Knox College, completing the scientific course with the class of 1895. He then went to Geneseo, Illinois, and in company with James H. Andrews established a daily paper, which they conducted for about a year. Mr. Lindstrum then sold his interest to his partner and aided in organizing the Kewanee Daily Courier, which he published for a year. He next went to Chicago and worked on the Chicago Post for a few months. On the 17th of October, 1897, he came to Galesburg and began working on the Evening Mail in the business department, with which he was connected foi

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 453

three years. He filled the office of deputy county clerk under Frank Adams for two years and then became publisher of the Evening Mail, continuing at the head of that paper from 1903 until the 1st of November, 1907, when he purchased the Holmes & Chase Insurance Agency, which he still carries on in the Holmes building. In this connection he represents the Continental, Fidelity-Phenix, Fire Association, Franklin, Hamburg-Bremen, Liverpool & London Globe, North British & Mercantile, Philadelphia Underwriters, Royal, Springfield, Svea, The Ocean Accident & Guaranty Corporation, Fidelity & Deposit Company, Standard Live-Stock Insurance Company, and Bankers Like of Lincoln, Nebraska. On the 1st of January, 1910, Mr. Lindstrum organized the Provident Savings Association and was elected its secretary, in which position he still continues. His agency is one of the largest in this part of the state and he also has voice in the management of other business projects. Today he is a stockholder of the Lindstrum-West Drug Company, and other Galesburg institutions.

On the 3d of October, 1898, Mr. Lindstrum was united in marriage to Miss Sybil Winifred Chaiser, a daughter of John P. and Betsy (Linbbeck) Chaiser, of Bishop Hill, who received her schooling in Knox College, graduating in 1898. Her father was born in Balinge Parish, in Upland, Sweden, January 1, 1844, and on coining to America in 1850 joined the Bishop Hill Colony. In early life he followed the cooper's trade for some time but afterward engaged in the grain and lumber business and also acted as agent for the Rock Island & Peoria Railroad Company for a number of years. In 1888, with a handsome competence acquired from his labors, he retired from active life. His political allegiance is given to the prohibition party. Mrs. Chaiser was born in Gefleborg, Sweden, May 24, 1848, and came to America in 1849. They were married February 5, 1870, and became parents of three daughters: Alice E., S. Winifred and Juna C.

To Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrum has been born a son, Herbert James, whose birth occurred at Galesburg, June 3, 1906. In his political views Mr. Lindstrum has always been a republican since age conferred upon him the right of franchise and while he has not sought nor held political office he has been especially interested in the welfare and progress of the city and has cooperated in many movements for the general good. From 1907 until 1910 he was a member and secretary of the library board. Mr. and Mrs. Lindstrum are both members of the Central Congregational church. His business record has been characterized as honorable and upright and he deserves classification with the leading business men of the city.

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