Link to main page


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might lead to the discovery of the fugitive. Knowledge of his whereabouts came at last through an acquaintance of McCoy, the man with whom he had stayed while in this vicinity. It was learned from him that McCoy had lately stopped at his house as he was making his way through the timber west of Princeville to the southern part of the county, and that he was engaged in cutting railroad ties at Kingston. It was also learned that after crossing the Spoon River he had made his way to Andover, where he had disposed of one of the horses and then gone on to New Boston, where he placed the other two in a Livery stable. All of the horses were eventually recovered and restored to their owners.
The task of making McCoy's arrest devolved upon John L. Blanchard and Hugh Roney, and they set out at once to perform that duty. Having arrived at Kingston, they bided their time until they had assured themselves that the man they wanted was there and were certain where he might be found. This done, they secured the service of a constable, and, at a late hour of the night, made their way to his lodging place and knocked at the door. They were admitted after some hesitancy, and, after they had made known their mission, McCoy was called. That gentleman soon appeared at the foot of the stairway in stocking feet with boots in hand. He took in the situation at a glance, and with the agility of a cat, sprang at the nearest man and knocked him down. This precipitated a free-for-all fight, which, though short, demonstrated that McCoy was a bad man and a hard one to handle. He was taken into custody and brought to Princeville for a preliminary hearing, and was held to appear before the grand jury, which duly indicted him for grand larceny. He was placed in the old jail at Peoria to await his final hearing. Not long after his committal to the jail, and while the company were still jubilant over his capture, word came that he had escaped. It was true. He had availed himself of the first favorable opportunity and knocked the turn-key down at an un-


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guarded moment, made good his escape and fled to California, and has never been heard of since. After his capture McCoy stated, in telling of his adventure with the horses subsequent to the theft, that astride one of the horses and leading the other two he swam Spoon river when it was bank full of water and floating ice. The incident shows something of the determination of the man the company was dealing with and explains the difficulty of this capture. The news of his escape was not relished by the company, but the fault was in nowise theirs, and as much credit is due them for their excellent work as if he had not escaped.
The history of the company from the time of the McCoy raid till within a few years of the present time is marked by only minor affairs not worthy of mention. In the fall of 1889, however, the company was again called out and again evinced its usefulness and its summary way of doing things. About sixty dollars worth of clover seed was stolen from John Little and William Elliott, the former a member of the organization, and the society in a very short time had rightly placed the blame and were in hot pursuit of the guilty parties. A detachment of the members cautiously surrounded the house at night in which the accused men were supposed to be, and quietly waited for the moon to rise. When the light was sufficient to enable them to follow in case an attempt was made to escape, three of their number, Fred DeBord, John Miller and A. M. Wilson approached the house, entered with some difficulty and went up stairs. There they found an empty bed which was yet warm, indicating that its occupants were in hiding. They descended to the cellar and there attired in short pajamas and crouching behind barrels they discovered the two suspects. The criminals were duly apprehended, tried and convicted and served their term in the penitentiary. The clover seed was found and restored to the owners, and the T. D. and M. A. A. were again justly proud of their good work.


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The last episode in the company's history occurred a little more than six years ago. The occasion furnished perhaps one of the hardest problems the society has ever been called up to solve. On the night of Tuesday, July 9, 1895, Edward Auten had four horses stolen from his pasture in the north part of town. Mr. Auten was not a member of the detective association and so carried on a search for four days without their aid. But it proved a fruitless search: not a trace of the missing horses could be found. On the following Saturday Mr. Auten laid the ease before Captain Slane and after some deliberation the company decided to make an effort to recover the property. It was then Saturday evening and little could be done before Monday, which would make five days that the thieves had had to make off with their booty. They knew nothing of the direction or the distance the thieves had gone and had not the slightest clew that could help them to find out. The prospect was discouraging, to say the least. They began Monday morning, however, with their characteristic thoroughness and zeal. Descriptive cards were mailed to every city and railroad town between the Illinois and the Mississippi rivers, and a reward of $50 was offered for the capture and return of the horses.
Tuesday morning word came that four horses answering the description on the card had been stopped at Cuba, Ill., about sixty miles west of here in Fulton County. Captain Slane, W. H. Wisenburg, then First Lieutenant, and Russell Chaplin, who was then employed by Mr. Auten and could identify the horses, were driven to that place at once by Albert Morrow. They reached Canton at dusk that evening, changed teams and drove on without delay toward Cuba, which was several miles farther west. When they were out of Canton a few miles, they met a number of men from Farmington who had been to Cuba endeavoring to get the horses and claim the reward. They told Captain Slane and his party that they might as well turn around and go home for they would never be able to get the horses from the parties holding them.


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They stated that they had tried every argument and every means they could bring to bear on the case, but with no avail, and said that when they left, the Canton fellows, who were there on the same mission, were meeting with about the same success as they had had. But the four men going west were not to be thus easily thwarted in their purpose. They had come to get the horses, and it was their determination to return with them at all hazards. They drove on and arrived at Cuba about ten o'clock that night. There they found the little town agog with excited citizens and miners lustily discussing the justice of the various claims to the reward. The citizens of the town and surrounding country were much perturbed over the demands of the parties from Canton and Farmington and they made it so unpleasant for them that both had left in disgust. This cleared the field for Captain Slane and his party and they presented their claims. They found that an elderly man named Irwin, who lived on a farm near Cuba, had been walking through his pasture in company with one or two of his family on the Sunday before and had seen the horses standing near a fence in a hollow behind a clump of trees. They approached them, and when they were near the horses, two men sprang up and ran off into the timber near by. They found the horses tied, and this and other evidence roused their suspicion. That night they watched, but no one came near. They were convinced that the horses were stolen and sent one of their number to inform the marshall of Cuba, who came and took the horses and held them on suspicion. On Monday they had received one of the descriptive cards, and had sent word that the four horses found by Mr. Irwin answered the description. They had regarded everyone doubtfully, who had come since that time and laid any claim on the horses, and had refused to give them up, thinking the parties were after the reward which was rightfully their own. Therefore when the men from here pressed their claim to the horses, they were required to answer a great many questions and to give a much ful-


34

ler description of the animals. They were told that Mr. Chaplin had broken the colts to drive and that he could give them as full a description as they liked, which he proceeded to do. Captain Slane then asked it they might see the horses. They refused at first, but finally consented. They were taken through the stable back to the last stall, when they found the four horses tied in a tight box stall, securely held with heavy timbers and firmly spiked. When finally the way was cleared, Mr. Chaplin went in among the horses and spoke to them. He was at once greeted with a whinney of recognition. That was enough. No further evidence was needed to convince them that these men were the rightful owners. But this was not the end of the trouble. The reward was to be paid to someone. Mr. Irwin, the man who really found the horses, claimed the reward, and the marshall, "Jeff" T_________, who took charge of them, stoutly maintained that the reward should be his. To make matters worse the marshall had been imbibing pretty freely of ''rock and rye," and was rather garrulously inclined and unreasonable in his demands. The rabble of miners, who had also tarried at the cup, had espoused "Jeff's'' cause and began to vociferously demand the reward for him. The party from here had been warned before starting to act carefully, for they would be apt to find a tough crowd waiting for them. They began to feel that the warning was timely, that the crowd was indeed a tough one. It was apparent to those interested that no satisfactory argument would be made under such unfavorable circumstances. They therefore repaired to the office of the livery barn, bolted the door against those disinterested and proceeded to settle the question of reward. The men outside crowded around the office window and made as much of a demonstration as was possible in the hope that their influence might favor the marshall. Cries of ''Stay with 'em. Jeff, d—n 'em, stay with 'em," could be plainly heard. The marshall still complained that they had not enough evidence, that these men had a right to take the horses. He


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asked Capt. Slane to show his authority for taking them. The captain drew from his pocket an order for the horses signed by Mr. Auten, which he had thoughtfully taken along, and showed to him. This seemed to have a good effect on the marshall as he was more considerate from that time. The Captain then asked him if he considered Mr. Irwin an honest man, a responsible man, a man that would do the fair thing. Tillman said he did. The Captain then turned to Mr. Irwin and asked him if he would deliver the horses to him in the road in front of the barn for the reward less the expense of returning the horses. He said he would. And he did, and received the reward and gave Capt. Slane a receipt for the same. And the party from Princeville started out about midnight on their homeward journey of sixty miles, leaving Irwin, ''Jeff'' and the miners to settle their own disputes in their own way.
The next day about 4 o'clock they arrived in Princeville after driving all that night and the next day through a heavy rain. That evening the horses were returned to Mr. Auten, who promptly paid all the company's expenses and further expressed his appreciation of their work by substantially remunerating them. The thieves were not found, but the recovery of the horses under such circumstances was regarded by the society as one of their most successful ventures.
The recital of this event virtually brings the history of the company up to the present time, as nothing worthy of special notice has occurred since then. At present the organization is in a most prosperous condition. Financially and numerically it is strong, and it stands ready, as ever it has, to protect the interests of its members by bringing criminals to justice and restraining, by the very fact of its existence, the hand of those who would enrich themselves at the expense of others. S. S. Slane is the only surviving one of the five men who organized the society. The five surviving charter members are S. S. Slane, J. T. Slane, Frank Beall, Tal Moody and E. Keller. The present officers of


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the society are: Captain, S. S. Slane; First Lieutenant, John Miller; Second Lieutenant, A. B. DeBord; Third Lieutenant, Chas. Taylor; Fourth Lieutenant, M. V. Conklin; Secretary, Dr. T. E. Alyea; Banker, Joseph Friedman. Mr. Slane has filled the office of captain for the last fifteen years, a longer time than any other man has ever served. At their meeting in December he was re-elected for another year and was presented by the association with a gold headed cane as a token of their regard for him and their appreciation of his long and efficient service. Dr. Alyea has served for the past twelve years as secretary. He is also chief caterer for the Association, the delicious savor and the wholesomeness of his oyster stews having undoubtedly conduced materially to the harmony and good health that prevails among the members. The society has the distinction of being the only chartered organization of the kind in the state, and Princeville has the distinction and the good fortune to be the home of that society.



CORRECTIONS.

"In Township Histories," a volume pertaining to local history and printed before the days of the O. S. U. P. V., a list of the Postmasters of Princeville inadvertently omitted the name of William H. Alter, who was commissioned on April 6, 1866 and served, as near as can be remembered now, one or two years.

Also, a list of the early physicians inadvertently omitted the name of Dr. J. C. Charles, who was practicing in Princeville in Civil War times, and for several years thereafter.


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CIVIL WAR RECORD OF PRINCEVILLE.


Introductory paragraph taken largely from History of Princeville Township,
written by Edward Auten and Peter Auten 2nd, in 1902.

When the war broke out, the "Lucky Thirteen," who all came back, went from Princeville, and they with others joined the "Peoria Battery," Battery A. of the Second Illinois Artillery. In the fall of 1861 several more Princeville men joined the 47th Regiment of Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and a considerable number of others joined Col. Ingersoll's Regiment, the 11th Cavalry. When the group of thirteen were about to start to Peoria to enlist in the Peoria Battery, Rev. Ahab Keller of the Princeville Methodist Church made a very devout and fervent prayer that the entire thirteen might be spared to safely return, and sure enough all of them did, after three and four years service.

The distinctively Princeville company was started in August, 1862. On that date Congressman Ebon Clark Ingersoll (brother to Bob) came out from Peoria to hold a "war meeting." Julius S. Starr accompanied him in the hope of getting recruits for a Peoria company, and recruit hunters were present also from Chillicothe and other places. The meeting was held in the old Methodist Episcopal Church, then on the corner southwest of the public square. The crowd was so large that the windows were taken to enable men to hear on the outside. After the speaking the crowd gathered on the public square, when Clark Ingersoll got on a wagon and proposed a Princeville Company. John McGinnis began fifing and led a march around the "liberty pole." Others fell in, a few at a time, until there were fifty men marching around and around the "liberty pole." Then they paraded to Dr. Charles's office, got out a table in the center of the room, and signed the muster roll.



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Within forty-eight hours the roll was increased to 98 men.

This was Company K of the Eighty-Sixth Regiment, Illinois Infantry. John F. French was elected Captain, James B. Peet, First Lieutenant and H. F. Irwin, Second Lieutenant. The company was soon ordered into camp at the Peoria Fair Grounds, and saw, in all, twenty-one engagements, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge and Kenesaw Mountain being among the number. The company was in "Sherman's March to the Sea." Somewhere near one-half of the company still survive (1902), and those residing at Princeville are organized, with their comrades, J. F. French Post, No. 153, G. A. R. On Decoration Day, 1900, John McGinnis dedicated in Princeville Cemetery, a monument "In Memory of all Soldiers and Sailors who, on Land or Sea, periled Life for Liberty and Law -- 1861-65." Princeville always honors her soldiers and Decoration Day sees the gathering of several townships in memory of the dead and in honor of the living.

Below are lists of part of the young men from the territory of this Old Settlers' Union who enlisted in the first three groups named, the Peoria Battery, the 47th Illinois Infantry and the 11th Cavalry. These lists are incomplete and it is true that numbers of other Princeville men enlisted in various other companies. There is also added the enrollment of Company K. of the 86th Illinois Infantry, believed to be complete but subject to correction; and a list of the soldier dead in the Princeville Cemeteries and Campbell Cemetery.


The mossy marbles rest
the lips that he has prest
in their bloom,
And the names he loved to hear
Have been carved for many a year
On the tomb.





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LETTER FROM JOHN Z. SLANE, IN "CO. K."

Postmarked in a war envelope bearing the design of a
smoking cannon, alongside the stars and stripes,
labeled "Our Compromise."


Louisville, Ky., Sept. 29th, 1862.
Washington Mott—Dear Sir:--
Having a few moments leisure time I thought I would write you a short letter. 'We are encamped in the upper part of this place, but do not expect to remain here long. The soldiers here are as thick as the pigeons were around Princeville last spring, there being over two hundred thousand here. General Nelson, Commander of the army here, was killed this morning by Jeff C. Davis a prominent officer. I did not learn the particulars of the case further than this: Davis went to Nelson's room (it being at one of the principal hotels of this place) on business. Nelson ordered him out of his presence at the same time slapping him in the face, whereupon Davis instantly shot him, he dying in fifteen minutes. This killing of men is no strange occurrence here. I saw a dead soldier yesterday morning lying on the sidewalk. No one could tell who killed him and I think but few cared. He was stabbed in the breast. Several have been shot by the guards; they get drunk and kick up a fuss whereupon they are dealt with accordingly.
Buell's army, sixty or seventy thousand in number arrived here last Friday. They are hard looking cases, having been in the service about fourteen months. some of our boys complain of the fare here. It is somewhat hard, we having nothing to eat excepting cast iron crackers, bacon and coffee, only what is given us and what we jayhawk. The people here are the most charitable I ever saw. We eat with them frequently and they will not have pay for it. Then Wash when you hear abolitionists talking about the people of the


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South being poor, uncharitable and ignorant just refer them to Company K. of the eighty-sixth regiment for information worth knowing on this point.
        Some of the boys saw _______ __________ here yesterday. He denied his name saying he was a brother of _________'s. They invited him to pull off his hat, telling him it was no use talking, whereupon ___________ caved. I saw George Earl and Oliver Bagley here. They are both soldiers.
I hope you will excuse my poor writing, this being a hard place to write on account of noise and confusion and having to sit on the ground and write on our knees, and naturally a very poor scribe. I want you to write to me as soon as you receive this. Give me the news generally. I want to know how the corn is coming out and how making molasses goes. Direct your letter to J. Z. Slane. Company K., 86th Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Louisville. Ky.
Your old friend. etc..
(Signed) J. Z. SLANE.

(Initialed by "N. N.," presumably a censor).


MEMBERS OF PEORIA BATTERY


John P. ALDRICH John W. AUTEN Stephen E. BALDWIN
John W. BARNABY Wm. BEST Onias BLISS
Jos. G. BLOOMER Wm. BOBIER Henry BURGESS
J. F. CARMAN Haller CHARLES Sam COBURN
Wm. COBURN James DIMON John DIMON
Benj. ELLIS John W. FRENCH Enos FROST
Edwin HOAG Letz LAIR Noah LAIR
Wm. LAIR James MCGINNIS Hugh MCVICKER
Calvin MORROW Wm. MORROW Roswell J. NURSE
Oscar OSBORN Lewis G. PARKER David J. SCHRIVER
Albert H. SMITH Morris SMITH Wm. F. SPEERS
Henry STOWELL    



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MEMBERS OF CO.'s H. & A. 47th ILL. INFANTRY


Levi ADKINSON Jos. ARMENTROUT James BRASSFIELD
Jacob DIMON Jasper DOLLISON Patrick DRUM
James DRUMMOND John DRUMMOND N. Sweat ENNIS
Samuel GORDON Thompson GORDON Wm. GORDON
Absalom GRAY Thos. GRAY John GROVE
Gilbert HALL Geo. HALL John HARLAN
Joseph HARLAN James P. HERVEY Thomas Y. HERVEY
Robt. HOUSTON Thos. KEADY James KINGDON
John KINGDON David MARTIN David MENDELL
Aaron C. MOFFITT Boling MOORE Frank RATHBURN
Isaac P. REED Elisha RICE Eli B. ROGERS
John SMITH Chas. STEVENS Jacob SUTHERLAND
George WILKINS Phineas R. WILKINSON Chas. WILLIAMS
J. M. YATES Wm. W. YATES  



MEMBERS OF CO. D. 11TH CAVALRY.



Elmer ALFORD Isaac W. ALFORD Wm. H. ALFORD
Stephen A. ANDREWS Henry BRONSON Wm. COBURN
Wm. Hughes CORNWELL Cornelius DUKES Wm. DUKES
Geo. H. HORSLEY Victor LAMBERT James Calvin MCMILLEN
Thos. MONTGOMERY Leonard OERTLEY Wm. N. PEET
David POTTS Thos. PURCELL Conrad Emery RUSSELL
Elmer RUSSELL Ebenezer E. RUSSELL George Washington RUSSELL
John SHEELOR Cyrus S. SMITH Wm. WARHURST



42 and 43

Roster of CO. "K" 86th ILL. INF.


* - Promoted


Captains    
John F. FRENCH Levi A. ROSS  
     
First Lieutenants    
James B. PEET John MORROW  
     
Second Lieutenants    
Henry F. IRWIN John MCGINNIS  
     
Sargeants    
1st Sgt. Peter H. SNYDER    
     
John MORROW * John MCGINNIS * Alexander BUCHANAN
Elijah COBURN John CARTER John Z. SLANE
John J. ANDERSON    
     
Corporals    
John CARTER * Edwin L. SMITH Levi A. ROSS *
John Z. SLANE * Ebenezer M. ARMSTRONG Samuel BOHRER
John J. ANDERSON * William H. AUTEN  
     
Musicians    
David SMITH John E. WHITE  
     
Wagoner    
John DUKES    
     
Privates    
Charles E. ALTER Warren F. ANDERSON Henry A. ANDREWS
Charles S. ATEN George AUTEN Frank BEACH
Andrew J. BECKNER Wm. H. BLANCHARD Charles A. BROCH
Green BURGESS Henry BUTLER Sylvester BUTLER
Patrick BYRNES Samuel C. COBURN George COOK
John J. COWLEY William DEAL Henry DEBORD
Jefferson DEBORD John DEBORD Nelson DEBORD
Peter DINSMORE Hezekiah FOLEY Joseph FRANCIS
Albert GLADFELTER Casper GLADFELTER David GLADFELTER
Frederick GLADFELTER George W. HAMILTON George A. HARE
Henry H. HARE Jefferson HARE Marmaduke HARE
Joseph D. HARRIS Henry HAYWARD William HUGHES
Andrew KELLER Edmund KELLER Emanuel KELLER
William H. KELLER Andrew J. LAIR Henry LITTLE
Benjamin LITTS James A. LYNCH Charles MCGUIRE
John MCMILLEN James MILLER Erastus MORROW
Joseph J. NACE George B. NAIL William T. NAIL
George W. NEWMAN Joseph PARENTS William PEMBLETON
William P. PIGG John T. POTTS William POTTS
William W. POTTS Philander C. REED Simeon W. RILEA
Hugh RONEY Peter RONEY William ROOK
James A. RUSSELL James M. RUSSELL John M. SABIN
Madison E. SANGER Moses M. SAYLES Thomas SAYLES
Andrew J. SCOTT Achibald SMITH Isaac L. SMITH
John W. SMITH Elijah B. SNEDAKER Noah SPRINGER
Francis TIMMONS James S. WATSON William R. WHITE
James E. WHITE Charles WILEY William H. WISENBURG
Harrison YOUNG Jeremiah C. ZILER  



LIST OF SOLDIER DEAD.
(Corrections and additions invited; also lists from other nearby cemeteries).
Princeville Township Cemetery


Revolutionary War
John MONTGOMERY
Phineas BRONSON

"Phineas Bronson was a native of Connecticut, born at Enfield, November 9, 1764; died in Peoria County, Illinois, October 24, 1845, and is buried in Princeville Cemetery, where a tombstone inscribed, “A Soldier of the American Revolution”, tells the story of service.

John Montgomery was a private in the Virginia troops; was born in 1764, and died in Peoria County, Illinois, January 26, 1845, and is buried in the Princeville Cemetery. “A Soldier of the Revolution” is inscribed upon his tombstone.

Prepared by Mrs. Clara K. Wolf, Historian of Peoria Chapter D. A. R.: From Journal of the Illinois State Historical Society, Oct., 1913, p. 447.



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War of 1812

Abner ADAMS Asa BEALL Zenas BLISS
Samuel COBURN James HENRY Joseph NICKESON
Matthew REED John WILLIAMS  


War of 1812 and Blackhawk War

Margoram BELFORD (BRELSFORD) - Re-interred from Campbell Cemetery<p>


Mexican War

John A. HEBERLING Wm. PEPPARD  

Civil War

   * - Buried elsewhere, cenotaph here   ** - Re-interred from Campbell Cemetery


Charles ALTER Stephen A. ANDREWS G. W. BAY
Christian BETTS William BIEDERBECK ** Wm. BLANCHARD
Thos. BLAKEWELL Ezra BLISS William. E. BLISS
Wm. BLUE John BUSH Jos. J. CAMP
Wm. COBURN * Samuel COBURN Hughes CORNWELL
Wm. DEAL Nelson DEBORD Jasper DOLLISON
Nathaniel Sweat ENNIS J. H. FLAHERTY Hezekiah FOLEY
S. H. FREEMAN John F. FRENCH Milo C. GILLEN
Jonathan GOODMAN Wm. GUE John D. HAMMER
Henry HAMMER John HEBERLING Henry F. IRWIN
A. J. LAIR Wm. LAIR P. K. MCCREADY
D. D. MCDOUGAL John MCGINNIS Erastus MORROW
Henry MUSHBAUGH Henry OERTLEY Jos. PARENTS
D. M. POTTS J. A. PRATT O. S. PRATT
Chas. REESE Samuel REESE J. M. ROGERS
Wm. ROWCLIFF Ebenezer E. RUSSELL James RUSSELL
John SHEELOR Joseph SHULL J. Z. SLANE
Albert H. SMITH * Cyrus SMITH Isaac SMITH
John SMITH Elijah B. SNEDAKER Chas. STEPHENS
Edwin STEPHENS * James T. STEPHENS * Wm. STEWART
Geo. TARBOX John THACKER John WHEELER
Wm. H. WILLIAMS Wm. H. WISENBURG Harrison YOUNG



Spanish War


Walter AYERS



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St. Mary's Cemetery


Civil War
Frank ROTTERMAN


Campbell Cemetery


Civil War

David CAMPBELL Samuel CAMPBELL David HART
Thomas MCCONN ______ MARTZ Hugh RONEY



THE FIRST AND THE SECOND PRINCEVILLE
ACADEMY.

Edward Auten, 1894 and Peter Auten, 1915. The First Academy.


The idea of an Academy originated in the demand for such an institution about the year 1856, during which year, if I remember rightly, many of the Princeville young people, desiring better educational opportunities than were afforded by the common school. Under charge of one instructor for all grades, went to Farmington to attend a school where the higher mathematics and classics were taught by a graduate of Knox College, Milton S. Kimball, assisted by a New England lady, Miss Booth. (Extract of a letter from Mrs. Hannah G. Hutchins, of Chicago, a daughter of the late Wm. C. Stevens, of Princeville, a gentleman of education, culture and public spirit, who was prominent in the inception and progress of the Academy).
In the winter of '55 and '56 I taught at Farmington and numbered among my scholars there quite a number from Princeville whom I remember with much interest as among the brightest and most studious of my pupils. In the fall of 1856, owing I suppose to their kind partiality, as I had never been at Princeville up to that time, I was invited to take the school there for a session of twenty weeks, which I did. The school was


46


in the Presbyterian church. I do not remember the attendance exactly, but the number was large and there was so much interest in it that some of the leading citizens of the town urged me to remain, and promised to have a building erected for the Princeville Academy.
I was not able to do so, but heard afterwards with pleasure that the academy was built, teachers procured, and that it was quite prosperous. (Extract of a letter from Mr. Milton S. Kimball, now of Springfield, Ill., the first principal of the Academy).
The inception of the Princeville Academy arose from the felt need of such an institution at home. A number of the people in Princeville had been educated, and others who had not, saw the advantages of the added power and privileges that knowledge gave; they wished their children to gain what they themselves never had the opportunity to get. In addition the Stevens', the Morrow's, the Colburn's, the Cutter's, the Clussman's, the Bronson's, the Auten's and others had been sent hither and yon to get advantages that by combined effort they might have had at home. Also an idea got lodged in the minds of some that such an institution would help the community and the place, and give advantages to many which they could never otherwise enjoy. Hon. Judge Onslow Peters, of Peoria, helped the general public opinion some in a speech as he told the people of the difference between "those who could not tell B from a bull's ear and those who had an education." Miss Selina Booth, now Mrs. S. B. Newell of Farmington, Ill., a cultured christian woman of ability and one of the chief women of the State, was an important factor in the establishment of the first Princeville Academy, and after a conversation with some of those most interested, telling them she thought they might secure the services of Mr. Milton Kimball, a graduate of Knox College, steps were at once taken that engaged Mr. Kimball as principal and the Presbyterian church for a school room. As time went on circumstances showed that the school should have a house of its own. (Extract of a letter from Lemuel Auten, of Monica, Ill.)


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The question of a suitable building was soon agitated, meetings were called, parents were interested, and it was proposed to raise money by inducing the residents of the village and surrounding country to pledge taking shares of twenty-five dollars each. This was done—but the amount was raised but slowly. Those were days of small things and money was not plenty. Messrs. Wm. C. Stevens, Solomon S. Cornwell, Carlisle Aldrich and Misses Martha and Laura Aldrich, and Mrs. Eleanor Morrow were among the foremost to work in the cause. Finally sufficient was secured to warrant erecting a modest two-story frame building on the south side of Main Street, a little east of the present public school square. The building was put up, as was the custom in that time and previously, as much as could be by individual donations of time, work and material. The rock for the foundation was quarried in White Oak grove. By the fall of 1857 the building was ready for use. Mr. Leonard Andrews presided over the institution in its new home and taught for one year. Then followed with Rev. Jared M. Stone and wife as teachers, a period of great prosperity for the Academy. Assistants under Mr. Stone at different times were Nathan A. Means, Miss White, Miss Wright and Miss Burnham. The attendance grew to sixty or seventy and the people showed a great deal of enthusiasm over their school. Each year an exhibition was given, in which the larger part of the pupils took part in songs, orations, essays, personifications, tableaux, colloquies or discussions. A program of the "Second Annual Exhibition" held on March seventh, 1860, appended at the close of this article, shows that there was more real literary and musical and scholastic meat in one of these Exhibitions than in half a dozen of some school commencements in the twentieth century. All of those who attended the Academy were called "codfishes" by the young people who did not attend, and the Academy literary society was called "The Codfish Club."



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Gradually, however, the many young men who had gathered from the east and west, from Dunlap (then Prospect), Orange Prairie, Jubilee, Akron, Hallock and all the country west of Princeville, went into the army; the village boys enlisted, and many girls were obliged to remain at home. The number of pupils was greatly lessened, and when Mr. Stone removed (about 1863) the prospects of the school waning. Rev. William Cunningham was the next teacher, and he for a time revived interest in the Academy and awakened the ambition of some who were but lads when the older boys went to the war. Mr. Cunningham ceased teaching in '66, and as an academic institution the building was never reopened. It was rented for a time before the erection of the present public school building for the use of the district school, and was finally sold. It now, 1894, forms the front part of the building on Canton Street occupied by Mr. M V. Conklin as a general store. (Later sold and moved, and in 1915 constitutes part of a barn at home of L S. Hofer).
The war, no doubt, was the most potent influence in the decline of school prosperity. The older children were in the army or in business, married and scattered. The next generation of fathers and mothers did not seem to appreciate the advantages afforded by the home school, and did not support it with enthusiasm. However, the Academy did not exist in vain. In looking over an old programme of one of the annual exhibitions, we see the names of many who are now among the most useful of our citizens, and the fame of other pupils comes to us from afar. A few went from the Academy to college, and none, it can safely be said, who spent part of their school days in Princeville Academy, have counted those days lost. The following is part of a letter received from Mr. Thomas Keady, of Dunlap, Ill.: ''I entered as a pupil soon after Prof. Stone took charge, went off to the war in 1861, and do not remember to have entered the classic old building since, only one night to a Union League meeting presided over by Dr. Henry, when I was home on furlough after the


49


fall of Vicksburg. * * * I am glad to know that you are about to revive 'Auld Lang Syne' through a historical sketch. I wonder what sort of a grizzled squad would rally to roll call if we had a reunion some autumn day."

The Second Academy.
Mrs. Hutchins, who was one of the pupils of the first Academy, writes as follows (1894) regarding the new Academy: ''I have rejoiced greatly in the rehabilitating of Princeville Academy and its recent prosperous career on an enlarged plan, and wished that my beloved father might have foreseen this later success."
As time went on several of Princeville 's citizens realized that their village was lacking in higher education, and believed that a school of the right kind would be the greatest blessing which could be provided for the large number of boys and girls in the community. In the summer of 1887, matters began to take definite form; a number of those interested met together, talked over plans and the result was the signing of a paper pledging, in various sums, $1,000 for the maintenance of an academy one year. The signers of this paper constituted the board of management, and each subscriber , was entitled to receive the amount of his subscription in tuition during the year. The paper cannot be found and the following list may be incomplete:
Mrs. V. E. Aldrich, Peter Auten, J. H. Benjamin, Rev. C. M. Taylor, James Rice, Josiah Morrow, R. C. Henry, Lemuel Auten, Dr. R. F. Henry, Daniel Klinck, Ezra Adams, John Z. Slane, Mrs. Margaretta Henry and Edward Auten.
Four-page folders were printed and the surrounding country was canvassed for students. Mr. James Stevens and Miss Emma L. Jenness were secured as teachers at the recommendation of Rev. Taylor, who knew them both to be instructors of ability. The old Seventh Day Adventist church, situated on the present site of Mrs. Adams' house, southwest of the park, was secured for a school house. This was repaired and improved,


50


and one day early in September, 1887, about twenty-five young people assembled and enrolled as students in Princeville Academy. School progressed this year as well as could be expected. During the winter a small fire occurred, which necessitated the holding of school for a few days in the old village hall. The total enrollment of students this year was thirty-one.
In the second year numerous changes took place. The board of management was composed of but five: Josiah Morrow, Dr. R.. F. Henry, Rev. C. M. Taylor, Edward Auten and Lemuel Auten. Mr. C. F. Brusie succeeded Mr. Stevens as principal, and the recently built addition to the Presbyterian church was secured for school rooms. This year the total enrollment was thirty-four.
In 1889-90 the board of management consisted of the same five and Mesdames Margaretta Henry and Virginia E. Aldrich, and Misses Martha Aldrich, Elmira Jones and Augusta Yates in addition. There was no change in the faculty nor in the school rooms this year. For several months a Literary and Debating Society was conducted with many good results. Twenty-three students were enrolled.
Before the opening of the next year a new home had been prepared for the academy. The church building then recently vacated by the Methodist Episcopal congregation had been purchased by one of the members of the board and been put in good order from foundation walls to spire, partitioned with a fine partition, furnished with the most approved modern school desks. real slate-stone blackboards, a good regulator clock and other requisite furniture, and supplied with a bell of the best material weighing over six hundred pounds, cast expressly for this place. The ringing of this bell occasioned the presenting of a petition to the village council in the following words: "Princeville, Illinois, February 16, 1891.—To the officers of the village council of the village of Princeville: We, the undersigned citizens of the village of Princeville, do hereby protest against the tolling of the academy bell, placed in the


51


building owned by Edward Auten, and would request the stopping of the same." This petition was signed by one hundred and twenty-six of Princeville's citizens.
The principal for this year was Mr. B. M. Southgate, and the board of management consisted of Miss Martha Aldrich, Mrs. V. E. Aldrich, Josiah Morrow, Lemuel Anten and Edward Auten. The attendance was more than double that of the preceding year, and in June the second academy graduted its first class: Lewis R. Aldrich, Andrew Auten, Anna R. Auten. Lydia C. Auten. Leroy Jones, Fred Moffit, Lewis Morrow and Winn Morrow. These were all students of the classical course and all received Academy diplomas. Five of them were admitted to Williams College, two to Oberlin College and one to Wellesley College, all on certificates from the academy. All finished college except Winn Morrow, who died in August after graduation. Of those who had been in attendance, but had not graduated, some had gone away to school, some were teaching school, and some had begun business careers. The academy had already proven itself to be a valuable addition to the community.
Beginning with the year 1891-92, the Board of Management consisted only of Peter Auten, Lemuel Auten and Edward Auten, remaining the same through the remaining years of the Academy, up to June, 1900,— one of the privileges of the members of the Board of Management continuing to be the footing of the annual deficit.
In the fall of 1891, Mr. E. B. Cushing began a two years' principalship. In the summer of '91 the board published a pamphlet with a complete catalogue of the school from the start, and with announcements for the coming year. A new feature was the addition of the Musical Department, which remained until June, 1899, under the direction of Miss Alice Peters. Thorough daily instruction in singing was free to all students, and individual lessons in voice culture, piano and organ were furnished. In the winter an advanced singing class, the Chorus, was held each Wednesday evening,


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partly for drill, but more especially for the practice of church and other music, and a class of small children, the Junior Chorus, was held each Saturday for elementary drill and practice. It is due largely to Miss Peters' work and influence in the school that many of Princeville's young people at the time took so lunch interest in singing. This year was the first in which scolarships and rhetorical prizes were offered. The enrollment was ninety-three. Miss Jenness, the one instructor who had been with the academy during its first five years now retired from service.
Early in the summer of 1892. Miss Luella Gray was secured as art teacher, and lessons were given in the store building north of the Auten bank building. Enough patronage was not secured, however, to justify continuing this department after one year. The faculty for 1892-93 consisted of Mr. Cushing, Miss Peters, Miss Gray, Miss Mary Francis and Miss Georgie L. Kinney. The course this year was lengthened to four years and improved by the addition of modern languages and many other studies. In June. '93, there was one graduate. Laura Auten, who entered Oberlin College.
For the year 189:3-94 Mr. Cushing was succeeded as principal by Mr. H. W. Eckley. Although the year did not show so large an attendance as some before had done, it was not lacking in results. A monthly paper, the "Sol," was published by the students, and this, together with the regular rhetorical work, helped materially in developing literary ability. Physical culture also was conducted enthusiastically and made a very noticeable improvement in the carriage of the students' bodies. In June. '94. a class of nine was graduated:
Lennie Yates, Lois Blanchard. Nellie Auten, Albert Moffit, Harry Houston. Lena Ferguson. Martha Gordon, Deane Hopkins and Peter Auten. Of these nine, nearly all went to college.
During the year 1894-95, Mr. Thaddeus H. Rhodes was principal, with Miss Emma L. Rigdon as assistant, and Miss Peters in charge of the musical department


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as stated. An announcement of the Academy written that fall well outlined the policy of the school and purpose of the Board of Management in the following terms:
"In the new catalogue a number of new features will be noticed: The classical course has been lightened in the senior year, the scientific course has been changed so as to include book-keepng and commercial arithmetic, and with a view to preparing for teacher's first-grade certificate; there will be systematic instruction and drill in spelling, penmanship, class singing and physical culture; the Sol will be continued; a literary society will be organized in connection with the regular rhetoricals; occasional high-class entertainments and one or more full courses of lectures will be provided during the year; the musical department will give three concerts, and there will be two public rhetorical contests. The coming year bids fair to be a prosperous one for the academy. The Board of Management are more than ever determined that this school shall be one of the highest merit, ever worthy of its present reputation for thorough and efficient work. Their aim shall be to continue intact the present strict discipline, with a faculty individually strong in governing power, of high scholarship and culture, and of unquestioned character, who shall be models to lead our youth to high aims, high attainments and most worthy character. Their desire is that this school shall be only for the good of this community and of all whom its influence may reach, and that it may harmonize in its work with all other institutions, organizations and efforts for the advancement of knowledge and the building up of character with which it may have to do by reason of its location or its influence.
Cambridge and New Haven are proud of their Harvard and Yale, Galesburg of her Knox College, Toulon of her Academy, and the people of Princeville ought to be proud of Princeville Academy; they ought to show their appreciation by keeping the school filled with pupils. It brings the first few years of a higher


54


education to our doors, and is also designed to fit students for teaching and, in general, to aid them in their preparation for active, useful lives. It will bring to our village as residents families of culture and noble aspirations. It has brought and will yet bring into our midst teachers whose refining and elevating influence is felt out of and far beyond the academy walls."
The graduates in June, 1893 were two in number: Linus U Aldrich and Carrie B. Chase.
The faculty remained the same during 1895-96 with the addition of Miss Lydia C. Auten, teacher in the academic department. The graduates in June, 1896 were six in number: Julia C. Auten, Stewart R. Campbell, Mary Dickinson, William J. Ferguson, Besse L. Herriott, Mary C. Short.
For the year 1896-97 Mr. Ernest W. Cushing was principal with Miss Lydia Auten and Miss Peters as before, and Miss Anna R. Auten on the faculty. There was one graduate in 1897, Miss S. E. Violet Stewart.
The faculty remained the same during the year 1897-98 with the substitution of Mr. Royal B. Cushing for his brother as principal. Graduates in June, 1898 were eleven in number: Sarah R. Auten, George E. Dunlevy, Irma G. Evans, Harry D. Fast, Mervin A. Hoag, Earnest E. Lincoln, Walter J. Marsh, Grant Morrow, Duane J. Newell, Mary M. Stewart, Helen B. Tucker.
Mr. Royal B. Cushing continued as principal during the year 1898-99, with Misses Lydia and Anna Auten and Miss Grace Chapin as assistants, and in June, 1899, Edward Auten, Jr., Esther H. Auten, Roy E. Jackson and James A. Shafer were graduated.
In the year 1899-1900 Mr. James E. Armstrong was principal with Mrs. Lydia Auten Armstrong and Miss Grace Chapin continuing as assistants. The graduating class in 1900 consisted of Mignonne Phillips, Della Lucas, Irene Keach and Clauson M. Wilmot.
With the rise of the modern high school, the necessity for an academy did not seem so great to some of the parents and citizens, and the encouragement and


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appreciation was not sufficient for continuing the sessions of the academy any longer. It was hoped at first that the omission of school sessions might be only temporary, but they have not been resumed up to the present writing, 1915. The academy building in the meantime, has been used for primary school, and for high school temporarily while the present large new public school was building in 1907, and is at present used as warehouse.
The progress made by the former students of the academy as they have entered into the world of life, has fully justified the maintenance of the academy during the years that it was kept up, and there are some even yet who believe that a private school of such a character has students who as a body, have more strength of purpose in their work than the average body of public high school scholars. In closing this history, we wish to pay a tribute to the mothers and wives who, jointly with their husbands on the Board of Management took a deep interest in the welfare of the academy.



And if I should live to be
The last leaf upon the tree
In the Spring,
Let them smile as I do now
At the old forsaken bough
Where I cling.



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PRINCEVILLE ACADEMY—PROGRAMME OF THE
SECOND ANNUAL EXHIBITION, WEDNESDAY
EVENING, MARCH 7. 1860, AT SIX O'CLOCK.


PRAYER.

   
MUSIC—"For the Right."

Salutatory Charles A. Cornwell.
"Man's Destiny" John Auten.
"New England and the Union," Lemuel K. Andrews
"The Seminole's Reply," Franklin C. Hitchcock.
"Address to the Young" Leonard Riel.
"Warren's Address" Oscar M. Osborn
   
MUSIC—"Sword of Bunker Hill."

   
ESSAYS.

Life of a Sailor Louisa E. Keady
Friendship Sarah C. Riel.
Charity Augusta Yates.
Decision of Character Amanda Yates.
John Brown, of Harper's Ferry Judith Smith.
Make home Pleasant Mary Goodwin.
Good Manners Mary Jane Irwin.
A Reverie Mary Calhoun.
   
MUSIC—"Lords of Creation."

"Our Country," Wm. W. Yates.
"Washingtonii Vita," Augustus T. Stone.
"Mt. Tabor" John H. McCurdy.
"Adams and Jefferson," Wm. Yates.
Oration, Moral Progress during last Century, David Mendel.
   
MUSIC—"Gipsy Countess."

Oration—Progress of America Charles N. Hull.
   
ESSAYS.

The Dress Is not the Man Mary E. Baldwin.
Where is thy Home? Caroline Wilson.
When I was Young Martha A. Keady.
The Law of Nature Eugenie Hull.
A Poem Mary Myers.
Mexico Sarah Livingston.
A Romance Matilda McCutchen.
The Dead of '59 Mary H. B. Morrow.


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MUSIC—"Shining Shore"

COLLOQUY—WEALTH AND POVERTY.

Essays: Remembrances of N. Eng. Scenes Elizabeth Sabin
Life's Golden Age Sarah Chase.


"Incidents of Travel,"Martin B. Robinson
"Defense of England,"Wm. H. Cornwell.
"Ward's Oration"Henry A. Stowell.
"Rollo's Address to the Peruvians,"Onias W. Cummins.
{ Deserted Bride — Lilian Gray, Matilda McCutchen.
Bride's Maid—Flora Clinton, Olivia Cutter.


MUSIC.—"Never Court but One,"

Oration—Peace Andrew Auten.
Personification, Mirth Margaret Campbell.
Melancholy Mary H. Baldwin.

COLLOQUY—THINGS THAT SOMETIMES HAPPEN.

TABLEAUX—POWER AND SUBJUGATION.


"Dangers of the Spirit of Conquest," Edwin Stevens.
Essays { Field of View Philena Blanchard.
Diamond in the Dark Hannah G. Stevens.

TABLEAUX—SHE IS TALL AS ANY FIR TREE!


MUSIC—"Heather Bells."


Personification { Modesty Martha J. Hervey.
Friendship Philena Blanchard.
Patience Hannah G. Stevens.
Truth Olivia Cutter.
Oration—Accessions to our National Territory, Levi A. Lapham.


TABLEAUX—SIR WALTER RALEIGH SPREADING HIS CLOAK FOR QUEEN ELIZABETH.


Essays. { A School Girl's Soliloquy Martha J. Hervey.
Rural Happiness Olivia Cutter.

MUSIC—"Farmer's Boys and Girls."

COLLOQUY

{Teacher's Convention in Egypt,Solomon Bighead, Pres.—A. Auten.
Nehemiah Thumpkins, Sec'y—C. Alter.
ValedictoryLemuel Auten.

MUSIC (Closing Song)—Farewell.

BENEDICTION


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