Biographies from Albert J. Perry's 1912 History of Knox Co., IL

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208 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

DANIEL WAINRIGHT.

A long life of activity and enterprise devoted to agricultural pursuits gained for Daniel Wainright the financial independence that now enables him to live retired. * For more than forty years he was successfully identified with the farming interests of Chestnut township, and was a prominent factor in promoting its development along the various lines of public utility. Fie is a native of Ohio, his birth occurring in Claremont, on the 4th of May, 1829, and a son of Vincent and Nancy (Hall) Wainright. His father was born in New Jersey, in 1793, while the mother was a native of the state of Ohio. The paternal grandfather, Daniel Wainright, was likewise born and reared in New Jersey, from which state he joined the Continental ranks during the Revolution. In the maternal line, Daniel Wainright is of English extraction, his grandfather, Jeremiah Flail having emigrated from the mother country to the United States in the early years of the last century. He was a carpenter and millwright by trade, but subsequently withdrew from this vocation and took up farming, locating on a tract of land in Claremont county, Ohio, that he cultivated until his death in 1844. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Wainright there were born nine children, five sons and four daughters, as follows: Jonathan and Jeremiah, both of whom are deceased; Daniel, our subject; Catherine and Delia Ann, who subsequently became Mrs. Tuttle, both of whom are deceased; Rachel M., the wife of a Mr. Barr, William Henry and Hannah Lucinda, who are also deceased; and Wesley, who is living near Springfield.

The early years of Daniel Wainright's life were spent on his father's farm, in the work of which he assisted while pursuing his education in the district schools. In common with most country youths at that period his text-books were early laid aside and his attention devoted to the work of the fields and care of the stock. He was married at the age of twenty years and for some time following continued to engage in agricultural pursuits in his native state. Later deciding that better opportunities awaited him in what at that time was termed the west, he and his wife with their two children crossed the prairies to Illinois. Knox county was his destination and upon his arrival he purchased some land on section 3, Chestnut township, and there he continued to reside until 1901. Upon this worthy young couple devolved all of the hardships and discouragements that are incident to frontier life, but they were enterprising and hopeful and their determination never faltered. He applied himself intelligently and persistently to the cultivation of his fields, improving his place as his means warranted from time to time, and ultimately became one of the substantial agriculturists of the county. With prosperity came the respect and esteem as well as friendship of his many acquaintances, who recognized and appreciated the many fine qualities that made

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him a successful man and estimable citizen. Ten years ago, at the age of seventy-two years, Mr. Wainright decided to withdraw from active work and he and his wife left the farm and took up their residence in Knoxville, where they continue to live.

Twelve years ago Mr. and Mrs. Wainright celebrated their golden wedding, their marriage having occurred on the 13th of December, 1849. The maiden name of Mrs. Wainright was Eliza Jane Cramer, and she, too, is a native of Claremont county, Ohio, her birth occurring on the 10th of November, 1830. She is a daughter of William and Sarah Ann (Shoats) Cramer, the father a native of Germany and the mother of English extraction. She was an only child and was left an orphan at an early age, but she had a half-brother, Joseph Heritage. To Mr. and Mrs. Wainwright were born six children, two of whom are deceased, Benedict, who was the fourth in order of birth, and Loretta, the next younger, who died in infancy. Vincent, the eldest, whose birth occurred in Ohio, married Miss Frances Hauk, a native of Illinois, and they have two children Ernest and Edna. McGuire, also a native of Ohio, married Miss Arenia Coe, of Missouri, and they have two children, Clara, who is married; and Jennie, Joseph married Arenia Mallory, who was born in Kansas, and they have the following children: Arthur, Edith, Bertha, Mildred and Lloyd. Sarah Eliza, is the wife of Bert Eikey, a farmer of Orange township, and their children are: Louis, Bert, Ross and Flenrietta.

Mr. and Mrs. Wainright have always been active members of the Methodist Episcopal church and for forty years he was superintendent of the Sunday school. Fraternally he is a Mason, being affiliated with Pacific Lodge, No. 66, A. F. & A. M. He always recognized the obligation of citizenship by assuming his share of the governmental responsibilities in his township. For three terms he discharged the duties of supervisor and for three years he acted as road commissioner, while for one term he served as school trustee and as school director for twenty-eight years. A man of high principles and keen judgment, Mr. Wainright's views were always valued in the community where he resided, his foresight and powers of discernment giving weight to any opinion he might advance relative to the public welfare. During a residence in the county that has covered a period of more than half a century he has not only won many friends, but has established for himself a reputation that will be to his children a valued heritage.

FRANK G. MATTESON.

In the history of Galesburg's commercial and industrial development it is imperative that mention be made of Frank G. Matteson because of his close connection with one of the most important productive enterprises of the city, he being now president of the Pnrington Paving Brick Company, the plant being located in East Galesburg. He was born in Macomb, Illinois, August 24, 1867, his parents being Asa A. and Helen M. (Gardner) Matteson. The father was born in Berwick, Illinois, in 1837, and the mother's birth occurred in Knoxville, this state. In his boyhood days Asa A. Matteson came to Galesburg, pur-

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sued his education here and engaged in farming for a time. He afterward practiced law in Macomb, Illinois, for a period and in 1874 again came to this city where he entered financial circles as the vice president of the First National Bank, with which he was connected until his death. He also became prominent in the establishment and development of the business now conducted under the name of the Purington Paving Brick Company and was associated with that important undertaking to the time of his demise, which occurred January 2, 1895. His widow still survives and now makes her home in Webster Groves, Missouri. Mr. Matteson gave his political support to the republican party, held membership in the Odd Fellows lodge and in the Galesburg Club. They were married in this city and unto them were born four children: Frank G., of this review; Fred C, who is a resident of Aurora, Illinois; Grace M., the wife of R. W. Willis, of Webster Groves, Missouri; and Ralph, living in Rockford, Illinois.

Frank G. Matteson was educated in the public schools and after leaving the high school secured a position in the First National Bank, spending two or three years as collector. He afterward devoted four years to service as order clerk in the post-office and next entered the office of the Purington Paving Brick Company as general office boy. His advancement since that day has been continuous. The business was established in East Galesburg in 1890 by D. V. Purington and Asa A. Matteson and was incorporated at that time with D. V. Purington as president, W. S. Purington as vice president and Asa A. Matteson as secretary and treasurer. The business was incorporated with a capital stock of two hundred thousand dollars and was thus continued until 1892. The St. Louis Paving Brick Company was organized in that year with a capital stock of two hundred and fifty thousand dollars and No. 2 plant was built at East Galesburg. In 1893 the companies were merged under the name of the Purington Paving Brick Company and the capital stock was increased to five hundred thousand dollars. At that time D. V. Purington became president; W. S. Purington, vice president and general manager; Asa A. Matteson, treasurer; and Charles H. Chamberlain, secretary. These gentlemen constituted the board of directors together with George C. Prussing, S. S. Kimball, A. W. Vanderveer and William E. Phillips. The business has increased from year to year, enjoying a steady and continuous growth, the output for the first year being fifteen million bricks, while the present output has reached more than one hundred million. Their plant at first contained but one kiln and from that small beginning they have increased their capacity until they now have sixty-four kilns, theirs being the largest plant of the kind in the United States. Their business extends to all parts of the country, their brick being used in paving in Panama; in Memphis, Tennessee; Dead-wood, South Dakota; and Duluth and Superior, Wisconsin. The present officers are: F. G. Matteson, president; George C. Prussing, first vice president; C. D. B. Howell, second vice president; C. H.. Chamberlain, treasurer; William H. Terwilliger, secretary; W. W. Porter, assistant secretary; W. G. D. Orr, general manager; and E. L. Swett, general superintendent; with D. V. Purington as chairman of the board of directors, which board includes also Messrs. Prussing, Howell, Matteson, Charles H. Chamberlain, William E. Phillips and P. T. Walsh. They handle fifteen thousand car loads of freight in a year, use eighteen car loads of coal per day, employ six hundred men and have two hundred acres

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in their plant. The United States government has standardized the shale used by this company and the business has grown in volume and importance until it exceeds all other paving brick enterprises of the United States.

On the 19th of October, 1892, occurred the marriage of Mr. Matteson and Miss Daisy L. Lamoreux, a daughter of Dr. J. M. Lamoreux, of Galesburg, and their children are: Amy, whose birth occurred at Galesburg on the 22d of December, 1897; Helen, whose natal day was December 27, 1901 ; and Asa Gardner, who was born May 26, 1911.

Mr. Matteson is a republican in his political views, but the demands of his business have left him no time for office seeking or office holding. He belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, the Elks Club, the Loyal Legion, the Galesburg Club and the Country Club. His life is proof of the fact that there is an impossibility of placing fictitious values upon industry, determination and perseverance, but when these qualities are arrayed against competition and the usual obstacles of business life they eventually win success. The experience of Mr. Matteson has been of wide range, as he has progressed from the position of office boy to the presidency of the largest paving-brick manufacturing enterprise of the country.

JOHN HOLAHAN.

John Holahan, who has been engaged in the real-estate business in Galesburg for the past six years, was born in Waukon, Iowa, on the 18th of September, 1871. He is a son of James and Catherine (Fenelon) Holahan, both natives of Ireland, whence they emigrated to the United States during childhood. The father was reared in Connecticut, where he later learned sign and carriage painting. In 1859 he came to Iowa, locating in Waukon, where he met the lady who subsequently became his wife. Here he engaged in the implement business with which he continued to be identified until his death on the 6th of March, 1902, at the age of sixty-four years. He was a communicant of the Roman Catholic church, as is also the mother who still resides in Waukon, and he voted the republican ticket. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Holahan numbered nine, our subject being the third in order of birth. The others are as follows: William J., who was born on June 12, 1868, residing at Mason City, Iowa; Nellie M., the wife of William S. Hart, of Waukon; Maurice F., who was born on the 3d of July, 1873, now residing at Atlanta, Georgia; Thomas J., born March 28, 1875, who is living at Dixon, Illinois; James, born October 11, 1880, who is a resident of Victoria; Anna, who was born June 16, 1884, still at home; Mayme, a Sister in St. Xavier's Convent, Chicago, born July 27, 1886, and Gretta, born March 20, 1894, who is also at home.

Reared at home John Holahan attended the public and Presentation Convent Catholic schools at Waukon in the acquirement of an education. His school days were terminated at the age of sixteen years, when he laid aside his textbooks and entered his father's office, where during the succeeding five years he applied himself intelligently and industriously to acquiring a thorough business training under the capable supervision of his father. Upon attaining his majority

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it was considered that he was fully qualified to begin working for himself, so he went to Guttenberg, Iowa, and embarked in the implement business. He continued in this at that point for nine years, when he withdrew from commercial activities and went to Cuba, where he remained four years, traveling and dealing in lands. At the end of that time he returned to the United States and in April 1906, he came to Galesburg and engaged in the real-estate business. He was associated with his brother, Thomas J., until 1909, when the latter withdrew from the firm and Mr. Holahan has ever since been alone. In addition to local properties. both city and country, he has. large tracts of land for sale in Cuba and also the northwest. Since locating here he has met with good success and now is well established and doing a gratifying amount of business.

Bayfield, Wisconsin, was the scene of the marriage of Mr. Holahan and Miss Lucille Boutin, on the 4th of October, 1905. She was born in Bayfield, on the 25th of July, 1884, and 1S a daughter of Frank and Louise (Kintz) Boutin, who still reside there. Mrs. Holahan has four sisters and four brothers, and their names and birthdays are as follows: Allan, March 24, 1888; Francis, March 13, 1890; Meta, July 22, 1892; Anna, March 13, 1895; Hiller, November 15, 1898; Dorothy, November 20, 1899; Ruth, February 26, 1902; and Herbert, November 25, 1904. In the paternal line Mrs. Holahan is of French extraction. Her father, however, was born and reared in Montreal, Canada, while the mother was born in Antwerp, Belgium. He came to Bayfield during his early manhood and engaged in the lumber business and he also owned and operated a number of tugs on Lake Superior. He is a man of considerable prominence in his community, giving his political support to the republican party, and has served for two terms as treasurer of the county. Both he and his wife are communicants of the Roman Catholic church, and he also belongs to the Knights of Columbus and the Lumbermen's Association. Mrs. Holahan was reared in Bayfield, but completed her education at St. Mary's school in Prairie du Chien.

The political views of Mr. Holahan coincide with the principles of the republican party, and in matters of faith both he and Mrs. Holahan are Roman Catholics and belong to Corpus Christi parish. He also holds membership in the Knights of Columbus of SS. Vincent and Paul, the Galesburg Club and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. Mr. Holahan has won favorable recognition in both a business and social way during his residence in Galesburg, and now numbers among its citizens many stanch friends.

JAMES EDWARD HINCHLIFF.

For seventeen years James Edward Hinchliff was well known as a prominent, enterprising and reliable representative of commercial interests in Galesburg, where he conducted a retail lumber business. Moreover, he had a wide acquaintance throughout the county of which he was one of the native sons, his birth having occurred in Rio, July 17, 1853. Fie came of English ancestry, for both of his parents, James and Betsey Hinchliff, were natives of England, whence they emigrated to America in early life. They were married in the state of New York and in 1852 removed to Illinois, settling in Knox county.

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The public schools of this county afforded James E. Hinchliff his early opportunities for acquiring an education and later he continued his studies in Lombard College. He was reared to the occupation of farming and continued to follow it during the early years of his manhood or until 1891, when, believing that he would find a commercial career more congenial and hoping also to find it more profitable, he removed to Galesburg, where the following year he opened a retail lumberyard, continuing that business to the time of his death, which occurred March 28, 1909. In that period he had built up a satisfactory business, his reliable methods, his enterprise and his unfaltering energy being the qualities which served as the foundation for his success.

On the 1st of January, 1880, in Rio, this county, Mr. Hinchliff was united in marriage to Miss Ida M. Woodman, a daughter of David B. and Lourena Woodman. The children born of this marriage are: Everett E., who married Nell Town-send on the 15th of October, 1907; Lulu M., who on the 20th of September, 1911, became the wife of Roy C. Ingersoll; and Ray W. and Grace F., both yet at home with their mother.

Mr. Hinchliff was devoted to his family, his interests centering in his own home, where he was a devoted husband and father and a genial and hospitable host. His political allegiance was given to the republican party and his study of the questions and issues of the day confirmed him in the belief that its principles contained the best elements of good government, but he neither sought nor desired public office as a reward for party fealty. His religious faith was evidenced by the fact that he was a member of the Central Congregational church, to the teachings of which he was ever loyal and devoted, making his a manhood that measured up to the highest standards and won for him the admiration, high regard and trust of all with whom he came in contact.

RANSOM C. HUNT.

Ransom C. Hunt is actively connected with a profession which has important bearing upon the progress and stable prosperity of the community and in the practice of law, where advancement depends entirely upon individual merit and ability, he has made continuous progress, his careful preparation of his cases and his thorough knowledge of the law giving him a power in the courts that enables him to win many favorable verdicts.

Mr. Hunt was born on a farm two and a half miles southwest of Burlington, Iowa, January 24, 1844, his parents being John B. and Mary (Love) Hunt, natives of Illinois and Virginia respectively. The former was a son of John Beal Hunt, who was born in Maryland and made farming his life occupation. He married a Miss Bartlett and they removed from Tennessee to Illinois, establishing their home within the borders of this state ere it was admitted to the Union. For a time they were residents of Bond county and afterward removed to McDonough county. In 1833 they went to the territory of Iowa, where Mr. Hunt secured a tract of wild land in the central part of the state and his five sons, Charles W., Jesse, Samuel, Clayborn and John B., all had land around him so that the family took active and prominent part in the agricultural development of

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that section. There were six daughters in the family, Martha, Lydia, Mary Ann, Esther, Louisa and Sarah. The maternal grandfather of Ransom C. Hunt was David Love, a native of Virginia, who also made farming his life work. Removing westward with his family, they became pioneer residents of a district, southwest of Burlington, Iowa, where they spent their remaining days, Mr. Love passing away at the age of eighty-five and his wife when eighty-eight years of age. Their children were Wesley, Rodney, Joshua, James, Mary and Elizabeth.

John B. Hunt, father of Ransom C. Hunt, was a young lad when he accompanied his parents to Iowa. He was reared to the occupation of farming and continued to engage in tilling the soil until 1849, when, attracted by the discovery of gold in California, he crossed the plains to the Pacific coast. Not winning the fortune which he had hoped to gain, he returned in 1851 and again took up his abode on the farm in Des Moines county, Iowa, which he had left when he started for the west. There he engaged in agricultural pursuits until 1856, when he removed to Bushnell, Illinois, where he conducted a lumber business until 1863 and likewise filled the position of postmaster. He next removed to Macomb, Illinois, where he engaged in the grain business until June, 1865. At that time the family came to Galesburg, where he died November 14, 1904, at the age of eighty-four years and six months, while his wife's death occurred in 1887, when she was sixty-five years of age. She was a faithful member of the Methodist church. Their family numbered a son and two daughters: Ransom C.; Clara, the deceased wife of W. T. Jelliff; and Lois V., the deceased wife of Jesse Pickerell.

Ransom C. Hunt is the only surviving member of the family. He was reared on his father's farm in Iowa and during that period attended the district schools and also the public schools of Burlington and the old Denmark (la.) Academy. He went with his father to Bushnell in 1856 and there worked in the lumberyard and also attended school. Subsequently he became a student in the Lombard University of Galesburg. Lie continued with his father in the lumber trade in Bushnell until the father removed to Macomb, when he became a student in the law office of Hon. J. C. Thompson. In the fall of 1863 the family removed to Galesburg but Ransom C. Hunt and his father remained in Macomb until 1865, when they joined the others in Galesburg, and the subject of this review entered the law office of the Lion. A. C. Mason, who directed his reading until his admission to the bar in June, 1866. In 1869 he formed a partnership with the latter preceptor but for the past twenty years has engaged in practice alone. He has ever been devotedly attached to his profession, systematic and methodical in habit, sober and discreet in judgment, diligent in research and conscientious in the discharge of every duty—qualities which have enabled him to take high rank among the representatives of the Galesburg bar.

On the 1st of May, 1879, occurred the marriage of Mr. Hunt and Miss Irene Johnson, a native of St. Paul, Minnesota, and a daughter of S. F. and Hannah (Neeley) Johnson, who were originally from New York and became early residents of Galesburg. Later they removed to St. Paul, where the father conducted a shoe business, and for two years he was also a resident of Grinnell, Iowa. They then returned to Galesburg, where they still reside. In their family were seven children, Irene, Mary, Harry M., Guy B., Charles N., Mabel F. and Blanche. The daughter Mabel is now the widow of E. A. Davis. The maternal grandparents of Mrs. Hunt were James and Sabrina Neeley, who were among

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"the colony" that settled Galesburg. Air. and Mrs. Hunt have become the parents of two daughters and two sons: Beulah M., the wife of Harold M. Holland, of Galesburg; Albert V., who was educated in Lombard College; Harry C., who is in the employ of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company; and Florence I., who is attending school. The parents are members of the Central Congregational church and in its work take deep and helpful interest. Mr. Hunt gives his political allegiance to the democratic party but the only office that he has ever held was that of police magistrate, in which position he served from 1889 until 1896. He has always preferred to concentrate his energies upon his profession and few lawyers have made a more lasting impression upon the bar of the county both for legal ability of a high order and for the individuality of a personal character which impresses itself upon a community.

IRA S. CALLENDER.

Ira S. Callender, president of the Glenwood Ice & Coal Company and thus prominent in the business circles of the city as head of one of the important industrial projects here, was born in Peoria, Illinois, July 31, 1857, a son of Isaac and Sarah A. (Smith) Callender. His father was born in Henry county, Kentucky, September 10, 1833, and for many years followed farming in Illinois but at length retired from active life and removed to Galesburg, where he passed away September 10, 1907. He always voted with the republican party and filled the office of county supervisor, the duties of which he discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. He held membership in the Central Congregational church, to which his widow still belongs. She was born April 13, 1833, and yet makes her home in Galesburg. In their family were eight children: Ira S., of this review; James J., who is a resident of Tulsa, Oklahoma; Albert B., living at Matehuala, Mexico; William H., of Galesburg; Adella, the wife of Dr. T. F. Clark, of Kansas City, Missouri; Lilly Belle and Frank Edwin, both residing in Galesburg, Illinois ; and Alary Catherine, who is the wife of A. E. Wells, of Galesburg.

Ira S. Callender, whose name introduces this record, pursued his education in the public schools of Geneseo, Illinois, and remained upon his father's farm until twenty-one years of age. He made good progress in his studies and when a young man began teaching school, which profession he successfully followed for a time, displaying ability in imparting readily and clearly to others the knowledge which he had acquired. In 1880 he went to Nebraska, where he divided his time between general agricultural pursuits and teaching school for three years. On the expiration of that period he returned to Galesburg in December, 1883, and purchased an interest in the ice business with which he has since been connected. The business was established in 1885 under the name of the Glenwood Ice Company handling ice only, when in 1891 the scope of the business was extended to include the sale of coal as well. In 1907 the present firm style of the Glenwood Ice & Coal Company was assumed and the business was reincorporated. The officers in 1892 were: John Robson, president; A. D. Shults, treasurer; and Ira S. Callender, secretary. At the present writing Mr.

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Callender is president, A. E. Wells, secretary and C. S. Burnside, treasurer. The business is incorporated with a capital of one hundred thousand dollars and the company owns well equipped ice houses on the lakes east of Galesburg and at New Boston and Moline, Illinois. The coal trade is also an important branch of the business, coal being sold at retail. The enterprise has had a continuous, steady and gratifying growth, as is indicated by the fact that in the first year of its existence its sales amounted to twenty-five hundred tons of ice, while at the present writing the sales have reached fifty thousand tons of ice annually. In the first year but two wagons were used in delivery, while in the present year eleven wagons were used and forty men are employed outside of the office in Knox county, ten of the number being at New Boston. A large part of the ice harvested is furnished to dealers in other towns surrounding Galesburg, and to the Chicago Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company. The company also handles wood, kindling and oil, and the business is a most gratifying and profitable one. Its success is undoubtedly due in large measure to the honorable, straightforward business policy that is ever followed as well as to the progressive methods instituted by the president and his associate officers.

On the 2d of February, 1882, Mr. Callender was united in marriage to Miss Alice Bassford, a daughter of Samuel and Mary Antoinette (Lane) Bassford, of Brooklyn, New York. Their children are: Ira I., now deceased; Wallace V., who is living in Pasadena, California; Alice B., who is the wife of Archer Laurence, of Plainfield, New Jersey; Ida E., the wife of Hans John Von Hangen, of Matehuala, Mexico; Gladys M. and Ruth S., both at home.

While Mr. Callender has never been an active party worker, he does not fail to make his way to the polls and cast a ballot in support of the principles of the republican party, for he regards this as the duty as well as the privilege of every American citizen. He is prominent in the Elks lodge of Galesburg and is serving as one of its trustees but his position is preeminently that of an active, enterprising business man who is ever alert and determined and who brooks no 'obstacles in the path to success that can be overcome by persistent effort and indefatigable energy.

LAURENCE R. RYAN, M. D.

Laurence R. Ryan was born in Pontiac, Michigan, February 27, T858. He is descended from old Irish stock. His father was Bernard Ryan and his mother Maria C. Kelly. Both parents were born near Boyle, in County Roscommon, Ireland. They came to this country in the same ship and were married in 1848, in Detroit, Michigan. Twelve children were born to them and Dr. Ryan was the seventh. Bernard Ryan was a boiler maker by trade and held the responsible position of foreman at the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad shops in Galesburg for many years. He died in Galesburg, April 20, 1883, at the age of sixty-one. The mother was a devout Catholic and a home-loving woman. She lived for the church and her family. She died twenty-five years after her husband in the consciousness of having spent an absolutely pure Christian life, and in the eighty-sixth year of her age.

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Dr. Ryan attended the public schools in Aurora and Galesburg until he was thirteen years of age, at which time he was apprenticed to the boiler-maker trade under his father in the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy shops. He worked at the trade almost continuously and for ten years, rising from the position of rivet heater to that of foreman before he was twenty-five years of age.

During the time he was working in the shops he realized the necessity of securing an education, so he attended the business college and night school, which was then held in the Churchill school building. Having the ambition to rise higher than the position of boiler-maker foreman, but seeing no possibility of advancement along the lines he had started, he finally gave up the shop work and entered Knox College, determined to graduate and finally to enter his chosen profession, the practice of medicine. Because of the large family, the father had to support, he was forced to rely on his own resources and finance himself. This he did by working during the summer at his trade and had the pleasure of going through Knox College and Jefferson College without receiving a gratuity from anyone. While in college he entered into all the activities and besides having a high grade in scholarship, was active in athletics and on two occasions received prizes for excellence in gymnastic work. He graduated in 1886 and had the honor of being one of the commencement speakers.

Two years before his graduation in Knox College, he registered for the study Of medicine in the office of Drs. Aldrich and Wilson, so that by the time he graduated, he was well equipped for entering the medical school. He entered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1886 and after a severe course had the honor of securing the first prize of one hundred dollars for excellence of scholarship and best theses, graduating April 5, 1888.

Immediately after graduation he returned to Galesburg and entered into the practice of medicine with Drs. Aldrich and Wilson, securing a lucrative practice from the start. After a year in general practice he was tendered the position of medical examiner for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad, with control of the whole Galesburg division, which then comprised five hundred miles. This position he accepted and held for three years. With the ambition to do better still spurring him on, he left the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy after a service of three years and went to Europe to study his chosen specialty, the eye, ear, nose and throat. He was a student in the Berlin University, besides having private instruction, and also took a course in England, graduating from the London Post Graduate School in. 1892. Since his return from Europe in 1892, Dr. Ryan has devoted himself exclusively to the practice of his specialty in Galesburg.

For the last twenty years Dr. Ryan has enjoyed a most excellent practice, drawing patronage from a radius of fifty miles, and has done much to further the interests of medicine. He is a great believer in medical organization and cooperation for the good of the profession and, therefore, belongs to numerous medical societies and attends many conventions. He was one of the organizers of the first Galesburg Medical Society and was its first secretary. He was also one of the organizers of the Knox County Medical Society and became its president in 1903. He filled at different times every official position in the Military Tract Medical Society and was also the president of that society. He has prepared and read many scientific papers in the various societies from the city

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the American Medical Association. He was regular and special pension examining surgeon for many years and is now the official oculist for the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad. He served on the staff of the Galesburg Cottage Hospital for several years.

Dr. Ryan is at present a member of the Galesburg Medical Society, Knox County Medical Society, Military Tract Medical Society, Tri State Society, Chicago Ophthalmological Society, Illinois State Medical Society, American Academy of Ophthalmology and OtoLaryngology, and the American Medical Association.

Dr. Ryan has never courted political honors, but was a candidate for elector on the gold democratic ticket in 1896. He has never devoted much time to society or social affairs, secret societies or clubs. His interest has all been along the line of scientific study and travel. He has, however, for many years been a member of the Galesburg Business Men's Club, and was a director for six years, from 1900 to 1906. He has been a member of the Elk's organization since 1904. He has traveled extensively. Besides visiting all parts of the United States and Mexico, in 1898 he took a trip around the world, going an unusual way. On this journey he visited Australia, New Zealand, Samoa and the Sandwich Islands. Recently he has taken another extended trip from Galesburg to New York city, thence by steamer to Colon, across the isthmus to the city of Panama by rail, and finally up the coast of Central America and Mexico to San Francisco by steamer. On this trip he took occasion to examine carefully the excavations and locks of the Panama Canal which is reaching completion.

Dr. Ryan was married in 1889 to Margaret S. McChesney, also a graduate of Knox College. Seven children were born to them, five of whom still survive, namely: Helen Margaret Ryan, Marion Cecilia Ryan, Robert Laurence Ryan, Harriet Ewing Ryan and Dorrance Bernard Ryan. The first three are students in Knox College, while the other two are in the public schools of Galesburg, and all are unusually capable.

DE FORREST SEACORD.

De Forrest Seacord needs no introduction to the readers of this volume for he has been a lifelong resident of Knox county and his important business interests have made him widely known. He was born in Oneida in 1862 and after attending the public schools became a student in Knox College and afterward attended college at Racine, Wisconsin. Regarding his education complete, he then turned his attention to the business of importing Norman horses and owned and conducted extensive stables in Galesburg for a number of years. Later he turned his attention to street-railway interests of which he was superintendent for nine years or until the company sold out to the McKinley interests. At that time Mr. Seacord went to Springfield, Illinois, and was superintendent of construction for the McKinley lines in the building of the electric road from Springfield to St. Louis, a mammoth and important undertaking which he successfully executed. He then returned to Galesburg and later engaged in the sale of motor cars. He has secured an extensive business in this connection, selling a large number of cars annually.

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On the 15th of October, 1884, De Forrest Seacord was married to Miss Alice Updyke, and unto them were born two children, Marie and Wilkins, the latter being now associated with his father in business. The family is prominent socially and their own home is justly celebrated for its attractive hospitality. Mr. Seacord belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and is a charter member of the Country Club. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and as a public-spirited citizen he is widely known, his aid and cooperation being a tangible factor for success in the conduct of many important public enterprises. In his business he has so promoted his interests as to gain for him a prominent position among the substantial residents of Galesburg.

PROFESSOR LOREN R. WITHERELL.

Unquestionably one of the most versatile and highly cultured residents of Knoxville is Professor Loren R. Witherell, who is not only a scholar and writer of more than local reputation, but an able attorney and a successful lecturer, in addition to which he has taken out patents on twenty-five different articles, all of which are in common use. He was born in Erie county, Pennsylvania, on the 10th of May, 1843, and is a son of Ephraim H. and Rebecca (Donaldson) Witherell. The father was born in Vermont, on May 1, 1816, his parents being Asaph and Johanna (White) Witherell, natives of Massachusetts. Asaph Witherell was the first manufacturer in America of the cut nail, in the making of which he engaged in his native state for many years. Together with his wife and family in 1818 he started westward to Pennsylvania. They made the journey in the winter, and as Lake Erie was frozen they started to go from New York to Pennsylvania on the ice, but as it was thin in places they deemed the crossing unsafe, and returned to the shore. When they reached the northwest corner of Pennsylvania, they went south for about fifteen miles to the vicinity of Wattsburg, spending the night at the home of James Donaldson. Ephraim Witherell at that time was a lad of two years, while his future wife was a babe of one day. As his parents located in the vicinity, Ephraim Witherell there grew to manhood and learned the carpenter's trade. At the age of twenty-six years with his family he removed to Washington county, Indiana, where he engaged in contracting and building for five years. At the end of that time they crossed the prairies in a wagon to Peoria county, Illinois, residing there until the spring of 1851, when they came to Knoxville. The mother of our subject was born in Pennsylvania, on the 5th of March, 1818, her parents being James and Mary (Moore) Donaldson, who were also natives of the Keystone state. In both the paternal and maternal lines Professor Witherell is descended from old colonial families, both of his grandfathers being veterans of the war of t8t2, while some of his mother's ancestors located in this country more than two hundred and fifty years ago. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Ephraim Witherell numbered seven, the four eldest having been born before they located in Knox county. In order of birth they are as follows: Ursula, who died at the age of twenty years; Loren R., our subject; George, who is a farmer, residing a mile south of Knoxville; and Eri A., who is in the lecture field on a western circuit

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and is also engaged in teaching; Willard W., who engages in the real-estate business and also in building and contracting in Visalia, California; Silas, who is secretary and treasurer of a manufacturing company in. Springfield, Missouri; and Oscar C, who was engaged in the drug business in Knoxville, but has now passed away, his demise occurring at the age of thirty-eight years.

Professor Witherell received his introduction to the elements of English learning in the common schools of Peoria county, which he attended for one year. His education was continued in the public schools of Knoxville until he was eighteen years of age when he was sent to a private school in Erie county, Pennsylvania, where he studied for two winters. He was a brilliant student, possessing the retentive mind, strong powers of concentration and rapid reasoning faculties that mark the natural scholar. Study was to him not a hardship, but a joy and he applied himself so attentively to his work that he made. the best record of any pupil in the school, standing at the head of his classes in every subject. Upon the completion of his course he returned to his Illinois home and subsequently entered Lombard College. He matriculated in the latter institution in 1864, and there pursued special studies for three years, making a most creditable record. Having decided to take up the study of law, at the expiration of that time he entered the office of Willoughby and Grant in Galesburg, where for three years he diligently applied himself to the mastery of the principles of jurisprudence. He was admitted to the bar in 1871, and immediately thereafter opened an office in Rock Island county, where he engaged in practice for several years. He was meeting with most excellent success and was building up a very good clientage when trouble with his eyes compelled him to abandon his profession. In order to restore his sight and improve his health generally he turned his attention to fruit-raising and for thirty years devoted his summers to this occupation. In the winters he lectured on astronomy, geology and natural history in different schools, colleges and societies of the northwest, addressing more than a thousand different audiences. Although he still occasionally delivers a lecture, he has not followed the work regularly for about ten years, having withdrawn from it in 1901. Much of his time now is devoted to writing for the current magazines, while he also contributes editorials to various newspapers in both Iowa and Illinois. He has had more than one hundred of his poems published in papers throughout the country and in 1877 he published a history of John Brown in the Davenport Gazette. Not only does Professor Witherell possess unusual literary ability, but rare mechanical skill and he has always devoted much of his time to perfecting various contrivances upon which he holds patents. His first invention was a sugar-cane stripper, which he patented in 1865, when he was only twenty-two years of age. Later he patented a spiral gate and door spring, that is now used all over the world, while to him must be given the credit for the rubber stamp and printing wheels, which were placed on the market in 1866. He also invented the first computing postal scale, and he likewise holds the patent on a dusting brush and window fastener, as well as a clothes wringer and corn popper, and a number of other useful articles.

On the 5th of March, 1868, Professor Witherell was united in marriage to Miss Lottie A. Anderson, the ceremony being performed in Knoxville. Mrs. Witherell was born in Sweden, in 1852, and is a daughter of Swan and Mary Anderson, who emigrated to the United States and located in Knoxville during

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the early days. The parents are now both deceased and Mrs. Witherell passed away, on March 13, 1909. None of the children born of this marriage lived and Professor and Mrs. Witherell adopted two children, Arthur L. and Augusta. The former is now married and residing in Seattle, Washington, where he is superintendent of a large printing and publishing company. Augusta is the wife of Robert McCall of Davenport, Iowa. Professor Witherell has resided in the house he now occupies for fourteen years, the place being known as "Shady Hill," because it contains the largest and oldest tree in Knox county, which stands in the front yard. The kitchen of this house was built by Professor Witherell and it is a most interesting room. It is constructed from wood taken from a number of historical houses in Knoxville, the old Hebbard House providing the door. This was taken from the room that was occupied by Abraham Lincoln, on the night of October 6, 1858, the time he and Douglas held their memorable debate.

In addition to all of his other talents, Professor Witherell is endowed with considerable musical ability and he has devised a number of clever musical instruments of real artistic value from squashes, gourds and other vegetables. Professor Witherell has been an ardent curio collector for over fifty years, and has an immense and beautiful collection, handsomely arranged in cases, which he has named "The Old Curiosity Shop" and which he will locate permanently in some public park, where it will be a permanent attraction and of great value to the public for years to come. Pie has always been too deeply engrossed in the pursuit of his various personal interests to devote much attention to outside affairs, so has very few public connections. Pie is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, belonging to the Knoxville camp, one of the oldest in the county, which is his only fraternal connection. Professor Witherell has a wide and favorable acquaintance among the citizens of Knox county, where he has spent practically his entire life and is recognized as a man of rare worth and ability.

WILLIAM D. Fleharty.

Among the worthy citizens of Galesburg death has claimed, yet whose memory is enshrined in the hearts of those who knew them, is numbered William D. Fleharty. His was a noble character and his high ideals and lofty principles were manifest in the active part which he bore in church work and his unselfish devotion thereto. Pie was the first white child born in North Henderson township, Mercer county, Illinois, his natal day being October 4, 1834. His parents, Govert S. and Margaret H. Fleharty, were pioneer settlers of the state, casting in their lot with the early residents of Mercer county, when its settlements were few and when the work of development and progress seemed scarcely begun. The family lived upon a farm and it was on the old homestead that William D. Fleharty spent his youthful days, experiencing many of the hardships and privations of pioneer life, yet finding in these conditions the things which tested the mettle of his own character and constituted the foundation of his later successful career and nobility. Throughout the period of his minority he assisted

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in developing the home farm and in i860 he started out in life independently at the time of his marriage to Miss Mary C. Petrie, a daughter of William Petrie, of New Windsor, Illinois. They began their domestic life upon a farm in Henry county, Illinois, near Alpha, and there lived for about nine years, when, in 1869, they removed to New Windsor, where Mr. Fleharty turned his attention to the grain trade, meeting with success in that business during the twenty years which he devoted to the work. After the death of his wife he removed to Galesburg and in 1890 was again married, his second union being with Emma A. Gordon, a daughter of William H. and Martha Gordon, pioneers of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, who had also become a resident of Galesburg in 1890. There was one daughter by his first marriage, Anne.

Mr. Fleharty's influence was always found on the side of progress and improvement, especially along intellectual and moral lines. He was an active supporter of the schools of New Windsor and served in official connection therewith. In politics he was a stanch republican and filled the office of supervisor in Mercer county. He became one of the charter members of the New Windsor Congregational church, was superintendent of its Sunday school for a number of years and for a long time carried almost the entire work of the church on his shoulders. After removing to Galesburg he placed his membership in the Old First church, which later became the Central church, and continued equally faithful to its interests and active in its support and work. Men came to know that what William D. Fleharty promised he would do, that his word was as good as any bond solemnized by signature or seal and that in every relation of life he sought to follow the Golden Rule. "Not the good that comes to us but the good that comes to the world through us" is the measure of our success, and judged by this standard the life of William D. Fleharty was a most successful one.

BOANNERGES ELY.

Boannerges Ely, a resident of Knox county since 1846, was for many years successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits and is now living retired at his home in Wataga. He was born December 21, 1821, in Cumberland Gap, Claiborne county, Tennessee. His father, Solomon Ely, came in 1834, at the close of the Black Hawk war, to DeWitt county, Illinois, where he farmed until his death in 1865, when sixty-nine years old. He was an elder in the Christian church and in his politics was a stanch democrat until the time of Lincoln, when he joined the ranks of the republican party and remained a loyal member till the last. He was married to Rachel Turner, whose death occurred in 1848 at the age of forty-five. There were ten children in the family. The living are: Susanna, the wife of James Stewart, residing in Kansas; and Boannerges, the subject of this sketch, who was the youngest of the family. The grandparents on the father's side were Isaac and Katherine Ely, the former a native of Virginia, and the latter of Germany. The grandparents on the mother's side were William and Susan Turner, both natives of Virginia.

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When a boy, Boannerges Ely attended the district school and after school helped his father about the farm, beginning his apprenticeship at farming at the tender age of seven. When old enough to do a man's share of work he farmed in the employ of others, working for eight dollars a month. At the age of twenty-one he began to farm on his own account and in 1846 came to Knox county and bought land in Sparta township. Beginning with one hundred and twenty acres, he increased his holdings by additional purchases until he now owns three hundred and ninety acres. He was very successful both in general farming and in stock-raising through progressive methods, and the handsome farm which he improved and operated for many years proves his efficiency of management. He retired some years ago, renting his land from which he enjoys a comfortable income.

The marriage of Mr. Ely and Miss Mary Duvall, who was born in Kentucky, July 7, 1834, occurred November 3, 1850. Her father, Thomas Duvall, was a native of Bath county, Kentucky, born February 28, 1802, a son of James and Judith (Jennings) Duvall. His father was a soldier in the War of 1812. Thomas Duvall became a resident of Illinois in 1835, settling in Warren county. The following year he removed to Henderson township, Knox county, where he engaged in farming on a large scale, owning at one time two thousand acres of land. On the 22d of April, 1822, he was married to Miss Nancy Shumate, a native of Virginia, born August 19, 1804. Mr. Duvall died in the fall of 1890, on September 25, and his wife passed away March 2, 1888. Mrs. Ely was one of ten children, of whom five are still living. There were three children in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Boannerges Ely: Nancy, the widow of John Deming, who lives at Wataga, Illinois; William, who married Belle McGinnis, and is a farmer in North Dakota; and Ella, deceased, who was the wife of Samuel Temple and the mother of two children.

Mr. and Mrs. Ely are devout members of the Christian church at Wataga, of which Mr. Ely was one of the charter members. He is a republican and has held office on the town board for eight years. Mr. and Mrs. Ely have led a happy, peaceful life. Being among the oldest residents of this section of the country, they are well known to many people and have a host of friends. Mrs. Ely still passes an occasional hour at her old spinning wheel that she used when a girl and in the still silence broken only by her rythmic tread she lives over again events that happened in the days of long ago when Knox county was a region of prairie land and neighbors lived many miles apart.

GUSTAVE WENZELMANN.

The name of Gustave Wenzelmann figures prominently in connection with the industrial and manufacturing interests of Galesburg, in which city he took up his abode in 1904. He now has an extensive manufacturing plant, which stands in the midst of sixteen acres of ground, affording him excellent shipping facilities over the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and Santa Fe Railroads. In business management he displays all those requirements which are essential to success and has gradually worked his way upward to a creditable and gratifying position. vol. n—11

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Mr. Wenzelmann was born in Neunkhausen, Germany, on the 8th of March, 1867, a son of Ludwig and Rosina (Schneider) Wenzelmann, who were also natives of Neunkhausen, the father having been born on the 7th of January, 1838, and the mother on the 10th of October of the same year. Ludwig Wenzelmann was a cabinetmaker and sawmill owner and continued in business in his native country until 1882, when he came to the United States, settling in Kankakee, Illinois, where he followed his trade. He lived a life of usefulness and activity, his labors being terminated only in death, on the 17th of May, 1910. For a considerable period he had survived his wife, who died in 1886. Both were members of the German Evangelical church and his political allegiance was given the democratic party. In their family were three children: Alwina and Bertha, both now deceased; and Gustave.

The last named pursued his education in Germany, becoming a gymnasium student, and in the high school of Kankakee he continued his studies following the arrival of the family in America. After putting aside his text-books he secured employment in a lumberyard and store at Kankakee in the capacity of bookkeeper and later he utilized his earnings in establishing a general merchandise store at Missal, Illinois, embarking in business there on his own account in 1884. From the beginning he enjoyed a good trade and continued in active connection with this commercial interest for a considerable period, also serving as postmaster. In 1895, however, he disposed of his store and removed to Streator, Illinois, where he turned his attention to manufacturing, being thus active in the business affairs of that place until 1904, when he came to Galesburg and built the plant which he is now operating. He manufactures portable elevators, hardware specialties, power wash machines, vacuum cleaning plants, electric light outfits for farm houses and general labor-saving devices as well as gas engines and he also has a small piano factory. There is also a well 'equipped chemical laboratory connected with the establishment. The business is conducted under the name of the Wenzelmann Manufacturing Company and was incorporated in 1899, with Gustave Wenzelmann as the president, Mrs. Wenzelmann as vice president and E. H. Overholt as secretary and treasurer. Employment is furnished for many people and the company owns sixteen acres of ground adjoining the tracks of the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy and Santa Fe Railroads. The building covers eighty-three thousand square feet of floor space and is splendidly equipped for the different lines of manufacture there conducted. All departments of the business are well organized and, keeping in close touch with the trade, Mr. Wenzelmann understands the demands of the public and the needs of the times and so conducts his business as to meet these. Mr. Wenzelmann has been married twice. In the spring of 1892 he wedded Miss Florence Esther Powell, a daughter of Rev. A. B. and Alary (Haffner) Powell, of Missal, Illinois. They became the parents of four children, Rosa, Naomi, Jessie and Maxwell, all at home. The wife and mother passed away June 22, 1907, and on the 12th of August, 1908, Mr. Wenzelmann wedded Miss Marion Rees, a daughter of David and Mary Ann Rees, of Galesburg. There is one child of this marriage, Ann. Both wives of Mr. Wenzelmann were successful schoolteachers prior to their marriage. In politics he is a republican and has served as school director of the first ward but has never sought nor desired office in recognition of his party fealty. He belongs to the Galesburg

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Club and to Grace Episcopal church, of which he is a vestryman. While he is winning success in his business undertakings, his interests are not confined by his manufacturing activities but extend beyond to the broader and more general interests of life, he being ever recognized as a progressive citizen whose cooperation in public affairs marks him as* a valued resident of Galesburg.

CHARLES MILLER.

Charles Miller, a prominent contractor and builder residing at No. 1007 North Cedar street in Galesburg, has made his home in this city since coming to the United States in 1887. Lie has been continuously identified with building interests for the past third of a century and many of the most important structures of Galesburg stand as monuments to his skill and ability. His birth occurred in Kent county, England, on the 3d of November, 1862, his. parents being William John George and Emma Sarah (King) Miller, who were likewise natives of that country. The paternal grandfather was also born in England. . Both he and his wife attained a ripe old age and reared a large family of children, including the following named: William John George, Edward and Susie. George King, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was likewise a native of the Merrie Isle. Both he and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Emma Allen, were well advanced in years when called to their final rest. Their children were as follows: Emma Sarah, Anna, M. H., Susanna, George and Charles.

William J. G. Miller, the father of Charles Miller, was a job master and liveryman in Walmer, England. His demise occurred in 1903, when he had attained the age of sixty-four years, while his wife was called to her final rest in 1907 at the age of sixty-eight. They were faithful members of the Church of England. Unto them were born seven sons and four daughters, as follows: Emma Mary Ann, who is a resident of Walmer, Kent, England ; John William George, also living at that place; Charles, of this review; James, who makes his home in St. Louis; George Allen, who is deceased; Herbert Edward, of London, England; Percy, residing in Australia; Frederick, of Kent; Susanna Frances, the wife of James Grew, of Corydon, England; and two daughters, who died in infancy.

Charles Miller was reared and educated in his native county. When a youth of fourteen he put aside his text-books and was bound out to a lawyer that he might learn the trade of a builder, which he has followed continuously since 1877. In 1887 he emigrated to the United States and took up his abode in Galesburg, Illinois, where he has remained to the present time. Many of the prominent structures of the city were erected by him, among them being the public library; the Young Men's Christian Association, the building of which he superintended; the First National Bank; the People's Trust & Savings Bank; the Holmes building; the quarters of the Lass & Larson Company and the O. T. Johnson Company; and the power house of the People's Traction Company. He has likewise erected hundreds of residences and is frequently called in consultation by other builders. In addition to his extensive and important interests as a contractor and builder he is a stockholder in the Lass & Larson W^all Paper

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Company. Mr. Miller carries forward to completion whatever he undertakes, having a resolute spirit and strong determination that enables him to overcome all difficulties and obstacles and make steady progress toward the goal of prosperity.

On the 2d of October, 1884, Mr. Miller was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Lass Spinner, a native of Deal, Kent county, England, and a daughter of Henry Clement and Elizabeth Ann (Lass) Spinner, who were also born in that country. The father passed away at the early age of thirty-two years, while the mother died at the age of fifty-six. Henry C. Spinner was a dairy merchant. Unto him and his wife were born six children, namely: William H., Ellen, Elizabeth, Fannie M., and two who died in early life. Richard Spinner, the paternal grandfather of Mrs. Miller, was a gentleman farmer. To him and his wife, who bore the maiden name of Sarah Stokes, were born the following children: Henry, Susan, Fannie, Mary Ann and Jennie. William and Sarah (Eastes) Lass, the maternal grandparents of Mrs. Miller, had thirteen children, of whom the following are known: Frank, Elizabeth, Nora, Grove, Ebenezer, William, Loremia, John, Thomas, Mary and Sarah. Charles Miller, our subject, and Mrs. Miller were the parents of nine children, as follows : Harry William, a builder and farmer of Canada; Clarence and George, who died in infancy; Herbert L., a student; Ethel, at home; Clement, who is deceased; Ruth and Elizabeth, who are under the parental roof; and Emory G., who has passed away.

In politics Mr. Miller is independent, supporting men and measures rather than party. At the present time he is serving as alderman of the first precinct in the third ward. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, belonging to Alpha Lodge, No. 155, A. F. & A. M.; Galesburg Chapter, R. A. M.; Gales-burg Commandery, No. 8, K. T.; Knoxville Council, R. & S. M.; and Mohammed Temple of the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. He is also a member of the Galesburg lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He belongs to the Galesburg Club and made the second subscription for the erection of a club building. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Central Congregational church, to which his wife likewise belongs. The circle of their friends is almost coextensive with the circle of their acquaintances and all who know them entertain for them the warmest esteem and regard.

EDGAR J. LOCKWOOD.

Edgar J. Lockwood, who is living in Knoxville at the age of eighty-eight years, has devoted the greater part of his life to spreading the gospel as a minister of the Baptist church. He was born in Plattsburg, New York, on June 30, 1823, and is a son of Sheldon and Parthenia (Clark) Lockwood. His father was a native of New Milford, Connecticut, his birth occurring on the 20th of November, 1789, while his mother was born in Hartford, New York, on the 1st of September, 1795. Left an orphan in his early childhood at the age of seven years Sheldon Lockwood was bound out to a hatter in Connecticut. He also learned the furrier's trade, continuing to follow both occupations in his

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native state until 1812, when he enlisted in the army for seven years' service and participated in the second war with Great Britain. After the close of hostilities he located in Plattsbtirg, New York, where he established a furrier shop and also engaged in the manufacture of hats until 1825. Disposing of his business he then came west with his family, stopping for a time in Chicago, but later went to Ottawa, whence he subsequently removed to Lewiston. He resided there for several years then went to Warren county, purchasing some land in the vicinity of Berwick, that he cultivated for many years. There he passed away on the 21st of May, 1851, but the mother survived until January 21, 1889, her death occurring in Galesburg, and was laid to rest beside her husband in the cemetery at Berwick, Warren county. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Lock-wood numbered the following children, all of whom are deceased with the exception of our subject. In order of birth they are as follows: Melissa, who married Erskine Wilbur; Edgar J., our subject; Rachel, the wife of Daniel Belden; Catherine; Emily E., who for nineteen years was a teacher in the public schools of Galesburg; Alva C; Ira W. and Mason M., who were twins; Henrietta ; Jane E., the wife of S. P. Phelps, of Monmouth; and Mary Louisa.

The greater part of the education of Edgar J. Lockwood was acquired through reading and study after attaining maturity, his early advantages being confined to the brief and irregular sessions of the district school. Being the eldest son of a large family he was early compelled to assume the duties of manhood and at the age of nine years was entrusted to plow the fields. He was an ambitious youth, however, and longed to devote his life to a noble purpose, feeling deeply drawn to the ministry where he recognized great opportunities for usefulness. While little more than a lad he determined to devote his life to the spreading of the Gospel and with this purpose in view devoted every moment he was not occupied in the fields in reading and study. Ultimately he attained his ambition and was admitted to the ministry of the Baptist church. His first pastorate was in the vicinity of Prairie City, Illinois, where he remained for four years, at the expiration of that period being transferred to the church in Prairie City. Some of his charges were very small, and his duties being light, he also engaged in farming. From Illinois he went to Iowa, his first church in the latter state being at Bedford, whence he removed to Emerson. After leaving there he located on a farm in the vicinity of Bedford and in connection with the cultivation of this he also held the ministry of a country church. He next went to Kansas, locating in the vicinity of Emporia, where he preached for a time, going from there to West Plains, Missouri, where he resided for twenty years and had charge of a church. At the expiration of that time he withdrew from the ministry and coming to Galesburg lived with a daughter until the 1st of September, 1908, when he came to Knoxville. Although he has not held a charge for more than fifteen years, and seldom occupies a pulpit any more, Mr. Lockwood takes an active interest in all church work, and never misses a religious service unless the condition of his health prevents his attendance. He has always been a zealous and conscientious worker, and despite the many trials and hardships that confront every man who devotes his life to public service he has ever been sustained by the faith that is the comfort and solace of his age. He has never faltered but has faithfully discharged every duty in accordance with what to him seemed best.

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In Henry county, Illinois, on the 21st of June, 1849, Mr. Lockwood was united in marriage to Miss Mandana A. Jones, whose birth occurred in Canada, on the 2d of January, 1831. She is a daughter of Daniel and Atlanta (Bartlett) Jones, the father also a native of Canada, his birth occurring on February 22, 1808, while the mother was born in Vermont, on the 2d of January, 1810. They were among the pioneer settlers of Illinois, first locating in Mercer county, where the father engaged in farming, but later took up his residence in Gales-burg, and there both he and the mother passed away. They were the parents of seven children, of whom Mrs. Lockwood was the eldest. The others were as follows: Louisa, the widow of Leonidas Anderson, of Oklahoma; Orson, a veteran of the Civil war, now deceased; Harriet, also deceased, who is buried in the cemetery at Knoxville; Granville, who is a resident of Galesburg; Norvel, also of Galesburg; and Corwin, who lives in Shenandoah, Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lockwood there were born two daughters: Alice Irene, the deceased wife of Elisha White, by whom she had one son, Walter, now living in Chicago; and Effie Louise, who married Marshall Goodsill of Galesburg, and is the mother of four children: Ruth, Claire, Inez and Max.

Despite his advanced years, Mr. Lockwood is still in full possession of his faculties and takes an active interest in all matters pertaining to the public welfare, particularly of a religious nature.

EDWARD PAYSON WILLIAMS.

It is a difficult matter during the life of any one, to render a satisfactory tribute to his character, especially when the man concerned is of a' disposition so retiring and unobtrusive as E. P. Williams. He was born at Russia, New York, in the year 1833, and moved to Galesburg with his parents in the year 1836.

It seems most fitting and appropriate that he should be. mentioned in this volume in the History of Knox County, of which he has been so important a factor for many years. In the absence of a personal biography, we copy by permission from the "Bench and Bar of Illinois," edited by the late John M. Palmer of Springfield, Illinois, former governor and former senator from Illinois, the following historical sketch of Mr. Williams:

"Edward Payson Williams has resided in Galesburg for more than fifty years, and for the past twenty-five years has been the recognized leader of the Knox county bar. His modest and unassuming nature has kept him from the public gaze, but the strength, clearness and accuracy of his judgment, coupled with an unflecked purity and integrity of life, have made him known and respected and loved by all who have been either his clients or his friends.

"His father, Sherman Williams, was one of the early abolitionists, and first settled in Missouri; but his views on the slavery question were not accepted there and he was driven from the state by the pro-slavery element, fleeing by night with his wife and young children. His mother, Sally (Bradley) Williams, was a woman of very remarkable intellectual power, an omnivorous reader, with a genius and love for guiding and instructing youthful minds.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 239

"Mr. Williams' early life was spent on a farm, and, excepting portions of a few years which were spent in the district school and in Knox College, he did the hard and exacting work of the farm until he had passed his twenty-fifth year. An injury which he then received disabled him from continuing in that calling, and he took up with indomitable purpose his preparation for the practice of the law. After two years of study, he was admitted to the bar of Illinois on an examination conducted in person by the late Judge Corydon Beck-with. From the very beginning of his practice, he took rank as a lawyer who knew the law and could present it clearly, who prepared his cases with thoroughness and who tried them both skillfully and honorably; who gave the same high service to the small cause and to the poor client that the largest interests could command; and it "was soon known to all that he would neither take a retainer because the professional rewards were to be large if the cause did not commend itself to his judgment and conscience, nor refuse a cause that seemed to him meritorious though no reward were promised and its advocacy was unpopular.

"His name will be found as counsel in nearly every volume of the reports of the supreme court of Illinois from the forty-eighth to the present time. Upon important or intricate questions of law, no better briefs than his have been filed in that court. They have furnished the basis for the opinions of the supreme court in many leading cases; notably, in the celebrated county seat fight between Knoxville and Galesburg, settling the right of citizens by a bill in equity to purge poll books and election returns of the illegal votes cast, and to have the court determine the result of the legal votes at such election. Knox County versus Davis, Illinois Reports, volume 63, page 405. In Stowell versus Bair, Illinois Appellate Reports, volume 5, page 104, he filed a masterly brief on the question of the priority of lien upon growing crops between the landlord and the mortgagee. In Patterson versus McKinney, Illinois Reports, volume 97, page 41, his brief upon the proposition that conveyances to one's family made while heavily indebted and engaged in speculations can be set aside in equity as fraudulent, is preserved in the report. In Kiernan versus C, S. F. & C. Railway Company, Illinois Reports, volume 123, page 188, the court sustained his splendid set of instructions as to weight of evidence in condemnation cases.

''During his long career at the bar he has met in professional contests nearly every prominent lawyer of the Military Tract, and has won his full share of victories. In the early days his practice was not confined to Knox county, but extended to all the counties of the circuit. In Fulton county he practiced with Hon. William C. Goudy, who afterward became a well known lawyer in Chicago, and Hon.. S. P. Shope, afterward justice of the supreme court and now' in active practice in Chicago. He was often retained with or against Hon. Thomas G. Frost, afterward of Frost & Miller, of Chicago; lion. A. M. Craig, now one of the justices of the supreme court; Hon. Charles B. Lawrence, afterward justice of the supreme court, and then one of the leaders of the Chicago bar, and many others. He was an early friend of John P. Wilson, Esq., and of Judge Blodgett, of Chicago. All who have met him in the courts or have in other ways come to know him, esteem him for his fidelity as a friend and his integrity as a citizen, and warmly admire the ability and conscience which have characterized every act of his professional life. But his best work and high-

240 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

est title to distinction does not lie in his purely professional work. His greatest influence has been wielded as a man of honor and moral bravery, and through the many men who have gained their professional ideals and inspiration while students in his office.

"From the day he entered a law office until now, he has placed the obligations of a lawyer before his rewards and has always cared more to settle strife and protect rights by fair compromise than to encourage litigation or imperil his clients' interests in the hope of professional reward or distinction.

"Fie has not drawn the line merely against dishonest claims or methods, but against causes and courses that while entirely honest might prove hardships to the party, though beneficial to the attorney. For example, a mortgage for over twenty thousand dollars was sent him with instructions to begin foreclosure proceedings. The mortgagor was in default and a foreclosure proceeding would have brought an attorney's fee of an unusual size and of which, on account of the large number of persons dependent upon him, he was in real need. Yet because the mortgagee was honest and would, in his judgment, be able to pay the larger portion of the defaulted interest within the next six months, he made the unasked recommendation of a postponement of the foreclosure proceedings. The result was that the mortgagor saved his land and the mortgagee secured his debt, and Mr. Williams received but a nominal fee. And examples of this sort might be multiplied. The golden rule controls him both as a lawyer and as a man.

"Students from his office are found in the upper ranks of the profession from New York to Seattle, Washington, and all hold him both as a lawyer and citizen in the highest regard and affection.

"He is a republican in politics, as was natural from his early experiences, but he has never sought public office. In the early days of his practice he was city attorney of Galesburg for one term, and master in chancery of the circuit court for a short time. His friends have long desired to place him upon the circuit bench, where his profound knowledge of the law, tempered by his fine sense of justice, would have been so valuable to litigants; but he has been unwilling to make any canvass for the place or to undergo the strife of a political campaign. He has neither the temperament nor the natural gifts of an advocate, though in cases appealing strongly to his feelings he has made some very notable and effective arguments to juries. His conspicuous preeminence, however, is as a wise counselor who always sought and rarely missed 'the right of the matter.' Though past three-score years, he is still in active practice in the full possession of his ripened powers, and has associated with him in the practice two sons—Messrs. Edwin N. and G. P. Williams—who are rendering him strong and efficient aid in conducting the litigation in which the firm is retained." The Bench and Bar of Illinois, pages 452 to 454.

Since this biography was published, Mr. Williams has continued in the successful practice of his profession at Galesburg, Illinois, with a constantly increasing reputation. His life has been filled with deepest sorrows. His wife, for fifty years his constant and loving companion, assistant and adviser, has passed away, and two of his sons who were associated with him in the practice of law have also passed to the beyond. Perhaps no better idea can be given of the estimate in which Mr. Williams is held by the bar of Knox county, than to

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 241

quote a resolution unanimously passed at a meeting of the bar association of Knox county, held for the purpose of adopting resolutions upon the life and services of the late Justice Alfred M. Craig, in January, 1912.

'The Bar Association of Knox county assembled for the purpose of paying its respects and tribute to the memory of a distinguished member, who has passed away, are reminded of the fact that we have still with us, in active practice, the Nestor of this bar, whose seventy-ninth birthday will soon be here. While paying our tribute to the deceased, it is fitting that we remember the living who is still with us to guide and to inspire, and to extend to him our felicitations upon his approaching anniversary. Edward Payson Williams, by a long and distinguished career at the bar, has brought distinction, not only to himself, but the bar of which he is the acknowledged leader. By his unselfish public service, he has well served his day and generation. His unfailing kindness has endeared him to us all, and his integrity and moral worth is an example to us. May his sorrows be tempered to him and his remaining years be filled with joy."

We cannot close this brief sketch without mentioning one of the greatest honors that ever came to Mr. Williams, or in fact, to any other attorney of this state, and it must always stand as a most beautiful and substantial tribute to his memory and legal attainments.

In the year 1899 the legislature of the state of Illinois passed a resolution creating a "Practice Commission" for the purpose of making a thorough examination of the Practice Act and to suggest needed reforms and commission seem to be necessary and conducive to the improvement in court procedure. Two members were to be appointed from Cook county, one by the Cook County Bar Association, one by the appellate court of the First district, and of the remaining three, one by the State Bar Association, one by the governor of the state and one by the supreme court of the state of Illinois. Mr. Williams, of all the attorneys of this state, was selected by the supreme court to act upon that commission, thus signifying the full confidence of that august body in him as being qualified in every way to represent it in all the questions that might come before the commission. His appointment bears date September 15, 1899.

MAX J. MACK.

Max J. Mack, who for more than a third of a century has been actively identified with the business interests of Galesburg as a clothing merchant, has since 1895 been a member of the firm of Jacobi Brothers & Mack. His birth occurred in Cincinnati, Ohio, on the 6th of August, 1854, his parents being Jacob L. and Amelia (Thurnauer) Mack, both of whom were natives of Bavaria, • Germany. The paternal grandfather was also born there. Jacob L. Mack, the father of our subject, emigrated to America half a century ago and settled in Cincinnati, where he embarked in business as a wholesale clothier. His demise there occurred when he had attained the age of seventy years. His wife, surviving him, was seventy-two years old when called to her final rest. Their children were six in number, namely: Edward J., who is deceased; Leopold J.,

242 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

a resident of Cincinnati, Ohio; Herman, who has also passed away; Carrie, living in Cincinnati; Max J., of this review; and Samuel J., who makes his home in Anderson, Indiana.

Max J. Mack was reared to manhood in his native city and attended the public schools in the acquirement of an education, being graduated from the high school in 1872. Subsequently he attended a night law school for a time. Later he secured employment as bookkeeper in a wholesale house, holding that position until he left Cincinnati and came to Galesburg in 1875. Here he embarked in the clothing business on his own account and at the end of a year became a partner of his father-in-law, Abraham Jacobi, the business being conducted under the firm style of Jacobi & Mack until 1895. For the past sixteen years the establishment has borne the name of Jacobi Brothers & Mack. The partners now enjoy an extensive business and are very successful in its conduct.

On the 3d of May, 1876, Mr. Mack was united in marriage to Miss Fanny Jacobi, a' native of Knoxville, Illinois, and a daughter of Abraham and Clara (Schriesheimer) Jacobi, both of whom were born at Mannheim, Germany. They emigrated to the United States in 1848, first settling in Knoxville, Illinois, and later coming to Galesburg. Here Abraham Jacobi passed away in 1909, when eighty-five years of age. His widow, who still survives him, has now attained the age of eighty-two years. To Mr. and Mrs. Mack were born two children, Hattie C. and Julian J., both at home. The wife and mother was called to her final rest in 1904, when forty-nine years of age, her death being the occasion of sincere regret in the county in which she had spent her entire life.

Mr. Mack, a stanch republican in politics, acted as alderman of the first ward for eighteen years. Fie is now a member of the library board and served as its president for two years. Fraternally he is identified with the Masons, being a valued member of Vesper Lodge. His life has been one of well directed effort and enterprise, resulting in the attainment of a creditable and gratifying measure of success. In all his relations he has enjoyed the respect and confidence of his fellowmen because he is honest, upright, persistent and determined.

HERBERT W. WOOD.

Herbert W. Wood is now living retired in Galesburg but in former years was identified with general merchandising, with the grain trade and financial enterprises. The success which he achieved while still an active factor in business circles brought him a handsome competence that now relieves him from the necessity of further labor, save for the supervision which he gives to his invested interests. He was born in Westford, Vermont, April 24, 1844, a son of William S. and Phylena (Smith) Wood. The father was also a native of Westford and the mother's birth occurred in Braintree, Orange county, Vermont. William S. Wood followed merchandising in his native town and also conducted a tannery, after which he removed to Burlington, Vermont, where he filled the office of deputy sheriff. In the spring of 1859, he came to the middle west settling in Wataga, Knox county, Illinois, where he carried on general merchandising and also engaged in the grain trade for a number of years. He likewise con-

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 247

ducted a banking and loan business at a later date and carried forward to successful completion whatever he undertook. He was ever watchful of any opportunity and in its improvement steadily advanced toward success. In 1884 he went to Elgin, Illinois, where he resided for three or four years living retired during' that period. In 1888, he came to Galesburg, where he also lived retired up to the time of his death, which occurred February 3, 1897. For more than three years he had survived his wife who died in this city, September 21, 1893. In his political views William S. Wood was a republican and served in some local offices, acting as justice of the peace and as treasurer of his town. His life was upright and honorable and both he and his wife were members of the Congregational church in which he served as a trustee. They were married in Braintree, Vermont, and unto them were born four children, of whom Herbert W., is the eldest, the others are: Ella J., the widow of George F. Niles of Hartford, Connecticut; Clarence E., who was born July 1, 1850, and died April 29, 1852, and Carrie M., the widow of Albert T. Lewis of Elgin, Illinois.

Herbert W. Wood was educated in the schools of Westford and in the Burlington high school, after which he attended Knox College in Galesburg during the year 1863-4. His education completed, he entered his fathers store as a clerk and received thorough training in commercial methods as applied especially to general mercantile interests. In 1868 he became his father's successor in business and formed a partnership with his uncle, IT. P. Wood, which connection continued until 1880. They carried on the same line of business and also engaged in general banking. Throughout that period they conducted a prosperous business carrying a large and well selected line of goods for which they found a ready sale. The growth of their trade brought them an excellent annual income which in time afforded Mr. Wood a competence sufficient to enable him to retire from active life. He came to Galesburg in t888, and has since retired from further labor save for the supervision which he gives to his invested interests. He is now a stockholder in the First National Bank and has important realty holdings. He served as town clerk and in many other local offices, being corporation clerk at Wataga for a time.

On the 21 st of January, 1904, Mr. Wood was united in marriage to Mrs. Emma Walton, a daughter of Joseph and Orlena A. (Kirk) Woods of Plymouth, Illinois. Her father was born near Mt. Sterling, this state, May 10, 1829, of German parentage and died June 30, 1905. He was a soldier of the Mexican war, serving for a year and one-half after which he was honorably discharged. He followed the occupation of farming, owning and cultivating a tract of land until the time of his death. He was also an ordained minister of the Baptist church and his life was ever a helpful one, his time being largely spent in efforts to uplift and benefit humanity. In his political faith he was a democrat and he served as school director, but never sought political office. His wife died July 19, 1909, at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Wood, in Galesburg. There were seventeen children in their family, of whom Mrs. Wood was the seventh in order of birth. Her early education was acquired in the schools of Providence, Illinois, and later she spent three years in Eureka College. She was also an art and music pupil in Chicago, studying under Seabeck and Liebling for three years. She afterward engaged in teaching music in Macomb, Camp Point and Augusta—three towns of central Illinois.

248 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

She is a member of the First Christian Church, Galesburg, 111., Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Woman's Relief Corps and the Round Table Club, A lady of broad intelligence and wide reading, she is prominent in the social circles of the city and shares with her husband a popularity that has brought him many friends.

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HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 621

JAMES S. PAYNE.

James S. Payne, who is at present engaged as carrier in the rural delivery department of the United States post-office, is residing in Altona, Knox county. His birth occurred on the 17th of March, 1865, in Harrisonville, Missouri. He was the grandson of William and. Susan (Stephenson) Payne, both natives of Kentucky, and was the son of William B. Payne, a native of Lexington, Kentucky, who is at present living in Virginia, Illinois, at the age of eighty-nine years. William Payne started in life on his own account by accepting a clerical position and subsequently went to Harrisonville, Missouri, where he interested himself as partner with his former employer and engaged in the mercantile business for three years before removing to Virginia, Illinois, where he conducted a store. These various enterprises were both agreeable and profitable, and desiring to continue in the same line of business, Mr. Payne opened stores in Chandlersville and Ashland, Illinois. He was conducting these establishments at the time the new bankruptcy law became effective. This law affected his resources so badly that he lost practically all he had accumulated, and in 1898 was forced to retire. He was married to Hannah E. Allender, whose death occurred in 1895, and who was the daughter of Hiram Allender. To Mr. and Mrs. Payne eleven children were born, eight of whom are now living: John W., a resident of Kansas City; Eva, the wife of J. Chapman of Birmingham, Alabama; Richard and Wm. G., both of whom are residents of Kansas City, Missouri; Charles F., who is living in Plot Springs, Arkansas; Henrietta, who is married to D. Crum, a resident of Virginia, Illinois; Miranda, who is the wife of A. M. Thompson of Washington; and James S., the subject of this review.

After finishing his education in the common schools, James Payne attended Brown's Business College at Jacksonville, and Illinois College of Jacksonville, Illinois, from which he was graduated and prepared to enter upon a business career. His first position was in Oberlin, Kansas, where he was a clerk in the government land office for two years. Subsequently he left for Tecumseh, Nebraska, and engaged in the abstract business in Johnson county. Returning to Illinois he was employed in Virginia as a department commercial clerk for a short time previous to leaving for Beatrice, Nebraska, where he was engaged as express and baggage man for the Burlington & Missouri River Railway, now a part of the Burlington system. Again returning to Virginia he served in the capacity of deputy sheriff and ex-officio tax collector for three years and then left for Topeka, Illinois, where he purchased a drug store previous to going to Altona in 1896. Later he moved his drug store and, in 1901, entered the United States mail service as rural delivery man. At the present time he is serving in
that capacity and is also interested in western real estate and other business enterprises. In all these positions Mr. Payne has shown a true regard for the essentials and principles of business and has been an accurate and reliable employee.

Mr. Payne was united in marriage to Anna A. Buckman, who is the daughter of C. F. and Mary E. (Mauck) Buckman, and was born on the 5th of August, 1870. The parents are both living and are very active in their home duties. Mr. Buckman was a soldier in the Civil war. To Mr. and Mrs. Payne three children have been born: Marie, who is twenty-two years of age; Cal C, who is twenty years of age; and Doris, who is fourteen years of age.

Mr. Payne gives his political support to the democratic party and, although he has never sought office, he has been very active in promoting the policies of the party he thinks will be the most effective in producing good government. Recently he was elected police magistrate but could not accept the office because of his official position in the United States post-office. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Presbyterian church and he is also a member of the Knights of Pythias of Osceola, Iowa. At present he enjoys the confidence and respect of the members of his community, and both he and his wife are held in the highest regard because of their social characteristics and their sterling worth.

CHARLES H. RHODES.

For more than half a century Charles H. Rhodes has been a witness of the progress in the material and intellectual development of Knox county, having been born in Henderson, March 3, 1854. His father, William M. Rhodes, a native of Vermont, came to Illinois and settled in Henderson in the year 1851 or 52, plying his trade, that of wagon-making, which he had learned in the east. He had a shop of his own for a time and found much demand for his services in those days, when much of the transportation of farm products was done by wagon before the ramified system of local railroads was installed. He married Mary J. Brown, a native of Henderson township and a daughter of Wilson Brown who came to Knox county from Kentucky in pioneer days. Four children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Rhodes, of whom Charles H. Rhodes was the eldest. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church which lost a loyal supporter at the death of Mr. Rhodes in 1882. In his political allegiance he was a republican.

Charles H. Rhodes was educated in the village school and became self-supporting at an early age choosing farming for his calling, not only for the invigorating and varied nature of the labors which this occupation involves but also for the promising future which he foresaw. His judgment proved right as his later prosperity showed. In the choice of his home he always confined himself to the immediate vicinity of Henderson, where he purchased a farm of one hundred and six acres after some time and for twenty years devoted himself to its cultivation and development. He retired a few years ago and now rents the land from which he makes a good income. During the period of his activities

622 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

he was modern in the methods of farming which he employed, and progressive and alert in his administration of the place.

The marriage of Mr. Rhodes and Miss Frances Martin was solemnized February 18, 1880. She was born in Pennsylvania and was a daughter of William and Drusilla (Pope) Martin, natives of Pennsylvania, her father coming to Knox county in 1857, when he settled on a farm and followed agricultural pursuits throughout the remainder of his life. Three children were born to Mr.; and Mrs. Rhodes: Harry, who is married, a farmer in Ontario township, Knox county; Helen M., the wife of Fred Smith, a farmer, who has two children; and Margaret E., the wife of Harry L. Pople, employed in a general store in Monmouth, Illinois, who has one son, Irwin R. Dale.

Mr. Rhodes votes with the republicans and has been entrusted with the responsibilities of public office a number of times, serving as constable, justice of the peace and as school trustee, holding the latter office for a considerable length of time. With his family he worships in the Christian church of Henderson, believing in the doctrine of righteousness and truth as the basis upon which every religion and philosophy must be built. He is a man of serious mind and sterling traits of character devoted to his family and his friends.

IRVING W. DAVISON

Irving W. Davison, who resides in Henderson township, was born in Henderson, March 31, 1877, his parents being Joseph and Isabella (Kilgore) Davison, both of whom were natives of Pennsylvania. The father, who had been a resident of Knoxville, came to Henderson and engaged in the shoe business prior to entering upon agricultural pursuits which he carried on extensively later in life, owning four hundred and forty acres of land and raising cattle for the western market until his death, October 27, 1910.

Irving W. Davison received a common-school education and then assisted his father on the latter's farm until he started out on his own account, in 1907, on the one hundred and forty-acre tract of land he now owns and devotes to general farming. Although he has been farming independently for only four years, he has already met with a good measure of success and has shown that long years of experience are not necessarily indispensable to success if energy and determination take their place.

On October 17, 1902, Mr. Davison was married to Emma J. Nelson and to this union five children have been born, namely: Mary L., Helen C.,' Evelyn M., Gertrude B., and Gladys Margaret, deceased. Mrs. Davison is the daughter of Nels and Hannah Nelson, who have been residents of Knox county for many years. Nels Nelson was born in Christianstad, Sweden, October 6, 1855, and received a common-school education in his native, land, where he engaged in farming until 1877, when he came to America, there he has since carried on the same pursuit. He first settled in Henry county and was employed there for several years, although he resided in Knox county during the latter part of that-time. After five or six years he began farming near Henderson and Wataga and, in 1898, located upon the forty-acre farm which he had recently acquired

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 623

and upon which he now resides. In politics Mr. Nelson gives his support to the republican party and has served as road commissioner. He holds membership in the Swedish Lutheran church of Wataga, as well as Galesburg Camp, No. 667, M. W. A. On January 4, 1882, Nels Nelson was married to Mrs. Anna (Samuelson) Peterson, whose parents remained in Sweden, their native country. To Mr. and Mrs. Nelson six children have been born, of whom five are now living. The eldest, Christina, is married to Gust Malcolm, an agriculturist, who resides in Ontario township and has three children. Emil, who is an agriculturist in Henderson township, is married and is the father of two children. Emma is. the wife of Irving W. Davison, of this sketch. George is married and is an agriculturist in Henderson township. Minnie, the youngest, is residing at home. Mr. Davison gives his political support to the republican party, having a firm belief that its policies are most effective in securing good government. In this, as in his other relations, he is loyal and consistent, always acting according to his interpretation of the highest citizenship.

THOMAS CRAVER.

Thomas Craver, now deceased, who resided for many years in Walnut Grove township, was born May 26, 1824, in Hanover, Pennsylvania, and is a son of John and Christina (Stoekel) Craver, who were Pennsylvania Germans.

Thomas Craver, who was an undertaker by trade, spent his early life on the home farm, but after his marriage in 1851 came to Lynn township, Knox county, and settled in a little log house upon the farm which he cultivated for twenty-seven years previous to removing to Altona in 1885, where he lived retired until his death.

Mr. Craver was married September 17, 1851, to Miss Rebecca Cameron, who was a daughter of Angus Cameron and was born on September 14, 1832, in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania. The father was a native of Scotland, his birth having occurred there in 1807, and he came to America with his brothers at the age of sixteen years. They located first in Canada but soon removed to Carbondale, Pennsylvania, with an uncle, where they remained throughout their lives. In Carbondale he followed the cabinet-maker's trade and showed a skill and ability which won him rapid promotion. He was married to Sabrina Snyder, whose birth occurred in New York state, May 31, 1812, and who passed away on the 17th of April, 1896. Mrs. Cameron was a daughter of Jacob and Margaret Snyder and a granddaughter of John and Mary Cameron, the former a shepherd boy in his youth. Mr. Cameron held membership in the Methodist church and his death occurred on September 29, 1896. To him and his wife nine children were born, six of whom are living. Mrs. Craver, the eldest, is the widow of Thomas Craver, the subject of this sketch. Duncan was born in Pennsylvania, October 3, 1834, and is at present residing with Mrs. Craver. At the age of twelve years he began assisting his father as a cabinet-maker and remained with him until 1859. In 1864 he removed to Iowa and again took up his trade, remaining in Cedar Falls for two years before removing to South Dakota. Subsequently he returned to Iowa and until 1905, when he came to

624 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

live retired with his sister, was engaged as a millwright. He was twice married, his first union being to Harriet Hoadley, of Wayne county, Pennsylvania, a daughter of Luther and Sophia (Sampson) Hoadley. To this union one child, Luther, was born, his death occurring when he was but one year old. Mrs. Cameron passed away in 1863, at the age of thirty years. His second marriage was to Mary M. Cockerell, a native of Wisconsin and a daughter of J. Cockerell, a native of England. Her death occurred in 1905, at the age of sixty years. Mr. Cameron has never given active support to any political party. He holds membership in the Baptist church and formerly was a member of the Knights of Pythias. Angus, the next in order of birth in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Angus Cameron, resides in Carbondale, Pennsylvania. Libby is the wife of P. Gray and resides in Streator, Illinois. Anna is the widow of J. Scurry, of Carbondale. Emma is married to Charles Gray and is residing in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania.

Mr. and Mrs. Craver became the parents of eleven children. Mary E., the eldest, is the wife of John S. Collinson and resides in Galva, Illinois. They are the parents of three children: Dennis, who is married and has three children; Wiley, who is married and has one child; and Cora. William V. resides in Lynn township and married Jessie McClatchy, by whom he has two children, Glenn and Thomas. John A. is also a resident of Lynn township and is married to Jessie Cochran and has one child, Ira Ross. Harriet is the wife of E. Burkhart, of Nebraska, and has two children, Jennie and Jessie. Anna is married and resides in California. She has one daughter, Stella, who married Dr. Mills. Minnie is the wife of A. A. Scott, of Altona, and Judge T., who resides in Walnut Grove township, married Emma Kermode. Four, Flora, Ira, Florence and Emma, died early in life.

Mr. Craver was a member of Altona Lodge, No. 330, A. F. & A. M., of Altona, and also belonged to the Order of the Eastern Star. Mrs. Craver is a member of the Presbyterian church of Altona and is active in its Ladies Social Union Society. Industry and persistency were the salient features in his career and were potent elements in the acquirement of his success, which not only spoke in terms of material gain but also won him the regard and high esteem of his fellowmen.

N. B. IVES, Sr.

N. B. Ives, Sr., who is now living retired, owns a fine farm of two hundred and thirty-eight acres on section 7, Victoria township, where for many years he successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising. He is one of the four children born of the marriage of Joshua and Katherine (Wilber) Ives, his birth occurring in Otsego county, New York, on the 9th of November, 1833. The parents passed their entire lives in Otsego county, the mother's death occurring at the age of twenty-three, when our subject was a child of two years, but the father lived to attain the venerable age of seventy-nine. They were members of the Lutheran church, while his political support Joshua Ives always accorded the republican party.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 627

The agricultural training of N. B. Ives was received under the supervision of his father on the old homestead in Otsego county, while pursuing his education in the district schools. He continued to follow farming in his native state until he was twenty-three years of age, when he decided that the west afforded better opportunities and greater advantages to the young man, so in 1856 he came to Illinois. Upon his arrival in Knox county he located in Victoria township and for two years thereafter worked as a farm hand by the month. At the end of that time he bought the place he now owns, which is located a mile northeast of Victoria. This was the property of the Force boys and was unimproved with the exception of forty acres. Mr. Ives was an enterprising, industrious young man, however, and had no hesitancy in undertaking the arduous task of placing the entire tract under cultivation. He was young, strong and full of ambition, and the thought of owning a farm proved an incentive to yet greater effort and the last forty acres of his land he broke entirely unassisted. Naturally he encountered the disappointment and discouragements common to pioneer life, but he never lost hope, possessing absolute confidence in ultimately attaining success. The operation of his farm was always given his personal supervision, the greater part of the work being done by him alone during the early years. His fields were devoted to the raising of such cereals as were best adapted to the soil, and under his capable direction annually yielded harvests that fully compensated for the labor expended in their cultivation. In connection with general farming he raised cattle, hogs and, on a smaller scale, horses all of a high grade, and attained lucrative results from these undertakings. Mr. Ives was actively engaged in the operation of his farm until fifteen years ago, when he had the misfortune to suffer a stroke of paralysis, and he has ever since been an invalid. He still resides on his homestead but the land is being cultivated by his son. It is a very attractive place, and has always been a source of great pride to its owner, representing as it does the self-denial, toil and struggles of his early manhood and middle age. All of the buildings now standing on the place have been erected during the period of his occupancy, the lumber for most of them having been hauled from Galva, this state, at that time the nearest trading post. His only prolonged absence from the farm since he settled upon it was during the war. As a member of Company K, Eighty-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry he went to the front, proving as efficient a soldier as a farmer. He saw much active service but was never wounded or taken prisoner and was mustered out at Nashville, Tennessee, with the rank of sergeant, receiving his discharge at Chicago.

On the 2d of January, 1861, Mr. Ives was united in marriage to Miss Susan Clark, who was born in Otsego county, New York, on the 20th of May, 1842. She is a daughter of William P. and Dinah (Soules) Clark. The parents were also natives of Otsego county, but they later removed to Knox county, and here the mother passed away at the age of seventy years, while the father reached the patriarchal age of eighty-seven. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Ives numbers five, as follows: W. J., who is a resident of Chicago; Ola C, who married Frank M. Robinson and is living in Houston, Texas; N. B., Jr., who married Minnie Watson and is also a resident of Houston; Ulysses S., a resident of this township, who married Mabel Robinson; and Sherman, who married Miss Florence Craver, now operating his father's farm.

628 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

Ever since granted the right of franchise upon attaining his majority, Mr. Ives has given his unqualified endorsement to the principles of the republican party. He cast his first vote for Abraham Lincoln and on each succeeding election has given his support to the candidates of the party of his early choice. Being a public-spirited man, he has taken an active interest in township politics and has served as collector, school trustee, director and Pathmaster, the duties of which offices he discharged in a creditable manner. Mr. Ives is one of the honored members of the local post of the Grand Army of the Republic, and for many years held the chaplain's chair in this organization. He is highly regarded as a citizen of his township, in the development and up- building of which he has taken an active and helpful interest during the fifty-five years of his residence, and is numbered among its substantial agriculturists.

SAMUEL RANKIN

One of the substantial citizens of Knox county and for many years a farmer of progressive ideals who occupied a place in the front ranks of the representatives of his calling, is Samuel Rankin, now living on his farm in Henderson township. His birth occurred in Uniontown, Fayette county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1844. He was a son of William and Eliza (Junk) Rankin, both natives of Pennsylvania, the former of Scotch-Irish descent, born in 1800. His father, who was an active Whig in politics, carried on agricultural pursuits in Pennsylvania until his death in 1877. His mother died in 1894..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.
During his boyhood and youth, Samuel Rankin remained with his parents in his native state, where he was educated, first in the elementary branches taught in the common schools, and then at Duffs College, in Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated in 1861. This education, although much above the average advantages of the youth of his day, did not fully satisfy him and consequently he entered Madison Institute, in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in order to have specialized training for a profession. At the close of the course he engaged in teaching and followed this calling for a number of years. In 1864 he went to Colorado and there spent some months in military service against the Indians. The following three years he spent at home in Pennsylvania and, in 1867, severed the last close ties that bound him to the scenes of his childhood and came to the middle west, settling in Henry county, Illinois. There he farmed for nine years on rented land and at the end of this period bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Henry county. This remained in his possession for two years, when he sold it and removed to Knox county, buying a farm in Henderson township. He carried on general farming and feeding cattle for market with much success. A few years ago he temporarily retired, turning over the management of the farm to his son, but returned to the same and is now carrying on general farming as before. He owns two hundred and seventy-four acres of land in this county and farms it all.

Mr. Rankin was twice married. His first wife was Mary D. Henderson, a daughter of Thomas and Hannah (Dunlap) Henderson. Her father settled in

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 629

this county in 1855 and in his manhood engaged in farming. He died in 1873 and his wife died in 1869. Mrs. Rankin passed to her future reward in the year 1886. She was the mother of five children, one of whom died in infancy. W. F., who is married and living in Cleveland, is a general agent for the Collier's Works. Mary E., the wife of Thomas Marks, resides in St. Louis. Samuel, Jr., married, is a farmer in Orange township, Knox county. Horace A., who is living in Oklahoma, is married and the father of one child.

On December 3, 1889, Mr. Rankin was married to Miss Nancy A. Pitman, his present wife, at Henderson. Her parents, Gideon and Mary J. (Champion) Pitman, were old settlers in this county, where her father was a prosperous farmer. By his second marriage Mr. Rankin is the father of one child, Ralph E., living at home with his parents.

Mr. and Mrs. Rankin worship in the Methodist Episcopal church of Henderson. In his political views Mr. Rankin is a republican. He has given much of his efforts and time to public service and for three terms was supervisor, for two terms assessor, and for two terms highway commissioner. Mr. Rankin is a public-spirited man actively interested in the advancement of the intellectual and social growth of his community.
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NEWTON M. MILROY #629


Newton McDowell Milroy, who is engaged in farming and stock-raising in Copley township, was born July 27, 1867, on his present homestead, his parents being Alexander and Janette (McDowell) Milroy. The father came to his present home in 1848, when a young man, and passed his entire active life upon that place until his retirement a few years before his death which occurred in Oneida on August 26, 1890, when he was sixty-nine years of age. In addition to general farming he also engaged in general stock-raising. Mrs. Milroy was the daughter of John and Elizabeth (McCornack) McDowell and was born on the 5th of January, 1830. Pier death occurred in March, 1908. They were the parents of eight children, of whom four survive: John P., a resident of Oneida; Maggie, who is the wife of N. Nish of Waukee, Iowa; Jennie, who is the wife of Charles Lansberry, of Iowa; and Newton M., who is the subject of this sketch. Mr. Milroy was a member of the John Knox church in which he took an active interest, and was also very active in the republican party.

Newton M. Milroy spent his boyhood and youth attending school until eighteen years of age, and then assisted his father on the home farm until he became of age. After that he farmed independently one hundred and forty acres of land which had been left to him by his father. So successful was this undertaking that he has since been able to add one hundred and forty acres of land, which adjoin the original farm. Upon this he is spending all his energy and labor. The farm is highly improved and well equipped with all the necessary buildings and machinery to carry on modern farming. By strict attention to business and employing modern methods his farming and stock-raising has become one of the most profitable undertakings of the kind in the township.

630 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

In 1891, Mr. Milroy was married to Sarah Lavina Olmsted, whose birth occurred May 28, 1869, near Altona, and who is the only child of William H. and Lavina (Youngs) Olmsted. Mr. Olmsted was born in Delaware county, New York, and removed to Knox county with his parents in 1856, settling in Victoria, where he spent his active career in farming. However, eighteen years previous to his death which occurred in 1899, he removed to a residence near Victoria. Mrs. Olmsted, whose birth occurred in Victoria in 1841, passed away in 1908, she being the daughter of Benjamin and Sarah (Miessmore) Youngs, natives of Ohio, the former born August 23, 1796. Her paternal grandfather, Stephen S. Olmsted was an agriculturist and cabinet-maker, and was married to Clarissa McMorris. His death occurred in 1897. To Mr. and Mrs. Milroy six children have been born: Newton L., whose birth occurred December 18, 1891 ; Leslie F., who was born August 18, 1893; Mary Ethelyn, born November 20, 1898; Lavina Jenette, born January 7, 1902; and Marietta Agnes and Bethea Margaret, who were born February 21, 1908, and March 22, 1911, respectively.

Mr. Milroy gives his political support to the republican party, and although he does not desire the reward of office he has served as school trustee because of his interest in the educational development of his community. Both he and his wife are church members. That Mr. Milroy is a member of a family who have long been landholders in the United States is attested by the fact that he has in his possession a deed of land title signed by President Van Buren in 1840, and also one signed by President Tyler. Mr. Milroy is a man of high morals, and it has been a feature of his life to devote much of his time to further the moral and social development of his community, and his high aims and industry have won for him the respect and confidence of his fellow citizens.

ROBERT DAVISON.

Among the younger agriculturists of Henderson township Robert Davison stands out prominently as one who has worked for success along the most progressive lines. Pie was born in Henderson township, November 26, 1872, and is the son of Joseph and Isabella (Kilgore) Davison, the former a native of England and the latter of Pennsylvania. The father came to America in 1853 and almost immediately settled in Knox county, where he spent the remainder of his life, engaging in the shoemaking trade in Knoxville at first and next conducting a shoe store in Henderson, in which he had some eight or nine employees at one time. Pie conducted this business successfully until he began his career as an agriculturist on a farm of forty acres situated west of Hendersonville. This land was the nucleus of the extensive farm of four hundred and fifty acres which he owned at the time of his death, October 27, 1910. His marriage occurred, in 1872, in Henderson township and his wife is still living, her present home being in Watertown. In politics Mr. Davison gave his support to the republican party and served as township clerk for many years. Pie was identified with the Masonic order, belonging to Lodge No. 264, F. & A. M., of Henderson.

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Robert Davison received his education in the common schools and the Normal school at Abingdon, Illinois. Returning home after he had completed these courses, he assisted his father on the farm until he began his independent career in 1901, on the land which is his present home. This estate of one hundred and fifty acres shows how successful he has been as an agriculturist—the land yields abundantly, the buildings are modern and the machinery adequate for cultivation according to advanced and scientific methods. In addition to general farming Mr. Davison raises cattle and hogs for the eastern markets.

On November 28, 1901, Robert Davison was united in marriage to Mary E. Windom, the daughter of William and Mary (Folger) Windom, the former a native and lifelong resident of Ohio, where for twenty years he was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Monroe county. The mother was also born in Ohio and was a resident of Monroe county for twenty years, before she came to Henderson, where she passed away in 1904. She was one of the eight children of Robert and Nancy (Haines) Folger, natives of New Hampshire county, Virginia. Mr. and Mrs. Davison are the parents of one child, Joseph E., who is living at home.

In politics Mr. Davison is a member of the republican party and has served as township collector. Fie holds membership in the Methodist church of Henderson. In both of these relations he is loyal and honorable and his example is one which has done much to further the integrity of his fellow citizens. He has earned for himself the name of a thorough and progressive agriculturist and has done much to develop his district and to raise its standard of cultivation and stock-raising.

WILLARD B. GOFF

Willard B. Goff, who resides on a farm of his mother's in Henderson township, is the descendant of a family which has long been connected with agricultural pursuits. His parents, James F. and Mary J. (Baxter) Goff, the former a native of Kentucky and the latter of Ohio, carried on agricultural pursuits in Henderson township, Knox county. They had three children : Charles A., deceased; Willard B. Goff, who was born October 15, 1871; and Otis J., living in Galesburg. James Goff came to Knox county early in life and resided here almost continuously until his death in 1889. In 1851 he joined the great number of people going west to the California gold fields and the family still has in its possession the saddle he used when returning.

Willard B. Goff received his education in the common schools, the Abingdon Normal school and Brown's Business College in Galesburg. For the first three or four years after he had completed his education he was employed in a general store in Little York, Warren county, Illinois, and then went to Chicago and engaged in the commission business for six years. Returning to his father's farm when he gave up his Chicago business, he immediately took an active part in farming the home place and has continued it up to the present time. The farm consists of two hundred acres and is well adapted for raising cattle and hogs and also for general farming.

632 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

In February, 1903, Mr. Goff was married to Era Reynolds, the daughter of James and Mehitabel (Smith) Reynolds. The father, a native of Sugar Grove, Illinois, was engaged in farming in Warren county until his death in 1889. In politics he was a prohibitionist, and in religious faith a member of the United Presbyterian church. Mr. and Mrs. Goff have one child, Willard Percy, born December 24, 1906.

Mr. Goff has proved his ability as an agriculturist by the success he has had in developing the farm he manages and his increasing returns show that a state of cultivation has been reached which could be attained only by careful application of scientific and progressive methods. He has been engaged in this pursuit for a comparatively few years and yet has had time to establish his reputation as one of the successful agriculturists of Henderson township.

MRS. ELIZA A. COLEMAN.

Mrs. Eliza A. Coleman, who resides on her farm of one hundred and twenty acres, on section 13 of Victoria township, was born in Stark county, Illinois, February 16, 1854. She was a daughter of Joseph Kane, who was a native of Beaver county, Pennsylvania, born June 9, 1812, and moved when a small boy with his parents to Ohio, where he was reared and educated. The family later came to Illinois and settled near Canton. In Fulton county, Illinois, in 1833 Mr. Kane was united in marriage to Miss Barbara Heckard, who was born near Baltimore, Maryland, July 2, 1818, and was a daughter of John Heckard, a native of that state. The parents resided in Fulton county for several years and then removed to Knox county, where they remained until December, 1858, when they repaired to Victoria township and spent the rest of their lives on the farm now owned by George Patty. The father was engaged in general farming and raised yearly a large number of hogs. He was a democrat in politics and much interested in education, serving many years as school director. He died April 13. 1895, and his wife, having preceded him by nearly fourteen years, died June 12, 1881, and they are both buried in West Jersey cemetery. In their family were thirteen children: Mary Ann, Jane, Charlotte, Samuel, John, James, Joseph, George and Miner, all of whom were born in Fulton county, Illinois; and Eliza A., William and Rosetta, who were born in Stark county; and an infant child, who was born and died in Knox county.

Eliza A. Kane was five years of age when her parents removed to Victoria township, where she was reared and educated. She was trained to the duties of the household and remained at home with her parents until her marriage, which occurred March 14, 1881. At that date she became the wife of James Cole-man, who was born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, December 27, 1830, the son of Samuel Coleman, a native of that state. James Coleman was reared under the parental roof and remained at home until 1858, when he came to Knox county, Illinois, arriving May 30. Shortly afterward he wedded Charlotte Kane, a sister of Eliza A. (Kane) Coleman. Charlotte (Kane) Coleman, who was a member of the Methodist church at West Jersey, Illinois, died at the age of thirty-nine years and is buried in West Jersey cemetery. She left

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 635

five children, the oldest of whom, a daughter, is now deceased. After their marriage James and Eliza A. (Kane) Coleman lived on the farm on which Mrs. Coleman now resides and there Mr. Coleman was actively engaged in general farming. His business insight, energy and perseverance brought to him a goodly measure of success and Mrs. Coleman is now comfortably situated in life. They were the parents of four children. • Clyde, who is a graduate of Toulon Academy and of Williams College at Williamstown, Massachusetts, is now a graduate student in the chemistry department of the University of Chicago. In 1910 he was a teacher in the Military Academy at Culver, Indiana. Francis J. resides at home with his mother and operates the home place. Ada and Susie L, who complete the family, are both living at home. The death of the husband and father occurred on November 20, 1904, and he is buried in West Jersey cemetery. His death was deeply regretted by his many friends and was an irreparable loss to his immediate family. He was a republican in politics, a citizen of progressive spirit, who was much interested in all that pertains to the public welfare. He gave much attention to the cause of education and served as school director throughout most of the time of his residence in Knox county. He attended the Methodist Episcopal church of West Jersey, services of which organization, Mrs. Coleman, who is a lady of many good traits of heart and mind, and whose life is in harmony with her Christian profession, also faithfully attends. She has passed much of her life in Victoria township and has a large circle of friends, in whose regard she stands very high.

WILLIAM SNIDER.

One of the substantial citizens of Abingdon and of prominent standing in his community is William Snider, whose birth occurred in Clermont county, Ohio, November 4, 1835. His parents, Abraham and Elizabeth (Meyers) Snider, both died of the cholera, in 1849, leaving their son William an orphan at the age of thirteen years. Thrown wholly upon his own resources in the tender years of his youth, he cast about for a suitable occupation. Farming lay nearest at hand, and this he pursued for some little time. He then went to Goshen, where he found employment, dividing his time between farm work and, for a time, work in a cabinet-maker's shop. He continued as a farm hand in the summer and a teamster in the winter months. In 1855 and the year following he operated a threshing machine.

William Snider was married to Miss Angelina C. Harvey of Clermont county near Goshen. Two weeks after their marriage, the bridal couple set out in a wagon overland for Knox county, Illinois, where they began housekeeping and spent the winter. In the spring of the following year Mr. Snider bought a farm in Chestnut township, seven miles southeast of Abingdon. There they lived for seven years. In the spring of 1864 he returned to Abingdon and bought a home on the site where his present residence stands, living there for the following two years. He then bought what is known as the Mound farm, a tract of one hundred and eighty acres, two miles east of Abingdon, where the family lived for another period of two years. In 1868 he yearned again for

636 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

the comforts of town life, so he repurchased his former residence and property in Abingdon, living there for a brief period. The year 1869 he spent in the Rocky mountains, and on his return in the spring of 1870 purchased a one hundred and sixty-acre farm, one and one-half miles east of Abingdon, where he built a home, residing there until the spring of 1875. At this time he again repurchased and occupied his former town home. The spacious colonial house in which he is now living was built in 1884 and was the first handsome residence erected in Abingdon.

In business enterprises William Snider has always dealt on a large scale. For more than forty years he was an extensive cattle buyer and shipper, doing the greater part of the cattle shipping of this section. He was, besides, one of the most extensive stock men in Knox county, feeding, on an average, a thousand head of sheep, one hundred and fifty head of cattle and between three and four hundred head of hogs annually. As a necessary adjunct to his cattle-breeding industry he invested heavily in farm lands at various times. In 1878, he bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres and, in 1880, another farm of two hundred and forty acres, both in Indian Point township. These he operated with hired help for a number of years, using the produce of the same for feeding his stock. During this period he also acquired three farms in Iowa. Two of these were in Taylor county, one consisting of two hundred acres and the other of one hundred and forty acres. The third was a tract of two hundred acres in Van Buren county. In 1909, however, he disposed of the last of his farm holdings, having retained his two farms in Indian Point township up to that time.

To Mr. and Mrs. Snider no children were born. Mr. Snider has always been actively interested in politics and served on the republican county central committee for a period of about sixteen years. Beyond this honor, however, he always consistently refused to consider public preferment of any kind. Since 1864 he has been a member of the Abingdon Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F. Throughout his life Mr. Snider has met with more than the average degree of success, due to his daring enterprise and his untiring application to his duties. He thinks and acts in large units, but never to the neglect of the important details which are essential in the conduct of every business. In his own community he is highly esteemed and claims many friends, and few men of this vicinity enjoy a wider acquaintance in the adjoining counties.

CLARK ANDREW MAIN.

Clark Andrew Main, who is an agriculturist in Walnut Grove township, was born December 18, 1879, upon the farm on which he is now residing. He is the grandson of Peter and Jane (Ferguson) Main, the former having come to America with his three children after the death of his wife in Scotland. After arriving in Chicago they proceeded directly to Knox county, but subsequently went to Minnesota for a short residence before returning to this county, where his death occurred May 1, 1878, at the age of sixty-nine. Clark Main is the son of Andrew and Ellen (Moore) Main, the former having been born December 6, 1846,


HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 637

 in Mothler, Ayrshire, Scotland, and the latter in Rio township, on the 13th of March, 1848. Mr. Alain arrived in America when he was but seven years of age, and was in Chicago during the time of the cholera epidemic, which caused the death of his only sister. Mrs. Main was the daughter of Lyman K. and Mary S. (Woodman) Moore, the former a native of New York state and the latter of Massachusetts. The paternal grandfather, Holland Moore, of New York, was married to Sarah Kendall. Air. and Airs. Lyman Moore came west early in life and located in Rio township, where they were engaged in agricultural pursuits until their death, Air. Moore passing away in 1885 at the age of seventy-one years and his wife dying the same year. -Air. and Airs. Alain were the parents of three children: J. Edwin, who is an agriculturist residing at Altona; Kate, who is married to Walter D. McMasters, a resident farmer of Walnut Grove township; and Clark A., the subject of this sketch.

Mr. Main never took an active part in politics but was a prominent member of the Presbyterian church in Altona.

Clark Main's boyhood and youth were spent in a way common to the youth born and reared on the farms in the Mississippi valley. After laying aside his text-books at an early age, he took up farming upon his father's farm, and there gained his first experience in the occupation he was to follow throughout his active career. After his father's death he took full charge of the homestead, and showed his early training had given him the ability to execute the work which was entrusted to him. In addition to general farming he also engaged in stock-raising.

Mr. Main was married on the 18th of January, 1905, to Kate Rhodes, whose birth occurred February 12, 1883, and who is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.  E. B. Rhodes. Her grandparents were Edwin R. and Sarah (Bartlett) Rhodes. E. B. Rhodes is a resident of Mason City. Iowa, and was married to Alary L. Epperson, whose death occurred in 1884, when she was twenty-one years of age. She was the daughter of William D. and Alary Jane (Westfall) Epperson, originally of Madison county, Kentucky, but who were residents of Knox county after 1836.

In politics Air. Alain gives his support to the republican party, but has never sought office as a reward for party fealty. In religious faith he is a member of the Presbyterian church of Altona, and lives in accordance with its teachings. By his devotion to his farm and by his life, which has been spent in accordance with the highest ideals of citizenship, he has won for himself the respect and esteem of all.

JOHN JUNK.

John Junk, an octogenarian living in peaceful retirement in Henderson township, Knox county, was formerly closely associated with the agricultural interests of this locality. Born in Fayette county, Pennsylvania, Alay 6. 1827, he was a son of James and Elizabeth (Lincoln) Junk. On his paternal side he was of German descent, his grandfather having been born in Germany and

638 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

settled in New Jersey on coming to this country, in the middle of the eighteenth century. From there he went to Pennsylvania, in 1765, where he engaged in farming on a large scale, owning over two hundred acres of land. There his son James, the father of the subject of this sketch, was born. On coming of age James Junk engaged in agriculture, the calling which he followed throughout his life. His death occurred in 1877. Mrs. Junk, the mother of John, was a relative of Abraham Lincoln.

In the days when John Junk was a boy, the advantages of schooling were meager indeed, he was, however, given the best education that the limited opportunities of his remote rural locality afforded, which was at that time a subscription or private school presided over by a curiously interesting Irish schoolmaster. When grown to manhood John Junk learned the carpenter and millwright trades. He came west and settled in Galesburg, Illinois, in 1855. There he was about to enter upon a business career with G. W. Brown, who had a corn-planter factory, but he had no sooner begun his new work than he was given a contract from ex-Governor McMurtry to work on the new buildings which he was erecting on his farm. Next he built a schoolhouse and thereafter other contracts followed, so that he never lacked employment in carpentering. He worked as an artisan three or four years when his wife, disliking his long absences from home since his work often took him to distant parts of the county, prevailed upon him to settle on a farm and cultivate the soil. Accordingly he commenced farming. In 1865, he bought the farm in Henderson township which he still owns but which his son is managing for him. It is a very fine tract of land comprising four hundred and thirty acres. His son is continuing the work in which he was so successful, that is, general farming and stock-raising. He also made a specialty of breeding shorthorn cattle, for which he won a considerable reputation.

On November 28, 1855, John Junk was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Robertson, a daughter of Alexander and Narcissa (Ferguson) Robertson, pioneers of Knox county, who settled here in 1828 when her father purchased a farm. Mr. and Mrs. John Junk are the parents of one child, Alexander, who lives at home and operates his father's farm. Mr. Junk gives his political sympathies to the democratic party. He has at different times served as supervisor, assessor, road commissioner and as town clerk. Now, within sight of the fields that have grown very dear to him through the passing years, Mr. Junk is living in comfort, looking back upon his life with the calm serenity of one who has performed his duty well.

DAVID WOOLSEY.

Like a patriarch of old, David Woolsey, who is in his eighty-fourth year, presides at the head of a family of eight children and thirty-three grandchildren, but unlike his forefathers of Biblical days he governs them only in spirit and by the noble example of his own life. David Woolsey's residence in Knox county covers a period of sixty-three years, and for the past forty-six years he has lived on his present farm of three hundred acres on section 13 in Haw Creek

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 641

township. His grandfather, William Woolsey, remained a resident of his native state, New York, until middle life, when he removed his family to Sandusky, Plains, Ohio, where he lived until his death at the age of about eighty years, his wife departing this life at an earlier date. His father, Hezekiah Woolsey, was born and brought up in Ulster county, New York, and was there married to Miss Hannah Cutler, likewise a native of Ulster county, where her father, David Cutler, was born. During Mr. and Mrs. Hezekiah Woolsey's residence in Ulster county, New York, two children came to gladden their home, a son named William, who died in Pennsylvania at the age of eight years, and David Woolsey, born January 3, 18.28. The family then removed to Pennsylvania, following Mrs. Woolsey's father thither, and lived there a year during which time their daughter Elizabeth was born. She is the wife of Daniel McHenry of the state of Washington and has five children. At the end of their year's residence in Pennsylvania the family left that state for Sandusky Plains, Ohio, where the parents remained until their death. There the following children were born: Sarah Jane, deceased, the wife of Stephen Longnell; Martha, deceased, the wife of William Talent; Mary, deceased ; Walter, deceased, a former resident of Knox county, married to a Miss Leighbarger; Isaac, deceased, also a former resident of Knox county, living at Gilson; Silas residing in the state of Washington; and two children, a girl and a boy, who died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Hezekiah Woolsey were members of the Methodist Episcopal church, the former dying in Ohio at the age of sixty years and the latter in Knox county, Illinois, at the age of fifty-six years.

David Woolsey obtained his education in Ohio and when twenty years of age came to Knox county, Illinois, having a capital of ninety dollars on which to make his start in life. After living here five years he returned to Ohio with a team, in order to bring his widowed mother to live with him in Knox county. Soon after this he was married and settled on a farm which he rented in Maquon township, continuing in the cultivation of this land and in performing job contracts for his neighbors for ten years, removing thereafter to a farm which he rented in Haw Creek township. In the spring of 1865 he bought with the money he had laboriously saved up to this time the farm on which he now lives retired, and which he bought of Jacob Wolf. He moved onto the new place on April 5th, at which time the house was not yet completed nor a single fence was up. Undaunted in his determination not to lose the opportunity of the first year's harvest he set about the task of doing his spring sowing while attempting to finish his home, to build the necessary farm buildings and to put up the fences. He was successful in this ambitious undertaking and when the summer crops were gathered, was richly rewarded with an abundant yield, being obliged to hire help for only five days during that time. He devoted himself to general cultivation of the soil and to stock-raising for shipment and from time to time added to his holdings by further purchases until he became the owner of more than a section of land. This he has since largely divided among his children keeping the title to three hundred acres of land and residing there while it is being operated by several of his sons. He was likewise a stockholder in the Maquon National Bank but has transferred his bank stock to his wife, who is now the owner of it.

642 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

Mr. David Woolsey was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Frye, a native of Ohio, who died in Maquon township at the age of thirty-five years. To this marriage were born three children, Leta, William and one who died in infancy.

Mr. Woolsey was again married,. in 1856, his second union being with Miss Mildred Logan, a native of Virginia and a daughter of Alexander Logan. Of this union there were born ten children, five of whom are living. They are: Alva, residing in Haw Creek township, who is married to Flora Hall and has four children, Myrtle, Mabel, and twins, Carter and Chester; Lenora, the widow of William Chase, who resides in Flaw Creek township and has four living children, Nina, Doris, Wayne and Paul; Julia, the wife of Milton Sherman, residing in Oklahoma, who has six children, Harold, Everett, Clyde, Mildred, Carl and Mabel; Charles, operating his father's farm, who is married to Bell Phillips and has three children, Lloyd, Percy and Opal; and Clyde, sharing the management of the homestead farm with his brother Charles, who is married to Lulu Phillips and has two children, Mabel and Ethel. The deceased children are: Alonzo, who died when two years of age; Arzella, who passed away in January, 1912, and was the wife of Frank Nelson, residing in Elba township, leaving five children, Floyd, Blanche, Warren, Russell and Selma; Louisa, who died at the age of seven months ; William, who was married to Nora Taylor, and had two sons, Harley and Taylor; and Deborah, who died at the age of twenty years.

Mr. and Mrs. David Woolsey belong to the United Brethren church. Fraternally Mr. Woolsey is connected with the Odd Fellows, of Maquon. Since the origin of the republican party he has been one of their loyal followers, supporting their men and measures and the principles for which they stand, but he has always declined the honor of public office, knowing that his time belonged to his family and to the perplexing problems involved in the management of a large estate. This single-minded devotion to his duties and to the goal which he set himself at the outset of his career has been richly rewarded, so that he is now numbered among the substantial men of Knox county who have built their fortune by arduous labor, keen judgment and careful management.

Charles E. WEECH.

Charles E. Weech, who is a farmer residing in Walnut Grove township, was born in Knox county, on the 13th of June, 1869. He is a son of Joseph S. and Nancy E. (Cox) Weech, the former a native of Somersetshire, England, and the latter of Knoxville, Illinois. The father was a son of Joseph and Martha (White) Weech, the former of whom died in 1871, at the age of fifty-seven years. Joseph Weech left England with his wife and ten children, in 1859, and at once settled in Oneida, Illinois. Later he purchased the present Weech homestead and until the end of his active career engaged in farming. Mrs. Weech's parents were also natives of England; her death occurred in 1892, at the age of seventy-seven years. The great-grandfather of our subject, Stephen Weech, was also an agriculturist and his death occurred in 1846, at the age of eighty-five years, his wife passing away at the age of eighty-seven.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 643

Joseph S. Weech, the father of our subject, was born January 16, 1842, and came with his parents to the new world in 1859. Here he engaged in farming at home until he was twenty-four years of age but after his marriage, at that time, he purchased a small farm of forty acres in Walnut Grove township, which he cultivated for three years before disposing of it and purchasing the property upon which the homestead now stands. At this time the place comprised eighty acres and was the property of a brother before Joseph S. Weech acquired title thereto. Since 1901 he has been living retired. He was married to Nancy E. Cox, whose birth occurred in Knoxville and who is sixty-seven years of age. Her parents, David and Hannah (Wooley) Cox, are among the oldest settlers of the county. To Air. and Mrs. Joseph S. Weech ten children were born: Charles, the subject of this sketch; Rosa, residing at home; Alice, the wife of E. Fudge ; Ida May, who is married to Amos Beard, of Jefferson county, Illinois; Joseph, who is wedded to Emma Fuchs and is residing in Walnut Grove township; Martha, who is living at home; Nora, who is the wife of Arthur Reece, of Walnut Grove township; Arthur, who married Mabel White and is a resident of Idaho; Winnie, who is the wife of Enos Devore, and is residing in Cass county, Iowa; and Etta, living at home. Joseph S. Weech is a member of the Methodist church of Oneida, which he has supported by his liberal donations both at the time of the erection of its new building and annually toward its current expenses and he has held the office of township road commissioner for several terms.

As a boy Charles E. Weech left school when but twelve years of age and began working on his father's farm, on which he continued until he was twenty-one years of age, after which he farmed on the Joseph Weech property for six years and then, in 1895, removed to his present home, where he has engaged in general farming and stock-raising ever since. His success in this undertaking is due to the untiring energy and persistent labor which he has displayed in cultivating the property. His farm comprises eighty acres in Knox county, and he also owns two hundred and forty acres in Canada.

On the 12th of December, 1889, Charles E. Weech was married to Miss Anna May Davey, a daughter of Edwin Procter and Emily H. (Wagner) Davey, the former a native of Somerset, Somersetshire, England, born March 8, 1828, and the latter of Norwich, New York state. Mrs. Charles E. Weech was born on the 30th of September, 1870, in Walnut Grove township. Her father came to America as a young man and located at once in Knox county, where he devoted his life to agricultural pursuits, dying at Oneida when seventy years of age. Mrs. Davey, whose birth occurred June 11, 1844, a daughter of J. H. and Amanda (Walworth) Wagner, the family being of German descent, passed away August 22, 1899, when fifty-five years of age. Her great-grandfather, Wagner, served in the Mexican war and Thomas Davey, her grandfather on the paternal side, was a native of England, as was his father, Samuel Davey. Mrs. Charles E. Weech was one of four children, the others being: Nellie, the wife of J. Sheffield, of Campbell, Nebraska; Emma, who is married to George Sloan, a resident of North Dakota; and George Thomas, of Yates City. To Mr. and Mrs. Weech seven children have been born: Ethel, who died at the age of five years ; Eva Adelia, who is nineteen years of age and is teaching school; and Florence, Charles Edward, Hazel Leonora, Clarence Davey and Fern Martha, who are seventeen, fifteen, twelve, eight and six years of age, respectively, and are all residing at home.

644 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

Mr. Weech gives his political support to the republican party and has served as school director for twenty-two years. He holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of America of Oneida. He is a lifelong resident of Knox county and because of his success in his agricultural pursuits he has become one of its well known and much respected citizens.

WILLIAM MAIN.

William Main, who is now living retired in Altona, has been closely identified with the agricultural development of Knox county. He is one of the sturdy and thrifty natives of Scotland whose natural characteristics so well fitted them to achieve successful careers in the west, and although his life record is not marked by exciting events, there is in his history much that is worthy of contemplation and of emulation, for he has ever been loyal to duty, discharging faithfully the tasks that come daily to his hand. He was born May 12, 1844, in Blackhill on the banks of the Ayr river in Ayrshire, Scotland, and is the son of Peter and Jane (Ferguson) Main and grandson of Peter and Elizabeth (McKuan) Main, agriculturists who originally come from the Scotch Highlands. The father, whose birth occurred in Galloway, Scotland, in 1809, came to the United States in 1855, going directly to Chicago, where occurred the death of one of his daughters who had contracted cholera. After a brief stay in that city he removed to Millers Station and subsequently settled in Oneida. where he worked by the month until 1857. In that year he removed to Minnesota, but in the fall of 1857 returned to Oneida, and for the next eight years was engaged in agricultural pursuits in Copley township. In this he met with a good measure of success but retired to the home of his son, where on May 1, 1878, his death occurred. His wife died in Scotland in 1848 at the age of twenty-eight years. Of his family of three children William Main, the subject of this sketch, is the only surviving member. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and lived in accordance with its teachings.

William Main spent his early years attending the common schools until he reached the age of twelve years. At that time he began active labor and did a man's work on a farm, hiring out for board and clothes. Subsequently, as he became more proficient, he earned ten dollars a month, and after working for two years, he enlisted in Ontario township, in 1862, at the age of eighteen years, in Company I, One Hundred and Second Illinois Infantry, under the command of Captain F. C. Smith. Mr. Main has a wonderful war record and served in the Western army under Sherman and Gordon Granger for three years, and later under Sherman in the Atlanta campaign. He participated in the battles from Chattanooga to Atlanta but was never wounded and, more remarkable yet, never attended sick call. He accompanied Sherman on his march to the sea, in which the hardships incident to fighting were even more bearable than those caused by the swamps to be passed. On the 6th of March, 1865, he was mustered out, marching through Washington in the grand review. He immediately returned home and hired out on a farm until, in partnership with his brother, he rented land and began farming independently for two years, at the end of which period they were able to purchase a tract of their own. Since that time his life has been devoted to agricultural pursuits until his retirement in 1909, when he removed to Altona. After 1873 he purchased the farm which his son now occupies, and devoted over thirty-five years to its cultivation. In this undertaking he displayed many of the characteristics of the Scotch,—thrift, perseverance and energy. He has always been recognized as one of the leading business men of his community, and his ability as such has been clearly seen in his service as director of the Altona Bank.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 645

In 1873 Mr. Main was married to Anna Andrews, whose birth occurred March 15, 1849, m Ayrshire, Scotland, and who was a daughter of Hugh and Margaret (Wilson) Andrews. The former passed away in 1878 at the age of sixty-one years, and the latter, who was the daughter of John and Anna Wilson, died in 1892 at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. Andrews came to Knox county in 1855 and^ resided on a farm which was situated in Ontario and Walnut Grove townships during the remainder of his life. Mrs. Main was one of five children born to her parents, the others being: John Andrews, a stock buyer of Altona; Thomas Andrews, an agriculturist; Grace, who is the wife of Thomas Hobbs, a farmer; and Mary, who died in 1880 at the age of twenty-one years. To Mr. and Mrs. Main three children have been born: Thomas P., who is residing on the old homestead and is married to Patience Jarman and has one child, Clara; May, who is the wife of J. E. Hubble of Philadelphia, and has two children, Mary and John; and Jennie S., who became the wife of A. Johnson of Galesburg and has three children, Erwin, Helen and Robert.

Mr. Main has always enjoyed excellent health and is a remarkably young-looking man. He gives his political support to the republican party. He has served as road commissioner for many years and has also been an active member of the school board. Both Mr. and Mrs. Main hold membership in the Presbyterian church and she is active in the Ladies' Social Union and the Missionary Society of that church and also holds membership in the county kindergarten board. Throughout their community Mr. and Mrs. Main are held in high esteem and regard by all who know them and are numbered among Altona's most representative and w7orthy citizens.

JOHN EMERY McMASTER.

John Emery McMaster, who owns and operates a farm in Walnut Grove township, Knox county, was born in that township on the 6th of August, 1873, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. John McMaster of Altona, of whom a sketch appears elsewhere in this volume..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.
John E. McMaster spent his early days at home attending school and assisting his father on the farm, but in 1898 he started upon his independent career and on September 8 of that year was engaged as fireman by the Chicago & North Western Railway and subsequently in 1903 passed the examinations qualifying him to act as engineer on that railroad, he being one of the five that passed their tests

646 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

with credits of one hundred per cent, chosen out of two hundred and fifty applicants. During the next three years he was thus employed but at the end of that time he entered upon agricultural pursuits and for the past five years has been engaged in farming and stock-raising, meeting with the success which his persistency, industry and progressiveness merit.

On April 20, 1903, Mr. McMaster was married to Miss Minerva Locke, whose birth occurred August 17, 1879, in Jewell county, Kansas, and who is a daughter of Clinton and Nettie (Clark) Locke, the former a native of Davis county, Iowa, where he was born in 1851. He was a son of John and Mary (Miller) Locke, the former coming to America when he was twelve years of age and settling near Nashville, Tennessee. Later he removed to North Carolina and his death occurred when he was ninety years of age. Mrs. Locke died in 1898, at the age of eighty-four years. Mrs. Clinton Locke was born March 6, 1855, m Sacramento, California, her parents being Frank and Catherine (Vanderford) Clark, the former having been engaged in the mercantile business. The Clark family settled in California in 1852 but later removed to Iowa, where the father died January 17, 1866, at the age of forty-four years, the mother still residing in Swan, Marion county. When Mr. Clark crossed the plains from Red Rock, Iowa, he was one of a family of fifteen, who were making the journey. It took them five months to reach the coast and the entire trip was fraught with many dangers, the Indians met en route being particularly hostile. To Mr. and Mrs. Clinton Locke four children were born, namely: Floyd, a resident of Clinton, Iowa; John, who is living in Reno, Nevada; Mrs. Minerva McMaster; and Rea, of Rock Island. After finishing school Mrs. McMaster was employed in a clerical position until her marriage. To Mr. and Mrs. McMaster two children have been born: Lola Mae, who is seven years of age; and Bequeath, who is five years of age.

In politics Mr. McMaster is a republican although he has never sought or desired the honors or emoluments of office. He holds membership in Lodge No. 330, A. F. & A. M., of Altona, Illinois, and both he and his wife belong to the Baptist church of Boone, Iowa. Mr. McMaster has always been a resident of the county and has given practically his whole attention to farming, today being recognized as one of Walnut Grove township's progressive and able agriculturists.

ELIAS C. CALL.

Elias C. Call, who is now living retired in Altona, Knox county, was born in Rutland county, Vermont, on the 22d of June, 1835, his parents being Osman and Olive (Clark) Call. His grandfather, Isaiah Call, was the first member of the family to leave his native state and locate in this county. He came here at the time the Mormons had extensive settlements in this locality. After settling in Walnut Grove township he devoted his entire life to agricultural pursuits and the brickmaking trade, he being the first brickmaker in this county. Osman Call was born at Woodstock, Vermont, in 1808, and followed the brickmaker's trade until he removed to Illinois in January, 1855, and settled in Knox county.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 647

Later in life he became an authority on arithmetic and was the author of a well known text-book on that subject. Mrs. Call was a daughter of J. Clark, a native of England, and her death occurred in Altona in 1895, at the age of eighty-five years and six months. Of this union three children survive: Elias, the subject of this review; Roenna Seymore, who is residing in Indianapolis, Indiana; and Loyal, who is living in California and who served in the Civil war..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.

Elias C. Call received his early education in the common schools, after which he accepted employment by the month on various farms and subsequently worked in a sawmill in New York state previous to coming to Altona in 1854. On the 22d of April, 1861, he enlisted for service in the Civil war, joining Company F of the Twenty-second New York Infantry under Colonel Phelps, serving in the Army of the Potomac near Washington. Because of severe illness contracted during the service he was mustered out in 1863, the same year in which his brother, who served in the Chicago Battery of Artillery, was made a prisoner at Andersonville. After Elias Call's honorable discharge he went to New York state and was again employed for a short time in a sawmill, but in 1864 he removed to Altona, making the trip by way of Canada. From that time he engaged in agricultural pursuits and, although he is now living retired, he still manifests an active interest in the farming problems of the county. In the cultivation of his property he met with the success which is usually gained in this rich agricultural district by the farmer who shows persistent and unremitting energy and who is willing to engage in constant labor.

Mr. Call has been twice married. His first union was to Miss Olive Haines, and to them two sons were born: William H., who is a teacher in Utah; and Charles W., who is residing in Hubert, Crow Wing county, Minnesota. . Mr. Call's second union was to Mrs. Mary Huntly White, who was the widow of Peter White and whose birth occurred in 1836 in McConnellsville, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Call is the mother of two children by her first husband, Joseph Stillwagon, namely, Alice Stillwagon and Elizabeth Stillwagon. Of her union to Peter White there were born eight children, Sadie, George, Levi, Henry, Ida, Mary, Delia and David.

Without desire for office as a reward for party fealty Mr. Call gives his unfaltering allegiance to the democratic party. He was a representative farmer and by his application and sturdy character has gained many friends, and he and his wife are held in high regard by all who claim the honor of their acquaintance.

HON. EDWARD J. KING.

In legislative service, to which he has three times been called by popular suffrage, and in the practice of law Hon. Edward J. King has given evidence of strong mentality, keen insight, a public spirit and devotion to duty that rank him with the representative and valued citizens of Galesburg. He was born in Springfield, Massachusetts, July 1, 1867, and in both the paternal and maternal lines is a representative of old New England families. The line of descent in the King family can be traced back in this country to about 1660, when the American

648 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

progenitor settled in Suffield, Connecticut. Captain Thaddeus King, the great-great-grandfather, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. The great-grandfather was John King, also a native and resident of Connecticut. The grandparents of our subject, Albert and Louise (Leavitt) King, were natives of Connecticut, where the former followed the occupation of farming to the age of sixty-five years, when his life's labors were ended in death. His wife long survived him and reached the remarkable old age of ninety years. They were the parents of two sons and a daughter: John A.; Francis, who died at Suffield, Connecticut; and Mrs. Julia Randall.

John A. King, the father of Edward J. King, was born in Connecticut, spending his youthful days in Suffield, whence in early manhood he removed to Springfield, Massachusetts, where he carried on business as a contractor and builder. In that state he wedded Alice L. Houghton, a native of Massachusetts, and a daughter of Albert and Louise (Ralph) Houghton. Her father was born in Connecticut and was an engineer on the New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad. His wife was a descendant of a British officer. Mr. and Mrs. Hough-ton made their home in Springfield, Massachusetts, for many years but afterward went to Windsor, Connecticut. Mrs. Houghton is still living in Suffield, Connecticut, at the unusual old age of ninety years. They were the parents of the following children; Edward, who died at Sacramento, California, about 1906; Alice L., the wife of John A. King; Elizabeth, who married Charles Mead, of Springfield ; Mrs. George Duncan, afterwards intermarried with Frank Fisher, a widow; Annie, the wife of Walter Fogg, of Springfield, Massachusetts; Emma, the wife of Frank Leonard; and Martha, the wife of George Wallace, of Suffield, Connecticut.

Mr. and Mrs. John A. King began their domestic life in Springfield, Massachusetts, and about 1870 removed to Hamburg, Iowa, whence in 1877 after residing in various places, the father came to Galesburg, where for a number of years he engaged in the livery business. During the past ten years, however, he has conducted a grain business in Chicago. lie was a soldier of the Civil war, serving as a private in Company A, of the Forty-sixth Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry. His political allegiance has always been given to the republican party and his membership relations are with the Odd Fellows society. His wife, who was a member of the Baptist church, died in Springfield, Massachusetts, in the opening decade of the twentieth century at the age of fifty-seven years. They had but two children and the daughter, Louise, died at the age of seventeen years. Mrs. Alice L. King, the mother of our subject, married a second time, becoming Mrs. Lombard, of Springfield, Massachusetts, and there were children of that union.

Edward J. King spent his early boyhood in Springfield, Massachusetts, and in Windsor and Suffield, Connecticut, on New England farms and in attending the common schools there. He has been a resident of Illinois since 1880, at which time he took up his abode in Galesburg and was a pupil in the public schools until graduated from the high school in 1886. Later he entered Knox College and is numbered among its alumni of 1891. He taught for one year before entering college and after the completion of his course at Knox took up the study of law and was admitted to the bar in 1893, since which time he has followed his profession in Galesburg, having here an extensive practice that connects him

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 649

with much of the important litigation tried in the courts of the district. He always prepares his cases with great thoroughness and care and his careful analysis enables him to present his points in logical form and to draw there from correct conclusions.

On the 1st of January, 1895, ^r- King was married to Miss May B. Roberts, a daughter of Rev. H. P. and Anna (Blanchard) Roberts. Mrs. King was born in Cairo, Illinois, where her father, a Congregational minister, was preaching. He served throughout the Civil war as a lieutenant and chaplain and died while on a visit in Colorado in 1887. He was, however, a resident of Galesburg at the time. His wife survived until September, 1896, and passed away at the age of sixty-four years. They were the parents of but two children, the elder daughter being Nellie A., who is now the widow of Fred S. Rockwell and resides in Denver with her son, Robert B. Rockwell. The younger daughter, May B., became the wife of Mr. King and they now have one son, Ivan R. King. The mother is a member of the Central Congregational church. Mr. King is well known in fraternal circles of this city, belonging to Alpha Lodge, No. 155, A. F. & A. M.; to the Odd Fellows society, the Knights of Pythias and the Elks. Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise he has been a stalwart advocate of the republican party and is a recognized leader in its ranks, thoroughly conversant with the vital questions and issues of the day and working along practical lines to secure the adoption of its principles. In 1893 he was elected city attorney and served for one term. In 1907 he was again called to office in his election to the house of representatives of the Forty-fifth Illinois general assembly and endorsement of his first term came to him in his reelection to the Forty-sixth and Forty-seventh general assemblies as a member of the house. Mr. King was the republican caucus nominee for speaker of the house of the Forty-sixth general assembly being defeated by Edward D. Shurtleft* through a combination of democrats and republicans, who afterward elected William Lorimer United States senator. As a member of the state legislature he has carefully considered questions which have come up for action and neither fear nor favor can swerve him in his support of a cause which he believes to be just and right. lie also holds to a high standard of professional ethics, ever treats the court with that courtesy which is its due and never indulges in malicious criticism because it arrives at a conclusion in the decision of a case different from that which he hoped to hear. lie gives to his clients the service of well developed talent, unwearied industry and wide learning, but he never forgets that there are certain things due to the court, to his own self-respect and above all to justice and the righteous administration of the law which neither the zeal of an advocate nor the pleasure of success permits him to disregard.

JOHN S. MATHEWS.

John S. Mathews is the owner of a fine farm of three hundred and forty acres, to the further development and improvement of which he devotes his attention in connection with stock-raising, and is meeting with excellent success in both. He was born on his present homestead located on section 22, Salem township, on January 6, 1859, a son °f William and Mary Jane (Montgomery)

650 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

Mathews, the father a native of Ireland and the mother of Pennsylvania. William Mathews emigrated from the Emerald isle to America in his early manhood, locating in Knox county, where he acquired one hundred and sixty acres of land. Being both ambitious and diligent he intelligently applied his energies to the cultivation of his land, his efforts meeting with such lucrative returns that he was later able to extend his holdings until he had acquired the title to three hundred and forty acres of land, now the homestead of his son John S.. To Mr. and Mrs. William Mathews there were born seven children, one of whom died at the age of four months. The others are as follows: Sarah N., the wife of Joseph W. Maxwell, of Yates City; John S., our subject; William C, who is living north of Douglas; Minerva Jane, the wife of Thomas Andrews, also residing north of Douglas; Robert T. a minister in the Presbyterian church, located at Louisville, Kentucky; and Clara B., now Mrs. Nixon of Yates City. The parents are now both deceased, the father having passed away at the age of seventy-seven and the mother at eighty-one, and are buried at Yates City. They were charter members of the Presbyterian church of that city and always took an earnest and helpful interest in all religious work, having given much assistance in building the church at Farmington. Mr. Mathews was a republican in politics and for many years held the office of school director in Salem township. He engaged in general farming and stock-raising during the entire period of his active career and met with success, being numbered among the prosperous agriculturists of the county. A man of high principles, his upright conduct and unquestionable integrity won him the esteem of all with whom he had transactions.

Together with his brothers and sisters John S. Mathews attended the common schools of Knox county in the acquirement of an education. They all terminated their student days with the completion of the high school with the exception of the brother Robert T., who was graduated from Knox College and afterwards attended the McCormick Theological Seminary. When his school days were ended John S. Mathews gave his undivided attention to the cultivation of the fields and care for the stock on the homestead, and many improvements upon the place were instituted by him. After his marriage Mr. Mathews brought his bride to the home of his childhood and here they have spent the entire period of their domestic life. Until the last two years he has operated his entire holdings, but he is now renting forty acres. Beside the cultivation of his fields he raises high-grade cattle, hogs and horses, making a specialty of Hereford cattle which are nearly all on the Wisconsin register, and Percheron horses.

In 1890 Mr. Mathews was married to Miss Clara Mabel Emery, born October 22, 1869, was is a native of Lynn township, Knox county, and a daughter of David and Amelia (Brooks) Emery. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Mathews there have been born four children: David W., Helen B., Amber G. and Bernard Emery.

The family are members of the Presbyterian church, of which Mr. Mathews has been a member of the board of trustees for eighteen years and is also an elder. He is also a director of the Farmers Telephone Company, and was formerly president, and is a member and secretary of the Percheron Horse Company. His political affiliations are with the republican party and he has been called upon to serve for four years as township assessor, while he has satisfactorily filled the position of school director for twenty-one years, a record which bespeaks the confidence of his fellow citizens. His entire life has been spent in the immediate vicinity of his present homestead, which is located on sections 21 and 22 of Salem township, and among his closest friends he numbers the comrades of his boyhood, this in itself being a tribute to his character.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 651-

GEORGE W. DAVIDSON.

George W. Davidson formerly associated with the agricultural interests of Knox county is now living retired in the village of Henderson. His father, Robert Davidson, born in Ireland in 1817, was the son of Hans and Jane Davidson of Ireland, who came to this country in November, 1817, bringing with them their son Robert who was then a babe six months old. They settled in Ohio, where they lived for many years. When Robert was of age he went to Maryland and there met Julia Ann Elishier whom he made his wife. At this time the great influx of settlers was beginning to invade Illinois, chiefly attracted thither by the promising agricultural prospects. Robert Davidson, too, followed the throng and, accompanied by his bride, settled near Springfield. There they lived ' for a little time during which period George W. Davidson, their first child, was born December 28, 1846. Their next home was Peoria, Illinois, where they remained until 1851, when they took up their residence in Galesburg. ' Mr. Davidson opened a plow shop in Henderson, and for four or five years made plows, which he sold in distant as well as neighboring localities, often hauling his iron and plows across the whole state to Iowa and other states. In 1856 he commenced farming and built a sawmill and in i860 bought a farm, to which he removed his family. Here he devoted himself to agriculture, operating three hundred and fifteen acres of land. He was a man of marvelous physique and great endurance, only once in his life being so ill, as to necessitate a doctor's call. He continued in his farm work up to the time he was eighty-three years old and passed away three years later in 1903. His wife died in 1891, at the age of sixty-five years. She belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. They were the parents of two other children, daughters, one of whom died in 1855. The other daughter is Mrs. Anthony Smith, of Henderson. Mr. Robert Davidson was a democrat in politics and for many years served his county in the capacity of road commissioner. He was not a member of any church but gave liberally to the advancement of any worthy religious cause.

George W. Davidson had a common-school education and when old enough engaged in agriculture. Ill health, however, followed him for many years. During the year 1873 he resided in Galesburg and at the end of this time returned to his farm, where he stayed until 1880, when he again resided in Galesburg for a brief period, only to return to the farm and once more pursue his agricultural labors. He was engaged in general farming, raised hogs and stock and had some reputation for breeding blooded Norman and trotting horses. He gave up farming permanently October 20, 1907, when he retired to Henderson, where he is now living.

652 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

The marriage of Mr. Davidson and Miss Sarepta J. Baer was celebrated October 7, 1869. She was a daughter of Rev. D. E. and Susan (Ryan) Baer, who came originally from Germany but lived most of their lives in Spring Run, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, where Mr. Baer was a minister in the United Brethren church. Sarepta (Baer) Davidson's grandfather and two of her brothers were also preachers of the same faith.

Three children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Davidson. Minnie, the wife of William Ward, a real-estate agent in Galesburg, is the mother of two children, Geneva and Lucile. Robert, is a merchant in Henderson. David Earl, a wholesale coal dealer in Galesburg, by his first wife, Mamie McDermott, has one child, Leonora. His second wife was formerly Miss Lucile McCune.

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Davidson are ardent workers in the United Brethren and Methodist churches in Henderson. They have a large circle of friends, who esteem them highly for their progressive interest in every measure contributing to the moral and spiritual welfare of the community.

FRANK STEWART STEPHENSON.

Frank Stewart Stephenson, who owns and operates a farm in Walnut Grove township, was born July 21, 1866, in Oneida, Illinois, his parents being George L. and Grace (Stewart) Stephenson of Oneida, where the former is a prominent representative of mercantile interests.

In the public schools of Oneida Frank S. Stephenson acquired his education. After he had finished his school course he accepted a clerical position in his father's store at Oneida, and remained there until 1903, when he removed to the farm upon which he has since resided. His land is highly developed and well equipped with buildings and machinery, adequate for carrying on its cultivation according to the most advanced and most profitable methods. In addition to general farming he is also extensively engaged in stock-raising.

It was while he was residing in Oneida that Frank Stephenson was married on the 30th of September, 1891, to Miss Cummings, whose birth occurred October 21, 1869, on the Cummings homestead, her parents being Leonard B. and Celinda (Bulkeley) Cummings. The father was born in Union, Maine, near the Atlantic seacoast, June 28, 1823, his parents being Suel and Sophia (Barnard) Cummings, the former also a native of Maine, where he engaged in farming, having passed away in 1866 at the age of seventy-seven years, the latter having died in 1890 at the age of ninety-two years. Leonard Cummings, their son, left school at an early age so as to give his time and attention to his father's farm. Later he was employed at logging in a lumber camp for two winters, and subsequently, at the age of twenty-three years, he and his brother were employed in a trunk factory in Boston, but this work was discontinued when he enlisted in the Mexican war. His service covered a period of eighteen months, and after being mustered out he joined the great army of gold seekers going to California in 1849. He made the trip by water, sailing in a sloop around Cape Horn. For three years he remained in the mining district and then returned home, coming to Galesburg in 1853. Subsequently he purchased the farm which has since been

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 653

the Cummings homestead. Mrs. Cummings was born on the 22d of August, 1838, in Lyme, Connecticut, and was the daughter of A. W. and Margaret Ann (Covenhoven) Bulkeley, the former having been born October 18, 1805, in Colchester, Connecticut, and the latter, September 28, 1805, in New York city. Mr. Bulkeley followed the carpenter, contractor and cabinet-maker's trade throughout his life. He removed to Fulton county in 1839, and in 1851 came to Copley township, Knox county, where his death occurred in 1879, his wife dying in 1886. Mrs. Bulkeley was the daughter of James and Elizabeth (Demorist) Covenhoven, who were of Dutch ancestry, but the family had long resided in. this country, James Covenhoven having been a soldier in the Revolutionary war, as were many other members of the family. Mr. L. B. Cummings was a member of the Masons belonging to the A. F. & A. M. lodge, of Altona, Illinois, and although he was never active in politics he was wide awake to the issues of the day, and used what influence he could to promote measures which would tend to public improvement. Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson have become the parents of five children: Maude Aurelia, whose birth occurred July 28, 1892, and who is at present a student at the Illinois Woman's College at Jacksonville; Frank Stuart, Jr., whose birth occurred, May 25, 1895, and who is a student in the Oneida high school; George Cummings, born June 4, 1898, and attending school at present; Ruth Celinda, whose birth occurred August 29, 1899; and Robert Bulkeley, whose birth occurred December 11, 1901.

Mr. Stephenson is not interested in politics, but because of his interest in the moral condition and the development of the community he has served as a member of the school board of Oneida for five years. Fraternally he is connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, of Oneida, Illinois, and lodge No. 576 of the Knights of Pythias of Oneida, an organization of which he is a charter member, and of which he is now chancellor commander.

A. C. WILLIAMS.

A. C. Williams resides on section 4 of Victoria township, where he and his brother Walter engage in general farming and stock-raising on a farm of one hundred and fifty-four and three-fourths acres, that was formerly the property of their father. He was born in England on the 12th of May, 1850, and is a son of Thomas and Emma Williams, who emigrated to the United States with their family in 1852. Upon their arrival in this country they came directly to Knox county, where the father acquired the farm now owned by his sons. This was partially improved but Mr. Williams made many changes during his life time, erecting some new buildings and bringing the fields under higher cultivation. Here he engaged in general farming and stock-raising until his death, which occurred at the age of sixty-three years. He was survived for several years by the mother, who had passed the sixty-seventh anniversary of her birth at the time of her demise. They were both buried on the family lot in the cemetery at Galva. His political allegiance Air. Williams accorded the democratic party and in matters of faith he and his wife were Episcopalians. He always took much interest in all public affairs, particularly those of a governmental nature, but

654 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

never held any office save that of postmaster, the duties of which he discharged at Milroy for twenty years. Six children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Williams, of whom our subject is the youngest. In order of birth the others are as follows: George, who married Miss Azalea Annis and resides at Galva; Mary Ann, the wife of John Freed, of California; Thomas, who married Mary Starboard and is now living in Missouri; Walter, who was born on the 27th of October, 1845; and Emily, the wife of L. D. Blackwood, of Missouri.

As he was only a child of two years when he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United States, A. C. Williams was reared and educated in Victoria township. Fie received his agricultural training on the farm, where he now resides, under the capable direction of his father, during his boyhood and youth. After the latter's death the three sons, George, Walter and A. C, continued to operate the farm but the two latter subsequently bought the interest of their brother and have ever since continued alone. They have directed their operations along the lines generally adopted by the modern agriculturist and , their efforts have been correspondingly rewarded. Their fields, are carefully tilled and devoted to those cereals that are best adapted to the soil, and they annually reap abundant harvests. During the period of their ownership they have installed many modern conveniences and improvements and now have one of the well equipped farms of the township. In 1905 they tore down the old house that had done service for many years, and erected a comfortable country-residence, that has greatly added to the general appearance of the place. They keep the fences and buildings in good repair, ample sheds are provided for their implements and machinery and their stock is well housed, in short everything about their farm evidences capable management and thrift.

Mr. Williams married Miss Sarah J. Sornborger and they have become the parents of seven children, as follows: E. B.; Helen, who is deceased; and Altha, Alfred, Bertha, Ruth and Bryan. He accords his political support to the democratic party, as does also his brother, but they have never aspired to the emoluments of office or public honors. Mr. Williams has passed fifty-nine of the sixty-one years of his life in Victoria township, where both he and his brother are widely known and held in high esteem, by reason of their upright principles and honorable business methods, manifested in all of their transactions.

FRANK H. OLSON.

Frank H. Olson, who is proprietor of one of the leading mercantile establishments of Altona and also the postmaster of the town, was born in Ontario township, Knox county, November 25, 1873. His father, Peter Olson, who died December 12, 1911, in Walnut Grove township, reached the age of eighty-one years. He came as a young man to America and took up farming, which he followed for some time but later turned his attention to merchandising at Wood-hull, Illinois. For a number of years he carried on business with a fair measure of success and eventually sold out. He lived up to his death retired near Altona, making his home upon a farm which he owned. His only surviving brother is a resident of Seattle, Washington. Peter Olson married Hannah Matson, who is

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 655

also deceased. They became the parents of seven children: Oscar, who is now living in North Dakota; Edith, the wife of Charles Johnson, of Ontario township ; Frank H, of this review; Emma, the wife of H. L. Peterson, a merchant of Altona; Hilda, at home; Arthur, who is following farming in Canada; and Harry, who has charge of the old home farm.

After his school days were over, Frank H. Olson engaged in clerking in Oneida, Illinois, for J. N. Conger, spending two years in that way. Fie afterward entered the Burlington Business College, where he studied for a term and then went to Chicago, where he was employed by Marshall Field & Company. He afterward returned to Oneida, where he embarked in business on his own account, becoming a partner with Metcalf Brothers in the ownership and conduct of a grocery store. After three years he sold out and removed to Altona, where he joined C. J. McMaster in the conduct of a grocery and hardware business. Three years later he became connected with C. E. Cowles in a business that was carried on for two years and later he formed a partnership with G. A. Johnson, which association was maintained for three years. Mr. Olson then purchased his partner's interest in the business and is now conducting a hardware and grocery store, carrying a well selected line of goods in each department and meeting with success in their sale. His business is well managed and his familiarity with the trade enables him to buy judiciously and sell at a fair profit, thus gaining the success which is the legitimate reward of all honorable endeavor.

Mr. Olson was united in marriage to Miss Bessie Bristol, a daughter of Frank Bristol, who was a carriage manufacturer of Oneida but is now deceased, as is his wife, Mrs. Emma Bristol. They were early residents of Oneida and were widely and favorably known there. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Olson has been born a son, Frank Bristol, now fourteen years of age. The parents are members of the Presbyterian church, in the work of which they are actively and helpfully interested, Mr. Olson serving as one of the church trustees. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of America as a member of Camp No. 3737. His political support is given to the republican party and he held the office of town clerk until appointed postmaster of Altona on the 16th of March, 1908. He is still filling that position and in office has made as creditable a record as he has in business. He is justly accounted one of the representative and public-spirited citizens of Altona, accomplishing what he undertakes whether for his own benefit or for the progress and welfare of the community at large.

JOHN H. SHEAR.

John H. Shear, who is residing on his farm in Walnut Grove township, was born on the 22d of April, 1847, in Otsego county. New York, and is a son of Henry D. Shear, whose father was the first of the family to come to America from Holland. The father was born in New York state, April 10, 1813, and after he finished his early schooling learned the carpenter's trade. Subsequently he came with his brother to Illinois, locating in 1857, near Galesburg, Knox county, Illinois. After farming for ten years near Galesburg he purchased the

656 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

farm upon which William McMaster is now residing. His death occurred upon this place, September 22, 1901. On the 30th of November, 1834, he was married to Eliza A. Multer, of Summit, New York. She was born April 6, 1813, and her death occurred on the 10th of September, 1895. They were the parents of seven children, four of whom are now living: Joseph, of Buxton, North Dakota; Moses Aaron, of Clay county, Nebraska; Julia, the wife of George McMasters, of Walnut Grove township; and John H., who is the subject of this sketch. Two sons, Cyrus M. and George A., died during the Civil war while enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Forty-eighth Regiment of Illinois Infantry.

John H. Shear began his active career at the early age of twelve years, when he began assisting his father on the home farm. He remained there until his marriage, when he removed to the farm upon which he is now residing and engaged in general farming and stock-raising. For a few years following 1876, he also conducted a mercantile business in Altona, Illinois, but soon gave this up to devote his whole attention to agricultural pursuits.

On the 5th of August, 1891, Mr. Shear was married to Miss Maud White, whose birth occurred June 16, 1871, in Belmont county, Ohio. She was a daughter of Philander and Hannah Jane (Roby) White, the former having passed away on the 16th of March, 1900, and the latter living in Altona. The parents came to Knox county in 1890 and settled near Altona, where Mr. White was engaged in farming until his retirement a short time previous to his death. Mrs. Shear's grandfather, Thomas White, was one of the early settlers of Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. White six children were born, four of whom survive: Edwin, of Newton, Kansas; Alice, who is the wife of O. McGrew, of Altona; Sally, who is the widow of F. Lester and is residing with her mother; and Mrs. Shear. Mr. and Mrs. Shear are the parents of three children: Walter W., whose birth occurred July 31, 1892; John Wesley, who was born on December 1, 1896; and Bertha, whose birth occurred April 1, 1900.

In politics Mr. Shear gives his allegiance to the republican party and has been elected to office by that party. In religious faith he is a member of the Methodist church of Altona and is at present serving as one of its trustees. His success in life has been due entirely to his own efforts and to diligent and persistent labor. Fie has displayed many of the praiseworthy traits which he has inherited from his stalwart Dutch ancestry and stands as one of the substantial and valued citizens of his community.

AUGUST 'PETERSON.

August Peterson, who has been engaged in agricultural pursuits in Knox county and is at present conducting a livery stable, was born in Altona, on the 21st of July, 1887, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Victor Dahlgreen. The father's death occurred in 1905 and the mother passed away when her son was but four years of age.

From that time August Peterson was reared in the home of N. A. and Christina (Lundgren) Peterson, of Galva. August Peterson remained there until

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 659

he was eighteen years of age. In his youth he attended the common schools and also assisted his foster father in agricultural pursuits. Subsequently he was employed by a railroad for two years and during that time, on the 18th of March, 1908, he met with an accident which incapacitated him for further manual labor of that sort. Having been trained to habits of thrift, he had by this time accumulated sufficient money that on the 12th of October, 1908, he was able to engage in the livery business at Altona. He conducts a modern establishment and his treatment of his patrons and his reasonable prices have secured him a good patronage.

In the family of August Peterson were two brothers, George and David. George was brought up by a Mrs. Smith, of Altona, but he died in 1905. David, the other brother, was reared by a Mrs. Krohnland, who lived in Altona. Later the family removed to Colorado and David accompanied them to that state. He has now established his permanent residence in Denver and is still living with the Krohnland family.

Mr. Peterson is not particularly interested in politics, having given the greater part of his attention to his business undertakings. His religious faith is indicated in his membership in the Lutheran church of Altona. He is well known in business and social circles and has many warm friends, whose high regard has been gained by reason of his sterling worth.

CHARLES WESLEY MAIN.

Charles Wesley Main, who is a resident agriculturist of Altona, Knox county, was born on the 21st of March, 1856, his parents being Elias and Mary Ann (Huntington) Main. The father, who was born in Otsego county, New York, was a son of Peter Main, and came to Illinois for the first time in 1847, locating at Belvidere, where he engaged in farming for two years before returning to New York state. His trip westward, which was made in company with a brother, was taken over the Great Lakes route to Fort Dearborn, Chicago. When they arrived in Chicago they were offered fifteen acres of land where Lake street now is, for fifteen dollars per acre. This instance shows how remarkable the growth of Chicago has been, and how little investors realized its future greatness. The return trip eastward was also made on ship board, and one of its interesting incidents was the race which took place between two vessels during a heavy storm. So great was the interest in the contest that even a wagon belonging to Mr. Main was used for firewood in order to keep up the necessary amount of steam. His brother, a sailor, attended to the sounding of the depths of the water. After a short visit to the east the father returned west, to Altona, and at that time built the home in which he is now residing, having procured the lumber in Rock Island. The trip from Belvidere to Victoria was made in wagons at the time the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railway was being graded. In his early days he had learned the wagon-maker's trade, and throughout the greater part of his life he was engaged in various kinds of wood construction work. In addition to building wagons he also made caskets. As he was the only manufacturer of these in his district he received a large patronage and usually charged

660 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

fifteen dollars apiece for them. He was married to Mary Ann Huntington, whose birth occurred July 7, 1817, in Otsego county, New York. Her death occurred on the nth of July, 1887, in the old homestead, and Mr. Main passed away in 1901 at the age of eighty-six years. He held membership in the Methodist church, being one of the original members and founders of this church at Altona. Throughout its existence he was one of its most generous and enthusiastic supporters. So great was his interest in its welfare and progress that, at the time of his death, he left a provision in his will which stated that the Methodist church of Altona was to receive an annual contribution of one hundred dollars to be used toward the pastor's salary, this provision to be operative for ten years. His charitable spirit was also shown by the fact that he also provided for a three hundred dollar annual donation to Abingdon College. To Mr. and Mrs. Main the following children were born: David E. and Dewitt C, both deceased; Delos S., who is living in Lebanon, Illinois; Mary J., deceased; Ella, a widow, who was the wife of William Stockdale, a pharmacist of Altona, Illinois; Emma L., who is married to R. Henderson, a resident of Houston, Texas; Joseph T., who is living in Galesburg; and Charles W. Main, who is residing in Altona and is the subject of this sketch.

Charles Wesley Main has lived an active and useful life, and has done his share in developing the agricultural interest of Knox county, a county which depends so greatly upon its soil for its resources. His spirit of citizenship has been such that he has won the regard and respect of his fellow citizens.

SAMUEL V. STUCKEY.

Samuel V. Stuckey, cashier of the Farmers & Mechanics Bank, to which position he was called in December, 1908, was born in Altona, this county, September 6, 1865. His father, John A. Stuckey, was a native of Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, born in April, 1832, and in his youthful days he came to Illinois, settling in Knoxville, where he engaged in farming. A few years later he became connected with the hardware business in Altona and was prominently associated with its commercial interests for an extended period, occupying an enviable position as a reliable merchant and progressive business man. He is also prominent in local political circles and, in 1880, was elected sheriff of Knox county, to which position he was reelected, serving in all for six years. He afterward went west to California and is now engaged in business in Rosemond, Kern county. His fraternal relations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. In his political views he is a republican and in addition to the office of sheriff he filled a number of township positions, discharging his duties with credit to himself and satisfaction to his constituents. In early manhood he wedded Margaret Norris, who was born near Baltimore, Maryland, about 1835. She died in 1899 in the faith of the Congregational church of which she had long been a faithful member. In their family were four children: George N., now a resident of Minneapolis, Minnesota; Samuel V.; Nellie, the wife of William T. Walsh, of Los Angeles, California; and John H., who is living in the same city.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 661

Samuel V. Stuckey pursued his education in the schools of Altona and Gales-' burg, supplementing his early school course by study in Brown's Business College, In 1883 he was appointed deputy sheriff under his father, being at that time a youth of eighteen years, and continued in the office until the 9th of February, 1890. On that day he became clerk of the circuit court, which position he filled until December, 1908. In the previous February he had entered financial circles, having accepted the position of cashier of the Farmers & Mechanics-Bank, with which he is still connected. He had previously been a director of the bank for ten years and was then called to the office of cashier, which position he has since capably filled, proving a popular bank official, always courteous in his treatment of the bank's patrons and at the same time careful in protecting the interests of the institution which he represents.

On the 22cl of September, 1887, Mr. Stuckey was united in marriage to Miss Martha M. Clay, a daughter of Alonzo C. and Lovina M. (Derby) Clay, of Galesburg, both of whom were natives of Andover, Vermont, and in 1836 the father came to Knox county with his father, John T. Clay. Fie became a farmer and in 1849, during the gold excitement, was one of the originators of the party that left Galesburg, in January, 1849, overland by ox wagon, for the gold fields of California, crossing the great American desert, but in a few years returned, devoting many years to general agricultural pursuits. His wife came to Knox county in January, 1850, and died in February, 1890. Mr. Clay gave his political allegiance to the democratic party, filled a number of township offices and was also county supervisor, serving as chairman of its building committee at the time of the erection of the county jail. Fie was a Universalist and both he and his wife displayed many sterling traits of character. His death occurred December 27, 1898. Their daughter, Mrs. Stuckey, was born in Galesburg, June 9, 1863. The other member of the family was Charles C. Clay, who died May 5, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Stuckey are well known in Galesburg where they have an extensive acquaintance. He has made a creditable record in office and in financial circles and his ability constitutes one of the factors in the capable management and successful control of the Farmers & Mechanics Bank.


EDWIN P. WILLIAMSON.

Equally capable of pursuing business enterprises and farming, Edwin P. Williamson has established for himself a reputation that is known throughout Knox county. Agriculturists know him for his success both in general farming and stock-raising. He was born March 13, 1870, on the old homestead, where he now resides and where the old home still stands. His father, William Williamson, was a native of Sweden, born October 10, 1833. When seventeen years old he accompanied his parents, Olof and Margaret Olofson to America.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 689

William Williamson was one of six children that grew up, namely: Jonas, who died in 1893; Peter, who lives at Chariton, Iowa; Margaret, the wife of W. C. Olson; Moses, who lives in Galesburg; and John, who died in the Civil war, a soldier from Knox county. They located in Sparta township, Knox county, Illinois, in 1850, where the father engaged in farming. In 1854 William Williamson bought a part of the farm on which his son Edwin now lives and which has remained in the family ever since. He was a remarkable man, a fact patent enough, when one considers the manifold business and commercial enterprises in which he was the prime initiator and which were closely connected with the development and growth of the economic life of varied and widely scattered communities at various times. He conducted a general mercantile business in Moline, Illinois; he owned a flour mill at Clay Center, Kansas; in partnership with his brother he owned the Wataga Flour Mill, one of the oldest flour mills in Knox county; he was a stockholder in the Galesburg National Bank and in the Bank of Galesburg; with his son, L. O. Williamson, he managed a store at Galesburg and gave liberally for the encouragement of other business enterprises. He was a charter member of the Swedish Lutheran church at Wataga. In politics he was a loyal worker for the republican party and served as school trustee and as commissioner of highways. In 1903 he removed from the farm in Sparta township to Wataga, where he died on February 13, 1906. His wife, the mother of Edwin P. Williamson, was formerly Katharine Olson, who was born in Sweden, April 7, 1836, and died December 11, 1908. Her father, Lars Olson, brought his family to America in 1849 and settled in Sparta township. Mrs. Williamson was one of a family of four, namely: Martha, the wife of Oliver Stream, of Sparta township; Lars W. Olson, who died in 1907; and William, who died in the Civil war, a soldier from Knox county.

On September 28, 1855, William Williamson married Katharine Olson, a daughter of Lars and Katharine Olson, and to them were born ten children, of whom only five are living at the present time. Mary J. was married to A. B. Danielson on October 22, 1875. She died on the 5th of February, 1885, leaving three children, Arthur, William and George. J. Henry married Natalie Byloff on March 22, 1894, and in their family are five children, George, Grace, Raymond, Harold and Louise. M. Amelia was united in marriage on September 3, 1885, to the Rev. A. F. Nelson. Her demise took place on the 26th of January, 1890, and she is survived by two children, Blenda and Ernst. Lars O. married Alary C. Swanson on September 17, 1885. He died December 30, 1891, and his widow survived him until June 16, 1902. Amanda C. is the fifth in order of birth. Martha E. passed away January 5, 1882. The next in order of birth is Edwin P., whose name appears at the head of this review. George E. died February 12, 1894. Frederick L. was married on April 11, 1900, to Miss Daisy Y. Wickstrom and they are the parents of three children, Maurice, Martha and Inga-borg. Alvin L., the youngest member of the family, married on December 1, 1909, Miss Lena McKee. On September 28, 1905, Mr. and Mrs. Williamson celebrated the fiftieth Anniversary of their wedding. The immediate family and a number of distant relatives and devoted friends gathered at the old farm home round the festive board and later on a group picture of the golden wedding guests was taken, which appears in connection with this sketch. Later in the afternoon two receptions were held at the town home by the worthy couple, which were largely attended.
 

690 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

After the usual schooling in the elementary branches taught in the district schools, Edwin P. Williamson began his career as a clerk in his father's store in Moline. He remained there two years and in 1889 went home and farmed for the next four years. At the death of his brother George he took charge of the Wataga Flour Mill, which he managed successfully for two years. Fie then engaged again in farming in Flenderson township, where he remained four years, until in 1903 he removed to the old homestead in Sparta township. Flere he has lived since that time, taking charge of the management of the farm when his father retired and continuing the work after his death. His agricultural labors have met with unusual success, a fact attested by the flourishing condition of the farm and the generous profits which accrue therefrom. He is also a director of the Wataga State Bank.

On March 22, 1899, Miss Lavinnie E. Olson gave her hand in marriage to Edwin P. Williamson. She was born in 1871, in Sparta township, Knox county. Her father was Jonas Olson, a native of Sweden, who came to this country in 1856 and made his home in Sparta township, east of Wataga. His death occurred in 1909. His wife, the mother of Mrs. Williamson, was Anna Catherine Danielson before her marriage. She was born May 22, 1852, and died in 1881. She is a daughter of Andrew and Betsy (Brita) Danielson, of whom the latter is still living, being in her eighty-sixth year.

To Mr. and Mrs. Williamson were born the following children: Eva Catherine and Andrew William, twins, deceased; Ruth Amelia, born January 27, 1907; and Amanda Pauline, born May 16, 1909. Mr. Williamson and his wife are members of the Swedish Lutheran church of Wataga, in which he holds the office of trustee. His political preference is for the republican party. He has served as a member of the school board two terms and for two years was highway commissioner. Ever interested in the welfare of the community, he spares no efforts in promoting its advancement and encouraging its progressive spirit, which is one of its marked characteristics.

DR. FRANK CHAPMAN.

Dr. Frank Chapman, who for the past twelve years has been successfully engaged in the practice of osteopathy in Galesburg, was born in Spring Grove township, Warren county, Illinois, on the 5th of May, 1871. He is a son of A. A. and Ann M. (Buck) Chapman, natives of the state of New York and the parents of three children: Norman Ward, who is living in Portland, Oregon: Isa, the wife of Dr. Charles Owens of Chattanooga, Tennessee: and Frank, our subject. A. A. Chapman was reared in Cayuga county, New York, and

692 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

there he engaged in agricultural pursuits, after leaving school, until he was twenty-two years of age. In 1856 he left the Empire state and came to Illinois, locating in Warren county, where for many years he was actively engaged in farming. He passed away in Galesburg in 1908, at the age of seventy-four years, but the mother is still living although she has celebrated the seventy-fifth anniversary of her birth. The paternal grandparents were Orson and Rebecca (Gifford) Chapman, whose family numbered eight: Orson G., Olean, Alexander A., Harriet, Sophia, Kate, Abbie and Esther. The grandfather was a native of Connecticut, but he subsequently removed to the state of New York, where he engaged in farming until age compelled his retirement. He passed away when he was seventy-six, but the grandmother was eighty-eight at the time of her death. The maternal grandparents were Norman and Maria Buck, and to them were born six daughters: Adeline, Allura, Emily, Ann M., Elizabeth and Ellen. Mr. Buck was in middle life when called to his final rest, but she lived to attain the venerable age of seventy-five years.

The youthful years of Dr. Frank Chapman were passed upon the farm, where he was born in Warren county. At the usual age he entered the district schools but later went to Lombard College, where he was prepared for the State University. After leaving the latter institution he returned to the farm, devoting his entire time and attention to agricultural pursuits until 1897. In the latter year together with his wife he went to Kirksville, Missouri, where they studied osteopathy. They were awarded their degrees in February, 1899, and immediately thereafter returned to Illinois, establishing an office in Galesburg that they have ever since maintained. Both Dr. Chapman and his wife are very well equipped for their work in every way, their preliminary preparation having been most thorough as well as their professional course. They are practical and also progressive in their ideas, and have most ably and satisfactorily demonstrated their skill during the period of their residence in Galesburg. Their efforts have met with very good results and they have succeeded in building up a large and lucrative practice, many of their patients representing the best families of the city.

On the 6th of November, 1895, Dr. Chapman was married to Miss Ada P. Hinckley, a native of Galesburg and a daughter of Charles A. and Clarissa N. (Root) Hinckley. Dr. Ada Chapman was reared in this city, and after completing the public schools she entered Knox College, from which institution she was graduated in 1891. She subsequently taught in the training school of Galesburg and also in the country schools until her marriage. Her parents wert natives of the state of New York, her father having come from Elmira and her mother from Camden. Mrs. Hinckley was one of the pioneers of Galesburg, having accompanied her father on his removal here in 1836. She has now attained the age of eighty years, and has passed practically her entire life in this city. Mr. Hinckley came west in 1846, locating in Knoxville. He was a well known farmer of Knox county, but was living retired at the time of his death, which occurred on the 15th of October, 1910, in Galesburg, at the age of eighty-five years. The paternal grandparents of Dr. Ada Chapman were Alfred and Eliza (Stanley) Hinckley, who migrated here in the pioneer period and lived to attain a ripe old age, he being eighty-seven at the time of his death. Six children were born to them: Charles A., Mary E., George W., William S.,

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 693

Harriet and Francis E. The maternal grandparents were Riley and Lavinia' (Butler) Root. They were natives of the state of New York, and resided at Camden, that state, until her death, when he removed to Knox county, where he passed his latter years. She was quite young at the time of her death, but he lived to the age of seventy-six. Five children were born to them, but only two lived to attain maturity: Clarissa Noble and Dency E.

Fraternally Dr. Frank Chapman is affiliated with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, while his political allegiance is given to the republican party. Although Dr. Frank Chapman is one of the public-spirited and progressive citizens of Galesburg, always being ready to assist in forwarding every movement that he deems at all likely to redound to the benefit of the community at large, he does not prominently participate in political affairs. He feels that the duties and responsibilities of his profession make it practically obligatory for him to devote his entire time and attention to his practice, in which he is meeting with such excellent success..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.
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706 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

• who is the wife of C. Carlson of Walnut Grove; Margaret, the wife of Olof Peterson, of Altona; John, who is the subject of this sketch; and Louis, Frank, George and Nellie, all residing in Altona.

Leaving school at the early age of fourteen years John Johnson entered the employ of his father on the home farm, and for the next ten years was actively engaged in assisting in its cultivation. After that time, however, he entered the meat market of Whiting-Van Scoyk at Galesburg, but later returned to Altona, and since 1907 has been in partnership with Mr. Whiting, of the firm of Whiting & Johnson, of Altona. His market is ably managed, and, realizing that satisfied customers are the best advertisement for future business Mr. Johnson aims at treating all who may patronize him with the respect and courtesy due them. Mr. Johnson was married to Nellie Neilson, whose birth occurred November 4, 1865, at Kylinge Point, in southern Sweden. She is the daughter of Nels and Anna Swenson, both of whom are still living. The grandmother died, in 1909, at the age of ninety-two years. Mrs. Johnson came to America in 1885 with friends and settled at once in Altona, where she was married. She was one of two children, her sister residing in Sweden at present. To Mr. and Mrs. Johnson eight children were born: Emma, whose birth occurred February 24, 1889, and who is the wife of Roy Rankin, an agriculturist of Media, Illinois, and has one child, John Robert; Anna, born on the 25th of November, 1890, who is engaged in teaching school; Minnie, Inez and Bessie, whose births occurred November 12, 1893, December 23, 1895, and October 5, 1897, respectively; and George, Theora and Vivian, whose births occurred January 20, 1902, October 10, 1903, and August 15, 1906, respectively. With the exception of Mrs. Rankin they are all residing at home..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.

Mr. Johnson is an active member of the republican party, and since he cast his first vote has always voted for the men and measures of the party whose policies he considers the most conducive in promoting good government. He has served as alderman of Altona for four years and is now serving his second term and is also a member of the school board. He holds membership in the Modern Woodmen of America of Altona. As a life-long resident he has been a witness to much of its development, and has been influential in promoting its business interests. Because of his strict integrity and high principles he holds the respect of his fellow citizens.

JOHN W. STEPHENS.

In days of old, before the chronicler of events appeared to write the story of his nation's greatness, people drew their inspiration from the past by hearkening to the tales the old men told, by listening to the song of the bard, by scattered reminiscences of the aged nurse, handed down from generation to generation. Then the romance of history was not entombed within the covers of a book, it was graven on the minds and living in the hearts of the people. To-day much of that old-time poetry has gone out of our lives. We are too preoccupied with the demands which our severely competitive mode of living has thrust upon us. Too late, perhaps, when the last pioneers of our western civilization will have passed from among us, we will come to realize what we have lost in their picturesque recital of the events of the early days, of the white man's struggle for supremacy in a new country.


HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 709

There is still dwelling in Knox county a man whose life links us with that past of mystery and charm. His name is John W. Stephens, son of one of the early settlers and, for a period of more than seventy-four years, intimately associated with the rise and growth of Knox county. Those who have had the privilege of listening to his reminiscences will remember with a thrill the story of his father's experiences with the Indians, and of the winter of the heavy snow when the settlers were in danger of perishing. They will listen with delight to the description of the district school, where Mr. Stephens found his only opportunities for an education. It was a typical old log schoolhouse with split log benches and a puncheon floor. A fire in the huge fireplace at one end supplied the heat. Across square openings cut in the walls paper was stretched to serve as windows. These were the primitive surroundings amid which the boys and girls of those days were given that stern training that prepared them for a life of hardship and toil..
Janine and Wini stay off my pages & do not copy & paste or whatever you do and reformat to make it yours when it's mine first do your own work be honest for a change!!! I thank you, my ancestors thank you and you soon thank yourselves.

John W. Stephens was born in Warren county, New Jersey, on the 6th of June, 1825. He was the son of Richard and Eleanor (Addis) Stephens, both natives of New Jersey, where they were reared and married. In 1830 they came to Illinois locating in Fulton county, but the difficulties with the Indians and other unforeseen trials compelled them to give up their residence in this state. They therefore went to Ohio and lived in Warren county for seven years. In 1838, however, seeking solace after the crushing blow he received in the loss of his wife, Mr. Stephens again set his face westward, retracing his way to Illinois. This time he chose Cedar township, Knox county, for -the family abode, continuing to live there until his death in April, 1854.

John W. Stephens was nurtured at home and availed himself of the meager educational advantages that pioneer life afforded. Among his companions who helped to make his school days a pleasant memory, was Mary H. Stephens whom he later chose for a helpmate. They were married on October 29, 1848, coming directly to Cedar township, Knox county, Illinois, where they established their new home on a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 4. Mr. Stephens had just purchased this farm a short time before at five dollars an acre. After living here five years he sold this piece of land and bought the farm on which his father had first settled on his advent in Knox county. There Mr. and Mrs. Stephens lived until 1894 when they removed to Abingdon, which they have made their home ever since. The old farm of one hundred and forty acres about which all the family traditions center since 1839, that ms father had owned before him and that he had tilled for thirty-nine years, he now gave over to the management of his son. He owns, furthermore, a farm of eighty-three acres on section 16 in Cedar township.

In 1890 Mr. Stephens' wife died and three years later, on October 11, 1893, he married again. It is a curious and interesting coincidence that the second Mrs. Stephens, whose given name is Mary C, and the first Mrs. Stephens both bore the name "Stephens" before their marriage and there was no relationship between them. Of Mr. Stephens' first marriage there were four children. Only one survives, Charles E., who married Miss Harriet Latimere, of Abingdon. Mr. Stephens is a republican and during the war served for three years as


710 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

member of the board of county supervisors. The office of justice of the peace which he held at one time he resigned at the end of a year. Unwearied in his efforts for the improvement of his locality and the up- building of his community, he was for twenty years road commissioner of Cedar township and for a long period a member of the school board. Mrs. Stephens is a member of the Congregational church, in which her husband also worships. Mr. Stephens is still in the possession of excellent health and cheerful spirit and, looking back upon a long life nobly spent in usefulness to his family and community, he finds peace and contentment of mind, the richest rewards that can crown a man's declining years.

EBENEZER LASS.

Ebenezer Lass, president of the Lass & Larson Company of Galesburg, conducting a wholesale and retail business in wall paper, paints, oils and glass, has sought his success along the well defined lines of labor and has won his advancement through close conformity to a high standard of commercial ethics. At a time when many men put aside the more active and arduous pursuits of business life he is still busily engaged along commercial lines and his energy and persistency of purpose are those of a man of much younger years. He was born in Kent, England, October n, 1839, his parents being William and Sarah (Eastes) Lass. The father was a confectionery manufacturer who conducted business for many years but ultimately retired. He died in England in 1883, when about seventy-nine years of age, his birth having occurred in 1804. His wife, who was born in Kent, England, in 1806, passed away in 1888, at the advanced age of eighty-two years. They were both members of the Wesley an church, in the work of which they took active and helpful interest, Mr. Lass serving as one of the church officers. They were married at Deal, Kent, England, in 1827, and unto them were born twelve children: Elizabeth, now deceased ; Francis, who is living at Sandwich, England; Sarah, the wife of William Ekins, of Riverside, California; Grove P., deceased; William, a resident of Galesburg; Laura, who has passed away; Ebenezer; Frederick and Benjamin, both deceased; John, living in this city; Thomas, still a resident of Deal, County Kent; and Mary, the wife of Theodore Baldwin, also of Deal.

Ebenezer Lass pursued his education in a private school of Deal and when fourteen years of age was apprenticed to learn the decorator's trade, at which he worked in that town until he had attained his majority. He then went to London, where he followed his trade for three and a half years, but, believing that better opportunities were waiting on this side of the Atlantic, he came to the United States in 1866, settling in Galesburg, where he followed his trade until 1884. He was ambitious, however, to engage in business on his own account and carefully saved his earnings until he felt that his capital justified him in starting in business on his own account. In partnership with C. T. Larson and J. G. Lafferty, he established a store and when two years later Mr. Lafferty sold his interest to the other partners the firm of Lass & Larson was organized. Under that name the business was conducted until 1905, when it was incorporated

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 711

under the name of the Lass & Larson Company, its officers being Ebenezer Lass, president, and C. T. Larson, secretary, treasurer and manager. They now handle wall paper, paints, oils and glass, selling to the wholesale and retail trade. They employ twenty people in their establishment in Galesburg and also have salesmen on the road. Their business has grown year by year and, carrying a large and well selected line of goods, they have every reason to feel that their trade will still further increase.

On the 4th of July, 1868, Mr. Lass was married to Miss Emma Pittock, a daughter of William and Elizabeth (Bailey) Pittock, of this city. Unto them were born seven children: Grace, now the wife of Francis Sisson, of Yonkers, New York; Charles, living in Galesburg; Effie, Kate and Mamie, all deceased ; William, of Treadwell, Alaska; and Edith, at home. The wife and mother passed away February 22, 1882, and on the 26th of May, 1886, Mr. Lass was again married, his second union being with Miss Lucy M. Jerauld, a daughter of Harvey and Maria Jerauld, of Galesburg. There was one child of this union, George, now deceased.

Mr. and Mrs. Lass hold membership in the Central Congregational church and his fraternal relations are with the Odd Fellows lodge of Galesburg. His political allegiance is given to the republican party and he is interested in all that pertains to general progress and improvement, finding time to cooperate in measures for the general good while carefully managing his business affairs. He early learned the fact that diligence and industry must determine the success to which one can achieve. He has, therefore, persevered and his capable management. added to his thorough early training, has been a salient feature in gaining him the success which now classes him with Galesburg's substantial and progressive merchants. .

MARY ARNOLD TEMPLETON.

Mary Arnold Templeton, who is residing in Altona, Illinois, was born on the 7th of April, 1846, in Victoria township, Knox county. She is a daughter of John and Nancy (Herman) Arnold, whose births occurred in 1810 and 1812 respectively, the former being a native of Dayton, Ohio, and the latter of Tennessee. John Arnold was a blacksmith by trade, and from early youth took up this occupation. Later he worked on a canal as boss of a gang, and subsequently traveling through Alabama he followed the carpenter's trade. After his marriage, however, in 1836 he came to Victoria township by way of Peoria and Kickapoo creek, and took up farming. He made the trip by team and when he arrived at the land for which he had set out he found it already sufficiently cleared and immediately built a log cabin upon it. He resided there until 1853, following his trade for a livelihood, when he removed to Victoria. In that town he engaged in horse-shoeing and blacksmithing until his death, which occurred on the 8th of December, 1864. His wife was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Steven Herman, agriculturists. They removed to Alabama at the time they were early settlers. The mother's death occurred there in 1887. Mr. Arnold was one of the most prominent democrats in his region and held many local offices. His parents

712 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

were Ephraim and Elinor Arnold. To Mr. and Mrs. John Arnold ten children have been born, four of whom survive: Robert H., a resident of Peoria, who is married and has two children; Mrs. Templeton, who is the subject of this review; Jane, of Victoria, who is the wife of Irving Norton, a shoemaker, and who has two children; and Eliza, who is residing with Mrs. Templeton.

In April, 1869, Mary Arnold was married to Thomas Foster Templeton, whose birth occurred in 1830, and who was a son of John and Nancy (Foster) Templeton, whose deaths occurred in Princeton, Illinois, and in Pennsylvania respectively. Thomas F. Templeton was born in Armstrong county, Pennsylvania, but removed to Knox county when a child, where he engaged in farming until he entered the hardware business in Altona in 1862. For ten years he was thus engaged with his brother-in-law. At the end of that time he disposed of this business and took up agricultural pursuits in Victoria township. On account of ill health, however, he soon disposed of his farm "and lived retired until his death which occurred on the 10th of January, 1907. He was a stanch republican and for many years held office on the school board; In religious faith he was a Presbyterian and was an elder in the Presbyterian church of Altona for several years. He also held membership in Masonic Lodge, No. 330, of Altona.

To Mr. and Mrs. Templeton three children were born. Maude Alberta, the eldest died in 1904, at the age of thirty-six years. She is survived by her husband, E. H. Mason, of Galesburg, and three children, namely, Donald, who is eighteen years of age and teaching school in Victoria township; Marjory, who is sixteen years of age and attending high school; and Nanny B., who is fifteen years of age. Nanny B., the second, in order of birth, whose death occurred in 1893 when she was twenty years of age, was the wife of William Gehring, of Galesburg. The youngest child died when very young.

Eliza Arnold, who is residing with her sister, Mrs. Templeton, was born on the 8th of February, 1840. At the age of twenty-three years she attended Knox College for one year, having taught previously for six years. After leaving college she again engaged in teaching, and for twenty years was connected with the schools of Victoria township. She is one of the oldest teachers in this county, and all through her career was most successful in her pedagogical pursuits. She holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church.

Mrs. Templeton is one of the active workers in her community in all organizations which are formed to promote the public good. Charitable and kindly, her home is always open to those who need her assistance or to whom she can prove a faithful friend. Her life has been spent in the interests of others, and she is now one of the most esteemed residents of Altona.

BURRELL N. CHAPIN.

Burrell N. Chapin, seventy-seven years of age, has spent his entire life in Illinois and the record he has made is a most creditable one, for his success has never been gained at the sacrifice of others' interests and at no time has he refused to give his aid and support to those movements which have been instituted for the public good. In business affairs, too, he has shown sound judgment and capable management and by wise


HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 717

 investments has secured a competency and has become one of the substantial citizens of Knox county. He was born in Fulton county, Illinois, August 4, 1834, a son of Moses B. and Irenia (De Maranville) Chapin. The father was born in Massachusetts and was a son of Consider and Esther (Wallace) Chapin. The grandfather was likewise a native of Massachusetts and was a descendant of Deacon Samuel Chapin, who was one of the Puritan fathers who came to America about 1640. He was one of those to whom a monument has been erected in front of the public library at Springfield, Massachusetts, being a founder of that city. Esther (Wallace) Chapin, the grandmother of Burrell N. Chapin, was a native of Scotland and is a descendant of Sir William Wallace. The Chapins are also related to a number of distinguished Americans. Captain Caleb Chapin, the great-grandfather, was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, valiantly aiding the colonies in their struggle for independence. His son, Consider Chapin, was a* gifted poet of his day. Moses Chapin, born and reared in Massachusetts, came to Illinois in 1832, the year of the Black Hawk war, in which he took an honorable part. He made the journey overland from Pennsylvania on horseback and settled in Fulton county. He was a cooper by trade and established a shop in Lewiston, Illinois, where he resided until 1840. He then removed to Farming-ton, where he also built a shop, there residing for five years, or until 1845, when he purchased some land near Farmington and turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. He continued to live upon that place until his death, which occurred in 1872. When he came to Illinois his family numbered three children, and eight were born after the arrival in this state. The eldest of the family was Sylvia, who died at the age of twelve years, and Minerva and Gorham are also deceased, the former passing away at the age of two years. The latter was a soldier of the Civil war, serving as a lieutenant in the One Hundred and Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry. The others of the family were: Sophronia, who became the wife of Lyman Sanders, both now deceased; Burrell N.; Cornelia, the wife of Captain Francis M. Taylor, of the One Hundred and Third Illinois Infantry, but both have passed away; Ivory, who was a soldier of the One Hundred and Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry during the Civil war but is now deceased; Pausanias, the deceased wife of Enos Kelsey who went to the front with the One hundred and Third Illinois Volunteer Infantry; Flora, a resident of Farmington, who is the widow of Joseph Routson, who was likewise a soldier of the One Hundred and Third Illinois; Ora H., who served in the One Hundred and Third Illinois Infantry and was killed by the Indians in Arizona in 1871; and Marshall D., a resident of Monmouth, being the youngest of the family. Mr. Chapin has, on the maternal side, a number of illustrious ancestors. His grandfather, Jabez De Maranville, served on the Lake Erie under Perry in the war of 1812, whose father, Charles De Maranville, marched on the "Lexington Alarm" of April 19, 1775, from Freetown, Massachusetts. Robert and Tamsine (Bacon) Buffum, who were among the first to espouse the Quaker religion and were persecuted for their faith, were ancestors, as were also William White, the eleventh signer of the Mayflower Compact, and who was the father of Peregrine White, the first child born of English parents in America; another ancestor was John Vassall, alderman of London in 1588, who fitted out, at his own expense, two ships of war, with which he joined the royal ships

718 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, ILLINOIS

to oppose the "Spanish Armada." His son William Vassall came to America with Winthrop in 1630 and was a founder of the Massachusetts Bay colony, and was a member of the "Council of War" in 1642. All the above being lineal ancestors of the mother, Mrs. Irenia Chapin. The mother passed away in Farmington in 1900 at the advanced age of ninety-two years. For eighty years representatives of the name have not only taken an active part in promoting the development and progress in pioneer days, but also in bringing about the present-day growth and prosperity of Illinois.

Burrell N. Chapin spent his youthful days in Fulton county, where he attended the country schools, pursuing his studies in one of the old-time log schoolhouses in Farmington. At the age of eighteen years he spent one term in an academy. Subsequently he engaged in teaching school in the winter and worked at farm labor during the summer months. His time was thus passed until his marriage. He was only thirteen years of age when, in 1847, he was appointed to deliver the mail from Farmington to Macomb, Illinois. This was known as the pony mail and the distance covered was fifty miles each way. As the years passed Mr. Chapin resolved to become owner of a farm and the year i860 saw the realization of his hope in his purchase of a tract of land in Oneida, Knox county, where he carried on general agricultural pursuits. He afterward purchased a tract of eighty acres near Farmington, Fulton county, Illinois, which he continued to cultivate until 1872, and then disposed of that property to purchase a farm near Knoxville, which he conducted until 1878. He then bought another farm in the vicinity of Knoxville, devoting his energies to the cultivation of the fields until 1892, when he took up his abode in the town of Knoxville and has since lived retired. As the years passed he kept adding to his landed possessions until he owned three hundred acres, most of which, however, he has since disposed of, and from his interests he derives a substantial annual income that relieves him from the necessity of further labor save the supervision of his investments.

It was on the 22d of September, 1857, that Mr. Chapin was united in marriage to Miss Cynthia J. Culver, who was born near Buffalo, Erie county, New York, June 24, 1838, a daughter of William and Susan W. (Kirby) Culver. The father was born near Auburn, New York, in 1802, and the house in which he first saw the light of day is still standing. The mother's birth occurred near New Bedford, Massachusetts. The father of Mrs. Chapin was a son of Joseph Culver, who was a soldier of the Revolutionary war, as was his father, Samuel Culver, and the family was of English descent. The mother of Mrs. Chapin was a daughter of Silas Kirby, a native of Dartmouth, Massachusetts, whose father, Silas Kirby, Sr., bravely defended the cause of liberty in the Revolutionary war. Mrs. Chapin, therefore, is qualified for membership in the Daughters of the American Revolution in both the paternal and maternal lines. Her father followed the occupation of farming in the Empire state and on coming to Illinois settled in Salem township, Knox county, where he purchased a tract of land upon which he resided until the spring of 1861. He next purchased a farm near Henderson, Knox county, but afterward took up his abode on a farm near Wataga, where he resided until his retirement, after which he resided in Knoxville until his death, which occurred March 5, 1881. His widow long survived him, and died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Chapin on the 7th

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 719

of December, 1895. They were the parents of five children: Caroline, who became the wife of Joseph Ross, both of whom are now deceased; Elizabeth, who married Burton Miller and they are also deceased; Joseph W.? who has passed away; Cynthia J., who became Mrs. Chapin; and William E., a resident farmer of Knox county.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Chapin were born four children. Edith A., who was born July 9, 1858, is now the wife of John D. McClure, of Knoxville, and they have one daughter, Edith M., who is the wife of Merrill Young and resides upon a farm east of Knoxville. Ida died at the age of three years. Eva J. married Charles Maple, of Maquon, who is postmaster of that place, and they have two children, Newton M. and Ora S. Maple. Mr. Chapin's youngest child, Ora Eugene, who is a distinguished lawyer of Chicago, is also prominent in Masonic circles. He was born May 30, 1870, and married Miss Camilla Capps, of Farmington, by whom he has one child, Minor J.

Both Mr. and Mrs. Chapin are consistent members of the Presbyterian church and are also members of the Knox County Mayflower Society, while Mrs. Chapin and her two daughters hold membership with the Lucretia Leffingwell Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution. On the 26. of September, 1907, Mr. and Mrs. Chapin celebrated their golden wedding, on which occasion the ladies of the Presbyterian church of Knoxville served an excellent dinner while all the members of their family, their sons, daughters and grandchildren, were present—one hundred and forty in all. They have now traveled life's journey together for fifty-four years, their mutual love and confidence increasing as time has passed on. They are regarded as one of the most highly esteemed and worthy couples of the county, for their lives have ever been well spent in the faithful performance of duty and have been characterized by many good deeds. Mr. Chapin deserves much credit for the success which he has won, bringing him at last to a prominent position among the substantial residents of his adopted county.

REV. FREDERICK J. DUNN.

It has been said "Not the good that comes to us but the good that comes to the world through us is the measure of our success," and judged in this way the life of Rev. Frederick J. Dunn has been a most successful one, for as a minister of the gospel he has carried the glad tidings to many who have sat under his preaching and has influenced many lives for good. At the. age of ninety-three years he is now living retired, an honored and venerable citizen of Knoxville. Fie was born in Oneida county, New York, May 22, 1819, a son of David and Philinda (Cady) Dunn, both of whom were natives of Oneida county, the former born November 14, 1791, and the latter August 5, 1796. In his early life the father worked as a farm hand but afterward learned the trades of a cooper and brick mason and worked along those lines in Oneida county and also in Herkimer and St. Lawrence counties. Subsequently he returned to Oneida county and after a short time removed to Lewis county. New York, where he made his home with his son Frederick and later also lived with his son Frederick

720 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, ILLINOIS

in Illinois, passing away in Galva, Henry county, on the 28th of November, 1884, at the ripe old age of ninety-three years. He had long survived his wife who passed away at the home of her son, Frederick, on the 18th of January, 1858, when sixty-one years of age. The Rev. Dunn was at that time a resident of Rio, this county. The family included five daughters: Rhoda, now the deceased wife of Thomas Watson, of Knox county; Olive, who became the wife of Caleb H. Gates Brayton of St. Lawrence county, New York, who is now deceased; Cornelia P., the widow of Thomas Humiston ; Jane Ann, who died in infancy; and Sarah Jane, who married John Gibbs. She resided in Lewis county, New York, for a time and afterward removed to Cherokee county, Kansas, where both passed away.

The Rev. Frederick J. Dunn was the third in order of birth in the family. He acquired his preliminary education in the public schools of Herkimer county, New York, and afterward attended the Free Will Baptist Seminary at Clinton, Oneida county, New York. The founder of that college was Mr. Kellogg, who afterward became the first president of Knox College at Galesburg. In further pursuit of his education Mr. Dunn attended Whitesboro Academy in Oneida county, New York, and subsequently took up the profession of teaching, which he followed through the winter seasons while in the summer months he worked at farm labor. In June, 1853, he arrived in Knox county, Illinois, first settling in Ontario, where he remained for ten years. On the expiration of that period he removed to Rio township and in company with Michael Metcalf built a sawmill in Henderson Grove which they conducted for one summer and then sold. Mr. Dunn next purchased a farm and continued to engage in the cultivation of the fields for several years. In 1858 he was licensed to preach as a minister of the United Brethren church and much of his life has been devoted to this holy calling. He was never absent from an annual conference during fifty-one years and is widely known to the membership of his denomination. He preached for four years at Mount Chappel, being there when the church was built. He has acted as minister in different churches in the county and other parts of the state and is now the oldest living minister in Knox county. For the past five years, however, he has lived retired in Knoxville and can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future without fear because his life has been an element for good in the communities, where he has resided. His zealous support. of the cause of Christianity has aroused the interest and cooperation of others and his work has been of no restricted order.

On the 4th of March, 1846, in Oneida county, New York, the Rev. Dunn was united in holy bonds of matrimony to Miss Susan P. Wetmore, who was born in that county July 13, 1823, and was a daughter of Ezra and Susan Wetmore, natives of Rhode Island, who removed to New York in early life. In the family of Mr. and Mrs. Dunn were the following children. Lucia is the wife of Theo. Madison, a resident of the state of Washington, and they have one son, Frederick. William E., now living in Rio township, married Miss Addie Haskins and has two children, Roswell E. and Clark. Marian is the wife of William Wilson, of Kansas City, Kansas, and they have six children, May, Eva, George, Lucia, Nina and William. Roswell died June 3, 1882. The mother of these children passed away March 24, 1864, and in Henderson, Illinois, the Rev. Dunn was again married, on the 15th of February, 1865, his second union being

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 721

with Maria Ryan, a native of Franklin county, Pennsylvania. They had two children: Frank A., deceased; and Frederick, a resident of Chicago who married Elsie Naly and has one child, Dorothy. Again Mr. Dunn was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, who died February 22, 1895, and on the 23d of September, 1897, he married Margaret E. Wallach, who was born in this county, April 16, 1854, and is a daughter of Jacob and Martha Wallach, natives of Pennsylvania, the former of German and the latter of Irish descent. Such in brief is the life history of Frederick J. Dunn, a man widely and favorably known in Knox county and honored wherever known. By precept and example he has taught the better things of life and his influence and teaching have led many to choose those things which are worth while and have actual value as factors in character building.

 

 

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663 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, ILLINOIS

GRANT GIBBS.

Grant Gibbs, whose death occurred April 21, 1911, in the Augustana Hospital, Chicago, was for many years a resident agriculturist of Sparta township. His birth occurred in Knox township, on the 27th of February, 1867, his parents being Nelson and Sarah (Henshaw) Gibbs, formerly residents of Athens county, Ohio. Subsequently they removed to Adams county and later to Knox county, where they purchased a farm, upon which they resided for a short time. After disposing of this they located in Knox township and engaged in agricultural pursuits until their deaths, which occurred in Knoxville. The paternal grandfather, Simeon Gibbs, also settled in Knox township, where he spent the greater part of his active life in agricultural pursuits.

Grant Gibbs was married to Nettie Amanda Lane, who is a daughter of Inman Herbert Lane and was born on the 27th of November, 1867, in Linn county, Kansas. Her paternal grandfather, Lorenzo Lane, of Ohio, was married to Julia Ann Wise, of New York, and they were among the early settlers of Persifer township. The father was born in Persifer township and spent his early life on the farm previous to enlisting for service in the Civil war. After four years' service he returned home and left for Linn county, Kansas, immediately after his marriage, where he farmed for Five years previous to removing to Rice county and engaging in stock-raising for five years. Subsequently he went to Linn county and then to Edwards county, where he conducted a grocery and meat market. After a short residence in Hutchinson, Kansas, he removed to California and entered upon agricultural pursuits, giving the greater part of his attention to stock-raising. His death occurred in February, 1910, and was due to the effects of injuries received in a train wreck. He was married to Miss Laconia Celissa Eldridge, a daughter of Gardner and Parmelia (Meecham) Eldridge, the latter of Scotch-Irish descent. The Eldridge family were among the early settlers of Copley township, Gardner Eldridge being its first representative, residing there until his death. Mrs. Eldridge died on the 21st of April, 1876, at the age of thirty-three years. Mr. Lane was a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and also the Grangers lodge in Rice county, Kansas. To Mr. and Mrs. Lane five children were born, Mrs. Gibbs being the only one surviving. At the age of eight years, after her mother's death, she removed to the home of her grandfather, Lorenzo Lane, until she went to live with her father in Kansas, when she was fourteen years of age. She resided there for four years previous

664 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

to returning to Illinois, where she was married in 1888 to Grant Gibbs. To this union five children were born, the only surviving one being Charles William, of Wataga, whose birth occurred August 21, 1893. Mr. Gibbs was an active and enthusiastic republican and held many offices in this district, being constable and village police of Wataga for four years previous to his death. He also held membership in the Congregational church of Wataga, the Modern Woodmen of America of Wataga, the Royal Neighbors of Wataga and the Yeomen of Gales-burg. Mrs. Gibbs holds membership in the Royal Neighbors of Wataga, the Yeomen of Galesburg and the Ladies Aid Society of the Congregational church of Wataga. Mr. Gibbs' career was a commendable one and was one of the many evidences of what patience and perseverance can do in overcoming difficulties, surmounting discouragements and achieving success. He was an upright man, interested not only in the agricultural but also in the social standing of his community, and he acquired the confidence and respect of his neighbors both 'as a substantial farmer and a useful citizen.

EDWARD W. GOLDSMITH.

Edward W. Goldsmith, a well known agriculturist of Sparta township, was born on the place, where he now resides, on the 20th of October, 1867. Lie is a son of Edward H. and Ann Maria (Whiteford) Goldsmith, both natives of the state of New York. The father was born in Orange county on December 22, 1834, but at the age of twenty years he came to Illinois with his father, who located in Knox county. The paternal grandparents of our subject were Schuyler H. and Katherine (Howell) Goldsmith; the former passed away in Knox county and the latter in New York, where she was also buried. In later years her son brought the body to Knox county and placed it in the family lot in the Robbins cemetery. Schuyler H. Goldsmith subsequently married Mary Carley, and to them were born two children: Helen, the wife of A. McGill, of Kansas; and Schuyler, who is a resident of Corning, Kansas. Schuyler LI. Goldsmith, Sr., came to Illinois with his .family in 1854, locating in Sparta township, where he followed farming until his death in 1861. Having been given the advantages of a very good education, after leaving school Edward IT. Goldsmith taught during the winter months in the various districts in this vicinity until 1877, c^e" voting his summers to agricultural pursuits. During the early years of his domestic life he settled on the farm, now operated and owned by his son, and here he passed away on July 7, 1900, at the age of nearly sixty-six years. The mother of our subject was born at Lodi, Seneca county, New York, on the 12th of June, 1834, a daughter of William and Margaret (Williams) White-ford. The father, who was a farmer, passed away when he was fifty and when his daughter Ann Maria was a child of but four years. She was reared by B. C. Osborn, a merchant of Burdett, New York, and his wife, Malinda (Winter) Osborn, a native of New Jersey, continuing to make her home with them until her marriage. Of the six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Whiteford two are now living: Mary E., the widow of Lynn E. Harris, of Nevada; and James, who is a resident of Elmira, New York. Mr. and Mrs. Edward H. Goldsmith were
667 History of Knox County, Illinois

married in New York, in March, 1859, but later settled on the farm now owned and operated by their son,
Edward W. They were the parents of two daughters and one son, but the former are both now deceased.
In matters of faith they were Congregationalists and for twenty-four years Mr. Goldsmith was secretary
of the church at Wataga. In politics he was a republican, but he never held office. The later years of his
life were entirely devoted to agricultural pursuits, in which he met with a goodly degree of success.

Reared on the farm, where he is now living in the acquirement of his early education, Edward W. Goldsmith
attended the schools of the vicinity. After mastering the common branches he enrolled in the academy of
Knox College at Galesburg, where he, studied for three years. Upon laying aside his textbooks he returned
to the farm, assisting his father in its further improvement and cultivation until he attained his majority,
when he was taken into partnership, receiving a share of the yearly dividends. This arrangement continued
until the death of Edward H. Goldsmith when the son came into the property, being his father's sole heir.
Enterprising and progressive in whatever he undertakes, Mr. Goldsmith has met with more than average
success in his farming and stock-raising, and now owns one of the attractive and well equipped farms of
the community.

For his life companion Mr. Goldsmith chose Miss Minnie L. French, who was born in Sparta township, on
the nth of January, 1868, and is a daughter of Hugh and Louisa (Schroeder) French. Mr. and Mrs.
Goldsmith have three children: Frank F., who is now seventeen years of age, attending Galesburg high
school; Anna L., who is fifteen and a student of the Galesburg high school; and George S., aged twelve
years.

His political support Mr. Goldsmith accords to the republican party, and for twenty-two years he has
served as school director, having taken an active interest in all matters of an educational nature. He is one
of the public-spirited citizens and capable business men of Sparta township, where he represents the
third generation of his family, whose various members have always been held in high esteem.

JESSE WILMOT.

A well known agriculturist of Sparta township, who has passed practically his entire life in the vicinity of
his present farm is Jesse Wilmot. Brought here as an infant during the early pioneer days he has watched
with interest the development of the country, as the vast forests and prairies' have been converted into productive farms, and thriving towns and villages have sprung up where the Indian's tepee used to stand. He is a native of New York, his birth having occurred in Steuben county, on the 17th of February, 1836, and a son of Amos and Betsey (Crawford) Wilmot. His father was born in Connecticut in 1803, and there he was reared
and educated. In his early manhood Amos Wilmot went to New York, locating in Brown county, where he followed the shoemaker's trade until his marriage. Soon after this event he located on a farm in Steuben county, and assiduously

668 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

applied himself to its further improvement and cultivation for seven years. At the expiration of that
period, in 1836, together with his wife and family he came to Illinois, locating in Sparta township, which
at that time contained scarcely an inhabitant. Here he erected a log cabin and he and his family assumed
the hardships and privations of pioneering. About them were vast forests and great expanses of unbroken
prairie, the woods abounded with game of all kind and now and then an Indian was seen prowling about.
Their nearest neighbors were located a mile away and Peoria was the most convenient trading post, while
theirs was the first log house erected in the township and they were likewise its first citizens. But both
Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot were young and full of courage, and cheerfully bore the many privations and
discomforts that devolved upon them, passing the remainder of their lives on the farm, where they reared
their family. The mother, who was a native of the state of New York, had attained the age of seventy
years at the time of her death in 1878. Their family was as follows: Sidney L., the eldest, who is
mentioned at greater length elsewhere in this volume; Sarah, the wife of Thomas Mansfield, both now
deceased, who celebrated their golden wedding on the 17th of February, 1902; Hannah, the wife of Elmer
Bennett, both of whom are now deceased; Jesse, our subject; Emma, the deceased wife of Edward Taylor;
Bradley, who is living in Carroll county, Missouri; Rebecca, who married J. R. Shull of Carroll county,
Missouri; and Lydia, the wife of J. Rogers, of Lincoln, Nebraska. The father was a member of the
Congregational church of Ontario, and his political allegiance he gave to the Whigs until that party was
merged into the republican, after which he gave his support to their candidates. He was a public-spirited
man with high standards of the duties of citizenship and always took an active interest in all township
affairs.

Jesse Wilmot was only an infant when brought to Sparta township by his parents on their removal to this
county, and the greater part of his life has been passed in the immediate vicinity of his present home.
Educationally he was afforded only the meager advantages of the district schools of that period, and at
the age of ten years assumed his share of the duties connected with the operation of the farm. He
remained at home with his people until he was twenty-one years of age, when he began working for himself.
Having been reared in the country, remote from a town or settlement of any kind, he had been given little
choice in selecting a vocation, so naturally he continued to follow agricultural pursuits, which was the only
career with which he had a chance to become acquainted. He first settled on a place west of Wataga, but
two years later he came to his present place and here he has ever since resided. Farming fifty years ago
involved much more drudgery and hard, wearing labor than today, when machinery at a comparatively small
outlay will do in a few hours the work that formerly consumed days to accomplish, and it is that period
which Mr. Wilmot recollects so vividly. In 1864, with his wife and family he started across the country in
an emigrant wagon to the eastern border of Kansas, but as the Indians were giving considerable trouble
upon their arrival in Worth county, Missouri, they changed their course, going to Council Bluffs, Iowa.
From there they went to Webster City, that state, but after two years residence there returned to Knox
county.

Mr. Wilmot established a home for himself when he married Miss Eliza

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 669

Firkins, who was born at old Henderson, this county, on the 6th of March, 1842. She is a daughter of
Russell and Margaret Jane (Teller) Firkins, natives of the state of New York, the father's birth having
occurred in 1810, and that of the mother in 1816. They came to Illinois in 1837 and were among the first
settlers of Henderson. From there they later removed to Sparta township, but subsequently settled in
Warren county, later coining again to Knox county, where the father passed away in 1857. He was long
survived 'by the mother, whose death occurred in 1890. Thirteen children were born to Mr. and Mrs.
Firkins, who are, with the exception of two sons and four daughters, deceased. In the paternal line Mrs.
Wilmot is of English extraction, her grandfather, George Firkins, a tailor by trade, having come to this
country during the early days of the Revolution. He was seized as a British subject by the English
soldiers, who found him concealed in a barrel on the vessel, but he managed to make his escape and came to
America, where he enlisted in the army. He passed away in 1858, at the venerable age of ninety-three
years, and his wife, whose maiden name was Lydia Titus, died in 1859. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot
numbers nine, as follows: Elizabeth, who first married George Williams, by whom she had one daughter,
Minnie, and after his death became the wife of John Peterson, of Henry county, and the mother of four
children; Hattie, the wife of George Howland, of Abingdon, this state; Sidney, of Sparta township, who
married Ella Dobson and has seven children; Almeda, the wife of James Dobson, a street car conductor, of
Galesburg, who has four children; Milton J., who married Delia Salisbury and has five children, now a
resident of North Dakota; Winfield, of Sparta township, who married Fay Bloomfield and has three
children; Harry, also of Sparta township, who married Delia Swadley and has one son, George; Laura, the
wife of Edward Frampton, of Rio township, by whom she has had two children; and Olive E., the deceased
wife of Wallace Standard, who left one child, Francis, who is living with Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot. They also
have three great-grandchildren, Laura and Carl Peterson, the daughter and son of Minnie Williams, who
married Emil Peterson, and Virgil Miller. On the 6th of September, 1909, Mr. and Mrs. Wilmot
celebrated their golden wedding, at which occasion there were present ninety-two members of the family.

In his political views Mr. Wilmot is a stanch republican, but he has never held an office, having preferred
to give his attention to the development of his personal interests. Tie is one of the well known
representatives of a highly respected pioneer family and has many friends in Sparta township, who accord
him the regard his high principles and substantial qualities well merit.

THOMAS McCLURE.

Thomas McClure, who is a well known agriculturist of Lynn township. Knox county, was born on the 25th
of July, 1852, at Stranraer, Scotland. He is a son of Andrew and Jane (Carnahan) McClure. the former of
whom passed away in Scotland. Subsequently the mother came to America in 1867 with her three children,
Thomas, Robert and John, and settled in Walnut Grove town-

670 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

ship, this county, where she entered upon agricultural pursuits. Later she married Simeon Collinson, who
died in 1895, at the age of eighty years. To their union one child was born, Ernest Collinson, who is in the
insurance business in Galva.

Thomas McClure attended the district schools for a short time and subsequently was bound out to Henry
G. Collinson, until he became of age, when he started out for 'himself on his mother's farm, upon which he
now resides. He has been engaged in agricultural pursuits throughout his active career and has met with
the success which the persevering, energetic farmer wins in this rich agricultural district. He possesses
the salient characteristics of the Scotch race which form such a valuable asset to the enterprising citizen
of this country. In addition to general farming he also engages in stock-raising to a considerable extent,
and this undertaking has become as profitable as farming.

On the 10th of March, 1880, Mr. McClure was married to Miss Louise Collinson, a daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Thomas Collinson of this county. To their union eight children have been born: Henry Franklin, born
October 3, 1880; Bell, whose birth occurred on the 25th of December, 1881, and who is the wife of
Albert Clark, of Oklahoma; John, born February 21, 1884, who is a bank cashier at Oklahoma; Andrew
Thomas, born May 27, 1886, who is married to Myrtle Callahan, and is residing in Walnut Grove township;
Arthur Earl and Clara May, born February 12, 1891, and August 19, 1893, respectively; and Ernest and
Mary Jane, born April 28, 1895, and March 31, 1898, both of whom are residing at home and attending
school.

Mr. McClure is a democrat, giving his support to the democracy because of his firm belief that its
platforms are best suited for producing a practical and able government. He has held the office of
highway commissioner for three years. Both he and his wife hold membership in the Methodist church of
Victoria, and he is one of its trustees. Fie is also a member of the Modern Woodmen of America of
Victoria and of the Fraternal Reserve Life Association of Galesburg, of which his wife is also a member.
Fie has never regretted the fact that he left Scotland to make his career in a country which offers equal
opportunities to all its citizens, and he has become a most loyal citizen to the country of his adoption.

JOHN C. NELSON.

John C. Nelson, who follows farming on section 32, Knox township, is one of the substantial citizens that
Sweden has furnished to this country and in his life he exemplifies many of the sterling traits of his race.
He was born in Sweden, October 29, 1841, and his parents, Carl and Hannah (Ingeman) Nelson, were
natives of the same country. With their family, numbering five children, they came to America and made
their way at once across the country to Knoxville, where Mr. and Mrs. Carl Nelson resided until called to
the home beyond. The father was one of the cholera victims of 1854 and the mother, long surviving him,
passed away in 1891. Their children were: Ollie C.; Swan, who died in Jefferson City, Indiana, in 1862;
John C.; Mrs. Sarah Peterson; and

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HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 873

children. After remaining with them for a short time he returned to his western home, a remarkable feat for one of his years, showing the virile health and vitality he is now enjoying. He was married to Lena Carter, who was a daughter of William Carter, whose birth occurred near Mansfield, Ohio. She passed away in 1895. To their union nine children were born, five of whom survive: William P., who is the subject of this review; Isaac, who is in the real-estate business in Chicago; Mary, who is married to W. R. Soper, of Galva; Isabel, who is the wife of Dr. Burbank of Santa Cruz, California; and Cora, who married Henry Fropwell, of California.

William P. Reed received a few years' education in the district schools near his father's farm and at the same time was actively engaged assisting his father in the duties on the home property, beginning at the age of nine to handle the plow. He did other heavy labor and attended school for a short time during the winter. In 1861, when he was eighteen years of age, he enlisted at Kewanee, for service in the Civil war with Company H of the Ninth Illinois Cavalry under Captain Bishop. He served for three years in the western army under Sherman. In 1862 he also served under Stephen Curtis through Missouri and Arkansas, and in the winter of 1862-63 continued to Memphis, Tennessee, to take part in the Grierson raid through that state to Louisiana. He was captured in battle at Moscow, Tennessee, and sent to the Alabama prison. Six weeks. later he was transferred to Andersonville, where he remained for eight months when he was again transferred, this time being sent to Charleston, South Carolina. During his detention at Andersonville he escaped once but was captured by bloodhounds. An incident worth mentioning which took place during Mr. Reed's venturesome exploits, occurred on his recapture, when within forty miles of Pensacola, Florida, the rebels, to make doubly sure of their captive, had a blacksmith weld irons on his arms and a ball and chain to his ankle. Subsequently he escaped on a log in the river but was betrayed by a negro and was again captured, but finally while on parole at Savannah, Georgia, he escaped and for a month lived by begging. Finally he became acquainted with a Union family, who supplied him with clothing and twenty dollars in money, but he was again captured, and while being transported to prison he jumped from the freight car, joined his army and was sent to New York city. Later he was sent to Annapolis, where he was mustered out and left for home by way of Peoria, Illinois. Later, at Springfield, he was discharged, and almost immediately afterward left for Colorado, where for eighteen months he engaged in cattle herding. At the end of that time he returned to Galva, but after his marriage returned to southern Kansas, where for five years he was engaged in agricultural pursuits until he purchased his present home. When he went to Kansas he was in company with horse and sulky and took up a land claim near Cherryville, where the Osage Indians were their neighbors. He erected the cabin himself and built their log house. The cabin had one half window for light. Two months later his wife followed by way of Kansas City, and remained with her husband on that place for five years. They resided within three miles of the noted Bender family, but Mr. Reed had never heard of them until, while searching for his cattle which had been lost, he met them. This was during the Bender family's noted criminal and murdering career. In 1873 Mr. Reed came to Galva and purchased his father's farm. Two years later he

874 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

bought the place upon which he is now residing. He has since lived near Galva continuously excepting the year of 1887 when he removed to Galesburg, so that his children might have better educational advantages. All his property has been brought under a high state of cultivation, and under his capable management and, because of his untiring efforts and perseverance, his is one of the most productive properties in this section.

On July 17, 1867, Mr. Reed was married to Miss Mary Ellen Soper, whose birth occurred on the 29th of September, 1848, near Kingston, Illinois, and who is a daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Eggleston) Soper, the former a native of New Jersey and the latter of Albany, New York. The mother came from Fulton county with her parents when she was quite young. Joseph Soper was an agriculturist throughout the greater part of his active career, but after disposing of the management of his land, he engaged in the hardware and grocery business at Galva, disposing also of that before his retirement. His death occurred in 1907 when he was eighty years of age and the mother is still living at the age of eighty-one years. Of their five children only two survive, Emma Treloar, of California, and Mrs. Reed.

Of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Reed the following are living: Josephine H., who is married to Daniel S. Kelly, of Victoria, Illinois; Jay D., of Iowa, who is married to Retha Van Riper and who is the father of three sons, William, Maurice and Claude; and Daniel Porter, who is residing on the home farm and who is married to Miss Bessie Van Buren, a daughter of John and Luella Van Buren. Mr. Reed is a Mason, holding membership in Lodge No. 330, of Altona, Illinois. He is also a member of the G. A. R. Post, No. 45, of Galesburg. In his agricultural pursuits and subsequently in his business undertakings Mr. Reed displayed the same marked determination to succeed and ability to concentrate his whole efforts upon one undertaking that he displayed while in the war. His one aim has been to succeed and to succeed along lines which are a credit to himself and his community, and to a large degree he has met with that success.

JAMES E. ROBERSON.

James E. Roberson, who owns and operates a fine farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 18, Indian Point township, was born in the southwestern part of Knox county, on the 7th of January, 1864. His parents, James and Mary (Smith) Roberson, were both born in Kentucky. The paternal grandfather, who was a farmer, died in the Blue Grass state, after which his widow and four sons came to Illinois. They located in Wood ford county, this state, in 1834 and two years later came to Knox county, purchasing government land in Indian Point township, that lately was sold for one hundred and twenty dollars per acre. It was there that James Roberson spent the remainder of his life and where his children were born and reared. Mrs. Roberson is still living at the age of seventy and makes her home in Abingdon. Four sons and two daughters were born of this marriage: William, who is the eldest member of the family, now residing in Abingdon; Luna, the wife of Jason Day, a farmer

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 875

of Iowa; Lida, who married Charles Kendall, of California; James E., our subject; Thomas, who is also a resident of California; and Clarence, who is the youngest member of the family, a carpenter of Abingdon.

The boyhood and youth of James E. Roberson were spent amid the scenes with which his manhood has been familiar, his education having been obtained in the district schools of Indian Point township. He remained on the home farm with his parents until he had attained his maturity, during which time he became thoroughly familiar with the practical methods of agriculture, under the capable supervision and direction of his father. For the past twenty years he has been farming for himself, during which period he has met with a fair measure of success. In 1892, he settled upon the place he now owns, and here he engages in general farming in connection with which he raises cattle, hogs and sheep, making a specialty of breeding and raising a high grade of Poled Angus cattle. His efforts in both lines of the business have been rewarded with very good results and he is regarded as one of the substantial citizens of the township.

The 22d of February, 1893, was the wedding day of Mr. Roberson and Miss Clara Dawdy, a native of this township and a daughter of Warren and Anna (Brown) Dawdy. The father is a native of Knox county, being a son of one of the first settlers, while the mother was born in Ohio. They are both living and continue to make their home on the farm in Indian Point township, where they have resided for many years. Two daughters were born unto them, the one Mrs. Roberson, and the other, Minnie, who became the wife of John Schister and is living on the old Roberson homestead.

Mr. and Mrs. Roberson are members of the Christian church and fraternally he is a member of the Odd Fellows, being identified with Abingdon Lodge, No. 184, I. O. O. F. In matters politic Mr. Roberson gives his support to the democratic party, but does not actively participate in township affairs, although he meets the requirements of good citizenship by casting a ballot on election day. He is one of the highly esteemed citizens of the community, whose excellent judgment and inherent ability has enabled him to be numbered among the prosperous agriculturists of the township.

J. ARTHUR ROUTH.

J. Arthur Routh, for years an electrician in Chicago and other Illinois towns, is now operating a farm near Hermon, on section 19, Chestnut township, Knox county, Illinois, where he was born January 21, 1873. His father, Thompson L. Routh, whose biography appears in this volume, is a native of Clinton county, Ohio, coming to Chestnut township, Knox county, Illinois, in the early fifties when he was three years old. He followed the occupation of his father, engaging in farming which he still pursues in this vicinity with much success. His mother, Mary C. (Leigh) Routh, is a native of Knox county.

J. Arthur Routh received a thorough education in the district schools of his community, at Hedding College, Abingdon, and in the Normal School there, and in the Bushnell Normal College. When twenty-three years old he went

876 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

to Chicago and secured employment in the General Electric Company's shops. After two years he left Chicago, continuing electrical work at Pontiac, Peoria, Galesburg and Abingdon, covering in all a period of eleven years. In 1907 he settled on the farm on section 19 where he was born. Here he is living at present and operating one hundred and five acres of land which furnish him with a generous income. He also owns four hundred and sixty acres of land in Jackson county, Wisconsin, and a residence in Abingdon. Besides general farming he devotes himself to the raising of thoroughbred Jersey cows, an occupation in which he has been unusually successful.

He was married to Miss Gertrude Robertson in 1900. She is a daughter of William B. and Jennie (Neece) Robertson and is a native of Colchester township, McDonough county, Illinois. Her father was born in Kentucky and her mother in Missouri. They are still residing in Colchester, where Mr. Robertson is engaged in farming and is also a carpenter and contractor. They had four children born to them: Herman C, a dairyman in Colchester; Ora, deceased; Gertrude, the wife of J. Arthur Routh; and a child, who died in infancy. Gertrude (Robertson) Routh was educated in the Colchester schools and at Bushnell Normal College, and then taught school in her home community for four years, when she resigned in order to marry Mr. Routh. She is the mother of two children, Mildred Doris, seven years old, and Howard Aubrey, three years old.

J. Arthur Routh votes with the republicans and has been road overseer for one term. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church in which they are highly esteemed by a large circle of friends.

THOMAS R. P. GOUGH.

Thomas R. P. Gough, who is filling the position of postmaster at Williams-field, has been a resident of Knox county for twenty-seven years. Pie was born in Bristol, Somersetshire, England, in 1864, and is a son of R. C. and Frances (Jones) Gough. His parents spent their entire lives in England, of which country the father was a native, but the mother came from Wales.

Reared to the age of twenty years under the parental roof, Thomas R. P. Gough attended a private school in. the pursuit of his education. When he had acquired such knowledge as to enable him to undertake life's heavier responsibilities, he laid aside his text-books and learned the carpenter's trade. In common with many other young men America strongly appealed to him as the promised land of opportunities, in which to pursue his career amid conditions somewhat different from those to which he had been born, and 1884 saw him on his way to the United States. Pie landed in New York city and immediately made his way inland to Illinois, locating in Truro township, Knox county. There he engaged in farm labor, in connection with which he also followed his trade until 1893, when he took a position with C. C. Davis & Company, who are in the grain business. He remained in their employ for eleven years, resigning his position to assume the duties of postmaster, to which office he was

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 877

appointed on the 1st of October, 1904. He is now serving his eighth year in this capacity, in connection with which he has also done farming.

For his wife Mr. Gough chose Miss Ethel May Tucker, a daughter of Noah N. Tucker, and unto them have been born three children: Ellen Frances, Glen Thomas and Mabel Evelyn.

The religious views of the family are manifested through their affiliation with the Methodist Episcopal church, and fraternally Mr. Gough is a Mason, holding membership in the blue lodge of Princeville and the chapter of Yates City. He also belongs to the Eastern Star of Princeville, and the Woodmen of the World, being identified with the Williamsfield camp. In his political views Mr. Gough is a republican, having given his unqualified endorsement to the principles of this party ever since granted the full rights of citizenship. He has displayed rare efficiency in discharging the responsible duties of his present office, his service having proven highly satisfactory to the community at large. During the long period of his residence in Williamsfield, Mr. Gough has won and retained the friendship of many of the most estimable citizens of the town, as he has always manifested those qualities that invariably win respect in both his public and private life.

N. N. TUCKER.

N. N. Tucker is the owner of a very attractive homestead of twenty acres located a half mile southeast of Williamsfield, where he is now living retired. For many years he was successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising in Knox county, the proceeds realized from his business being largely invested in real estate in the county and he now owns three hundred and twelve acres of farming land in Truro township.

He was born on a farm located a half mile from his present residence, November 18, 1858, and is a son of Samuel and Mary (Mundy) Tucker. The father passed away in May, 1893, a^ the age of seventy-one years, but the mother is still living and now resides in Williamsfield. Samuel Tucker was born in Ash-land, Ohio, in October, 1822, the first twelve years of his life being spent on his father's farm in his native state. In 1834 the family removed to Illinois, settling in Brimfield township, Peoria county, where he resided for fourteen years. At the expiration of that time he came to Knox county, locating in Elba township, but at the end of six years removed to Truro township, taking up his residence on a farm a half mile south of Williamsfield. There he passed away, being at that time the most extensive landowner in the township. The mother is a daughter of one of Knox county's pioneer settlers, and represents the third generation of her family in the county. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Tucker there were born eleven children, seven of whom are living, as follows: J. J., who is a resident of Courtland, Kansas; L. V., who lives in Galesburg; Elizabeth, who married A. D. Moon, living on a farm south of N. N. Tucker; N. N., our subject; Sarah, the wife of C. H. Eastman, .of Galesburg; Mary Evelyn, who married Dr. Ben D. Baird, of Galesburg; and Eugene, who lives at Knoxville.

878 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY

As he was reared in the country N. N. Tucker attended the district schools, and while mastering the common branches, he was acquiring a practical knowledge of agriculture by assisting his father with the work of the farm. After leaving school he remained on the home place for several years, devoting his entire time and attention to the work of the fields and care of the stock, thus laying the foundation for a successful agricultural career. He has been very fortunate in his undertakings, having met with more than an average degree of prosperity, and now owns, in addition to the place where he is living, a farm containing one hundred and thirty-two acres, located east of his homestead, and one hundred and sixty acres on section 36. Determination of purpose and unceasing industry have been prominent factors in the success of Mr. Tucker, who has at all times manifested clear judgment and good business sagacity in the direction of his activities. He located on the place where he is living at the present eighteen years ago, and during the greater portion of that time engaged in general farming and stock-raising but is now living retired, having acquired a competence that, together with the income from his different properties, provides him with all of the comforts of life.

For his wife and helpmate Mr. Tucker chose Miss Ellen Jordan of Truro township, and unto them were born four children: Ethel, the wife of T. R. P. Gough; Rilla, who married Fred Hurlbut, a farmer of Truro township; Leonard, who married Nora Stodgel and is now a resident of Williarnsfield; and Lola, who is still at home.

Fraternally Mr. Tucker is affiliated with the Masonic order, and his political support he gives to the republican party. He is a public-spirited, progressive man and has always taken an active interest in all township affairs, and for eighteen years served as road commissioner, while for thirteen years he was justice of the peace. The ability with which he discharged the duties of both offices is attested by the length of his terms. The entire life of Mr. Tucker has been spent in the immediate vicinity of his present home, where he enjoys a favorable acquaintance and has a large circle of friends, many of whom were the comrades of his youth and the playmates of his childhood.

WALTER N. DIKEMAN.

Walter N. Dikeman, who far twenty-five years has been engaged in general farming six and a half miles southeast of Maquon, is a native of Illinois. His birth occurred in Fulton county, July 14, 1853, ms parents being Cornelius and Lydia (Douglass) Dikeman, both natives of the state of New York, where they were also reared and married. During the early years of their domestic life they came west, settling in Fulton county, where they spent the remainder of their lives with the exception of one year when they resided in Minnesota. Farming* always engaged the energies of Mr. Dikeman, who with his wife and family endured all of the hardships of pioneering during the early days, in order to bring the. wild land upon which they located into a state of productivity. Two of the children born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Dikeman lived to attain maturity, the one beside our subject being James, a retired farmer of Fulton county, who married Emerlis Bodkins.

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 881

Reared on the farm, where he was born, Walter N. Dikeman's educational advantages were confined to what the district schools in the vicinity afforded. As the country was new and but sparsely settled, the schools were primitive and offered but little opportunity to acquire more than a thorough practical knowledge of the common branches. After laying aside his text-books, his entire attention was devoted to the cultivation of the home farm, during a period of about three years. He then left the parental roof and began his independent career as a farmer and for two years thereafter leased land at different places. After the death of his parents he returned to the old homestead, which he operated for five years. Disposing of his interest in this at the expiration of that time he came to Knox county and in 1886 settled upon the place where he has ever since resided. Mr. Dikeman has effected extensive improvements on this place during the period of his residence, having erected substantial buildings and made many other changes of a minor but telling nature. He owns five hundred and fifty-two acres of land, one hundred and fifty of which he is renting to his son. The remainder he devotes to general farming and stock-raising, in both of which pursuits he has met with a most gratifying degree of success. He is a man of energy, whose foresight and clear judgment as well as practical ideas have been the secret means of his attaining his present state of prosperity. He has always given his personal supervision to the plowing, planting and harvesting of his crops as well as the care of his stock, and that his efforts have been amply rewarded is attested by his present circumstances.

Mr. Dikeman chose for his wife Miss Roletta B. Stiarwalt, a daughter of George Montroville Stiarwalt, of Ohio. Of this marriage there have been born five children. Rosa Belle, the eldest, married W. D. McCoy and has three children, Merle Marie, William Earle, and Walter 'Dennis. Earle, who is operating part of his father's farm, married Maude Ryer and has two children, Bernice Irene and Norma Maude. Jessie Fay, the third in order of birth, married N. J. Nelson. The two youngest children, Walter and Loretta Pearl, are both living at home.

In his political views Mr. Dikeman is a republican, but he has never taken an active part in township matters of a governmental nature, his energies being bent upon the development of his varied interests in which he has met with well merited success.

JAMES A. SHAFFER.

A prominent and highly successful agriculturist of Truro township was the late James A. Shaffer, who passed away February 1, 1890. He was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, on the 15th of April, 1841, a son of Benjamin B. Shaffer, a farmer, who removed from the Keystone state to Illinois in 1856, locating in Knox county, where he passed the remainder of his life.

James A. Shaffer was reared in his native state to the age of fifteen years, attending the public schools in the acquirement of his education. From early boyhood he was trained in agricultural pursuits and naturally when he was


882 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

ready to begin working for himself chose the vocation to which he was best adapted. In whatever he undertook he would have succeeded, being a man of enterprise and industry and much determination of purpose. He was practical in his ideas, progressive in his methods and always directed his undertakings with foresight and intelligence. At the time of his death he owned between four hundred and fifty and five hundred acres of land in this township, all of which was under high cultivation. A portion of this had been the old family homestead, and during the long period of his occupancy Mr. Shaffer effected many improvements in the property. He made a careful study of the soil, planting his fields to such cereals as he deemed best adapted to it. In connection with general farming he also engaged in stock-raising, both undertakings proving lucrative under his capable supervision. He was only forty-seven years of age when he passed away, and was actively engaged in the operation of his farm, three hundred and twenty acres of which is now being cultivated by his son, Benjamin.

For his wife and helpmate Mr. Shaffer chose Miss Louisa J. Oberholtzer, and they became the parents of six children. Vesper, who is the eldest of the family, graduated from the Women's Medical College of the Northwestern University in Chicago, and is now engaged in the practice of her profession in that city. Joseph O., who is a farmer living in Canada, married Ella Grimm and they have four children: Hortense; Lester, who is deceased; Vesper; and Helen. Benjamin B., who is the second son, is engaged in the operation of the old homestead. Lie married Mary E. Fitzgerald of Chicago. Celesta married Walter Potts, a farmer of this township, by whom she has had four children : Harold H., who is deceased; Willis J.; and Lester B. and Letta Bell, who are twins. Letta became the wife of Fred M. Brown and they are living on a farm in South Dakota. James A., who is the youngest member of the family, is living at home.

Mr. Shaffer was a public-spirited man and took a deep interest in all township affairs, giving his support to the men and measures of the democratic party. He had high standards of citizenship and always discharged his share of public duties faithfully, having filled various offices of the township. A man of upright principles and unquestionable integrity, loyal to his friends and true to every trust reposed in him, he was held in high esteem by all who knew, him, his death being occasion for deep and widespread regret throughout the community.

OSBORN T. ROBERTS.

Osborn T. Roberts, who is engaging in general farming on section 26, Cedar township, Knox county, has by means of his businesslike methods and intelligent direction become recognized as one of the capable and highly successful agriculturists of the community.

Mr. Roberts was born on a farm in Mercer county, Illinois, on the nth of January, 1869, his parents being Obed and Mary Ottilia (Peterson) Roberts. His father was a native of Mercer county, Pennsylvania, his birth having there

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 883

occurred on the 28th of February, 1845. When a lad of eight years he removed to the west with his parents who located in Mercer county, where Mr. Roberts later engaged in farming for some time. About twenty years ago he went to Henry county, this state, where he acquired a farm in the cultivation of which he engaged until his death on the 27th of May, 1911. The mother, who was born in Ohio sixty-three years ago, is still living on the old homestead in Henry county. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Roberts there were born nine children, of whom our subject is the eldest, the others being as follows: Nellie, who is deceased; Frank, who is living in Henry county, Illinois; Bessie, who is living at home; Mabel R., the wife of F. E. Anderson, Cedar township, Knox county; George W., who is a resident of Mercer county, Illinois; Grace, the wife of T. S. Briggs, also of Mercer county; Arthur C, who is at home; and Benjamin H., who is deceased.

The boyhood and youth of Osborn T. Roberts were spent on his father's farms in Mercer and Henry counties, in the common schools of which he obtained his education. At the age of twenty-four years he withdrew from agricultural pursuits, to which he had devoted his energies ever since his early boy-* hood, and engaged in the hardware business in Alpha, Illinois. After spending six years in commercial activities, he decided that the life of a farmer was more independent and afforded greater possibilities, and therefore disposed of his business and came to Knox county, where he has ever since resided. He owns one hundred and nine acres of land, which by means of intensive application and capable supervision he has brought to a high state of cultivation. He has always taken great pride in his homestead and during the period of his residence has wrought many and extensive improvements, making it not only one of the attractive but valuable properties of that district.

In 1893 Mr. Roberts was united in marriage to Miss Emily Anderson, whose birth occurred in Henry county, Illinois, on the 7th of November, 1868. Mrs. Roberts is a daughter of the late Nels P. and Louisa Charlotte (Anderson) Anderson, both natives of Sweden. The father, who was a cabinet-maker, emigrated to the United States when a boy. For many years he followed his trade in Galesburg, this state, but the greater part of his life was spent in Henry county, where he passed away about nine years ago. The mother was also reared in America, having come to this country when a little girl and early locating in Illinois, where she was living at the time of her demise in 1898. Of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Anderson there were born seven children : Ida, who is deceased; Emily, now Mrs. Roberts; Albert, who is a resident of New Windsor, Illinois; one who died in infancy; Frank, who is living in Knox county; and the two eldest, both of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Roberts, who is a woman of rare charm and culture, obtained her early education in the common schools of Knox county, after the completion of which she attended Knox College at Galesburg. Later she studied music and German at Hedding College, Abingdon, while she took a course in painting while living at home. Having decided to devote her attention to teaching, she subsequently pursued a professional course in the normal school at Geneseo, Illinois, and for twelve years taught in a school near Windsor, this state. The family of Mr. and Mrs. Roberts numbers six, all of whom are still at home: Earl F., Dole N., Keene O., June L., Nellie O. and Glenn O.

884 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

The religious belief of the family is manifested through their membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, while Mr. Roberts' fraternal connections are with the Masonic order of Abingdon and the Modern Woodmen of America of Alpha, Illinois. During his earlier years he gave his political support to the democratic party, but he now votes the straight republican ticket. Fie belongs to the progressive and modern class of agriculturists, who recognize the necessity of applying to their work the same principles and methods as pursued by the business man of any other field, and as a result he is meeting with substantial success.

SALVADOR HUNTLEY RYAN.

Although one of the more recent additions to the business circles of St. Augustine, Salvador Huntley Ryan has, however, for many years been actively identified with mercantile interests in Knox county and in the meantime has gained for himself recognition as an enterprising, progressive and successful business man. He is one of Illinois's native sons, his birth having occurred in Pontoosuc on the 29th of April, 1857, his parents being Adam H. and Nancy (Aldredge) Ryan. The mother was born in Mount Vernon, Indiana, and the father in Kentucky, and in the latter state they began their domestic life, Mr. Ryan there giving his attention to general farming. In 1848, however, he brought his little family, then consisting of wife and two children, to Illinois, and here he continued his operations in the field of agriculture, engaging in that line of activity until the outbreak of the Mexican war, when he enlisted and served throughout the period of hostilities. He participated in many engagements and in the battle of Cerro Gordo suffered the loss of one arm. his son, L. T. Ryan, served throughout the Civil war. Following its close, in 1867, Adam H. Ryan went to Missouri to live, and there his remaining days were passed, his death occurring on the 1st of March, 1892. His wife survived until the 2d of March, 1904, passing away at the home of her son Huntley. After the arrival of the family in Illinois five children were added to the household, but of the family of seven children only two are now living, a brother of our subject, Andrew W. Ryan, now making his home in Oklahoma.

In the schools of Victoria township, Knox county, Salvador Huntley Ryan acquired a good education and after its completion he turned his attention to farming as an occupation, being therein engaged in Victoria township until thirty years of age. Thinking, however, to find in mercantile pursuits a more congenial field of labor he removed to the town of Victoria and for one year was there engaged in general merchandising. Fie then took up his abode in Williamsfield, Knox county, and continued in that line of business, there remaining for thirteen years. In 1909 he arrived in St. Augustine and since then has occupied a prominent place in the business circles of the town as the proprietor of a general store. Long experience in that avenue of activity has proven to him that satisfied customers are the best advertisement and accordingly he carries a stock of goods which is well adapted to meet the demands of his patrons. The nature of his business policy, too, has begotten the confidence of the general public, and the

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 885

business transacted over the counters of his house is constantly increasing in importance and volume.

Mr. Ryan was married, in Galesburg, Illinois, on the 3d of February, 1876, to Miss Margaret Ericson, who was born in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, in April, 1854. Her parents, who were both natives of Sweden, came to the United States at an early day, locating in Wisconsin. There the mother died and later the father came to Knox county, Illinois, where he engaged in general farming until his death. By her marriage to Mr. Ryan their daughter became the mother of three children, as follows: Elmer M., a resident of Galesburg, who married Miss Myrtle Breece, of Dahinda, Illinois; B. Doris; and Edna S., the wife of John Rush, of Galesburg, and the mother of one son, John. Mrs. Ryan passed away on the 27th of December, 1898, and on the 18th of February, 1901, in Galesburg, Mr. Ryan was again married, his second union being with Miss Margaret Brennan, who was born in Abingdon on the 25th of November, 1862. Her parents, Thomas and Alice Brennan, were natives of Ireland, where the father engaged in railroading. He came to Knox county, Illinois, at an early day, locating at Abingdon, where he made his home for several years, after which he removed to Galesburg and there resided until his death. The mother survives him. Unto the second marriage of Mr. Ryan there has been born one child, Grace G.

Mr. Ryan's religious belief is that of the Methodist church while fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias at Williamsfield, and also with Williamsfield Lodge, No. 779, I. O. O. F., having passed through all of the chairs in both bodies. He has taken an active part in republican circles in Knox county, serving as town clerk and treasurer of Williamsfield, and is now serving on the village board of St. Augustine, while at the same time he is acting as a member of the school board of St. Augustine. He takes a keen interest in the various phases of public life, doing all in his power to further the welfare of the community along material, intellectual and moral lines, and is ranked among the influential and representative citizens of the locality.

WILLIAM M. WELSH.

William M. Welsh, who is engaged in general farming and stock-raising in Truro township, is a worthy representative of a family that has long figured prominently in the agricultural annals of Knox county. His birth occurred on the old homestead in the vicinity of Maquon on the 24th of December, 1852, his parents being Michael and Kathrin Welsh, who are mentioned at greater length elsewhere in this work.

Reared on the farm in the acquirement of his education, William M. Welsh attended the district schools. He passed the early years of his life as did the other lads of the community at that period. When not engaged with his lessons he was largely occupied in discharging the tasks assigned by parental authority, while his leisure hours were devoted to such pastimes and sports as were appropriate to the season. He remained under the parental roof until he was twenty-eight years of age, assisting in the operation of the farm. Being in

886 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

every way qualified to begin his independent agricultural career, in 1880 he bought eighty acres of land on section 21 of this township, upon which he settled. He applied himself assiduously to its cultivation, directing his energies with such foresight and intelligence that he met with good financial returns. As his circumstances justified, he added to his holdings at various times until he now owns two hundred and eighty-three acres on section 21, forty acres on section 15, and twenty on section 16. During the long period of his ownership he has made many improvements on his place, including the erection of large, substantial barns and outbuildings and the addition of many modern conveniences consistent with the spirit of progress that has ever characterized his undertakings. Mr. Welsh gives all of his attention to the plowing, sowing and harvesting of his fields, and annually realizes a handsome dividend on his season's labor. In connection with general farming he devotes much attention to the raising of stock of a good grade, and this also has proven to be very lucrative. System and method always distinguish his undertakings, and as he is very energetic and possesses an abundance of determination he is prospering in his business enterprises. His property is given careful supervision; the barns, fences, out-buildings and residence are kept in good repair, the fields are well tilled and the grounds are neat and tastefully arranged. Everything about the place indicates the capable management and thrift that invariably accompany success.

For his wife Mr. Welsh chose Miss Mary Murphy, a daughter of John and Bridget Murphy, farming people of this section, who emigrated from Ireland to the United States in 1876, locating in Peoria county. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Welsh, as follows: Michael Mc, who is attending school at Normal, Illinois ; J. E., who is employed on the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad at Galesburg; William L., who is farming, and married Wilma Kern, of Peoria; James Wendell, who is assisting with the home farm; and Catherine E., who died at the age of six months.

The family are all communicants of the Roman Catholic church, and fraternally Mr. Welsh belongs to the Modern Woodmen of America. His political allegiance he gives to the democratic party, considering that their principles are best adapted to subserve the interests of the nation in its entirety. He has always taken an active and helpful interest in all township affairs, and for twenty years has been a school director, and he has also served as assessor. Mr. Welsh is one of the estimable citizens of the community and is proud of the fact that he was born and raised in Knox county, where he has ever since lived. His prosperity is the well merited reward of industry and constant application in the direction of his activities.

DANIEL BURNAUGH.

Daniel Burnaugh, now living retired in St. Augustine, was for many years closely identified with the material up- building and development of this town as carpenter and contractor, and many of the substantial structures not only of this community but of the surrounding district are monuments to the skill and handiwork of this venerable octogenarian. One of Ohio's native sons, he was

HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY 887

born in Clermont county, on the 13th of August, 1830, his parents being John and Sarah (Oswald) Burnaugh. The father, who was of French descent, was born in Clermont county, Ohio, while the mother, of German lineage, claimed Pennsylvania as the state of her nativity. The family had long been established in Ohio, the grandfather of our subject, Carey Burnaugh, having removed to that state from Virginia at a time when Indians still inhabited that region. There John Burnaugh was reared and married and there followed the occupation of a builder and contractor throughout most of his life time. His wife also passed away in Ohio. Of their family ten children grew to maturity.

The educational privileges which Daniel Burnaugh received during the period of his youth were those of the common schools of Clermont county, Ohio, and when yet a lad in years, he learned the carpenter's trade under the direction of his father, whom he assisted prior to leaving his native state. In early manhood, however, he came to Illinois, arriving in Knox county in 1856, and for a year thereafter he made his home with an uncle, Joseph Burnaugh, near Abingdon. In 1857 he came to St. Augustine and here he has since resided with the exception of one year spent in Kansas and a similar period in Michigan City, Indiana. Upon his arrival in St. Augustine he purchased his present home and at once began business as a carpenter and contractor, in which field of labor he continued throughout his active career. He is a skilful workman, who added to his mechanical ability modern ideas and progressive methods, and it was not long before he had gained for himself a reputation which won for him a large and remunerative patronage. He built many of the residences, schools, churches and other structures not only of his home town but also of Abingdon, Gales-burg and the surrounding country, and for many years has been one of the well known and representative business men of St. Augustine. He is still active today, and is living in the enjoyment of a competency which is the merited reward of a well spent and busy life.

Mr. Burnaugh was united in marriage in Knoxville, Illinois, on the 17th of December, 1856, to Miss Lucinda Dorman, who was born in the state of Indiana in June, 1838, a daughter of Henry and Sarah (Hendricks) Dorman, natives of Maryland and North Carolina respectively. The father, a farmer by occupation, removed to Tennessee in early life and later removed to Indiana, where he carried on agricultural pursuits for some time. He came to Illinois at an early period in its development, locating in Knox county, and here carried on general farming until his demise, his wife also passing away in this county. In their family were nine children, five daughters and four sons, but only three are now living. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Burnaugh were born four children, of whom two have passed away. The elder surviving child, John, is married and resides in Galesburg. He has two children, Gertrude, the wife of Orlie Alan, residing near Abingdon, by whom she has three children, Russell, Esteline and Ormand; and Juanita, living at home. Lillie Burnaugh became the wife of Henry Mason and they now make their home near Greenbush, Illinois.

Mr. and Mrs. Burnaugh hold membership in the Christian church, the teachings of which have ever formed the guiding influences in their lives. His identification with the Masonic order covers a period of more than a half century, dating from the year 1854, and he is now one of the oldest members of that organization in the state, belonging to Avon Lodge, No. 253, A. F. & A. M.,

888 HISTORY OF KNOX COUNTY, Illinois

Since 1857, or for a period covering more than fifty-four years, he has resided in this present home, and in the meantime has been an interested witness of the many changes which have been instituted for the advancement of this section, and in this work of progress and improvement he has taken an active part, his well directed efforts not only resulting in substantial individual success but also proving potent elements in the up- building of this district. Few have taken a more active interest in the material growth of the community, and St. Augustine numbers him among its loyal-spirited, representative and valued citizens.

 

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