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Vandenberg Newspaper clippings of obits submitted by Gloria Jackson

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 These obituaries I copied for ten cents a piece at the Galesburg Library, Galesburg, IL., to post here for your pleasure.  I have made every effort to try and not have typing errors and such and that all information is correct due to my ability to obtain copies from either the Warren County Library or the Galesburg Library by looking at microfilm.  If you should happen to find any errors feel free to email me the correct data or what you would like changed. You may also email me any obits you'd like to share with others and I'll post them here or on another obit page.  Thanks!

Ellen Jane Kirkpatrick Babcock


        The Monmouth Review January 28, 1899---- reported that the death of
Mrs. George Babcock occurred at 8:30 o’clock that morning at the family residence, 206 East Broadway. She had been an invalid for the last five years but her last sickness began only last Monday night, when she was taken with an attack of the grip. She sank very fast and was quite low the day before. Toward evening she rallied and this morning was able to recognize her son and daughter, who came to Monmouth on the early trains. She was conscious almost to the time she passed away. The funeral would be held Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the family home. Ellen Jane Kirkpatrick was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1832. She came to Monmouth in 1855 with her family and on March 09, 1859, married George Babcock. Three children were born to them and the husband and the others were at her bedside this morning. The children are Miss Minnie E. Babcock who lived at home, Mrs. Silas Porter of Kansas City, Kansas and Fred Babcock of Omaha. Of her family, only her brother and sister, I. M. Kirkpatrick and Mrs. Mary K. Rankin were living. Mrs. Babcock was a conscientious Christian and for many years had been a member of the Presbyterian church. She was also a charter member of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union in Monmouth and retained her connection with it until her death. She was a woman who was beloved by all her friends for her gentle ways and pleasant manners.
    The Monmouth Review. January 31, 1899, stated that a very large number of her friends attended the funeral of
Mrs. George Babcock, which was held at the family residence, 206 East Broadway, at 10 o’clock that morning. Her pastor, Dr. A.H. Dean of the Presbyterian church, was in charge and his address showed the exceeding preciousness of the Christian’s hopes and comforts. Dr. T .H. Hanna assisted by offering prayer and Reverend W.J. Sanborn read selections from the scriptures. The music was furnished by a quartet, Miss Carrie Sipher, Mrs. Anna Morgan of Marshalltown, E .D. Brady and Will Gilbert. Their first selection was “Abide With Me” and the second “The Land to Which We Go”. The floral offerings were beautiful, including a handsome bunch of white roses from the W.T.C.U. of which Mrs. Babcock had been a member since its organization. The pall bearers were Draper Babcock, J. E. Alexander, Isaac Hodgens, George Armsby, T. H. Rogers and Walter Scott.     She died at her home at 206 East Broadway. She had been an invalid for five years but died after a case of grippe. She came to Monmouth with her family in 1855. She was survived by her husband and three children, Minnie Babcock, at home, Mrs. Silas Porter of Kansas City, Kansas and Fred Babcock of Omaha. She also was survived by her brother I .M. Kirkpatrick and a sister. Mrs. Mary K. Rankin both of Monmouth. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and of the W. C. T. U. Her funeral was conducted at her home by The Reverend W. J. Sanborn and Dr. T. H. Hanna.

Agnes Gill Black Wright

The Monmouth Review of 28 November 1903 . Mrs. Agnes G. Wright died that morning at 1:15 o’clock from heart failure at her home, 315 West Broadway. About a year and a half ago she fell and broke her hip and since then she had been mostly confined to home. She was born 9 July 1819 in Highland county, Ohio and in 1836 was married to Washington Wright. In 1851 she came to Warren county, settling near Sugar Tree Grove and moved to Monmouth about twenty three years before where she had lived since. Eight children were left to mourn her loss, Mrs. John Shelley of Salt Lake City, Utah; Mrs. John Nash of Barneston, Nebraska; Mrs. J.L. Graham of Norwood; Emma Wright of Monmouth; H.L. Wright of Armour, Nebraska; J. A.. Wright of Summerfield, Kansas; W. M.. Wright of Wayne, Nebraska and S. B.. Wright of Breckenridge, Ohio. Mrs. Wright was a faithful and consistent member of the First United Presbyterian church and a woman of great strength of character. Her life was an exemplary one, and she will be greatly missed by her many friends. The funeral would be held at the residence Monday morning at 10:30 o’clock with Reverend J. F.. Jamison of the Ninth Avenue United Presbyterian church in charge. Interment would be made in Monmouth Cemetery.
        The Monmouth Review of 30 November 1903 reported that the funeral services of Mrs. Agnes G. Wright were held that morning at 10:30 o’clock at the late residence, 315 West Broadway. Reverend J. F.. Jamieson conducted the services, assisted by Reverend T. C.. Pollock of the Second United Presbyterian church. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful. The pallbearers were W. M.. Wright, J. A.. Wright, H.L. Wright, D.C. Gowdy, J.L. Graham and W. H. . Findley. The interment was made in Monmouth Cemetery.

Calvin M. Rodgers

         Monmouth Review of 17 May 1906. Honorable Calvin M. Rodgers died in his home in Hale 16 May 1906 at 6:30 o'clock the evening before, having been in poor health for some time and his death expected hourly for several days. The name of Rodgers and the family had been known in Warren county for the past seventy years. The name was not only associated with the pioneers of Warren county but was to be traced in the settlement of Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century. Reverend John Rodgers, the grandfather of the subject of the sketch, emigrated from Scotland, where he was born about the year 1736 when he was about thirty-five years of age. The father of Calvin M. Rodgers, Aleri Rodgers was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia in 1785 and in 1822 brought his wife and four children to Monroe county, Missouri. The journey was performed overland by their own conveyance and was laboriously traveled through Tennessee, Kentucky and Illinois to St. Louis, then a small village upon the frontier. When the family had been increased to ten children, the move to Warren county was made in 1836 and the death of the elder Rodgers occurred in Hale township in 1863, followed by the death of the mother in 1880. To Aleri Rodgers and his brother, Andrew, was to be accredited the “introduction of the first reaping” machine west of the Alleghenies. It was of the McCormick pattern and was shipped from Lynchburg, Virginia to Richmond, New Orleans and up the Mississippi river to Oquawka and then by wagon to the old Rodgers homestead in Hale township. The day of its trial was one long remembered by the early agriculturists. Many witnessed the initial trial and it was at once voted a success. The life of Calvin Rodgers was a success. He was always at peace with the world and his friends were many. He held his parents in reverence and in turn had the admiration of every one who came in contact with him. Calvin Rodgers was born in Monroe county, Missouri on 15 February 1835, 1836, his parents, Aleri and Mary (Davidson) Rodgers, moved to Warren county and settled upon the land that has been the homestead of the Rodgers family since that day. The family of the elder Rodgers consisted of ten children, but to Calvin M. was given the old home and the oversight of affairs of the farm since the day of his marriage. Mr. Rodgers’ schooling was acquired in such schools as the section afforded during the winter months of its early history and this was supplemented by attendance at Knox college during the winter months of 1853 and 1854. He had a bright mind and was of a most practical nature. He was always well posted on the affaires of the community and the country and his judgment was often sought. Mr. Rodgers was early recognized as a leader among men. When but twenty-one years of age, he was elected a school trustee and for many years was re-elected to the position, and his counsel made of the schools of his district the best in the county. The election to this office was followed by his neighbors choosing him as commissioner of highways and then as supervisor. The latter office he held for a number of years. In 1882 he was chosen by the Republicans to represent the Twenty-seventh district in the general assembly and was also elected to the Thirty-fourth general assembly in 1884. In the legislative half his ability was recognized by his assignment upon a number of important committees. Since the laws of the State established the county boards of review of assessments, Mr. Rodgers was chosen by the county court to a place upon that commission in Warren county and the office was most acceptably filled by him. Mr. Rodgers was elected one of the trustees of the Warren County Library and Reading Room Association in 1878. He served the library as one of its most intelligent and trusted trustees from that date to this. His wide reading and his business ability made of him a most valuable member of the board. His sterling integrity brought him the confidence of the entire community in this and in many other public trusts. Having known Mr. W. P.. Pressly as an intimate friend for many years and possessing his complete trust, he helped to faithfully carry out the latter’s intentions in building up the library. Mr. Rodgers married Miss Eliza A. Paine on 27 November 1858. She was the daughter of Charles H. and Parthenia (Amson) Paine, who came to Warren county from New England and settled in Sumner township about the same year, that the elder Rodgers and his family came to Hale township. To the union were born eight children, six of whom still survived., Romaine M. Charles H., Aleri A., William D., Alexander and Emily I. The funeral would be held at the residence, seven miles northwest of Monmouth, at 1:30 o’clock the next afternoon. The interment would be made in the Sugar Tree Grove cemetery.
    The Monmouth Review of 18 May 1906 reported that the funeral of the late Calvin M. Rodgers, whose death occurred Wednesday was held that afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from the family residence northwest of the city. A large number of friends attended the funeral to pay their last respects to one who they had honored in life. Reverend Samuel Brown of the Henderson church conducted the service and the pallbearers were chosen from the sons and nephews of the deceased. . Interment was made in the Sugar Tree Grove Cemetery.

Mary Wier Millen

        Monmouth Review of 26 November 1906. Mrs. Mary Millen, widow of Reverend Samuel Millen, one of the pioneer ministers of Warren and Henderson counties, died at her home on North Sunny Lane 25 November 1906 after a long and lingering illness. About a week ago, she took a change for the worse and her son, Dr. Will Millen was summoned to the Monmouth from Omaha. Miss Mary Wier was born in Chester district, South Carolina, in 23 September 1822, so was 84 years old at the time of her passing. She moved with her parents to Monroe county, Indiana in 1834 living near Bloomington where she grew to womanhood. She united with the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church under the ministry of Reverend William Turner at Bloomington, Indiana. In August 1846, she was united in marriage with Reverend Samuel Millen, well known to the older residents of Warren and Henderson county. The couple came to this county soon after their marriage. The husband dying here in 1871. The deceased was the mother of five boys, Theophilus, who died in infancy, John W. who died in 1882 just as he was ready to enter the ministry, Dr. Samuel of Clarinda, Iowa who died in June of 1906, Dr. W. M. of Omaha and Theodore M who was for many years the librarian of the Warren county library. An adopted daughter, Mrs. Fannie Mark of Monmouth and a sister Mrs. Wylie of Bloomington, Indiana survive. Mrs. Millen was a woman of find strength of character and lived a life that was worthy of emulation. She was a member of the Second United Presbyterian church. Funeral services would be held the next morning at 10 o’clock at the residence on North Sunny Lane with Reverend S. H. Weed in charge. Interment would be in the Monmouth cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 28 November 1906 stated that her funeral was conducted by Reverend S. H.. Weed in the absence of her pastor Dr. T. C,. Pollack. Burial was in Monmouth cemetery beside the remains of her husband, who had preceded her in death by many years.
 

William McCutchan

     Monmouth Daily Review of 8 April 1907. He died at 6:30 at his home on North Main Street. His death was a result of a lingering illness of three years, he had been very low for the past weeks and his death was expected. He had a stroke while on a trip to Pecos Valley in New Mexico and had been paralyzed since then. He was survived by his wife, Elizabeth. He was born in Cherry Fork, Adams County, Ohio on 30 Dec 1830. His father was a farmer. He moved to Park County, Indiana when he was a young man and later came to Fulton County, Illinois. After his marriage he lived in Mercer County. In 1892, they moved to Monmouth. He was a member of the First United Presbyterian Church of Monmouth and was a zealous religious worker in the congregation at Norwood in the early day. He was survived by a son Frank of Alexis, a daughter Mrs. Fannie Porter of Alma, Nebraska. He was survived by his brothers, Dr. J. M.. McCutcheon of Alexis, E.G. of Glamore I. T.., and his sisters, Mrs. T. M.. Miller of Monmouth, Mrs. Sarah M. Stewart of Brookfield, Mo., Mrs. William Patterson and Mrs. C.R. McClelland of Alexis. The funeral will be held Wednesday am from his residence and Dr. J. A.. Burnett will officiate, concluding services will be held at 2 pm on Wednesday at the Norwood United Presbyterian Church. Pallbearers were relatives of the deceased living near Norwood, C.R. McCutchan, Robert Miller, Clarence Stewart, N. McClellan, Clarence McClellan and Melvin Patterson. Burial was in the Norwood Cemetery.
 

Margaret Miller Warnock

 Monmouth Review of 30 October 1909 . Mrs. Margaret Warnock, formerly of Alexis, died at the home of her father Thomas Miller at 417 North First Street in Monmouth 30 October having been dangerously ill for some months. Her home was in Alexis but she had come to Monmouth for medical care for her cancer. Margaret Miller had been born in Fulton county but moved to the Alexis vicinity in her early childhood. She married in October of 1891 and moved to a farm southeast of Alexis. She left her father, her husband and six sisters and three brothers to mourn her loss. Her sisters were Mrs. Mary Millen of Monmouth, Mrs. Ella J. Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska, Mrs. Emma A. Wiley of Monmouth, Mrs. V. I.. McKelvie of Monmouth, Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon, Iowa and Miss Lena Miller of Monmouth. Her brothers were R. F.. Miller of Alexis, W. B.. Miller of Kansas City, W. B.. Miller of Kansas City and George E. Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho. The funeral was held at the home of her father. Her funeral was conducted by the Reverend C. M.. Lawrence of the Alexis United Presbyterian church assisted by Reverend J. A.. Burnett.
      The paper says she was buried in the Monmouth cemetery but her stone is in the Alexis cemetery. Her death certificate is found in Warren county records, book B, page 223, #6109. She died at 55 years, 10 months and 21 days on 30 October 1909 at 1 am at 417 North 1st Street. She died of carcinoma of the rectum, she had had this for 1 year and six months. She was buried in the Monmouth cemetery 2 November 1909 by Blackburn & Turnbull, undertakers. Her doctor was E. L.. Mitchell of Monmouth.
She is also found in the Turnbull Funeral Home records, they say she died at 55 years, 10 months and 21 days and was buried 1 November 1909 in the Monmouth Cemetery.

Charles Rollins Mc Cutchan

The Monmouth Review of 21 June 1909 reported that C.R. Mc Cutchan, whose home was six miles north of Monmouth died the night before at 9 o’clock. His death was caused by appendicitis which had been allowed to develop so far that it was found impossible to remove the cause of the trouble. Mr. McCutchan was one of the most respected citizens of the county. He was also an influential member of and worker in the United Presbyterian church in Gerald. C.R. McCutchan was born 31 March 1857 in Mercer county, Illinois. When he was 14, he moved with his parents to the state of Virginia where he lived until 1882 when he came back to Warren county where he lived until his death. On 4 March 1885, he married Miss Jennie Crozier, to which union there were four children born, all of whom lived at home with their parents. They were as follows, Lella, Hattie, Gerald and Gretta. He was also survived by two brothers and one sister, who all lived in Indian Territory. The funeral services would be held on 22 June 1909 at the late residence, six miles north of Monmouth. The services were conducted by Reverend J. F.. Jamieson, pastor of the Ninth Avenue church after which the body was brought to Monmouth for burial.
He is found in the Turnbull funeral records, he was born in Warren county, Illinois, died Spring Grove township. He was married and was 52 years, 2 months and 20 days old.

James Douglas Porter

        Monmouth Review Atlas of 5 April 1909. James D. Porter who was a well known and well respected resident of Monmouth died at his home at 214 West Archer Avenue on the afternoon of 4 April 1909 at 12:15 after a serious illness of years and although the end was not unexpected, the many friends of the old man learned the news of his death with deepest regret. James D. Porter was born 29 May 1826 in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was one of a family of ten, only one brother survives him, A. J.. Porter of Fairmount, Nebraska. He came to Illinois in 1854 settling on land the county line near Norwood, where he engaged in farming for many years.. He married Miss Mary H. Irvin of Philadelphia in 1852 and they had two children, John B. Porter of Lewiston, Missouri and Mrs. Anna Greene of Chicago. Mrs. Greene was here when her father died. He also left a widow, nee Miss Mary M. Watt of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. Mr. Porter was an old resident of Norwood. Mr. Porter was one of the founders of the Norwood church, having united with the church at an early age. Since coming to Monmouth he had become a member of the First Presbyterian church in Monmouth. He was a prominent Democrat and was one of the stockholders in the Warren County Publishing Company which published the Warren County Democrat for some years and later the Evening Gazette. His funeral was conducted by Dr. W.R. King assisted by Reverend Mr. Fleming of Norwood and he was buried in the Norwood cemetery. Brother's obituary is below submitted by Chuck Porter.

William Porter "Shotgun Bill"

[Aledo Democrat Tuesday, October 17, 1899] Mr. William Porter's funeral was held in the Presbyterian church on Wednesday at 11 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Henning, assisted by Rev. Baer,, of Alexis. Mr. Porter was one of the early settlers of the community, and has form any years been a genial neighbor to all. Some time ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and has been partially helpless since, although not confined to his bed. His children from a distance were all present except Mrs. Boyd, who lives in California. Mrs. Craig, of Kansas City, is stopping for a short visit with relatives. We extend sympathy to the bereaved wife and children. He is buried in the Norwood cemetery lot 3, block 27. This obituary was submitted by Chuck Porter who is a Great-Great-Grandson of William Porter; known by the country fold  by "Shotgun Bill Porter", he was a very distinguished hunter and outdoorsman distinguishing him from the other Porter's of the area. His brother, John B. Porter's obituary is above. If you are of any relation; Chuck Porter would love to hear from you. Email Chuck Porter

October 12, 1920 Monmouth Review Atlas:

Learns of death:

San Antonia, Texas, June 8--J. N. Porter of this city, father of Gabriel Porter, the young American killed by a Mexican officer in the Tampico oil fields, received a telegram from Tampico, December 22--stating that his son had been killed accidentally and that a letter with details would follow. The letter has not arrived and the father learned from a newspaper reporter last night the manner's of his son's death.

Mrs. Mary Porter

Review Atlas--April 15, 1881--Mrs. Mary Porter, relict of the last John Porter, died at her old home resident in Spring Grove Township non last Sunday, aged 71 years.  With her husband she came to this county from New York in 1835, and was accompanied by Seth Coren, Abner Davis, John Oakes, and Joseph Tinkham.  The first year she lived at Centre Grove.  The next year, 1836, her husband purchased the farm on which they lived and died, in Spring Grove Township.  Joseph Tinkham, of Tompkins Township, brother to Mrs. Porter, is now the only survivor of the little band of pioneers who came to this county together, and he too is breathing under the weight of years.  Mrs. Porter was one among the Old Settler's Association of Warren And Henderson Counties.  She was laid beside her husband in the Spring Grove Cemetery.


 

Jane McCutchan Miller

        Monmouth Review Atlas of 24 November 1908. At the ripe old age of four score and one, Mrs. Thomas M. Miller, a pioneer resident of Warren county passed to her reward at her home on North First Street at 6 o’clock in the morning on 24 November 1908. She had been an invalid for about four years and proved to feeble to withstand a severe attack of cold contracted some time before. Jane McCutchan was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert McCutchan and had been born in Adams county, Ohio 7 June 1827 and was one of a large family of whom two brothers and three sisters still survived. In October of 1848 she married Thomas M. Miller in Parke county, Indiana where they resided for several years. In 1854 they came to Warren county, settling about ten miles north of Monmouth. They lived there for 40 years before moving into Monmouth in 1894. The "60th" anniversary of the couple occurred October 11 1908 and the death of Mrs. Miller was the first to occur in the large family. Besides the family, ten children, nineteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, the last both little girls were left with the brothers and sisters to mourn the deceased. Of the ten children born to the union, five of them lived in Monmouth, Robert and Miss Lena Miller, Mrs. Edith McKelvey, Mrs. Emma Wiley and Mrs. Mary Millen. Those living elsewhere are William O. Miller of Kansas City, George Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho, Mrs. Margaret Warnock of Alexis, Mrs. Ella Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska and Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon City, Iowa. She also left two brothers, Dr. J. M.. McCutchan of Alexis and Gilmore McCutchan of Indian territory and three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Stewart of Little York, Mrs. Martin McClelland of Monmouth and Mrs. Mary Patterson of Norwood. Her funeral was conducted by Reverend J. A.. Burnett at the late home on North First Street with burial in the Monmouth cemetery. Pallbearers were W. M.. Miller, William Miller, Vernon McKelvey, Robert Miller, Alban Brownlee and John Warnock, sons and sons-in-law of the deceased.
 

Richard Carson McClelland

    Monmouth Review Atlas of 20 August 1908. Richard Carson McClelland died at his home on South Eleventh Street 19 August 1908 as a result of a fall received in his home five years prior while painting his house.. He had been in ill health since the fall. He was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania 25 September 1908. at the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted with Company H. of the 87th Pennsylvania Volunteers and served until the close of the war with credit and bravery. He came to Mercer county and settled in Norwood in 1866 marrying Martha McCutchan that same year on 25 October. He was a prominent and influential member of the community there for a number of years, moving to Monmouth March of 1908. . He had five children, four surviving with the widow, N. R.. of Norwood, Everett S. of Chicago, Clarence R. of Monmouth and Mrs. Della R. Duncan of Lanesville, Texas. Two of his brothers and three sisters survived him. W. T.. of Chula Vista, California, Frank L. of Topeka, Kansas, Mrs. Mary Archer of Kansas, Mrs. W. T.. McCutchan and Miss Sue McClelland of Monmouth. Mr. McClelland was a member of the United Presbyterian church of Norwood and belonged to the Alexis post of the G.A.R. Short funeral services would be held at the home on South Eleventh Street on Friday morning and held at the Norwood church in the afternoon with interment in the Norwood cemetery. He is buried in lot 4, block 27. He was buried in Norwood cemetery.

Lucinda Abigail Struthers Wallace

    Monmouth Review of 21 May 1906. Mrs. Gail Wallace died this morning at 10'o'clock at her home 545 North A Street after a long illness, the cause of her death being consumption. Gail Struthers was born 15 March 1855 five miles northeast of Monmouth and had always made her home in the city or vicinity. She was joined in marriage to William E. Wallace 16 March 1876. He had died three years previous. There were left to mourn her death, her father Thomas Struthers, one son, Kyle Wallace of St. Louis, Missouri and a sister Mrs. Oliver Crosier. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and during her residence in the city had gained a wide circle of friends who will hear of her death with sorrow. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the late residence and the remains interred in the Monmouth Cemetery.
    The Monmouth Review of 22 May 1906 reported that funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Gail Wallace, whose death occurred recently, were held that afternoon from her late residence 515 North A Street. Dr. W. R.. King of the Presbyterian church was in charge of the service which was held at 2:30. Interment was made in the Monmouth cemetery

Samuel Rutherford Millen M.D.

      Monmouth Review of 20 June 1906. Word had been received in Monmouth of the death at Bigelow, Missouri at 1:40 Tuesday afternoon of Samuel R. Millen, M.D. of Clarinda, Iowa 19 June 1906 from heart disease. Dr. Millan was a son of Mrs. Mary W. Millen of North Sunny Lane and a brother of Theodore M. Millen, librarian at the Warren county library. His wife was a sister of Judge T. G.. Peacock, Mrs. W. M.. Pinkerton, Mrs. T. H.. Spicer and the Misses Anna, Sarah and Matilda Peacock of Monmouth. Dr Millen was born near Clayton in Adams county 21 July 1853, his father being the late Reverend Samuel Millen. The family came to Henderson county in 1856 where the father was pastor of the Smith Creek church for a number of years during which he was prominent in the movement for the establishment of Monmouth college. In 1881 he married Miss Kate Peacock, who survived him. To them were born five children, James, Mary, William, Matilda and Catherine. Mary was in Monmouth for the college commencement but left Monday for Davenport, Iowa for a visit before returning home. The doctor was quite ill the last December but was better again recently and his death was sudden and unexpected. He was at Bigelow for a rest, his son James being with him. The funeral would be held at the home in Clarinda Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Mrs. Pinkerton and Mrs. Spicer had gone to Clarinda that afternoon and William Millen, a brother who had been visiting in Monmouth would go that night for the funeral.

Elizabeth McCrery White

        The Monmouth Review of 6 March 1906 reported that Mrs. Lucian White had passed away at 3:25 o’clock the afternoon before at Monmouth hospital where she recently had underwent an operation for appendicitis. Lizzie Almina McCrery, the daughter of the late David H. and Katherine McCrery, was born in Spring Grove township, Warren county on 6 August 1864. She became the wife of Lucian White in October of 1890. To that union were born three children, one of whom died in infantry. The husband and two children, Russell and Sarah Katherine were left to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and loving mother. In addition she was mourned by her stepmother, Mrs. Jennie McCrery of Monmouth, by four sisters, Mrs. H. A.. Foster, Mrs. J. W.. Reynolds, Mrs. W. S.. Gallagher of Gerald and Mrs. T. N.. McClanahan of Monmouth and four brothers, John C. of Julesburg, Colorado, David R. of Greeley, Colorado, Dwight C. and Ernest A. of Gerald. When quite young, Mrs. White joined the United Presbyterian church of Gerald and when she was married, she and her husband became members of the First United Presbyterian church of Monmouth. She was a member of the Missionary society of the Presbyterian church. The funeral would be held Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the home, two miles northeast of the city. The pastor, Dr. W.R. King would officiate.
The Monmouth Review of 9 March 1906 reported that the funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Lucian White were held the afternoon before at 1 o’clock from the residence northeast of Monmouth. Reverend W.R. King was in charge of the service in which he was assisted by Reverend T. C.. Pollack and Reverend J.F. Jamieson. The following relatives of the deceased acted as pallbearers: Dwight McCrery, Ernest McCrery, John Reynolds, Will Gallagher, E. Thompson and Dr. H. A.. Foster. The remains were laid to rest in
Monmouth cemetery.

Mrs. Nellie Jacobs

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL, Monday, Feb. 7, 1938:

        Funeral services for Mrs. Nellie Jacobs were held at the Lugg & Holliday funeral chapel this afternoon at 2 o'clock with Dr. Guy Z. Moore of the 1st Methodist E. church in charge. Mrs. Franz Ahlstrand and Mrs. C. E. Breed sang two numbers with Mrs. John Lugg accompanying. Interment was made in Glendale cemetery, the pallbearers being Archie Hendrickson; Arvid and Carl Johnson; Will Hayes; Frank Mink; and Alva Smith.

        Mrs. Jacobs was born in Skone (sic), Sweden, 15 Feb 1861. When she was 6 years old she came to Monmouth and had resided in this part of Ill. ever since. On April 14, 1883 she was married to John M. Jacobs, who passed away on 13 Feb 1906. Following their marriage, the home was for 8 years in Monmouth, 9 years in the Rozetta neighborhood, and about 10 years in the Larchland community. Following the death of her husband, she returned to Monmouth to live about 30 years ago.

        The members of the immediate family who survive are: 2 daughters and a son: Mrs. Oscar Fillman of Monmouth; Mrs. Fred M. Johnson of Roseville; and Marion Jacobs of East Moline. Another son, Alfred, is deceased. There are 5 grandchildren. There remain also 2 sisters and a brother: Mrs. William Sinton of Keokuk, IA.; Mrs. Matilda Jacobson of Los Angeles, Ca.; and John O. Tilson of Elwood, NE.

        Mrs. Jacobs had not been in robust health for some time and 2 weeks ago her condition became such that she was taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Johnson near Roseville, where she was given every care and where she was greatly comforted by the presence of her sister Mrs. Sinton. A bad heart condition combined with pneumonia caused her death on Saturday morning of last week at 10:30 o'clock.

        For 30 years Mrs. Jacobs had been a member of the 1st M. E. Church and her place at the service was never vacant whenever it was possible for her to be present. She was a devoted mother and an earnest Christian character.

Note: Mrs. Nellie Jacobs was born in Nasum Skane, Sweden, the daughter of Martin John and Christine (Olson) Tilson. Her parents and two brothers, Swain M. and John O. Tilson, all eventually left Illinois and settled in Elwood, Gosper Co, NE.

Forgus Graham

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL,

     Forgus Graham was born at Yellow Springs, Green Co., Ohio, Jan. 12, 1825, and died at his home in Larchland, Warren Co., Ill., Jan. 14, 1899, aged 74 years and 2 days.
    The subject of this notice was the youngest child of a family of eleven children: two sons and nine daughters, all of whom preceded him to the other world, except the brother, John R. Graham, who resided in Hale Township, Warren Co, Ill.
Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Miss Hannah E. Baldwin April 9, 1846. To this union were born nine children, six of whom survive him, who are: John R. of Grant City, MO. Mrs. Mary E. McLeod, San Jose, Calif., Mrs. Abigail J. Dalton, Adair, Iowa, Mrs. Sarah E. Druliard and Charles W. Graham, Vernal, Utah, and Mrs. Phebe F. Mangrum, Chapin, Ill. Only two of those were present at the funeral: Mrs. Mangrum and John R. Graham. The wife and mother died in 1874 and her remains were interred in Hickory Point Cemetery.
    On Dec. 23, 1875, Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Mrs. Eliza J. Brown in Monmouth, Ill. At the time of their marriage, Mrs. Brown was the mother of three children, Mr. William Brown, Mrs. Josephine Lellman, Larchland, and Mrs. Mary E. Sawval of Smithshire, all in Warren Co., Ill. These were all present at the funeral.
    Mr. Graham came to Ill. in the year 1853, and the greater part of the time has resided in Warren Co. Part of the time he was engaged in farming, but for over twenty-three years in the mercantile business at Larchland. He was well known and highly respected by all who knew him. His sudden and unexpected death has removed from Larchland an old and honored citizen, he will be greatly missed, his place in this community will be hard to fill. The large attendance of the old settlers at the funeral was an evidence of the high regard in which he was held. Early in his life he made a profession of faith in Christ as the Son of God and the Savior of men, and became identified with the M. E. church. For many years he was quite active in S.S. and other church work, but for a long time has been somewhat isolated from the church of his choice, yet has never changed his church relations.
    His sudden death is a very severe affliction to the many friends and relatives, and especially to the bereaved wife. The pleasant associations of over twenty-two years of married life cannot be severed so abruptly without causing deep sorrow.
May the shadows that fall around the bereaved today be silver lined by the dawning of "tomorrow".
    The funeral services were held in Grace Chapel, Larchland, on Tuesday at 11 a.m., Jan. 17, 1899. The remains were interred in Hickory Point Cemetery
. Hickory Point Cemetery, Thompkins Twp., Warren Co., IL Genealogy

*****Note from Foxie, your host,  when the Warren County Genealogical Society went out in 1981 and read the tombstones inscriptions of this cemetery.  Forgus Graham is not listed as being buried there.  There is a son Frank Graham of Forgus and Hannah Graham buried there.  I suppose, after last weekend, when my daughter Kate and I paid a visit to the cemetery I can see why there would be no tombstone left.  I was really shocked at the condition of the cemetery and the state it was in.  Will later post pictures taken on that day.  Thanks.*****

Margaret Warnock

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL,  November 02, 1909:

    Mrs. Margaret Warnock, formerly of Alexis, died at the home of her father Thomas Miller at 417 North First Street in Monmouth, October 30,1909, having been dangerously ill for some months. Her home was in Alexis but she had come to Monmouth for medical care for her cancer. Margaret Miller had been born in Fulton county but moved to the Alexis vicinity in her early childhood. She married in October of 1891 and moved to a farm southeast of Alexis. She left her father, her husband and six sisters and three brothers to mourn her loss. Her sisters were Mrs. Mary Millen of Monmouth, Mrs. Ella J. Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska, Mrs. Emma A. Wiley of Monmouth, Mrs. V. I. McKelvey of Monmouth, Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon, Iowa and Miss Lena Miller of Monmouth. Her brothers were R. F. Miller of Alexis, W. B. Miller of Kansas City,  and George E. Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho. The funeral was held at the home of her father. Her funeral was conducted by the Reverend C. M. Lawrence of the Alexis United Presbyterian church assisted by Reverend J. A. Burnett.


Mrs.  Elliot Passes Away

From Daily Review Atlas, Saturday, February 16, 1929 Page #3, Col. #3 Monmouth, IL,


HAD MADE HER HOME HERE FOR MORE THAN FORTY-FIVE YEARS -

FUNERAL MONDAY
    Mrs. Jennie Morton Elliott, for over forty-five years a continuous resident of this community with the exception of about four years, passed away this morning a little before 7 o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. Will Ferguson, 112 North Seventh Street. A week ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis at the time she was recovering from an attack of influenza, and her strength steadily failed to the end.

    Mrs. Elliott was the daughter of William and Flora (Culbertson) Morton, and was born near Madison, Indiana, March 19, 1851. In 1882 she and her sister moved to Monmouth and in 1897 she was united in marriage to D. H. McCreery  of near this city. Mr. Mc Creery died in 1903 and in 1916 his widow married John Elliott of Bruning, Nebraska, where they lived until his death in 1920. Since that time she has made her home with her niece, Mrs. Ferguson.

    In her girlhood days she united with the United Presbyterian church at Madison, Indiana, and later transferred her membership to the Second church of Monmouth. Her life was as sincere as it was unassuming and those who knew her best greatly revered her character.

She leaves to mourn her passing two brothers, John, in Kansas, and William, in Indiana, and a number of nieces and nephews, besides a large number of friends who had come to know here through the years she had lived in the community.

Funeral services will be held at the Ferguson home at 10:30 Monday morning, and interment will be made in Glendale cemetery, Monmouth, IL.

                                                                               
From Galesburg Daily Register, 18----under Mortuary:

-******Mortuary******-

    Miss Julia Bessing of Soperville, daughter of Mr. Andrew Bessing, died at her home yesterday of heart trouble, aged but 15 years.  The funeral will be held from the Mission Grove church at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

    Mr. William Langdon, an old resident of this county died yesterday at his home in Yates City, aged about 60 years.  The deceased was a man well-known and stood high in Masonic circles.  In Politics he was a Republican and in past years has been a hard worker in that cause.

    Alexander McKenzie, father of Honorable James A. McKenzie, died at the home of the latter on North prairie Street at 10 o'clock last night after a long illness of complication of diseases.  The deceased was well known in the county where he had a great many warm friends.  He was born in New York state, January 10, 1907, and lived in that state during his early boyhood: worked at Lockport on the Erie canal.  he went when a Young man to Crawford and Erie counti8es, Pennsylvania and in 1828 married a Miss Hendrix.  In the meantime he had taken up the shoemaker's trade which he followed for a number of years thereafter.  In 1839 he moved with his family, consisting of wife and four children, to Knoxville, Ill.  In 1853 he crossed the plains to California where he worked hard in the mines for about two years and returned to his home in Knoxville, July, 1855.  In 1867 He moved to Galesburg where he has since resided.  In politics he was formerly a Democrat. then a free soil Democrat and voted for the free soil ticket in 1848 & 1852.  In 1856, he voted for Freemont and has ever been a consisted and staunch Republican, having voted Republican principles for eight years before the party was named and twelve years before Whigs enough voted with him to make success possible.  He was in belief and membership a Methodist.  He was an industrious, honest and pure man.  The funeral will take place from the home at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon Re. Luckey officiating.

From Galesburg Daily Register, 1945, Galesburg, IL _____under

Monmouth News Notes:

by Special Correspondent;

Earle Bennett, Phone 1191

For delivery complaints Telephone---4782

Everett Foster, 53, DIES EARLY TODAY

    Everett Foster, 53, of 523 East Third Avenue, Monmouth, died at 4 o'clock this morning in Monmouth hospital where he was admitted for treatment last night.  The body was removed to the Turnbull Funeral home.

NATHAN O. BRIMMER DIES, AGED

    From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL, Monday, Feb. 7, 1938:

Mrs. Nellie Jacobs

Funeral services for Mrs. Nellie Jacobs were held at the Lugg & Holliday funeral chapel this afternoon at 2 o'clock with Dr. Guy Z. Moore of the 1st Methodist E. church in charge. Mrs. Franz Ahlstrand and Mrs. C. E. Breed sang two numbers with Mrs. John Lugg accompanying. Interment was made in Glendale cemetery, the pallbearers being Archie Hendrickson; Arvid and Carl Johnson; Will Hayes; Frank Mink; and Alva Smith.

Mrs. Jacobs was born in Skone (sic), Sweden, 15 Feb 1861. When she was 6 years old she came to Monmouth and had resided in this part of Ill. ever since. On April 14, 1883 she was married to John M. Jacobs, who passed away on 13 Feb 1906. Following their marriage, the home was for 8 years in Monmouth, 9 years in the Rozetta neighborhood, and about 10 years in the Larchland community. Following the death of her husband, she returned to Monmouth to live about 30 years ago.

The members of the immediate family who survive are: 2 daughters and a son: Mrs. Oscar Fillman of Monmouth; Mrs. Fred M. Johnson of Roseville; and Marion Jacobs of East Moline. Another son, Alfred, is deceased. There are 5 grandchildren. There remain also 2 sisters and a brother: Mrs. William Sinton of Keokuk, Ia.; Mrs. Matilda Jacobson of Los Angeles, Ca.; and John O. Tilson of Elwood, Nebraska.

Mrs. Jacobs had not been in robust health for some time and 2 weeks ago her condition became such that she was taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Johnson near Roseville, where she was given every care and where she was greatly comforted by the presence of her sister Mrs. Sinton. A bad heart condition combined with pneumonia caused her death on Saturday morning of last week at 10:30 o'clock.

For 30 years Mrs. Jacobs had been a member of the 1st M. E. Church and her place at the service was never vacant whenever it was possible for her to be present. She was a devoted mother and an earnest Christian character.
 

These obituaries are in a different format Due to wanting to get them typed up and online.  I have many more to come... so Check back often... Thanks

Obit - Tuesday, Dec. 17, 1985 - Monmouth Daily Review Atlas

LEONARD WESTLAKE

Mr. Leonard E. "Dick" Westlake, 91, of Aledo, formerly of Ponemah and Quincy, died Monday afternoon, December 16, 1985, at the Mercer County Nursing Home in Aledo.

He was born August 24, 1894 in Goren, Missouri, the son of Milton and Maggie Dunblazer Westlake. He married Mona Elnora Reese October 31, 1921 in Greenley, Kansas. She died in 1964.

Mr. Westlake retired in 1959 after more than 50 years with the Sinclair Oil Company of Quincy. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Monmouth, Monmouth Lodge #37, A. F. & A. M. , Mohammed Shrine Temple of Peoria, and the Low-Twelve Club of Monmouth.

He is survived by 1 daughter, Mrs. Marje Blythe of Seaton; 3 grand-children; and 5 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, parents, and 2 sisters.

Graveside services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, December 18 at the Warren County Memorial  Park Cemetery in Monmouth, under the direction of the Reiser-Trimble Funeral Home of Aledo.

    The Monmouth Review of 7 May 1898 reported that Adam Smith, one of the most highly respected citizens of the northwest part of the county, died the day before at his home. The funeral would be held at his residence, six miles northwest of the city, at 2:30 o’clock the next day.
The Monmouth Review of 9 May 1898 has his obituary, Adam Smith, whose death occurred at 5:20 o’clock Friday evening at his home northwest of the city was laid to rest the day time. The funeral service was held at 2:30 o’clock and Reverend A.M. Acheson of the Henderson church conducted the services. A very large number of the many friends he had were present. Mr. Smith was born in County Down, Ireland in 1840. He came to America in 1865 and settled at once in Warren county. He married Miss Elsie Nash in 1873 and two sons, R.J. and Fred Smith were born to them and left to mourn his death. Mr. Smith joined the Henderson United Presbyterian church soon after coming to this section and had always lived a consistent Christian life. He was highly respected by all who knew him.

 Monmouth Review 4 February 1881. It says that Colonel H.E. Paine who was well known as Grandpa died at his residence in Monmouth at the age of 91 years, 11 months and 20 days. He had been confined to his bed for nearly 8 months, no disease, only the natural giving away. It repeats his birth date and early history. He came to Monmouth in 1855 and had resided in Monmouth for over twenty years. He was survived by four of his children, Mrs. Elizabeth E. Smith, Eleanezer A, Barton F. and Hendrick E. Paine Jr. It talks about his Golden anniversary in Monmouth, where Charles H. Paine was the groomsman at the anniversary since he had been the groomsman at the first wedding and Harriet Phelps Paine's death in December of 1867. After her death he removed with his daughter Mrs. Elizabeth E. Smith who had been keeping house for them. His funeral took place at his home on the corner of Chapel and McClanahan at 2 pm on 4 February 1881.

Monmouth Review of 25 June 1898.
Marsham Lucas, one of the first settlers of Monmouth, died at the age of 96 years on 24 June 1898 at his home in Abingdon where he had lived since 1864. He came to Monmouth from Kentucky in 1829. At that time there was no town but he helped plat the town when the site was picked out by the committee appointed by the state legislature and also helped lay out many of the country roads. He bought one of the first lots ever sold in the city, lot 4 in block 12, the lot just north of the Hall garage on North Second street for $4.78 1/2. He bought the first reaper and mower ever brought to Monmouth, driving to Chicago in a wagon for it. He lived on a farm four miles east of Monmouth until his removal to Abingdon in 1864. Mrs. W .H. Frantz was his daughter. His remains were brought to Monmouth and his funeral service was held in the Christian church, with burial in the Monmouth cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 27 June 1898 had a further story about his death. The remains of Marsham Lucas were brought from Abingdon to Monmouth where he made his home for over half a century that morning. The funeral services were held in the Christian church and a large number of his old friends were present. Dr. A.H. Dean conducted the services assisted by Reverend C. G. Kindred, pastor of the Christian church, Abingdon. The music was by a quartet, Mrs. F. L. Hall, Miss Lucy Tresham, S.S. Hallam and James Hugg with Mrs. E.J. Clarke, organist. The pall bearers were George Sickmon, Thomas Beers, E.E. Wallace, N.Chapin, George Claycomb and C. Swiler. The interment was in the Monmouth cemetery. Those present from outside the city were Thomas and Richard Lucas, J.T. Schritland, Abingdon, Charles Lucas and wife, Mrs. Jane Lucas, Harry Lucas, Mrs. Stilson, J. Ellis, Galesburg.

March 10, 2003:

Carol Terpening who was married to my grandfather's brother Hugh Terpening passed away in her sleep March 10, 2003. Carol was born February 4,1923, in Galesburg, IL, to Karl C. and Ida J. Smothers Stephens.

Carol and Hugh Terpening were married on January 9, 1941, in Kahoka, MO. Uncle Hugh died December 2, 1990.

Surviving are 3 daughters, Carolyn Sue Chamberlain, Knoxville, Clara May and Gary Hornbaker, Oxford, Ark, Judy Angelo, Galesburg, and one step-daughter Madge and Charles Allison, Peoria & Florida; thirteen grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; a great-great-grandchild and three nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, a step-son, Gene Terpening, a brother and a sister.

She was reared and educated in Knoxville, IL. She was a homemaker and active in New Horizons in Knoxville.
She was a member of First Christian Church and O. A .K .S. in Knoxville.

Funeral will be at 10:30am Friday in Hurd-Hendricks Funeral Home, with the Rev. Jerry Hill officiating. Visitation will be from 6:30p to 8:30p Thursday night at the funeral home. Burial will be in Knoxville Cemetery.

Memorials may be made to her church.

On February 9, 2003, of this year her family had a birthday party for her at her church in Knoxville, IL. Aunt Carol has suffered with cancer for the last few years of her life. She never let it get her down. Every time you'd see she'd be smiling and willing to do something for somebody else. She also did a Meals for the older people in Knoxville, IL, the ones who couldn't get out.

Monmouth Review of 30 March 1898 in the Eleanor news.

Thomas Paxton, one of the early settlers of Warren county, died at his home at Eleanor 29 March 1898 after a lingering illness that continued for several years. He came to Illinois from Virginia in 1831, settling on the farm which he made home until his death. He was born in August of 1819 so was nearly 80 years of age when he died. He was survived by his wife and four children, L. M. Paxton, Mrs. Bell Junkin, Mrs. Frank E. Graham and Mrs. Ralph E. Sterrett. He was a life-long Christian and was a member of the Eleanor United Presbyterian Church at the time of his passing. His funeral service was conducted by Reverend J. M. Acheson, assisted by Reverend J. M. Ross of Kirkwood and burial was in the Henderson cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 4 April 1898 has a follow-up story about his death.
The funeral of Thomas M. Paxton was held at his late residence Friday at 2 o’clock. The services were conducted by Reverend J. M. Acheson, assisted by Reverend J. M. Ross of Kirkwood. The service was an impressive one. His late home was filled to overflowing with his many relatives and friends. Mr. Paxton was a life-long Christian and was a member of the Eleanor United Presbyterian church. He having expressed a desire many times to see an organization at Eleanor, he died rejoicing that this was accomplished. The deceased was born in Greene county, Ohio 3 August 1820, came to Illinois in 1831 and was married to Mrs. Jane Graham Hill 2 December 1858. He leaves a wife and four children, who have the sympathy of their friends in their bereavement. The children are Mrs. Bell Junkin, Mrs. Frank E. Graham, Mrs. R. E. Sterrett and Lincoln M. Paxton. Mr. Paxton was one of the early settlers here where he has since lived and made his home and of all his friends not one but highly respected him. The pall-bearers were Alex Parks, W. M. Rodgers, Lindsey Armstrong, W. A. Mitchell, N. R. Mackey, N. H. Torbett. The interment was made in the Henderson cemetery.

The Monmouth Review of 21 April 1898
The remains of D.C. Templeton, who died early Thursday morning
at his home in Chicago, were brought to Monmouth lasts night and taken to the home of his brother John A. Templeton on South A. Street. The members of the bereaved family and several friends made up the sad party. The funeral was held at 10 o’clock this morning at the First United Presbyterian church where Mr. Templeton belonged during his residence here. A large number of his old friends were present to pay their last respects to his memory. The services were very impressive and were conducted by Dr. T. H. Hanna and Reverend A. Renwick. The pallbearers were W. C. Norcross, W. K. Stewart, D. E. Findley, John E. McMillan, J. M. Campbell and Walker Templeton. D.C. Templeton was born near Freeport, Ill 2 March 1845 and received his early education there. He entered Monmouth College in 1863 and graduated from there in 1867 and the same year married Miss Harriet Paine. He became connected with the Weir Plow company and for about 20 years was with them. He was one of their most successful traveling men and through his long connection with the implement and steel trade had as wide an acquaintance as anyone in that business. For several years past he had been the general agent of the Alliquippa steel company of Pittsburg. For a number of years, he occupied a seat on the senate of Monmouth College. Mr. Templeton’s home was in Monmouth until about twelve years ago, when he moved to Omaha, going from there a year later to Chicago where he had lived since. His family consisted of his wife, two sons, John E. and S. Phelps and one daughter, Miss Maria P. Templeton. Mr. Templeton had a host of friends all over the country which he made by his genial, generous ways. He was always popular with the people he met and that was a reason for his success in his profession. His death has been heard of with sorrow by all who knew him. Several of his intimate friends and business associates came with the remains last night, among them being Charles J. Dorrance, Mrs. Agnes Barbour, Miss Fidelia Noe of Chicago, J. S. Canffman, Pittsburg and C. W. Dickinson of La Crosse, Wisconsin. Mr. Dickinson was formerly his stenographer at Weir’s

Saturday, April 05,1893 Republican-Register

Utah--William Gardener, of Coldbrook, died March 25th, aged 52 years.  Funeral services were held on Thursday at Tolbert Creek Church, by Rev. Mr. Pryor, of Cameron.  He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his departure.  Mr. Gardener was loved and respected by all who knew him.  Sincere, kind, and Upright, and will be sadly missed in the neighborhood where he had dwelt so long.  They laid him away in the Mosher burial ground, while sobs broke the stillness of that beautiful day.  And we believe he has gone to that beautiful land, the far away home of the soul, where the storms never beat, but the years of eternity roll.

Carrie B. Jones 

Review Atlas--April 08, 1881---North Henderson, Mercer Co., Sunday, April 03, of heart disease, Carrie B., wife of I. P. Jones, Esq., in the 25th year of her age.  She leaves a husband and two little boys to mourn the loss of a good wife and kind mother.

Alvah C. Allard

Review Atlas--April 08, 1881--Alvah C. Allard was born in New Hampshire.  Alvah removed with his family to Warren County, Ill., in 1856.

When our nation became involved in a great civil war he being in possession of a large degree of patriotism and believing that our commonwealth was in jeopardy, enlisted in the 834 regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers.  In this service he proved to be a valiant soldier.  Last fall he removed to Marshalltown, Iowa, and in a short time he gave his certificate of church membership to the M. C. Church of said place and was received into fellowship, in said church and remained a worthy member until his death, which occurred March 22, 1881.

He was married Dec. 26, 1880, but his married life was very short.  He leaves a dear wife who is severely bereft and who keenly feels her great loss.  His fatal sickness was termed typhoid pneumonia, he was sick just three weeks, during the latter part of his sickness his sister and her husband were with him.
 

Sarah Bruner

Review Atlas--April 15, 1881--Sarah Bruner, the wife of Peter Bruner, died at the old home residence in the east part of this township, on Saturday, the 14th inst., of congestion and disease of the heart, in the 61st year of her age after an illness of about three months.  her remains were buried on the "Old Ogden Farm" in Coldbrook.

Patsey Haley-the death on March 31 of Mrs. Patsey Haley at her home north of Cameron, at the age of ninety-two years. She was one of the first residents of Warren County, coming here and settling on the homestead on which she died early in the 1830's. Her funeral services were conducted by S. T. Shelton. Mrs. Haley was born in 1796, the year the first president was elected and had outlived all the succeeding ones except Hayes and Cleveland. She came to Illinois in an ox wagon, bringing her family with her.

February 01, 1888--- Benjamin Tinkham, who came to Warren County in 1836 and settled on a farm two and a half miles southwest of Cameron, where he died February 01, 1888. He was born in Windham county Vermont, about 1814, so was seventy-four years of age at this passing. One report of his death says the first land he broke in this county afterward was the home of Weir Plow company, now the Brown Lynch Scott site. In 1838 he married Sarah A. Hills at Berwick, Reverend Barton Cartwright performing the ceremony. He was the father of seven children of whom three sons and one daughter survived him. He was a member of the Methodist church, and his funeral in the Methodist church at Cameron was conducted by Rev. Samuel T. Shelton, assisted by Elder Haycock. Burial was in the Silent Home Cemetery south of Cameron.

The Following three Terpening's are all related and related to Foxie:

William Henry Terpening---who had come to Warren County, with his parents in 1835, died February 25, 1888, at his farm home a little north of the Tylerville church in Kelly township at the age of sixty years. He was a native of New York state. He left a wife, one son, and four daughters to mourn his passing. for some three years before he was taken with his fatal illness he was employed as a night watchman in the Brown planter works at Galesburg. Reverend Mr. Aten conducted the funeral at the Tylerville Church, and the burial was in the Old Terpening Cemetery a mile and a half west of the Church. William Henry was brother to John Peck Terpening below and son of Ezekiel and Olive Peake Terpening.

John Peck Terpening--one of the oldest residents of Tylerville, Kelly township, died the even of January 02, 1892, aged 80 years, 8 months, 21 days. John Peck was the son of Ezekiel and Olive Peake Terpening being born on April 12, 1811, Saratoga Co., NY. He had been ill for something more than a year. John Peck came to Warren County, IL, with his father, his new bride, Mindwell Smith Terpening, five brothers, his sister Maria Terpening Brown wife of George Washington Brown, and five other sisters all settling in Kelly twp., Warren County, IL, in the Spring of 1835. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, Mindwell, and seven children. He was a member of the Tylerville Methodist Church in which his funeral was held. He was buried in the Terpening Cemetery.  John Peck Terpening was a man very well thought of.

Ezekiel Terpening, son of Petrus and Maria Terwillger Terpening, his father being a soldier in the American Revolutionary War, and his grandfather Jacob Terpening also served and signed an document about the Revolution; died July 16, 1864 at the age of 82 years, 11 months, 4 days. Ezekiel was a veteran of the War of 1812. He came to Illinois in 1835, bringing with him his entire family and stayed in a one room cabin on section 33 for several months before better accommodations could be made for them. There was at one time 28 people living in this cabin. He left a wife and eleven children to mourn his loss.  Funeral was from the Tylerville Church and burial in the Terpening Cemetery.

 

December, !939, Galesburg Register-Mail

MOTHER DIES IN MONMOUTH

Mrs. R. A. Staley, mother of W. J. Costell, West Main street, this city, died this morning at 2:30pm at her home at 932 South Main street, Monmouth. Mrs. Staley had been ill several months.

SCHUYLER CORONER DIES--RUSHVILLE, IL

DEC 27, 1939--Dr. W. F. Justus Schuyler county coroner, died today after a long illness. He was 70 years old.

AXEL R. JOHNSON OF STRONGHURST DIES

STRONGHURST, NOV 19, 1943, Axel Rudolph Johnson of this city died Sunday evening at the Monmouth Hospital. He was born in Sweden, Nov 5, 1885, and came to the United State in 1909. He is survived by his wife and by a daughter, Martha.

Funeral services will be held at2pm Wednesday at the Bethel Lutheran church in Stronghurst and burial will be at the Stronghurst cemetery.

Friday, February 20, 1942 Galesburg Register Mail

FUNERAL HELD FOR MISS AUGUSTA MATTSON

Funeral services for Miss Augusta Mattson were held yesterday afternoon in Turnbull Funeral with the Rev. H. R. Ekerberg, pastor of the First Lutheran church, officiating. Herbert Levine sand and was accompanied by Dr. Marie Turnbull. Pallbearers were Lester Peterson, Eric Carlson, Herman Nelson, Carl Swanson, Verner Peterson and Carl Nelson. Burial was in Berwick Cemetery.

Friday, December 29, 1939--The Daily Register-Mail, Galesburg, Illinois

FUNERAL IS HELD FOR DR. A. W. GLASS

Funeral services for Dr. A. W. Glass, Monmouth dentist, were held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Lugg and Holloday Memorial chapel, in charge of the Rev., Donald Irwin, pastor of the Ninth Avenue United Presbyterian church, assisted by the Rev. J. F. Jamieson, and the Rev. John Lytle of Hanover, Ill. Mrs. Irwin sang two numbers, accompanied by Mrs. Gertrude Romine at the piano. Interment was in the Monmouth cemetery and pallbearers were Gus Gummerson, James Lipes, Kirk Phelps, Samuel Phelps, John Johnson, and Leonard Johnson.

Dr. Glass passed away Tuesday afternoon at his home, 715 East Archer avenue after a short illness.

Alfred Wilson was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas B. Glass and was born at Winfield, Ia., Sept 1, 1874. He came to Monmouth when a young man and with the exception of the time he was attending school elsewhere he had lived in Monmouth.

He graduated from Monmouth High school and from Monmouth college in 1897. He also attended the university of Iowa and later Northwestern college of Dentistry, from which he graduated in 1901. On Sept 14, 1905 he married Miss Bessie Ross, who survives. A son died in infancy. He is survived also by two brothers, Clarence Glass of Des Moines, Ia., and Thomas B. Glass of San Fernando, Cal. Dr. Glass was affiliated with the Ninth Avenue church in which he too an active part.

Monmouth--Dec 29, 1939-Residents of the Sugar Tree Grove community will enjoy their annual new Year's dinner at noon New Year's day in the Sugar Tree Grove church. The affair will be potluck.

Berwick---Dec 26, 1939--Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Pratt and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pratt came from their home at New Market, Ia., to attend the furneral of their uncle, Ed Pratt, at Monmouth last week, and called on thier aunt, Mary Watson, Berwick.

Mrs. W. J. Sheldon and Charles and Mrs. Feaster were visitors in Monmouth Thursday.

The Rev. and Mrs. C. K. Dean called at the hjome of Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Carr Sunday evening.

Several men came down from Chicago Sunday to the Tommy Jensen farm, west of here,a nd shot 100 rabbits and took them back to Chicago with them.

There were 142 present at Sunday school Sunday morning.

Donald Simmons entertained the Junior B. Y. B. U. Wednesday evening with a Christmas party. A grab bag was enjoyed by the children. Refreshemetns were served.

William Cobb of Bushnell was a business caller here Wednesday.

 

Mrs Thomas Skinner, a former Monmouth resident, passed away Saturday in Chicago.

Funeral services were to be held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Turnbull Funeral home in charge of the Rev. C. M. Webster, pastor of the Calvary Baptist church, with interment in the Monmouth cemetery.

Charles McClanahan death occurs today--

Charles McClanaha aged Monmouth resident at 821 West Archer Avenue, formerly Warren County superintendent of highways, died this morning at East Moline, where he was hospital patient.

Mrs. McClanaha preceded her husband in death only a few weeks ago. The body is being brought to Lugg & Holiday Memorial chapel, where funeral arrangements will be made.

Brother Executor in Allen $17,000 Estate

The will of Charles W. Allen, who died Nov 13, in Monmouth, was proven Saturday in Warren Court, and a brother, Everett E. Allen of Monmouth, names as executor of the instrument, filed his oath and bond.

According to the petition Mr. Allen left personal property of the value of $15,000 and real estate of the value of $2,000. The will drawn Aug 6, 1936, provide for distribution of property among his relatives and friends. Josephine Stewart of Chicago and R. W. Cowden of Monmouth were witnesses to the instrument.

Mrs. Lydia Hopkins Dies at Taylor Home

Mrs. Lydia Hopkins, 79, died at 1050pm Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Leroy Taylor, west of Abingdon. She had been ill one month and death was due to complications.

Funeral services will beheld at 1:30pm Wednesday at the Tarrant Funeral Home, in charge of The Rev. H. R. Jay of Congregational church. Burial will be in the Berwick Cemetery. Berwick Cemetery, Berwick Twp., Warren Co., IL

 

 These obituaries I copied for ten cents a piece at the Galesburg Library, Galesburg, IL., to post here for your pleasure.  I have made every effort to try and not have typing errors and such and that all information is correct due to my ability to obtain copies from either the Warren County Library or the Galesburg Library by looking at microfilm.  If you should happen to find any errors feel free to email me the correct data or what you would like changed. You may also email me any obits you'd like to share with others and I'll post them here or on another obit page.  Thanks!

Ellen Jane Kirkpatrick Babcock


        The Monmouth Review January 28, 1899---- reported that the death of
Mrs. George Babcock occurred at 8:30 o’clock that morning at the family residence, 206 East Broadway. She had been an invalid for the last five years but her last sickness began only last Monday night, when she was taken with an attack of the grip. She sank very fast and was quite low the day before. Toward evening she rallied and this morning was able to recognize her son and daughter, who came to Monmouth on the early trains. She was conscious almost to the time she passed away. The funeral would be held Tuesday at 10 a.m. at the family home. Ellen Jane Kirkpatrick was born in Perry County, Pennsylvania, March 11, 1832. She came to Monmouth in 1855 with her family and on March 09, 1859, married George Babcock. Three children were born to them and the husband and the others were at her bedside this morning. The children are Miss Minnie E. Babcock who lived at home, Mrs. Silas Porter of Kansas City, Kansas and Fred Babcock of Omaha. Of her family, only her brother and sister, I. M. Kirkpatrick and Mrs. Mary K. Rankin were living. Mrs. Babcock was a conscientious Christian and for many years had been a member of the Presbyterian church. She was also a charter member of the Women’s Christian Temperance Union in Monmouth and retained her connection with it until her death. She was a woman who was beloved by all her friends for her gentle ways and pleasant manners.
    The Monmouth Review. January 31, 1899, stated that a very large number of her friends attended the funeral of
Mrs. George Babcock, which was held at the family residence, 206 East Broadway, at 10 o’clock that morning. Her pastor, Dr. A.H. Dean of the Presbyterian church, was in charge and his address showed the exceeding preciousness of the Christian’s hopes and comforts. Dr. T .H. Hanna assisted by offering prayer and Reverend W.J. Sanborn read selections from the scriptures. The music was furnished by a quartet, Miss Carrie Sipher, Mrs. Anna Morgan of Marshalltown, E .D. Brady and Will Gilbert. Their first selection was “Abide With Me” and the second “The Land to Which We Go”. The floral offerings were beautiful, including a handsome bunch of white roses from the W.T.C.U. of which Mrs. Babcock had been a member since its organization. The pall bearers were Draper Babcock, J. E. Alexander, Isaac Hodgens, George Armsby, T. H. Rogers and Walter Scott.     She died at her home at 206 East Broadway. She had been an invalid for five years but died after a case of grippe. She came to Monmouth with her family in 1855. She was survived by her husband and three children, Minnie Babcock, at home, Mrs. Silas Porter of Kansas City, Kansas and Fred Babcock of Omaha. She also was survived by her brother I .M. Kirkpatrick and a sister. Mrs. Mary K. Rankin both of Monmouth. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and of the W. C. T. U. Her funeral was conducted at her home by The Reverend W. J. Sanborn and Dr. T. H. Hanna.

Agnes Gill Black Wright

The Monmouth Review of 28 November 1903 . Mrs. Agnes G. Wright died that morning at 1:15 o’clock from heart failure at her home, 315 West Broadway. About a year and a half ago she fell and broke her hip and since then she had been mostly confined to home. She was born 9 July 1819 in Highland county, Ohio and in 1836 was married to Washington Wright. In 1851 she came to Warren county, settling near Sugar Tree Grove and moved to Monmouth about twenty three years before where she had lived since. Eight children were left to mourn her loss, Mrs. John Shelley of Salt Lake City, Utah; Mrs. John Nash of Barneston, Nebraska; Mrs. J.L. Graham of Norwood; Emma Wright of Monmouth; H.L. Wright of Armour, Nebraska; J. A.. Wright of Summerfield, Kansas; W. M.. Wright of Wayne, Nebraska and S. B.. Wright of Breckenridge, Ohio. Mrs. Wright was a faithful and consistent member of the First United Presbyterian church and a woman of great strength of character. Her life was an exemplary one, and she will be greatly missed by her many friends. The funeral would be held at the residence Monday morning at 10:30 o’clock with Reverend J. F.. Jamison of the Ninth Avenue United Presbyterian church in charge. Interment would be made in Monmouth Cemetery.
        The Monmouth Review of 30 November 1903 reported that the funeral services of Mrs. Agnes G. Wright were held that morning at 10:30 o’clock at the late residence, 315 West Broadway. Reverend J. F.. Jamieson conducted the services, assisted by Reverend T. C.. Pollock of the Second United Presbyterian church. The floral tributes were numerous and beautiful. The pallbearers were W. M.. Wright, J. A.. Wright, H.L. Wright, D.C. Gowdy, J.L. Graham and W. H. . Findley. The interment was made in Monmouth Cemetery.

Calvin M. Rodgers

         Monmouth Review of 17 May 1906. Honorable Calvin M. Rodgers died in his home in Hale 16 May 1906 at 6:30 o'clock the evening before, having been in poor health for some time and his death expected hourly for several days. The name of Rodgers and the family had been known in Warren county for the past seventy years. The name was not only associated with the pioneers of Warren county but was to be traced in the settlement of Pennsylvania in the eighteenth century. Reverend John Rodgers, the grandfather of the subject of the sketch, emigrated from Scotland, where he was born about the year 1736 when he was about thirty-five years of age. The father of Calvin M. Rodgers, Aleri Rodgers was born in Rockbridge county, Virginia in 1785 and in 1822 brought his wife and four children to Monroe county, Missouri. The journey was performed overland by their own conveyance and was laboriously traveled through Tennessee, Kentucky and Illinois to St. Louis, then a small village upon the frontier. When the family had been increased to ten children, the move to Warren county was made in 1836 and the death of the elder Rodgers occurred in Hale township in 1863, followed by the death of the mother in 1880. To Aleri Rodgers and his brother, Andrew, was to be accredited the “introduction of the first reaping” machine west of the Alleghenies. It was of the McCormick pattern and was shipped from Lynchburg, Virginia to Richmond, New Orleans and up the Mississippi river to Oquawka and then by wagon to the old Rodgers homestead in Hale township. The day of its trial was one long remembered by the early agriculturists. Many witnessed the initial trial and it was at once voted a success. The life of Calvin Rodgers was a success. He was always at peace with the world and his friends were many. He held his parents in reverence and in turn had the admiration of every one who came in contact with him. Calvin Rodgers was born in Monroe county, Missouri on 15 February 1835, 1836, his parents, Aleri and Mary (Davidson) Rodgers, moved to Warren county and settled upon the land that has been the homestead of the Rodgers family since that day. The family of the elder Rodgers consisted of ten children, but to Calvin M. was given the old home and the oversight of affairs of the farm since the day of his marriage. Mr. Rodgers’ schooling was acquired in such schools as the section afforded during the winter months of its early history and this was supplemented by attendance at Knox college during the winter months of 1853 and 1854. He had a bright mind and was of a most practical nature. He was always well posted on the affaires of the community and the country and his judgment was often sought. Mr. Rodgers was early recognized as a leader among men. When but twenty-one years of age, he was elected a school trustee and for many years was re-elected to the position, and his counsel made of the schools of his district the best in the county. The election to this office was followed by his neighbors choosing him as commissioner of highways and then as supervisor. The latter office he held for a number of years. In 1882 he was chosen by the Republicans to represent the Twenty-seventh district in the general assembly and was also elected to the Thirty-fourth general assembly in 1884. In the legislative half his ability was recognized by his assignment upon a number of important committees. Since the laws of the State established the county boards of review of assessments, Mr. Rodgers was chosen by the county court to a place upon that commission in Warren county and the office was most acceptably filled by him. Mr. Rodgers was elected one of the trustees of the Warren County Library and Reading Room Association in 1878. He served the library as one of its most intelligent and trusted trustees from that date to this. His wide reading and his business ability made of him a most valuable member of the board. His sterling integrity brought him the confidence of the entire community in this and in many other public trusts. Having known Mr. W. P.. Pressly as an intimate friend for many years and possessing his complete trust, he helped to faithfully carry out the latter’s intentions in building up the library. Mr. Rodgers married Miss Eliza A. Paine on 27 November 1858. She was the daughter of Charles H. and Parthenia (Amson) Paine, who came to Warren county from New England and settled in Sumner township about the same year, that the elder Rodgers and his family came to Hale township. To the union were born eight children, six of whom still survived., Romaine M. Charles H., Aleri A., William D., Alexander and Emily I. The funeral would be held at the residence, seven miles northwest of Monmouth, at 1:30 o’clock the next afternoon. The interment would be made in the Sugar Tree Grove cemetery.
    The Monmouth Review of 18 May 1906 reported that the funeral of the late Calvin M. Rodgers, whose death occurred Wednesday was held that afternoon at 1:30 o’clock from the family residence northwest of the city. A large number of friends attended the funeral to pay their last respects to one who they had honored in life. Reverend Samuel Brown of the Henderson church conducted the service and the pallbearers were chosen from the sons and nephews of the deceased. . Interment was made in the Sugar Tree Grove Cemetery.

Mary Wier Millen

        Monmouth Review of 26 November 1906. Mrs. Mary Millen, widow of Reverend Samuel Millen, one of the pioneer ministers of Warren and Henderson counties, died at her home on North Sunny Lane 25 November 1906 after a long and lingering illness. About a week ago, she took a change for the worse and her son, Dr. Will Millen was summoned to the Monmouth from Omaha. Miss Mary Wier was born in Chester district, South Carolina, in 23 September 1822, so was 84 years old at the time of her passing. She moved with her parents to Monroe county, Indiana in 1834 living near Bloomington where she grew to womanhood. She united with the Associate Reformed Presbyterian church under the ministry of Reverend William Turner at Bloomington, Indiana. In August 1846, she was united in marriage with Reverend Samuel Millen, well known to the older residents of Warren and Henderson county. The couple came to this county soon after their marriage. The husband dying here in 1871. The deceased was the mother of five boys, Theophilus, who died in infancy, John W. who died in 1882 just as he was ready to enter the ministry, Dr. Samuel of Clarinda, Iowa who died in June of 1906, Dr. W. M. of Omaha and Theodore M who was for many years the librarian of the Warren county library. An adopted daughter, Mrs. Fannie Mark of Monmouth and a sister Mrs. Wylie of Bloomington, Indiana survive. Mrs. Millen was a woman of find strength of character and lived a life that was worthy of emulation. She was a member of the Second United Presbyterian church. Funeral services would be held the next morning at 10 o’clock at the residence on North Sunny Lane with Reverend S. H. Weed in charge. Interment would be in the Monmouth cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 28 November 1906 stated that her funeral was conducted by Reverend S. H.. Weed in the absence of her pastor Dr. T. C,. Pollack. Burial was in Monmouth cemetery beside the remains of her husband, who had preceded her in death by many years.
 

William McCutchan

     Monmouth Daily Review of 8 April 1907. He died at 6:30 at his home on North Main Street. His death was a result of a lingering illness of three years, he had been very low for the past weeks and his death was expected. He had a stroke while on a trip to Pecos Valley in New Mexico and had been paralyzed since then. He was survived by his wife, Elizabeth. He was born in Cherry Fork, Adams County, Ohio on 30 Dec 1830. His father was a farmer. He moved to Park County, Indiana when he was a young man and later came to Fulton County, Illinois. After his marriage he lived in Mercer County. In 1892, they moved to Monmouth. He was a member of the First United Presbyterian Church of Monmouth and was a zealous religious worker in the congregation at Norwood in the early day. He was survived by a son Frank of Alexis, a daughter Mrs. Fannie Porter of Alma, Nebraska. He was survived by his brothers, Dr. J. M.. McCutcheon of Alexis, E.G. of Glamore I. T.., and his sisters, Mrs. T. M.. Miller of Monmouth, Mrs. Sarah M. Stewart of Brookfield, Mo., Mrs. William Patterson and Mrs. C.R. McClelland of Alexis. The funeral will be held Wednesday am from his residence and Dr. J. A.. Burnett will officiate, concluding services will be held at 2 pm on Wednesday at the Norwood United Presbyterian Church. Pallbearers were relatives of the deceased living near Norwood, C.R. McCutchan, Robert Miller, Clarence Stewart, N. McClellan, Clarence McClellan and Melvin Patterson. Burial was in the Norwood Cemetery.

Margaret Miller Warnock

 Monmouth Review of 30 October 1909 . Mrs. Margaret Warnock, formerly of Alexis, died at the home of her father Thomas Miller at 417 North First Street in Monmouth 30 October having been dangerously ill for some months. Her home was in Alexis but she had come to Monmouth for medical care for her cancer. Margaret Miller had been born in Fulton county but moved to the Alexis vicinity in her early childhood. She married in October of 1891 and moved to a farm southeast of Alexis. She left her father, her husband and six sisters and three brothers to mourn her loss. Her sisters were Mrs. Mary Millen of Monmouth, Mrs. Ella J. Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska, Mrs. Emma A. Wiley of Monmouth, Mrs. V. I.. McKelvie of Monmouth, Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon, Iowa and Miss Lena Miller of Monmouth. Her brothers were R. F.. Miller of Alexis, W. B.. Miller of Kansas City, W. B.. Miller of Kansas City and George E. Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho. The funeral was held at the home of her father. Her funeral was conducted by the Reverend C. M.. Lawrence of the Alexis United Presbyterian church assisted by Reverend J. A.. Burnett.
      The paper says she was buried in the Monmouth cemetery but her stone is in the Alexis cemetery. Her death certificate is found in Warren county records, book B, page 223, #6109. She died at 55 years, 10 months and 21 days on 30 October 1909 at 1 am at 417 North 1st Street. She died of carcinoma of the rectum, she had had this for 1 year and six months. She was buried in the Monmouth cemetery 2 November 1909 by Blackburn & Turnbull, undertakers. Her doctor was E. L.. Mitchell of Monmouth.
She is also found in the Turnbull Funeral Home records, they say she died at 55 years, 10 months and 21 days and was buried 1 November 1909 in the Monmouth Cemetery.

Charles Rollins Mc Cutchan

The Monmouth Review of 21 June 1909 reported that C.R. Mc Cutchan, whose home was six miles north of Monmouth died the night before at 9 o’clock. His death was caused by appendicitis which had been allowed to develop so far that it was found impossible to remove the cause of the trouble. Mr. McCutchan was one of the most respected citizens of the county. He was also an influential member of and worker in the United Presbyterian church in Gerald. C.R. McCutchan was born 31 March 1857 in Mercer county, Illinois. When he was 14, he moved with his parents to the state of Virginia where he lived until 1882 when he came back to Warren county where he lived until his death. On 4 March 1885, he married Miss Jennie Crozier, to which union there were four children born, all of whom lived at home with their parents. They were as follows, Lella, Hattie, Gerald and Gretta. He was also survived by two brothers and one sister, who all lived in Indian Territory. The funeral services would be held on 22 June 1909 at the late residence, six miles north of Monmouth. The services were conducted by Reverend J. F.. Jamieson, pastor of the Ninth Avenue church after which the body was brought to Monmouth for burial.
He is found in the Turnbull funeral records, he was born in Warren county, Illinois, died Spring Grove township. He was married and was 52 years, 2 months and 20 days old.

James Douglas Porter

        Monmouth Review Atlas of 5 April 1909. James D. Porter who was a well known and well respected resident of Monmouth died at his home at 214 West Archer Avenue on the afternoon of 4 April 1909 at 12:15 after a serious illness of years and although the end was not unexpected, the many friends of the old man learned the news of his death with deepest regret. James D. Porter was born 29 May 1826 in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. He was one of a family of ten, only one brother survives him, A. J.. Porter of Fairmount, Nebraska. He came to Illinois in 1854 settling on land the county line near Norwood, where he engaged in farming for many years.. He married Miss Mary H. Irvin of Philadelphia in 1852 and they had two children, John B. Porter of Lewiston, Missouri and Mrs. Anna Greene of Chicago. Mrs. Greene was here when her father died. He also left a widow, nee Miss Mary M. Watt of Tyrone, Pennsylvania. Mr. Porter was an old resident of Norwood. Mr. Porter was one of the founders of the Norwood church, having united with the church at an early age. Since coming to Monmouth he had become a member of the First Presbyterian church in Monmouth. He was a prominent Democrat and was one of the stockholders in the Warren County Publishing Company which published the Warren County Democrat for some years and later the Evening Gazette. His funeral was conducted by Dr. W.R. King assisted by Reverend Mr. Fleming of Norwood and he was buried in the Norwood cemetery. Brother's obituary is below submitted by Chuck Porter.

William Porter "Shotgun Bill"

[Aledo Democrat Tuesday, October 17, 1899] Mr. William Porter's funeral was held in the Presbyterian church on Wednesday at 11 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Henning, assisted by Rev. Baer,, of Alexis. Mr. Porter was one of the early settlers of the community, and has form any years been a genial neighbor to all. Some time ago he suffered a stroke of paralysis and has been partially helpless since, although not confined to his bed. His children from a distance were all present except Mrs. Boyd, who lives in California. Mrs. Craig, of Kansas City, is stopping for a short visit with relatives. We extend sympathy to the bereaved wife and children. He is buried in the Norwood cemetery lot 3, block 27. This obituary was submitted by Chuck Porter who is a Great-Great-Grandson of William Porter; known by the country fold  by "Shotgun Bill Porter", he was a very distinguished hunter and outdoorsman distinguishing him from the other Porter's of the area. His brother, John B. Porter's obituary is above. If you are of any relation; Chuck Porter would love to hear from you. Email Chuck Porter

October 12, 1920 Monmouth Review Atlas:

Learns of death:

San Antonia, Texas, June 8--J. N. Porter of this city, father of Gabriel Porter, the young American killed by a Mexican officer in the Tampico oil fields, received a telegram from Tampico, December 22--stating that his son had been killed accidentally and that a letter with details would follow. The letter has not arrived and the father learned from a newspaper reporter last night the manner's of his son's death.

Mrs. Mary Porter

Review Atlas--April 15, 1881--Mrs. Mary Porter, relict of the last John Porter, died at her old home resident in Spring Grove Township non last Sunday, aged 71 years.  With her husband she came to this county from New York in 1835, and was accompanied by Seth Coren, Abner Davis, John Oakes, and Joseph Tinkham.  The first year she lived at Centre Grove.  The next year, 1836, her husband purchased the farm on which they lived and died, in Spring Grove Township.  Joseph Tinkham, of Tompkins Township, brother to Mrs. Porter, is now the only survivor of the little band of pioneers who came to this county together, and he too is breathing under the weight of years.  Mrs. Porter was one among the Old Settler's Association of Warren And Henderson Counties.  She was laid beside her husband in the Spring Grove Cemetery.

Jane McCutchan Miller

        Monmouth Review Atlas of 24 November 1908. At the ripe old age of four score and one, Mrs. Thomas M. Miller, a pioneer resident of Warren county passed to her reward at her home on North First Street at 6 o’clock in the morning on 24 November 1908. She had been an invalid for about four years and proved to feeble to withstand a severe attack of cold contracted some time before. Jane McCutchan was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert McCutchan and had been born in Adams county, Ohio 7 June 1827 and was one of a large family of whom two brothers and three sisters still survived. In October of 1848 she married Thomas M. Miller in Parke county, Indiana where they resided for several years. In 1854 they came to Warren county, settling about ten miles north of Monmouth. They lived there for 40 years before moving into Monmouth in 1894. The "60th" anniversary of the couple occurred October 11 1908 and the death of Mrs. Miller was the first to occur in the large family. Besides the family, ten children, nineteen grandchildren and two great-grandchildren, the last both little girls were left with the brothers and sisters to mourn the deceased. Of the ten children born to the union, five of them lived in Monmouth, Robert and Miss Lena Miller, Mrs. Edith McKelvey, Mrs. Emma Wiley and Mrs. Mary Millen. Those living elsewhere are William O. Miller of Kansas City, George Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho, Mrs. Margaret Warnock of Alexis, Mrs. Ella Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska and Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon City, Iowa. She also left two brothers, Dr. J. M.. McCutchan of Alexis and Gilmore McCutchan of Indian territory and three sisters, Mrs. Sarah Stewart of Little York, Mrs. Martin McClelland of Monmouth and Mrs. Mary Patterson of Norwood. Her funeral was conducted by Reverend J. A.. Burnett at the late home on North First Street with burial in the Monmouth cemetery. Pallbearers were W. M.. Miller, William Miller, Vernon McKelvey, Robert Miller, Alban Brownlee and John Warnock, sons and sons-in-law of the deceased.

Richard Carson McClelland

    Monmouth Review Atlas of 20 August 1908. Richard Carson McClelland died at his home on South Eleventh Street 19 August 1908 as a result of a fall received in his home five years prior while painting his house.. He had been in ill health since the fall. He was born in Washington county, Pennsylvania 25 September 1908. at the outbreak of the Civil War, he enlisted with Company H. of the 87th Pennsylvania Volunteers and served until the close of the war with credit and bravery. He came to Mercer county and settled in Norwood in 1866 marrying Martha McCutchan that same year on 25 October. He was a prominent and influential member of the community there for a number of years, moving to Monmouth March of 1908. . He had five children, four surviving with the widow, N. R.. of Norwood, Everett S. of Chicago, Clarence R. of Monmouth and Mrs. Della R. Duncan of Lanesville, Texas. Two of his brothers and three sisters survived him. W. T.. of Chula Vista, California, Frank L. of Topeka, Kansas, Mrs. Mary Archer of Kansas, Mrs. W. T.. McCutchan and Miss Sue McClelland of Monmouth. Mr. McClelland was a member of the United Presbyterian church of Norwood and belonged to the Alexis post of the G.A.R. Short funeral services would be held at the home on South Eleventh Street on Friday morning and held at the Norwood church in the afternoon with interment in the Norwood cemetery. He is buried in lot 4, block 27. He was buried in Norwood cemetery.

Lucinda Abigail Struthers Wallace

    Monmouth Review of 21 May 1906. Mrs. Gail Wallace died this morning at 10'o'clock at her home 545 North A Street after a long illness, the cause of her death being consumption. Gail Struthers was born 15 March 1855 five miles northeast of Monmouth and had always made her home in the city or vicinity. She was joined in marriage to William E. Wallace 16 March 1876. He had died three years previous. There were left to mourn her death, her father Thomas Struthers, one son, Kyle Wallace of St. Louis, Missouri and a sister Mrs. Oliver Crosier. She was a member of the Presbyterian church and during her residence in the city had gained a wide circle of friends who will hear of her death with sorrow. The funeral will be held tomorrow afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the late residence and the remains interred in the Monmouth Cemetery.
    The Monmouth Review of 22 May 1906 reported that funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Gail Wallace, whose death occurred recently, were held that afternoon from her late residence 515 North A Street. Dr. W. R.. King of the Presbyterian church was in charge of the service which was held at 2:30. Interment was made in the Monmouth cemetery

Samuel Rutherford Millen M.D.

      Monmouth Review of 20 June 1906. Word had been received in Monmouth of the death at Bigelow, Missouri at 1:40 Tuesday afternoon of Samuel R. Millen, M.D. of Clarinda, Iowa 19 June 1906 from heart disease. Dr. Millan was a son of Mrs. Mary W. Millen of North Sunny Lane and a brother of Theodore M. Millen, librarian at the Warren county library. His wife was a sister of Judge T. G.. Peacock, Mrs. W. M.. Pinkerton, Mrs. T. H.. Spicer and the Misses Anna, Sarah and Matilda Peacock of Monmouth. Dr Millen was born near Clayton in Adams county 21 July 1853, his father being the late Reverend Samuel Millen. The family came to Henderson county in 1856 where the father was pastor of the Smith Creek church for a number of years during which he was prominent in the movement for the establishment of Monmouth college. In 1881 he married Miss Kate Peacock, who survived him. To them were born five children, James, Mary, William, Matilda and Catherine. Mary was in Monmouth for the college commencement but left Monday for Davenport, Iowa for a visit before returning home. The doctor was quite ill the last December but was better again recently and his death was sudden and unexpected. He was at Bigelow for a rest, his son James being with him. The funeral would be held at the home in Clarinda Thursday afternoon at 3 o’clock. Mrs. Pinkerton and Mrs. Spicer had gone to Clarinda that afternoon and William Millen, a brother who had been visiting in Monmouth would go that night for the funeral.

Elizabeth McCrery White

        The Monmouth Review of 6 March 1906 reported that Mrs. Lucian White had passed away at 3:25 o’clock the afternoon before at Monmouth hospital where she recently had underwent an operation for appendicitis. Lizzie Almina McCrery, the daughter of the late David H. and Katherine McCrery, was born in Spring Grove township, Warren county on 6 August 1864. She became the wife of Lucian White in October of 1890. To that union were born three children, one of whom died in infantry. The husband and two children, Russell and Sarah Katherine were left to mourn the loss of a devoted wife and loving mother. In addition she was mourned by her stepmother, Mrs. Jennie McCrery of Monmouth, by four sisters, Mrs. H. A.. Foster, Mrs. J. W.. Reynolds, Mrs. W. S.. Gallagher of Gerald and Mrs. T. N.. McClanahan of Monmouth and four brothers, John C. of Julesburg, Colorado, David R. of Greeley, Colorado, Dwight C. and Ernest A. of Gerald. When quite young, Mrs. White joined the United Presbyterian church of Gerald and when she was married, she and her husband became members of the First United Presbyterian church of Monmouth. She was a member of the Missionary society of the Presbyterian church. The funeral would be held Thursday afternoon at 1 o’clock at the home, two miles northeast of the city. The pastor, Dr. W.R. King would officiate.
The Monmouth Review of 9 March 1906 reported that the funeral services over the remains of Mrs. Lucian White were held the afternoon before at 1 o’clock from the residence northeast of Monmouth. Reverend W.R. King was in charge of the service in which he was assisted by Reverend T. C.. Pollack and Reverend J.F. Jamieson. The following relatives of the deceased acted as pallbearers: Dwight McCrery, Ernest McCrery, John Reynolds, Will Gallagher, E. Thompson and Dr. H. A.. Foster. The remains were laid to rest in
Monmouth cemetery.

Mrs. Nellie Jacobs

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL, Monday, Feb. 7, 1938:

        Funeral services for Mrs. Nellie Jacobs were held at the Lugg & Holliday funeral chapel this afternoon at 2 o'clock with Dr. Guy Z. Moore of the 1st Methodist E. church in charge. Mrs. Franz Ahlstrand and Mrs. C. E. Breed sang two numbers with Mrs. John Lugg accompanying. Interment was made in Glendale cemetery, the pallbearers being Archie Hendrickson; Arvid and Carl Johnson; Will Hayes; Frank Mink; and Alva Smith.

        Mrs. Jacobs was born in Skone (sic), Sweden, 15 Feb 1861. When she was 6 years old she came to Monmouth and had resided in this part of Ill. ever since. On April 14, 1883 she was married to John M. Jacobs, who passed away on 13 Feb 1906. Following their marriage, the home was for 8 years in Monmouth, 9 years in the Rozetta neighborhood, and about 10 years in the Larchland community. Following the death of her husband, she returned to Monmouth to live about 30 years ago.

        The members of the immediate family who survive are: 2 daughters and a son: Mrs. Oscar Fillman of Monmouth; Mrs. Fred M. Johnson of Roseville; and Marion Jacobs of East Moline. Another son, Alfred, is deceased. There are 5 grandchildren. There remain also 2 sisters and a brother: Mrs. William Sinton of Keokuk, IA.; Mrs. Matilda Jacobson of Los Angeles, Ca.; and John O. Tilson of Elwood, NE.

        Mrs. Jacobs had not been in robust health for some time and 2 weeks ago her condition became such that she was taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Johnson near Roseville, where she was given every care and where she was greatly comforted by the presence of her sister Mrs. Sinton. A bad heart condition combined with pneumonia caused her death on Saturday morning of last week at 10:30 o'clock.

        For 30 years Mrs. Jacobs had been a member of the 1st M. E. Church and her place at the service was never vacant whenever it was possible for her to be present. She was a devoted mother and an earnest Christian character.

Note: Mrs. Nellie Jacobs was born in Nasum Skane, Sweden, the daughter of Martin John and Christine (Olson) Tilson. Her parents and two brothers, Swain M. and John O. Tilson, all eventually left Illinois and settled in Elwood, Gosper Co, NE.

Forgus Graham

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL,

     Forgus Graham was born at Yellow Springs, Green Co., Ohio, Jan. 12, 1825, and died at his home in Larchland, Warren Co., Ill., Jan. 14, 1899, aged 74 years and 2 days.
    The subject of this notice was the youngest child of a family of eleven children: two sons and nine daughters, all of whom preceded him to the other world, except the brother, John R. Graham, who resided in Hale Township, Warren Co, Ill.
Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Miss Hannah E. Baldwin April 9, 1846. To this union were born nine children, six of whom survive him, who are: John R. of Grant City, MO. Mrs. Mary E. McLeod, San Jose, Calif., Mrs. Abigail J. Dalton, Adair, Iowa, Mrs. Sarah E. Druliard and Charles W. Graham, Vernal, Utah, and Mrs. Phebe F. Mangrum, Chapin, Ill. Only two of those were present at the funeral: Mrs. Mangrum and John R. Graham. The wife and mother died in 1874 and her remains were interred in Hickory Point Cemetery.
    On Dec. 23, 1875, Mr. Graham was united in marriage to Mrs. Eliza J. Brown in Monmouth, Ill. At the time of their marriage, Mrs. Brown was the mother of three children, Mr. William Brown, Mrs. Josephine Lellman, Larchland, and Mrs. Mary E. Sawval of Smithshire, all in Warren Co., Ill. These were all present at the funeral.
    Mr. Graham came to Ill. in the year 1853, and the greater part of the time has resided in Warren Co. Part of the time he was engaged in farming, but for over twenty-three years in the mercantile business at Larchland. He was well known and highly respected by all who knew him. His sudden and unexpected death has removed from Larchland an old and honored citizen, he will be greatly missed, his place in this community will be hard to fill. The large attendance of the old settlers at the funeral was an evidence of the high regard in which he was held. Early in his life he made a profession of faith in Christ as the Son of God and the Savior of men, and became identified with the M. E. church. For many years he was quite active in S.S. and other church work, but for a long time has been somewhat isolated from the church of his choice, yet has never changed his church relations.
    His sudden death is a very severe affliction to the many friends and relatives, and especially to the bereaved wife. The pleasant associations of over twenty-two years of married life cannot be severed so abruptly without causing deep sorrow.
May the shadows that fall around the bereaved today be silver lined by the dawning of "tomorrow".
    The funeral services were held in Grace Chapel, Larchland, on Tuesday at 11 a.m., Jan. 17, 1899. The remains were interred in Hickory Point Cemetery
.

*****Note from Foxie, your host,  when the Warren County Genealogical Society went out in 1981 and read the tombstones inscriptions of this cemetery.  Forgus Graham is not listed as being buried there.  There is a son Frank Graham of Forgus and Hannah Graham buried there.  I suppose, after last weekend, when my daughter Kate and I paid a visit to the cemetery I can see why there would be no tombstone left.  I was really shocked at the condition of the cemetery and the state it was in.  Will later post pictures taken on that day.  Thanks.*****

Margaret Warnock

From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL,  November 02, 1909:

    Mrs. Margaret Warnock, formerly of Alexis, died at the home of her father Thomas Miller at 417 North First Street in Monmouth, October 30,1909, having been dangerously ill for some months. Her home was in Alexis but she had come to Monmouth for medical care for her cancer. Margaret Miller had been born in Fulton county but moved to the Alexis vicinity in her early childhood. She married in October of 1891 and moved to a farm southeast of Alexis. She left her father, her husband and six sisters and three brothers to mourn her loss. Her sisters were Mrs. Mary Millen of Monmouth, Mrs. Ella J. Montgomery of Ewing, Nebraska, Mrs. Emma A. Wiley of Monmouth, Mrs. V. I. McKelvey of Monmouth, Mrs. Cora Brownlee of Shannon, Iowa and Miss Lena Miller of Monmouth. Her brothers were R. F. Miller of Alexis, W. B. Miller of Kansas City,  and George E. Miller of St. Anthony, Idaho. The funeral was held at the home of her father. Her funeral was conducted by the Reverend C. M. Lawrence of the Alexis United Presbyterian church assisted by Reverend J. A. Burnett.


Mrs.  Elliot Passes Away

From Daily Review Atlas, Saturday, February 16, 1929 Page #3, Col. #3 Monmouth, IL,


HAD MADE HER HOME HERE FOR MORE THAN FORTY-FIVE YEARS - FUNERAL MONDAY
    Mrs. Jennie Morton Elliott, for over forty-five years a continuous resident of this community with the exception of about four years, passed away this morning a little before 7 o'clock at the home of her niece, Mrs. Will Ferguson, 112 North Seventh Street. A week ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis at the time she was recovering from an attack of influenza, and her strength steadily failed to the end.

    Mrs. Elliott was the daughter of William and Flora (Culbertson) Morton, and was born near Madison, Indiana, March 19, 1851. In 1882 she and her sister moved to Monmouth and in 1897 she was united in marriage to D. H. McCreery  of near this city. Mr. Mc Creery died in 1903 and in 1916 his widow married John Elliott of Bruning, Nebraska, where they lived until his death in 1920. Since that time she has made her home with her niece, Mrs. Ferguson.

    In her girlhood days she united with the United Presbyterian church at Madison, Indiana, and later transferred her membership to the Second church of Monmouth. Her life was as sincere as it was unassuming and those who knew her best greatly revered her character.

She leaves to mourn her passing two brothers, John, in Kansas, and William, in Indiana, and a number of nieces and nephews, besides a large number of friends who had come to know here through the years she had lived in the community.

Funeral services will be held at the Ferguson home at 10:30 Monday morning, and interment will be made in Glendale cemetery, Monmouth, IL.

                                                                               
From Galesburg Daily Register, 18----under Mortuary:

-******Mortuary******-

    Miss Julia Bessing of Soperville, daughter of Mr. Andrew Bessing, died at her home yesterday of heart trouble, aged but 15 years.  The funeral will be held from the Mission Grove church at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon.

    Mr. William Langdon, an old resident of this county died yesterday at his home in Yates City, aged about 60 years.  The deceased was a man well-known and stood high in Masonic circles.  In Politics he was a Republican and in past years has been a hard worker in that cause.

    Alexander McKenzie, father of Honorable James A. McKenzie, died at the home of the latter on North prairie Street at 10 o'clock last night after a long illness of complication of diseases.  The deceased was well known in the county where he had a great many warm friends.  He was born in New York state, January 10, 1907, and lived in that state during his early boyhood: worked at Lockport on the Erie canal.  he went when a Young man to Crawford and Erie counti8es, Pennsylvania and in 1828 married a Miss Hendrix.  In the meantime he had taken up the shoemaker's trade which he followed for a number of years thereafter.  In 1839 he moved with his family, consisting of wife and four children, to Knoxville, Ill.  In 1853 he crossed the plains to California where he worked hard in the mines for about two years and returned to his home in Knoxville, July, 1855.  In 1867 He moved to Galesburg where he has since resided.  In politics he was formerly a Democrat. then a free soil Democrat and voted for the free soil ticket in 1848 & 1852.  In 1856, he voted for Freemont and has ever been a consisted and staunch Republican, having voted Republican principles for eight years before the party was named and twelve years before Whigs enough voted with him to make success possible.  He was in belief and membership a Methodist.  He was an industrious, honest and pure man.  The funeral will take place from the home at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon Re. Luckey officiating.

From Galesburg Daily Register, 1945, Galesburg, IL _____under

Monmouth News Notes:

by Special Correspondent;

Earle Bennett, Phone 1191

For delivery complaints Telephone---4782

Everett Foster, 53, DIES EARLY TODAY

    Everett Foster, 53, of 523 East Third Avenue, Monmouth, died at 4 o'clock this morning in Monmouth hospital where he was admitted for treatment last night.  The body was removed to the Turnbull Funeral home.

NATHAN O. BRIMMER DIES, AGED

    From Daily Review Atlas, Monmouth, IL, Monday, Feb. 7, 1938:

Mrs. Nellie Jacobs

Funeral services for Mrs. Nellie Jacobs were held at the Lugg & Holliday funeral chapel this afternoon at 2 o'clock with Dr. Guy Z. Moore of the 1st Methodist E. church in charge. Mrs. Franz Ahlstrand and Mrs. C. E. Breed sang two numbers with Mrs. John Lugg accompanying. Interment was made in Glendale cemetery, the pallbearers being Archie Hendrickson; Arvid and Carl Johnson; Will Hayes; Frank Mink; and Alva Smith.

Mrs. Jacobs was born in Skone (sic), Sweden, 15 Feb 1861. When she was 6 years old she came to Monmouth and had resided in this part of Ill. ever since. On April 14, 1883 she was married to John M. Jacobs, who passed away on 13 Feb 1906. Following their marriage, the home was for 8 years in Monmouth, 9 years in the Rozetta neighborhood, and about 10 years in the Larchland community. Following the death of her husband, she returned to Monmouth to live about 30 years ago.

The members of the immediate family who survive are: 2 daughters and a son: Mrs. Oscar Fillman of Monmouth; Mrs. Fred M. Johnson of Roseville; and Marion Jacobs of East Moline. Another son, Alfred, is deceased. There are 5 grandchildren. There remain also 2 sisters and a brother: Mrs. William Sinton of Keokuk, Ia.; Mrs. Matilda Jacobson of Los Angeles, Ca.; and John O. Tilson of Elwood, Nebraska.

Mrs. Jacobs had not been in robust health for some time and 2 weeks ago her condition became such that she was taken to the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred Johnson near Roseville, where she was given every care and where she was greatly comforted by the presence of her sister Mrs. Sinton. A bad heart condition combined with pneumonia caused her death on Saturday morning of last week at 10:30 o'clock.

For 30 years Mrs. Jacobs had been a member of the 1st M. E. Church and her place at the service was never vacant whenever it was possible for her to be present. She was a devoted mother and an earnest Christian character.
These obituaries are in a different format Due to wanting to get them typed up and online.  I have many more to come... so Check back often... Thanks

Obit - Tuesday, Dec. 17, 1985 - Monmouth Daily Review Atlas

LEONARD WESTLAKE

Mr. Leonard E. "Dick" Westlake, 91, of Aledo, formerly of Ponemah and Quincy, died Monday afternoon, December 16, 1985, at the Mercer County Nursing Home in Aledo.

He was born August 24, 1894 in Goren, Missouri, the son of Milton and Maggie Dunblazer Westlake. He married Mona Elnora Reese October 31, 1921 in Greenley, Kansas. She died in 1964.

Mr. Westlake retired in 1959 after more than 50 years with the Sinclair Oil Company of Quincy. He was a member of the First United Methodist Church of Monmouth, Monmouth Lodge #37, A. F. & A. M. , Mohammed Shrine Temple of Peoria, and the Low-Twelve Club of Monmouth.

He is survived by 1 daughter, Mrs. Marje Blythe of Seaton; 3 grand-children; and 5 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his wife, parents, and 2 sisters.

Graveside services will be held at 2 p.m. Wednesday, December 18 at the Warren County Memorial  Park Cemetery in Monmouth, under the direction of the Reiser-Trimble Funeral Home of Aledo.

    The Monmouth Review of 7 May 1898 reported that Adam Smith, one of the most highly respected citizens of the northwest part of the county, died the day before at his home. The funeral would be held at his residence, six miles northwest of the city, at 2:30 o’clock the next day.
The Monmouth Review of 9 May 1898 has his obituary, Adam Smith, whose death occurred at 5:20 o’clock Friday evening at his home northwest of the city was laid to rest the day time. The funeral service was held at 2:30 o’clock and Reverend A.M. Acheson of the Henderson church conducted the services. A very large number of the many friends he had were present. Mr. Smith was born in County Down, Ireland in 1840. He came to America in 1865 and settled at once in Warren county. He married Miss Elsie Nash in 1873 and two sons, R.J. and Fred Smith were born to them and left to mourn his death. Mr. Smith joined the Henderson United Presbyterian church soon after coming to this section and had always lived a consistent Christian life. He was highly respected by all who knew him.

 Monmouth Review 4 February 1881. It says that Colonel H.E. Paine who was well known as Grandpa died at his residence in Monmouth at the age of 91 years, 11 months and 20 days. He had been confined to his bed for nearly 8 months, no disease, only the natural giving away. It repeats his birth date and early history. He came to Monmouth in 1855 and had resided in Monmouth for over twenty years. He was survived by four of his children, Mrs. Elizabeth E. Smith, Eleazer A, Barton F. and Hendrick E. Paine Jr. It talks about his Golden anniversary in Monmouth, where Charles H. Paine was the groomsman at the anniversary since he had been the groomsman at the first wedding and Harriet Phelps Paine's death in December of 1867. After her death he removed with his daughter Mrs. Elizabeth E. Smith who had been keeping house for them. His funeral took place at his home on the corner of Chapel and McClanahan at 2 pm on 4 February 1881.

Monmouth Review of 25 June 1898.
Marsham Lucas, one of the first settlers of Monmouth, died at the age of 96 years on 24 June 1898 at his home in Abingdon where he had lived since 1864. He came to Monmouth from Kentucky in 1829. At that time there was no town but he helped plat the town when the site was picked out by the committee appointed by the state legislature and also helped lay out many of the country roads. He bought one of the first lots ever sold in the city, lot 4 in block 12, the lot just north of the Hall garage on North Second street for $4.78 1/2. He bought the first reaper and mower ever brought to Monmouth, driving to Chicago in a wagon for it. He lived on a farm four miles east of Monmouth until his removal to Abingdon in 1864. Mrs. W .H. Frantz was his daughter. His remains were brought to Monmouth and his funeral service was held in the Christian church, with burial in the Monmouth cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 27 June 1898 had a further story about his death. The remains of Marsham Lucas were brought from Abingdon to Monmouth where he made his home for over half a century that morning. The funeral services were held in the Christian church and a large number of his old friends were present. Dr. A.H. Dean conducted the services assisted by Reverend C. G. Kindred, pastor of the Christian church, Abingdon. The music was by a quartet, Mrs. F. L. Hall, Miss Lucy Tresham, S.S. Hallam and James Hugg with Mrs. E.J. Clarke, organist. The pall bearers were George Sickmon, Thomas Beers, E.E. Wallace, N.Chapin, George Claycomb and C. Swiler. The interment was in the Monmouth cemetery. Those present from outside the city were Thomas and Richard Lucas, J.T. Schritland, Abingdon, Charles Lucas and wife, Mrs. Jane Lucas, Harry Lucas, Mrs. Stilson, J. Ellis, Galesburg.

March 10, 2003:

Carol Terpening who was married to my grandfather's brother Hugh Terpening passed away in her sleep March 10, 2003. Carol was born February 4,1923, in Galesburg, IL, to Karl C. and Ida J. Smothers Stephens.

Carol and Hugh Terpening were married on January 9, 1941, in Kahoka, MO. Uncle Hugh died December 2, 1990.

Surviving are 3 daughters, Carolyn Sue Chamberlain, Knoxville, Clara May and Gary Hornbaker, Oxford, Ark, Judy Angelo, Galesburg, and one step-daughter Madge and Charles Allison, Peoria & Florida; thirteen grandchildren; 23 great-grandchildren; a great-great-grandchild and three nephews. She was preceded in death by her parents, a step-son, Gene Terpening, a brother and a sister.

She was reared and educated in Knoxville, IL. She was a homemaker and active in New Horizons in Knoxville.
She was a member of First Christian Church and O. A .K .S. in Knoxville.

Funeral will be at 10:30am Friday in Hurd-Hendricks Funeral Home, with the Rev. Jerry Hill officiating. Visitation will be from 6:30p to 8:30p Thursday night at the funeral home. Burial will be in Knoxville Cemetery.
Memorials may be made to her church.

On February 9, 2003, of this year her family had a birthday party for her at her church in Knoxville, IL. Aunt Carol has suffered with cancer for the last few years of her life. She never let it get her down. Every time you'd see she'd be smiling and willing to do something for somebody else. She also did a Meals for the older people in Knoxville, IL, the ones who couldn't get out.

Monmouth Review of 30 March 1898 in the Eleanor news.

Thomas Paxton, one of the early settlers of Warren county, died at his home at Eleanor 29 March 1898 after a lingering illness that continued for several years. He came to Illinois from Virginia in 1831, settling on the farm which he made home until his death. He was born in August of 1819 so was nearly 80 years of age when he died. He was survived by his wife and four children, L. M. Paxton, Mrs. Bell Junkin, Mrs. Frank E. Graham and Mrs. Ralph E. Sterrett. He was a life-long Christian and was a member of the Eleanor United Presbyterian Church at the time of his passing. His funeral service was conducted by Reverend J. M. Acheson, assisted by Reverend J. M. Ross of Kirkwood and burial was in the Henderson cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 4 April 1898 has a follow-up story about his death.
The funeral of Thomas M. Paxton was held at his late residence Friday at 2 o’clock. The services were conducted by Reverend J. M. Acheson, assisted by Reverend J. M. Ross of Kirkwood. The service was an impressive one. His late home was filled to overflowing with his many relatives and friends. Mr. Paxton was a life-long Christian and was a member of the Eleanor United Presbyterian church. He having expressed a desire many times to see an organization at Eleanor, he died rejoicing that this was accomplished. The deceased was born in Greene county, Ohio 3 August 1820, came to Illinois in 1831 and was married to Mrs. Jane Graham Hill 2 December 1858. He leaves a wife and four children, who have the sympathy of their friends in their bereavement. The children are Mrs. Bell Junkin, Mrs. Frank E. Graham, Mrs. R. E. Sterrett and Lincoln M. Paxton. Mr. Paxton was one of the early settlers here where he has since lived and made his home and of all his friends not one but highly respected him. The pall-bearers were Alex Parks, W. M. Rodgers, Lindsey Armstrong, W. A. Mitchell, N. R. Mackey, N. H. Torbett. The interment was made in the Henderson cemetery.
The Monmouth Review of 21 April 1898
The remains of D.C. Templeton, who died early Thursday morning
at his home in Chicago, were brought to Monmouth lasts night and taken to the home of his brother John A. Templeton on South A. Street. The members of the bereaved family and several friends made up the sad party. The funeral was held at 10 o’clock this morning at the First United Presbyterian church where Mr. Templeton belonged during his residence here. A large number of his old friends were present to pay their last respects to his memory. The services were very impressive and were conducted by Dr. T. H. Hanna and Reverend A. Renwick. The pallbearers were W. C. Norcross, W. K. Stewart, D. E. Findley, John E. McMillan, J. M. Campbell and Walker Templeton. D.C. Templeton was born near Freeport, Ill 2 March 1845 and received his early education there. He entered Monmouth College in 1863 and graduated from there in 1867 and the same year married Miss Harriet Paine. He became connected with the Weir Plow company and for about 20 years was with them. He was one of their most successful traveling men and through his long connection with the implement and steel trade had as wide an acquaintance as anyone in that business. For several years past he had been the general agent of the Alliquippa steel company of Pittsburg. For a number of years, he occupied a seat on the senate of Monmouth College. Mr. Templeton’s home was in Monmouth until about twelve years ago, when he moved to Omaha, going from there a year later to Chicago where he had lived since. His family consisted of his wife, two sons, John E. and S. Phelps and one daughter, Miss Maria P. Templeton. Mr. Templeton had a host of friends all over the country which he made by his genial, generous ways. He was always popular with the people he met and that was a reason for his success in his profession. His death has been heard of with sorrow by all who knew him. Several of his intimate friends and business associates came with the remains last night, among them being Charles J. Dorrance, Mrs. Agnes Barbour, Miss Fidelia Noe of Chicago, J. S. Canffman, Pittsburg and C. W. Dickinson of La Crosse, Wisconsin. Mr. Dickinson was formerly his stenographer at Weir’s

Saturday, April 05,1893 Republican-Register

Utah--William Gardener, of Coldbrook, died March 25th, aged 52 years.  Funeral services were held on Thursday at Tolbert Creek Church, by Rev. Mr. Pryor, of Cameron.  He leaves a wife and five children to mourn his departure.  Mr. Gardener was loved and respected by all who knew him.  Sincere, kind, and Upright, and will be sadly missed in the neighborhood where he had dwelt so long.  They laid him away in the Mosher burial ground, while sobs broke the stillness of that beautiful day.  And we believe he has gone to that beautiful land, the far away home of the soul, where the storms never beat, but the years of eternity roll.

Carrie B. Jones 

Review Atlas--April 08, 1881---North Henderson, Mercer Co., Sunday, April 03, of heart disease, Carrie B., wife of I. P. Jones, Esq., in the 25th year of her age.  She leaves a husband and two little boys to mourn the loss of a good wife and kind mother.

Alvah C. Allard

Review Atlas--April 08, 1881--Alvah C. Allard was born in New Hampshire.  Alvah removed with his family to Warren County, Ill., in 1856.

When our nation became involved in a great civil war he being in possession of a large degree of patriotism and believing that our commonwealth was in jeopardy, enlisted in the 834 regiment of Illinois Infantry Volunteers.  In this service he proved to be a valiant soldier.  Last fall he removed to Marshalltown, Iowa, and in a short time he gave his certificate of church membership to the M. C. Church of said place and was received into fellowship, in said church and remained a worthy member until his death, which occurred March 22, 1881.

He was married Dec. 26, 1880, but his married life was very short.  He leaves a dear wife who is severely bereft and who keenly feels her great loss.  His fatal sickness was termed typhoid pneumonia, he was sick just three weeks, during the latter part of his sickness his sister and her husband were with him.
Sarah Bruner

Review Atlas--April 15, 1881--Sarah Bruner, the wife of Peter Bruner, died at the old home residence in the east part of this township, on Saturday, the 14th inst., of congestion and disease of the heart, in the 61st year of her age after an illness of about three months.  her remains were buried on the "Old Ogden Farm" in Coldbrook.

Patsey Haley-the death on March 31 of Mrs. Patsey Haley at her home north of Cameron, at the age of ninety-two years. She was one of the first residents of Warren County, coming here and settling on the homestead on which she died early in the 1830's. Her funeral services were conducted by S. T. Shelton. Mrs. Haley was born in 1796, the year the first president was elected and had outlived all the succeeding ones except Hayes and Cleveland. She came to Illinois in an ox wagon, bringing her family with her.

February 01, 1888--- Benjamin Tinkham, who came to Warren County in 1836 and settled on a farm two and a half miles southwest of Cameron, where he died February 01, 1888. He was born in Windham county Vermont, about 1814, so was seventy-four years of age at this passing. One report of his death says the first land he broke in this county afterward was the home of Weir Plow company, now the Brown Lynch Scott site. In 1838 he married Sarah A. Hills at Berwick, Reverend Barton Cartwright performing the ceremony. He was the father of seven children of whom three sons and one daughter survived him. He was a member of the Methodist church, and his funeral in the Methodist church at Cameron was conducted by Rev. Samuel T. Shelton, assisted by Elder Haycock. Burial was in the Silent Home Cemetery south of Cameron.

The Following three Terpening's are all related and related to Foxie, feel free to email me if you have any information or are related to these people. Thanks:

William Henry Terpening---who had come to Warren County, with his parents in 1835, died February 25, 1888, at his farm home a little north of the Tylerville church in Kelly township at the age of sixty years. He was a native of New York state. He left a wife, one son, and four daughters to mourn his passing. for some three years before he was taken with his fatal illness he was employed as a night watchman in the Brown planter works at Galesburg. Reverend Mr. Aten conducted the funeral at the Tylerville Church, and the burial was in the Old Terpening Cemetery a mile and a half west of the Church. William Henry was brother to John Peck Terpening below and son of Ezekiel and Olive Peake Terpening.

John Peck Terpening--one of the oldest residents of Tylerville, Kelly township, died the even of January 02, 1892, aged 80 years, 8 months, 21 days. John Peck was the son of Ezekiel and Olive Peake Terpening being born on April 12, 1811, Saratoga Co., NY. He had been ill for something more than a year. John Peck came to Warren County, IL, with his father, his new bride, Mindwell Smith Terpening, five brothers, his sister Maria Terpening Brown wife of George Washington Brown, and five other sisters all settling in Kelly twp., Warren County, IL, in the Spring of 1835. He leaves to mourn his loss his wife, Mindwell, and seven children. He was a member of the Tylerville Methodist Church in which his funeral was held. He was buried in the Terpening Cemetery.  John Peck Terpening was a man very well thought of.

Ezekiel Terpening, son of Petrus and Maria Terwillger Terpening, his father being a soldier in the American Revolutionary War, and his grandfather Jacob Terpening also served and signed an document about the Revolution; died July 16, 1864 at the age of 82 years, 11 months, 4 days. Ezekiel was a veteran of the War of 1812. He came to Illinois in 1835, bringing with him his entire family and stayed in a one room cabin on section 33 for several months before better accommodations could be made for them. There was at one time 28 people living in this cabin. He left a wife and eleven children to mourn his loss.  Funeral was from the Tylerville Church and burial in the Terpening Cemetery.

May 06, 1913,

Mrs. Mary Armstrong, widow of Martin Armstrong, died quite unexpectedly at her home in the Cedar Creek neighborhood the evening of May 06, 1913, heart failure being given as the cause.  Although well advanced in years, she had apparently been in good health, and the day of her death she had spent a great deal other time in her garden.  In the evening she stood by the kitchen stove while her daughter was preparing supper, and suddenly she fell, lapsed into unconsciousness, and within fifteen minutes passed away.  Her maiden name was Mary Collins and she was born in Washington County, Pa., in 1838.  She married Martin Armstrong, who preceded her in death 17 years.  Eleven children were born tot he couple, nine of whom survived their mother.  Her funeral was conducted by Rev. J. C. Warnock of the Cedar Creek Church, with burial in the Cedar Creek cemetery.

May 07, 1913

James Appleby, a well known resident of Kirkwood, died at this home, in than place May 07, 1913, his ailment being a malignant growth of the liver.  He was born in Camden, Ohio, in 1851, and came to Monmouth when a small boy of seven years.  Here he grew to manhood and way married in 1871.  Some years later he moved to Oquawka where he conducted a hotel for ten years, and then took up the same business in Burlington for twelve years.  Later he returned to Monmouth and operated the South Main street hotel.  Two years before his death he gave up the work on account of failing health and retired on a fruit farm at Kirkwood.  The wife and two sons, Bert of Kirkwood and Roy, of Davenport, survived him.  The remains were taken to Oquawka where his funeral service was held.

May 10, 1913

Alfred Ganyer, one of the well known colored residents of Monmouth, died May 10, 1913, after a short illness from heart trouble.  He was born in Louisiana in 1852. and had lived in Monmouth about ten years.  Besides his wife he left two children to mourn his death, Mrs. Ada Chambers and Webster, both of Monmouth.  The Funeral services were held at the home then the remains were taken to Canton, Mo., for burial .December 25, 1918

December 25, 1918

Miss Mary French, daughter of Jonathon and Martha Crawford French, died at the Watertown hospital the evening of December 25, 1918, having been in failing health for some time.  She had been a patient for several years.  Her parents were among the early settlers of Warren County and she was born at the old homestead just west of Monmouth .  In early life she untied with the Henderson United Presbyterian Church, then upon the organization of the first United Presbyterian church in Monmouth she transferred her membership to it.  Her funeral services were conducted by Re. S. G. Huey at the home of her sister, Miss Nannie French.

Mrs. Kate Harrington

Mrs. Kate Harrington of Oquawka died at Mercy Hospital in Burlington and her remains were brought back for burial in the Rozetta cemetery.  She was a former resident of Rozetta but had made her home in Oquawka for a number of years with her grandson, George C. Green.  Besides this grandson she was survived by a granddaughter.  Mrs. George Hartgrove of Rozetta.  These two were considered her only living relatives.

Mrs. Grace Butler

Mrs. Grace Butler died at the home of her brother-in-law, D. L. Harring, at Kirkwood, December 26, 1918, with pneumonia.  She had been living for some time in California, but came back to Kirkwood to care for the children of her sister, who had died two months before.  Mrs. Butler was born in Luray, Mo., and was nearly 33 y3a5rs of age.  She went to California about 1901, and married Mr. butler about 1906.  Her funeral was conducted by Dr. R. A. Brown of the Kirkwood Methodist church, with burial in the Center Grove Cemetery.

Daniel H. Schwartz

Daniel H. Schwartz, Father of Mrs. John Alexander Terpening of the Tylerville neighborhood, died at the Soldiers' and Sailors' home at Quincy December 22, 1918, and was buried in the Linwood Cemetery at Galesburg.  He was born in Knox County in 1846, and in 1870 married Miss Lou Harlan who survived him with four of the five children born to them.  He was a war veteran, and had been cared for at the Quincy Soldiers' home for sometime.

Lemuel A. Pendarvis died in the Galesburg hospital of paralysis the 26th December, 1918, having been sick for three weeks.  He was born in Schuyler county in 1848 and moved to Henderson county near Media where he followed the occupation as a farmer.  Two years before his death he moved (married) Elizabeth Richardson in 1875, and he was survived by fours sons, his wife and one daughter having died earlier.  His funeral was held at Raritan.

Henry Small, whose home was at 1025 south First Street, died in Missouri December 27, 1918, from pneumonia.  He left his wife and family here.

John Eugene Newman, the five year old son of Ed Newman of Good Hope, died December 28, 1918, from pneumonia following flu. His mother had died a few days earlier, and the rest of the family were all having attacks of the flu.

Mrs. Mary C. Raines died the evening of Decmeber,28, 1818, at the home of her mother, Mrs. Emma Clark, on North B Street, having been ill from Tuberculosis a long time.  She was born in Monmouth in 1872, and married Mr. Raines, who preceded her two years in death.  She was survived by seven children.  Her funeral was conducted by the pastor of the Christian church, and burial was in Monmouth cemetery.

Jamie Hunter of the Tylerville neighborhood died December 238, 1918, after a week's illness from pneumonia.  he was born elsewhere but had lived in the Tylerville neighborhood for fourteen years.  He married Miss Florence Griffith, and one child was born to this couple, but died in its infancy.  Mr. Hunter's burial was in the Linwood cemetery at Galesburg, following a private funeral service.

Helen Louise Murphy, the five months old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Murphy of West Third avenue, died December 29, 1918, after an illness of several days.  Her funeral was conducted by Dr. W. H. Craine of the Methodist church.

Charles Stice was a ranger in the War of 1812 and was in the Black Hawk War during the latter he became acquainted with Warren County soil and removed her in 1833.  He way a native of North Carolina.  His first location was in what is now part of Henderson county, but soon moved to Greenbush township, and was for awhile a merchant in Greenfield, now Greenbush. Later he moved to Swan township, where he died in 1869

Chester Potter was one of the first millers in the county, coming here with his family from Ohio in 1832, and taking charge of the Rockwell mill on Cedar Creek, in Sumner Township.  He cut two burrs, 12 inches in diameter, from granite boulders, and set them up in the mill for grinding corn.  Mr. Potter remained there one year, then went to Kelly township and erected a mill.

     The Atlas of October 31, reported the death of Chester Potter in the 66th year of his age.  Mr. Potter was a resident of Henderson Grove, in what is now Kelly township, where he had operated what was known as "Potter's Mill" on Section 22 Henderson creek.  Earlier he had been connected with the Buffum mill (later the Rockwell Mill), near Denny, then opened his own mill in Kelly township in 1833 and continued it s operation until about 1845.  Potter cemetery , on the same section on which the mill was located, was named for him, and he and his wife Eliza, who died in 1873, lie buried there.

Mrs. Sarah Britt, wife of Edward Britt, died December 17, 1899, at the family home near Utah, in Kelly township.  Mrs. Britt's maiden name was Sarah Foster, and she was born in Mountfield parish, Sussex county England, May 04, 1833.  She was married to Edward Britt at Mountfield June 16, 1858, and they came to America the following year.  She left her husband and six children, Mrs. Fannie H. Adcock of Utah, Fred E. of Pueblo, Colo., and Philip P. of Alexis, Charles E. then of Surrey but now of Monmouth, Foxie's note: Charles married my great grandmother Emma Wallace Terpening's sister, Irene Wallace,) Mary J. Bruner of Utah, Albert Britt of New York City.  She also left eleven grandchildren.  She was a member of the Methodist church, and her funeral services were held at the Tylerville Church.  Sarah was buried in the Terpening Cemetery just west of the Tylerville church.

Mrs. Mary Britt, one of the oldest settlers of the county, died at the family residence at Utah, in Kelly township, July 31, 1897, having been ill for sometime with a complication of diseases.  She was born in Sussex county England, in 1824, and came to this country in 1858, and with her husband, James Britt--brother to Edward Britt, whose was Sarah Foster Britt's husband--moved to Kelly township.  It had been her home ever since.  She was early in life a member of the Methodist church, but in 1863 untied with the Christian Church at Talbot Creek.  Besides her husband she left two sons, Joseph of Steward, Nebraska, and Edward of Utah, IL.  She was buried in the Terpening Cemetery.

Mrs. Draper Babcock, one of the most honored women of Monmouth, died August 07, 1903, after an illness of only two weeks.  Her maiden name was Mary Elliot and she was the daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Joseph Elliot and was born in Wyoming county, New York, in 1830.  In 1850, the family came to Monmouth and her father was one of the first pastors of the Baptist church here.  On December 22, 1852, she was married to Draper Babcock, who survived her, and for all her married life made her home on East Broadway.  She was the mother of three sons and one daughter, all of whom were here during the last days of her illness.  They were: E. C. and Howard E. living in Helena, Mont.; Lucius A. of Raton, New Mexico; and Mrs. A. B. Seaman of Denver, Co.  Mrs. Babcock was always active in her church work,, and one of the most earnest supporters of the temperance crusade movement.  She has a close friendship with Frances E. Willard and other temperance leaders, and also was a trusted friend and sympathizer of the colored race.  her funeral was held at the family home and conducted by Re. W. J. Sanborn, assisted by Rev. E. C. Cady.

Mrs. Robert Gerlaw, another death we should mention was that of Mrs. Robert Gerlaw who passed away February 09, 1905, from diabetes.  She was Mary Jane Black, a daughter of Jonathan and Abigail Black, and was born in Pennsylvania in 1852 she married Mr. Gerlaw and they made their home on the farm near Gerlaw which had ever since been their homestead.  In 1873 her husband laid out the town of Gerlaw on a portion of the home farm, and the founding of this village will cause the name of the family to be remembered throughout the coming years.  She was the mother of five children, one of whom had died previous to her passing.  She was a Presbyterian, and her funeral was conducted by Rev. W. R. King, with burial in the Glendale Cemetery (now a part of the Monmouth Cemetery.)

Mrs. Jemina Dixon, mother of Eli Dixon, and a pioneer of Warren County, died in Roseville, Feb 13, 1905, at the age of 88 years.  She was the daughter of Drury B. and Elizabeth Hurd Boyd, and was born in 1817, in Bath county Kentucky.  The family moved to Greene County, Ind., in 1825, and she lived there until she grew to woman hood.  She married Eli Dixon in 1840 and they continued their home there for some years.  In 1855, Mr. Dixon came to Warren County and bought some land in Point Pleasant Township, and in 1857 while making plans for the disposal of his Indiana property and coming to Illinois he took sick and died on October 27.  Mrs. Dixon, however, rented the Indiana farm the following year and came to Illinois, taking up her home on section 12 of Point Pleasant township.  She lived there until a few years before her death, when she moved into Roseville in a home close by the home of her son, also named Eli Dixon.  She was the mother of vie children only one of whom, Eli, survived her. She was a member of the church in Point Pleasant township and the funeral was held there and the burial was in the Point Pleasant Cemetery nearby.

Mrs. Harriet Butler, widow of Vincent W. Butler, died at the home of her son in Galesburg, February 08, 1`905.  She was 67n years old, and had lived near Greenbush the greater part of her life.  Her husband died five years earlier and she was survived by four children.  Her funeral  and burial were at Greenbush.

John Walker Green, who made his home in Monmouth for sometime, had graduated from Monmouth college in 1862, and married Miss Ella Denman, daughter of D. T. Denman, died at his home in Chicago February 09, 1905, from pneumonia.  He was about 63 years old and was survived by his wife and one daughter.  he was an adjutant in the Eighty-third Illinois infantry during the Civil War.

James Nesbit died April 04, 1907, at his home, 416 South Fourth street, after an illness extending over some four years, nearly all the time being confined to his home.  He was born in Chester district, South Carolina, in 1834, and moved into Indiana and later into Ohio, then came to Monmouth in 1866.  her served one year in the Civil War in the tenth Ohio Independent battery, enlisting in 1864.  In 1867 he married Miss Esther Campbell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. M. D. Campbell, well known residents of Monmouth, and to them were born Jeanette, Jessie, Mary, Ella, and Will.  he also left one sister in Monmouth, Miss Martha Nesbit.  He was for some years a member of the Second United Presbyterian church, but on the organization of the Ninth Avenue church he transferred his membership to that church.  His funeral was conducted by his pastor, Dr. J. F. Jamieson, with burial in the Monmouth cemetery.

 On March  05,, 1882, occurred the death of William Gibson, one of the pioneers of Warren County, in his eighty-first year.  Mr. Gibson was born in Blount County, Tenn., in 1802, then moved with his father to Xenia, Ohio, when he was five years of age.  He came to this county in 1830, and reside here until his death.  his wife, formerly Miss Mary A. White, and four children survived him. two other children having preceded him in death.  He had resided for 45 years on the farm on which he died, just west of this city.  He was a brother of Samuel and Robert Gibson, and a member of the First United Presbyterian church.  

W. A. Daugherty, father of Z.  Daugherty, attended the morning services at the Baptist Church in Young America on Sabbath, May 19, 1872, in his usual health, according to the Review Atlas.  Just as the congregation was dismissed, and nearly all had passed out of the house, Mr. Daugherty suddenly dropped dead on the floor.  Apoplexy or heart disease was supposed to have been the cause.  he was over seventy years of age.

On the same day, May 19, 1872, occurred the death of Jonathan French, a widely known and highly esteemed citizen living a half mile west of the city,.  He had been in his usual health until the evening before, when he complained of feeling ill, but not so as to incite any fear of the family as to his condition.  In the morning he was found in a dying state, and soon passed away.  He was in his 72nd year, and had for over thirty years been an elder in the United Presbyterian church.  His funeral was conducted by Rev. J. G. Barnes, assisted by Dr. John Scott.   

Moses Skinner, one of the best known colored residents of Monmouth, died January 24, 1908, at his home on East fifth Avenue.  He had been in declining health for some time.  Mr. Skinner was born in Tennessee in 1832, a slave.  he came north in 1862 and ever since had been a resident of Monmouth.  His first wife had died some 35 years before, and he was married again, and his second wife, Mrs. Harriet Skinner, survived him... He was member of the Second United Presbyterian church, and his funeral was conducted by his pastor, Dr. T. C. Pollock, with burial in the city cemetery.  Probably Monmouth Cemetery... Have to check. 

William Pierce died February 27, 1880, long time resident of the Greenbush neighborhood and later of Monmouth, which took place in Galesburg.  he was about 65 years of age and the cause of his death was typhoid pneumonia. William was born January 23, 1816, and came to Greenbush in 1836.  For a while he taught school in a log cabin located a short distance west of the little village, which was known at that time as Greenfield.  he married Angeline Waldron in 1837, and soon afterward opened up a farm on two adjoining quarter sections, on the very south west corner of Berwick township and the other in the south east corner of Roseville township.  It was here hat his wife died and she was buried a few rods west of the house in what is now known as the Pierce Cemetery.  Hers was a long grave until 1845 when Mrs. Amos Pierce was buried there.  About 1885 the ground was deed to Warren County, to be used a s a burial ground for residents of that community, and quite number o interments have now been made there.  For awhile the burial ground was in a terrible condition, but under the direction of the county historical society it was cleared up and for awhile at least presented a very creditable appearance.

  Mr. Pierce moved to Monmouth in 1858, and served as deputy sheriff under Deacon John Brown for some time, and was postmaster here from 1861 to 1865.  He was the father of Almira G. Pierce, who was  well-known resident here for many years. On going to Galesburg Mr. Pierce helped in the establishment of the Galesburg Liberal Institute which afterward became  to be continued when I find the rest of this... sorry... William is buried in the family cemetery called Pearce Cemetery. Also, you can find his bio and one of his parents in

Robert Gibson died at his home about a mile west of Kirkwood October 19, 1901, after a long illness from cancer of the stomach.  Mr. Gibson was born on the farm in which he died February 03, 18356.  His father, James Gibson has first come to Monmouth in 1832, settling first in this city, then removing to the farm west of Kirkwood a year later.  Mr. Gibson was married to Mrs.. Nancy Tyler Hutchinson on October 02, 1864, and they had one son, James McGaw Gibson, who died in infancy.  Mrs. Gibson died on October 02, 1876, that date being the twelfth anniversary of their marriage.  Mr.. Gibson was held in high esteem by friends in both Warren and Henderson counties.  his funeral was conducted by Rev.. R. Nairn of the Kirkwood United Presbyterian church, with burial in the Biggsville cemetery.  

Galesburg, Saturday, April 26

DEATH OF DR. HATCHETT

An Overdose of Morphine the cause:

Dr. Hatchett, a well known physician of Tylerville, a small place west of this city, died at twenty minutes past nine, last Sunday evening.  The circumstances so far as learned are these:  On Saturday morning, Dr. Hatchett ate a light meal at the home of his neighbor, Mr. J.P. Terpening, the doctor’s wife being absent at the time visiting with her brother, Mr. Strawther Givens, of Abingdon.  Not putting in an appearance at dinner, someone went over to the doctor’s house at tea time, to ask him if he did not feel like eating.  He was discovered to be in a profound stupor, owing to morphine, which he had taken.  As he had been in that condition before and had come out all right, no one thought anything serious of it.  On Sunday morning, however, he was found to be deeply under the influence of the drug and beyond arousing.  Medical assistance from this city was summoned, reaching there in the afternoon, and too late to be of any service in reviving the then pulseless and almost lifeless man.  In this condition the doctor passed away.

            The facts show that he had been vomiting more or less all day Saturday up to the time that the deadly effects of the morphine asserted sway over him.  He had been in the habit of taking morphine during times of restlessness and ill-health; and it is thought that on this occasion, in his weakness and illness, he took more than he had any idea of.  An empty bottle, which had contained chloroform, was found in his bed; but as to whether or not he had used this anesthetic could not be ascertained.

            As a practitioner, Dr. Hatchett was popular, his practice extending over a considerable stretch of country.  By physicians he was regarded as promising.  There was much deep interest manifested in his welfare when it was learned his condition was so serious.  The fact that he lived so long after entering into the stupor is considered remarkable.

            Dr. Hatchett was but thirty-three years old.  He had a run, however, that might be envied by many much older physicians, a proof of his fidelity, the accuracy of his opinions, and skill.  He leaves a wife and four children to mourn his sad demise.  The doctor had many friends here who deplore his death greatly.  The funeral services were held at Abingdon Monday afternoon.

 

Death of Mrs. Mary Gibbs

Mrs. Mary Susan Gibbs, of 1117 South Cedar Street, died at her home last night as the result of a busted blood vessel.

She was born in Kerkely county, Ohio, February 19, 1848, and passed to the Great Beyond on the third of November 1914. Mrs. Gibbs maiden name was Mary Susan Harmison and she was united to Philander Biggs in 1872. settling in Knox County, where they both lived the remainder of their lives. Mr. Biggs passed away June 16, 1900. To this union there were seven children born, six of whom are still living; George and Frank of Galesburg, Mrs. Julia Johnson and Mr. John Gibbs of Appleton; Mrs. Ethel Yarde of Cameron and Miss May at home. A son, Harry, met his death in a wreck near Maquon in 1909. There are also ten grandchildren, tow brothers and one sister, Mrs. Alice Kelsow and Charlie Harmison of Dahinda, and Bill Harmison of Williamsfield. The remains will be taken on the 10:45 train to Appleton Friday morning and the funeral will take place at the United Brethren hutch. Rev. Miluer will officiate. Friends and neighbors may view the remains at the residence 117 S. Cedar Street Thursday and Friday morning.

 

Mrs. Mary McCormick of Greenbush township died, suddenly last week of heart trouble from which she had been afflicted for some time. She lived alone, but was able to summon Mrs. A. E. Rubart and Mrs. M. J. Cutler, by phone. She died about an hour after they arrived at her home but before medial assistance could be secured.

Mary Kingston was born in the state of Tennessee, October 26, 1840. She came to Illinois in 1866 and was married to Charles McCormick in 1872, who died in April, 1895. Funeral Services were conducted at the Olive Christian church Friday, conducted by the pastor, Rev. W. Ernest Staley, after which her remains were laid to rest in the Holeman cemetery. don't know when this was printed out of a scrapbook of old newspaper clippings.

 

Mrs. Phebe Hardy, for many years a resident of Monmouth, died at the county alms home March 7, 1914, having reached the age of over ninety years, senility being the cause of her death. She was born in New York state in 1823, and came west many years before her end came. She was survived by one son, W. C. Hardy, of Keithsburg. Her funeral was conducted by Re. E. P. Smith of the Ninth Avenue church, with burial in the Glendale Cemetery.

 

John Brownlee, the oldest native resident of Sumner township, and prominent retired farmer and stock raiser, died at his home in Little York March 9, 1914. He had been ill for about four months and his death was due to old age and a general breaking down. He was born in Washington County, Pa., in August of 1831, so was in his 83d year. When quite young he came with his parents to Illinois, settling in Sumner Township, where his father died in early life. In 1856 Mr. Brownlee married Miss Nancy A. Barr at Keithsburg, and she survived him. Eleven children were born to the union, all but one surviving. Five of those lived in Little York: John W. Brownlee, Robert L., Warren, Mrs. Gertrude Severs and Catherine. Mr. Brownlee for many years had been a member of the United Presbyterian church, and his funeral was conducted by Rev. J. C. Warnock of the Cedar Creek church, with burial in the Little York Cemetery.

 

Mrs. Driffil, a life-long resident of Warren county and known to a great many people, died at her home at 921 South Second street March 6, 1914, after an illness of over a year. She had been operated on for cancer at Macomb some ten months before, but never regained her health. For six months she had been bedfast and her death was not unexpected. Her maiden name was Emma Chicken and she was born on a farm near Monmouth in 1857. She was married twice, her first husband being William Johnson who was killed in an accident in 1892. In 1901 she married John Driffil who survived her. Her funeral was conducted by Rev. John Rugh of White Hall, and burial was in the Monmouth cemetery.

 

**Mrs. Louise Dover died November 30, 1914, at her home at 1107 South Second Street, following an extended illness from diabetes. She had been sick for over a year and confined to her bed most of that time. She was born in Dover, Tenn., about sixty years before, and came to Monmouth in 1866 and had resided here ever since. She married Mr. Dover who survived her with one son Isaac. She also left two sisters, Mrs. Cora Wallace and Mrs. Melinda Floyd, both of Monmouth.

 

**Robert Liby, who for several years had been an employee of the Rock Island Southern railroad, was struck by M. and St. L. westbound passenger train at the Main street crossing the evening of November 30, 1912, and died shortly afterward at the hospital. There was but one person to see the accident, Mrs. Eva Mincher of 805 South A. Street, who had been at the depot to see friends off. She said she saw Liby attempt to board the train at the platform between the smoker and the coach, and wondered why he did not succeed in doing so as the train was moving but slowly. She saw him appear to fall and it seemed to her that hid body went immediately under the train. She turned her back and shrieked fro help, and soon several men responded and took charge of the case, while she went on home. The coroner's jury freed the trainmen off responsibility for the death. Mr. Liby was the  son of Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Liby, whose home was at 702 South D. street. He was born in Hale township in 1865 and had resided in Warren county all his life. In 1887 he married Sophie Herberer and to them were born four children, all of whom survived him, living with their mother in East St. Louis. The funeral was conducted by Rev. D. E. Hughes with burial in the city cemetery.

 

**Francis M. Blue, a well known resident of Roseville and vicinity, died at his home there December 1, 1914. after an extended illness from cancer of the eye, from he had suffered intense pain for some time. Mr. Blue was a native of Park County, Indiana, where he was born in 1832. He came to Warren county when but a lad, and in 18762 married Miss Malinda Bunkirk in Swan Township where they lived until a few years before his death, when they moved into Roseville. Mrs. Blue died in October of 1914. No children were born to this couple. How sad. Mr. Blue's funeral was held at his home with burial in Greenbush cemetery.

 

**A report was given November 30, 1914, of the death of Mr. Hugh McMillan, a resident of Henderson County near Biggsville, who had passed away presumably because of old age. Mr. McMillan was born in Chester district, South Carolina, in 1829, so was 85 years of age. In 1835 he came to Illinois where he had since lived. He married Miss Elmira Hopkins in 1852, and to them six children were born, though but one was living when he passed away, Alvah McMillan of Nebraska, Mrs. McMillan had died in 1865, and Mr. McMillan had been living at the home of his sister, Mrs. M. A. McDill, where he died. His funeral was held at her home and conducted by Dr. S. J. Kyle of the United Presbyterian Church.

 

**Seymour Catlin, on of the aged residents of Monmouth, died at his home at 120 east Franklin avenue June 24, 1907, after an extended illness from diabetes. He was a native of New York state, having been born there in 1823 but came to Illinois in 1841, walking with his father from Chicago to where Gladstone now is. He came to Monmouth in 1877 and made his home here until his death. In 1851 he married Miss Nancy J. Gray of Oquawka, who survived him. To them were born five children, only of whom survived him, Mattie Catlin, then living at her father's home. His funeral was conducted by Rev. C. L. McCulloch, with burial at Oquawka.

 

**Mrs. Nancy T. Patterson died at her home at 328 South Eighth street the morning of June 29, 1907. After an illness covering several weeks. She was the mother of Miss Florabel Patterson, a member of the Monmouth college faculty,; Mrs. Laura Pl Gilchrist, a teacher in the Willets school, Rev. W. H. Patterson, D. D., of Princeton, Ind., and Clem F. Patterson of Omaha, Neb. She was about 80 years old. Short funeral exercises were conducted at the family home by Dr. T. C. Pollock, then the remains were taken to Oskaloosa, Iowa, her former home, funeral service being held in the United Presbyterian church there, with burial in the Oskaloosa cemetery.

 

**Old Time Resident Passes--James McMahill

James McMahill, on of the most aged residents of Warren county, died at his home at Youngstown June 30, 1907. He had reached the remarkable age of 92 years, 7months, and 19days. He came to this county in 1832 and for many years was one of the most prominent men. His funeral was held in the Christian church at Youngstown with burial in the McMahill cemetery east of that place.

 

**John M. Paine died July 3, 1907, at the home of his father, John E. Paine, near Little York, after and extended illness. The past mortem examination substantiated the opinion of physicians that he had been suffering an affliction of the spleen, He owned a farm near Abingdon, but when he became so ill he was transferred to his father's home where he could receive better care. He was born in 1862 at the place where he died. For a while he was employed as a miner and assayer in the famous Cripple Creek gold.... Have to find adjoining page.

 

**Henderson Pioneer

**James W. Brook, a lifelong and well-known resident of Henderson county, died at the family home four miles north of Stronghurst March 4, 1914, after a long and tedious illness. Mr. Brook was born in Gladstone township in 1843, and his parents having come there four years previous. He received his education in the schools, at home and in Monmouth college. When the Civil war broke out he enlisted in the 158th Illinois volunteers and served until November of 1864 when he was given and honorable discharge and returned to Henderson county where he took up farming. In 1867 he married Miss Caroline Pierce, and to this union five children were born, three of whom survived him. His wife died and he married Emma J. Porter, who survived him with another son and two daughters. He was a member of the Olena United Presbyterian church, serving it in an official capacity for a number of years. His funeral was held at that church with Rev. H. P. Jackson in charge, and burial was in the cemetery there.

 

**Samuel Davies Wray--December 25, 1918

Samuel Davies Wray, son of John and Sarah Elizabeth Wray, who was born in Kirkwood in 1854, died at his home in Seaton December 25, 1918, having been in poor health for two years and a patient sufferer. He had resided in Kirkwood, Biggsville, and Little York, and the last five years at Oquawka. He married Anna Calhoun in 1898, and to this union tow children were bon who survived him with his wife. He was for a good while a member of the Cedar Creek United Presbyterian church in Oquawka. His funeral was conducted by Rev. M. G. Hanna, with burial in the Kirkwood Cemetery.==Meaning Center Grove Cemetery which sits right outside of Kirkwood on the Northwest side.==Foxie's Note.

 

**Mrs. Christina Frank of Kirkwood died at the home of her daughter. Mrs. Thomas Brockenmaker, at Eldora, Iowa, the night of December 29, 1918, from hydratid, and she had been ill for some time. Her remains were brought back to Kirkwood, and her funeral was conducted by Rev. W. D. Nichols, of Morning Sun, Iowa, a former pastor at Kirkwood, and burial was in the Kirkwood Cemetery. Mrs. Frank's maiden name was Seeger, and she was born in Germany in 1835, and came to the United States when eighteen years old. She married Mr. Frank in 1857, and they came to Warren county in 1860, settling in Ellison Township first, then moving to a farm a mile and a half north of Kirkwood. Mr. Frank died in 1901. There were four surviving children, including Louis Frank of Kirkwood. Mrs. Frank was a member of the Presbyterian church of Kirkwood and was a woman who lived her profession every day of her life. She was greatly missed after her passing.

 

Joseph W. Wood -- Review Atlas - April 28, 1865

CIVIL WAR VETERAN DIED FOR US

At Fort Donelson, Tenn, April 2d, 1865, Joseph W. Wood, private in Co B, 83d Regt. Ill. Vols., in the 21st year of his age.

The deceased was born in Logan County, Ohio, but had removed with his father to Warren co., Illinois, where he had resided for the last few years before enlisting in the 83d Regt. He enlisted on the 6th day of August, 1862. He was one of the bravest men in the Regt. always ready for duty and among the first to encounter danger. On the 30th of March he was  with others on a scout in the direction of Whiteoak Creek, and on the morning of the 31st, about 9 o'clock, when about twenty miles from the Fort they came across four guerrillas. One of these was instantly shot and killed, the other three retreated and were pursued by our men, among the foremost of these was Joseph W. Wood and W. Flinn, of Co B. About three fourths of a mile further on there were flat stones over which the road was made, and on these stones two of the guerrilla's horses felled own and fastened their riders. When the advance of our party came up, Flinn's horse fell down on the same stones and fastened him. Three others passed by, one of whom, Wm Ellis, halted and dismounted to reload his pistol. One other pursued the running guerillas, whilst Wood halted, faced about and commenced firing at the dismounted guerrillas, who by this time had extracted themselves and were retired a little from the road side. Flinn was shot dead by the guerrillas whilst under his horse, and Wood was shot twice, one in the shoulder and once in the thigh, whilst on his horse and in the act of shooting at them, the latter round taking effect also in the extremity of the bowels, which proved fatal in about forty hours. He died at 15 minutes past 1 o'clock a. m., on the 2d inst. His remains were brought to Young America and  interred. He was brave without caution. the two guerrillas made their way across a field and took refuge in an old mill. They were pursued by our men who, failing to get them to surrender, set fire to the mill and burned it to the ground. some think that the guerrillas, perished in the flames, but as they were not seen by any of our men after entering the mill, the story of their burning is not credited very much.

George W. Shepherd died at age 20 in Coldbrook township, April 12th, 1865. He was the son of Smith Shepherd.
C. K. Smith lost his ten year old son, Gene Bancrott, on April 15, 1865.
Benjamin F. Corwin, aged about fifty years died of typhoid pneumonia on April 23d, 1865 at Monmouth.
Captain Peter Mauck died of jaundice on August 3, 1855, at Galesburg, Knox Co., Illinois. Capt. Mauck was 83 years of age and one of the early settlers of Warren county, having emigrated from Brackenridge county, KY, in 1836. He took up his residence seven miles north east of Monmouth, where he lived until last spring, when he removed to Galesburg and took up his residence with a son-in-law. He was a native of Virginia, and died as he had lived, respected by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.
Thomas M. Paxton, of Warren county, on August 4, 1855, had Miss Martha P. Graham die of typhoid fever in his home. Miss Graham was just 18 years of age.
Lion Carson lost his ten year old boy in Henderson county on Friday, Aug 10, 1855.
Review Atlas -- August 24, 1855

Jacob and Jane Adkins, mother and son, lost their lives to typhoid fever on August 13, 1855. Jacob was 12 years old and his mother was aged 32 years she died on the 20th. Wife and son of William Adkins, who removed from Brown county, Ind. only a few weeks since. William is the only son of Rolon Adkins.

The late relict of Henry Carter, Bethany,  at age 68 years passed on about August 17, 1855 near Warren County, Illinois.
John Porter, Esq., died at Norwood, Warren county, Illinois, on July 20, 1880, aged 81 years and 1 month. The deceased resided most of his life time in Henderson township, near the Old Union School house, and was on of the early settlers of that neighborhood. About 1864, finding his children and relatives had nearly all left and gone west, he concluded to sellout and follow them. He bought a farm in North Henderson settlement, Mercer county, where the old "Ridges" had planted themselves in a compact body and taken a fast hold.

Though and old man at the time of his removal he began life again, cheerfully and actively, living to a good age and dying respected by all who knew him. He was last survivor of the Porter family, children of William Porter deceased. His brother, Mr. Joe Porter and his sisters, Mrs. Wiley, Mrs. Fee, Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Thompson, having all previously died as they respectively reached the age of 67 years.

Review Atlas --- July 16, 1880

We regret to learn that Jacob Miller, a former resident of Swan township, in this county, died of dropsy at his residence in Neosha County, Kansas, on the 1st inst, aged 49 years. He leaves a wife and four children. Mr. Miller left Warren county in 1874 and settled in Kansas. He was a son of that sterling old resident and true gentleman, John Miller of Berwick township.

James Elmer Moore, died of consumption on Wednesday evening, July 28th, 1880, at the residence of his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth moore, James Elmer Moore was only 16 years and seven months.
Alva Clem  --- Review Atlas -- August 13, 1880

The following verdict of the jury impaneled at Galesburg last week in the inquire into the cause of the death of young Clem, of Berwick township, an account of which we gave last week: State of Illinois, Knox County, ss

In the matter of the inquisition on the body of Alva Clem, deceased, held at Galesburg on the 5th day of August, A. D., 1880, we, the undersigned jurors, sworn to inquire of the death of Alva Clem, do find that he came to his death by the premature discharge of a cannon at Camp Shields in Galesburg, county of Knox and State of Illinois, and that his death was purely the result of an accident.

On December 21, 1864, Mary, daughter of Benjamin and Charlotte Claycomb, in the 11th year of her age, died of typhoid fever, after an unusually painful illness of about two months.
Review Atlas -- January 6, 1865

Sumner Township supervisor dies, December 24, 1864; Mr. John Acheson.

Mary A. Hallam wife of Samuel, died of typhoid fever in Monmouth on the 25, of November, 1864
 On December 6th, 1864, Susie J. Barnett, daughter of the late Elias Barnett, grand-daughter of J. Langdon, aged 14 years, 4 months, and 9 days.
Review Atlas: December 2, 1864

Sugar Tree Grove: Mrs. Anna Maria Allen dies at her residence, November 13th, 1864, she was the widow of the late L. N. E. Allen, and daughter of Aniel Rodgers, also lately deceased. She leaves seven children, the youngest not much over a year old. Thus have these children, with in almost a year, been deprived of their father, grandfather, and now their mother and with an aged grandmother are overwhelmed with a threefold sorrow. Let neighbors and Christian friends extend to them sympathy and help.

May Keller Peffer died of typhoid fever on the evening of November 23d, 1864, aged 7 years 10 months. She was the youngest daughter of W. A. and S. J. B. Peffer.
Jacob and Hannah Speakman, formerly of Chester County, Pennsylvania, lost a son, Charles Pimm of twenty-one years to typhoid fever on the 15th day of October, 1864. They live near Monmouth, Warren county, Illinois.
John Carr, a long-time resident of Monmouth and prominent in business affairs here, died the evening of July 7, 1892, at his residence on East Broadway. He had been ill for some time with inflammation of the bowels. but had about recovered, when some heart trouble and the end came unexpectedly. He was about 62 years of age having been born in New York in late 1830. He came to Monmouth in 1846 and had resided here ever since. Shortly after coming here, in company with his brother Nathan, he began the manufacture of plows and cultivators, and continued in that business for some time, retiring  just a few years before his death. He is survived by his wife, one son and five daughters, four of the latter living at home at the home of his passing. He also one brother living at Kirkwood and a sister living in Monmouth. The funeral services were held at the residence July 9, but the burial was delayed until the next day awaiting the arrival of the son and married daughter who could not reach here in time for the funeral.
David Boyd Findley
"Boyd" Findley, as he was popularly known, a long time resident of Hale township, died on Sabbath evening. May 24, 1885, as the result of a cancerous condition from which he had suffered for some time, and which had caused him to become, so emaciated that he was hardly recognizable. He was a son of James Findley, and came to this county with his father in 1832 or 1833. He was the youngest son of a large family, and spent most of his life in Hale township, his home being just west of the Sugar Tree Grove church, of which he was a member. He went across the plains to California with William Hanna in the days of the gold rush, but did not remain in the west long, He was a man of considerable means, and left some five or six hundred acres of fine farm land. His wife was formerly Miss Caroline Cannon, a daughter of Anthony Cannon, and they were the parents of a son and three daughters. He was a brother of Captain James Findley, and of Mrs. William Hanna.
Charles Cole of Kirkwood came to his death by being suffocated in the Carr grain elevator in that place May 11, 1885, Workmen at the elevator attempted to shut off the grain that was running through the spout into a car, but could not do so, and on investigation saw a boot in the spout. They went up stairs to investigate, and one man going into the bin found the lifeless body of the boy, who was about 16 years of age. It was about an hour before they could get the body out, and though it was till warm life had flown.

The boy had had his left arm cut off at the shoulder about three years before while attempting to get on a moving freight train, and he was quite a venturesome lad. always about trains and other places of danger. He had been ordered away from the elevator several times. It was said. He was a son of G. O Cole of Kirkwood.

Captain Armstrong Dead

Captain William M. Armstrong, sheriff of Warren county, died February 25, 1868, at the age of 33 years. He had for many years been a resident of Kelly township, his wife being a daughter of John Peck Terpening of that township. Soon after the beginning of the Civil War he enlisted in Co B 102d Illinois infantry, the company being largely recruited from Kelly township, and left for camp in Knoxville in September, 1862, holding the rank of first lieutenant. About six months later he was promoted to a captaincy and continued in that rank while he remained a member of the regiment. March 16, 18654, while leading his company in a fight at Averysboro, North Carolina, he was wounded by a bullet in the upper section of the right lung, and The ball remaining in his lung and finally causing his death.

In the fall of 1865, in recognition of his service in the army, he was elected to the office of sheriff of Warren county, and discharged the duties of that office faithfully and well until a few weeks before his death, when he became so enfeebled that he was confined to his room and his bed until the end came. Funeral services were held in the Methodist church here, conducted by the pastor, Rev. E. Wasmuth, and the remains were laid away in Monmouth cemetery.

Dr. W. L. Cuthbert, coroner, assumed the duties of sheriff, as provided by law, taking up his quarters in the jailor's residence.

This is one of Foxie's ancestor's if you related to William M. Armstrong or his wife Sarah Ann Terpening. Sarah was a sister to my 2nd great grandfather Harrison Peck Terpening and Merwyn as the family called him was brother to my 2nd great grandmother Martha Nicolina Terpening. Feel free to email me as I would love to hear from you. Thanks!

John G. Norcross whose death occurred in our city on Saturday, March 27, 1880, was born in Erie county, Pa., March 5, 1816. Most of his life has been spent in Monmouth and immediate vicinity. On the 7th day of March 1863, he made of profession of religion, and with thirty others united with the Presbyterian church of Monmouth.
In Coldbrook, March 26, 1880, Stephen Cullender Lee, died of typhoid malarial fever, aged 86 years, 11 months and 19 days. Mr. Lee passed on at the residence of his son, F. M. Lee, Esq., in Cameron, Coldbrook Township, Warren county, Illinois. Mr. Lee was born in Berkshire county, Mass, April 7, 1793, and at the age of 10 years moved with his parents to Erie County, PA. then knows the "Far West", He was married February 12, 1817, to Honorah Burchard, by whom he had eight children, six of whom with the wife and mother, have passed on before, two sons still remain, Frank M. in Cameron, Illinois, and Orville, residing in Kansas. The subject of this notice was a soldier in the war of 1812, acting as a mounted courier between Erie and Dunkirk, holding the rank of Orderly Sergeant. He was a member of the State Legislature of Penn., during the session of 1841 and 1843, and was for many years President of the Erie County agricultural Society, in which he was deeply interested. He moved west again in 1866, and settled in Cameron, Warren county, Illinois, where for almost fourteen years, he has been known only to be respected, honored and loved. The funeral was held in the Baptist church. He was buried in the Silent Home Cemetery, Floyd Township, Warren co. I know this because my daughter and dug up his tombstone. It is almost gone. Something really needs to be done for this fallen soldier and States man!
Killed by Train

D. B. Lee, a farmer living about two miles southeast of Cameron, was killed by a train while driving across the Burlington tracks a short distance west of Galesburg, November 10, 1869. He was driving a team with a full wagon load of wood, and walking along the wagon on the opposite side from the oncoming train, when the locomotive hit the wagon, driving it against him and throwing him in front of the train, which mangled his body in a horrible manner.

Mr. Lee had lived in Monmouth for some three years, being engaged in the grocery business here, and was a member of the First United Presbyterian church here. His funeral was held at the Baptist church  in Cameron, and his burial was in the cemetery south of that place. He's buried in the Silent Home Cemetery, Floyd township. Related to the man above.

Section Man Killed

A couple of weeks later a section hand named John Howie was killed by a train at Regnier's crossing just southeast of Monmouth. The engineer of the passenger train coming from the east saw the man standing by the track, and blew his whistle and the man stepped across the track and remained standing so close to the track that the locomotive struck him, throwing his crushed body several feet along the track. Howie was deaf and near sighted, which may explain why he did not move farther from the track. He was about 53 years old, a native of Scotland, and left a wife.

Frank and Elvira Williams lost their two day old infant son of convulsions on March 13, 1880.
A. R. and Emma Graham lost their infant son of ten days on March 16, 1880.
Elizabeth E. and M. C. Shellenbarger lost their infant child --cephalous, and congenital marasnius---of one day on April 2, 1880.
French Brownlee came to the county in 1833, and was a member of the board of supervisors and a justice of the peace for a number of years. He served in the Civil War, and died in a hospital in Chattanooga in 1863.
L. F. Pollock, Nova Scotia born, came in 1831, and for many years engaged in business in Little York, being the first postmaster there, and holding the position for over twenty years. He married Rebecca McFarland in 1833 and died in 1869.
Joseph DeHague was a Frenchman by birth. He ran on the river for a few years, then took up a claim in what is now Henderson county. In 1837, he built a double log cabin on the Mississippi River bottom and opened up a tavern. He remained there until his death.
Robert Wallace, born in South Carolina, came here from Kentucky in 1831, locating just north of town and putting up the first grist mill in Monmouth township. He had at first only a hand mill, but as the demand for meal increased. he put in one run by water power. The mill stones were cut out of boulders picked up on the prairie. The old gentleman possessed several hounds and had a reputation as a hunter. He was the father of the late E. E. Wallace, long time businessman of Monmouth, who for a long time kept a pair of his father's millstones in his yard in town.
Rev. John Wallace was the first minister of the Associate Reformed church in Warren county, coming here in 1833. He died in 1875. He was the father of T. B. Wallace, long time merchant of Little York.
John Hanna, father of William and O. L. Hanna, came to the county in 1835, settling twelve miles northwest of Monmouth. He was a native of North Carolina, and his wife, nee Sarah Crawford, a Virginia lady. He died in the fall of 1862.
Jacob Ryner was a native of Pennsylvania. After his marriage he lived for a while in New York, then came to Warren county in 1838, renting a farm for a while then buying the Talbott homestead on section 1 Monmouth township. He died in 1863, leaving a large family.
H. N. Logan came from Indiana to Warren County in 1836, settling in Kelly township. He held several offices and was postmaster at Utah in that township for a number of years.
Garland Ray was born in Kentucky, and came to Warren county in 1835, settling first in Roseville township and later moving to Lenox, near Berwick. He died April 12, 1881, and is buried in the Lenox/Union Cemetery.
Samuel J. Black brought his wife and family of ten children to this county in the fall of 1837, coming here from Harrison county, Indiana. He settled first about a mile south of Shanghai in Kelly township, and he and his wife were in the Advent church at Shanghai when it was wrecked by a tornado in 1868, though neither of them was seriously injured . They moved to Missouri, where they died.
Barzillai Parker, born in Maryland, spent most of his boyhood days in Kentucky, then came to Warren county in 1835 when about 25 years of age. He settled in what is Spring Grove township, pre-empting 100 acres. Later he bought more land until at his death in 1884 he owned 1000 acres. he was twice married and was the father of several children.
Monday, January 6, 1997, Register Mail- submitted by Kenneth--

Orin A. Mills,. 91,  a resident of the Marigold Health Care Center, 275 E. Carl Sandburg Drive, formerly of 91 Silver Street, died at 4:30a. M. Saturday, January 4, 1997, at St. Mary Medical Center.

He was born December 15, 1905, in Cameron, the son of Chris and Winnie Robinson Mills.

He married Zelda D. Loso on June 30, 1928, in Galesburg. She died January 21, 1987.

Surviving are one son, Arthur D. Mills, Galesburg, one daughter, Darlene Green, Galesburg, nine grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by one daughter, Mary Sutor. and by one brother and five sisters.

He was a letter carrier for the U. S. Postal Service for more than thirty years, retiring in 1964.

He was a member of the First Christina Church and the National Association of Letter Carriers.

Funeral will be at 1:30pm Wednesday in Hinchliff-Pearson-West Chapel, with the Rev. David Seitz officiating. Visitation will be one hour before the service at the funeral home. Burial will be in Oak Lawn Memorial Gardens.

Memorials may be made to the First Christian Church and to the Marigold Health Center.

Roland H. Olson; Bishop Hill---Roland H. "Rollie" Olson, 90, Bishop Hill, died at 4:30am Sunday January 5, 1997 at home.

Rollie was born December 20, 1906, near Bishop Hill, the son of Henry and Alameda Armquist Olson. He was the grandchild of Mary Malmgren Olson, who in 1846 was the first child born in Bishop Hill.

He married Julia W. Ericson on August 20, 1929. She died April 5, 1990.

Surviving are one son, Roger Olson, Galva, one sister, Mildred Sunberg, Geneseo, one grandchild and two great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by one brother and by his twin sister.

He was manager of the Bishop Hill Elevator for 31 years, and also worked as a bus driver nd janitor for the Bishop Hill schools.

He was member of the Bishop Hill Community United Methodist Church and Bishop Hill Old Settler's Association. He was a member of the Bishop Hill Volunteer Fire Department for 57 years. Funeral will be at 1:30pm Wednesday in Rux Funeral Home, Galva, with the Rev Karen Martin officiating. Visitation will be from 6:30pm to 8:30pm Tuesday at the funeral home burial will be in Bishop Hill Cemetery.

Memorials may be made to Bishop Hill Community United Methodist Church and the Bishop Hill Old Settlers' Association

Nov 14, 1846---Galesburg Paper.

In the bosom of her family, in this county, Mrs. Martha Allen, wife of Dr. Alfred A. Allen, of Little York aged 20years.

**Obituary of Minnie Katherine Houser Hodges
Peoria Journal Star, December 20, 2006
Minnie Hodges
ROSEVILLE - Minnie Katherine Hodges, 99, of Roseville passed away at 1:50 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2006, at the Roseville Country Manor.
Services will be at 1 p.m. Thursday at Corman Memorial Home in Roseville, where visitation will be one hour before.

**Eagle Publications, December 22, 2006
Minnie Katherine Hodges
Minnie Katherine Hodges, 99, Roseville, died at 1:50 p.m., Tuesday, Dec. 19, 2006, at Roseville Country Manor, Roseville.
She was born May 7, 1907, the daughter of Leonard and Emma (Crohe {Krohe}) Houser.
She married Herschel Hodges on Jan. 2, 1932, in Unionville, Mo.
She is survived by two nieces, Sue (Marvin) Garlic, Geneseo, and Pauline (Gene) Crumley, East Peoria; and one nephew, Dick (Judy) Houser, Rushville.
She was preceded in death by her parents, two brothers, one sister and one niece.
She was born and raised in Schuyler County and educated at WIU. She taught at Schuyler, Brown and Warren counties' rural schools for 31 years. She was a member of the Roseville Christian Church.
Funeral services will be held at 1 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 21, 2006, at Corman Memorial Home, Roseville.
The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the memorial home.
Memorials may be made to Roseville Country Manor Family Life Center, or Roseville Country Manor. contributed by Sara Hemp--
December , 1915, Galesburg paper:

Nearby Deaths:

Macomb--Mrs. Bert Vorhess died Wednesday morning at her home in Colchester, of asthma and complications, aged 42 years. 1 month and 10 days. She had been suffering with asthma for the past year, but she was never seriously ill until Tuesday night when she became worse and died at the time mentioned.

Table Grove--Mrs. Jacob Lawyer of Table Grove died Tuesday afternoon at 2:30pm of heart trouble with which she has been ill for over two years. for the past six weeks she has been bedfast and infirmities accompanying old age, hastened the end of her life. Her age was 72 years, 11 months and 4 days.

Monmouth--The funeral of the later Marion Mitchell Morrison, a former resident of Little York vicinity, who passed away last week in California, was held Saturday at Little York from the home o Henry C. parson. The services were conducted by Re. J. W. McClanahan, pastor of the United Presbyterian church of Little York. Interment was made in Little York cemetery besides the body of his wife. the Pallbearers were William A. Mitchell, W. A. Rodgers, and D. C. Gowdy, army comrades of the deceased and George Guy and Clyde Morrison, his sons.

Monmouth-- Mrs. R. M. Ross died on Tuesday evening at 7:20pm at the family home at 525 South Eleventh street, just outside the city limits. She had been ill but a week and death was due to heart complications connected with bronchial trouble.

Lewistown--Sterling Painter died at the home of his brother, Nathan Painter, in Lewistown, at 3:40 o'clock. Tuesday afternoon. Mr. Painter was born on the old Painter homestead three miles west of Lewistown. in 1849. and lived there until 188, when he moved to Lewistown and lived at the Waggoner hotel until his death, with the exception of the last two months. Those months he lived with his brother, Nathan and family. He was one of six children, all of whom are dead with the exception of Nathan of this city. The parents of the decedent were Walter and Ellen Painter, early settlers in Lewistown township. Mr. Painter never married.

Galesburg Paper not sure of date:

Last Rites of Mrs. J. W. Shoop.

The funeral services of Mrs. J. W. Shoop were held on Wednesday afternoon, at 2:30 o'clock. at the Methodist church. The services were in charge of the pastor, Rev. J. T. Pierce, assisted by Dr. W. D. Agnew. The music was furnished by a quartette composed of Mrs. W. D. Agnew, Miss Alma Berterman, Mrs. E. W. Cutler, Mrs. Henry Van Tuyl, who sang two numbers "Rock of Ages" and "Abide With Me" and a Vocal solo by Mrs. Agnew, entitled "Just for Today" with Mrs. F. J. Graves at the organ. Those who acted as pallbearers were W. T. Weisbach, George ?ore, E. J. Earel, A. B. Cable, T. J. White, Dr. A. P. Rolen. Interment was in the Abingdon Mausoleum. The large attendance of relatives and friends at the services and the many beautiful floral offerings were proof of the high esteem in which Mrs. Shoop was held in this city and vicinity.

Sketch of her Life:

Grace Florence Lofftus was born in Ellison Township, warren County, Ill., on January 20, 1862 and died in Abingdon December 13, 1915, aged 53 years, 10months and 23 days.

She was the daughter of Andrew J. and Mrs. Lavinia S. Lofftus, and one of 12 children, 11 of whom grew to mature years. Two sisters and two brothers survive, Mrs. E. A. Beam of Indianola, Ia; Mrs. Cora E. Golden of Abingdon; Azro P. Lofftus of Warren County and Ora G. of Peoria, Ill.

Mrs. Shoop grew to young womanhood on the homestead farm, which was her birthplace. Then in 1875 she came to Avon, Fulton County, Illinois to the home o her sister, Mrs. Beam, where she lived and attended school two years. She then returned home and at the opening of school in the fall of 1878 she came to Abingdon and attended Hedding College that year.

On June 4, 1879, she was married to J. Wesley Shoop, In her mother's home the place of her birth, near Roseville, Warren County<Illinois, the Rev. N. T. Allen conducting the marriage service. Since her marriage to Mr. Shoop their home has been at Abingdon for the past 15 years in town.

Zelma is their only child.

Mrs. Shoop was converted to God when 9 years old. When she came to Abingdon in the fall of 1879, she transferred her membership to this church, under the pastorate of Rev. M. A. Head.

While Dr. Buckey was the paster she brought about the organization of the Woman's Home Mission Society of the Abingdon church, which has continued ever since; for 13 years she was its president; until her health began to break, something over a year ago, always an officer, and a special way a carried the interests of the society upon her heart. She made it her special care in the church.

She was president of the Galesburg District W. H. M. S. during two years. As president of this local society she was also superintendent of the Queen Esther Society, the young ladies, and the Home Guards, the girls society, and the Mother's Jewels, the children's society. All these were her special care. She took great interest in the children's work. For some time she was a teacher in the Junior League.

Two years ago there was a partial stroke with its implications and warning. Then there was a stay at the hospital, with hope of permanent benefit. But one year ago there was another partial stroke. On the 27th of November, a third. her well marked Bible shows her love of the Holy Book. Inside her Bible cover there lies a selection evidently sent her by some friend in these last two years of suffering. when she was cut off from her beloved family.

December 15, 1916, Galesburg Evening Mail

MRS. ANDERSON PASSES AWAY--- RESIDENT OF COLDBROOK DIES OF PNEUMONIA AFTER SEVEN WEEKS ILLNESS--

After being ill for the past seven weeks with pneumonia. Mrs. Lottie Anderson, wife of Andrew Anderson, a prominent farmer residing just south of Coldbrook passed away at the home at 11:30 o'clock Thursday night. She had been critically ill most of the time, though at times she hand her friends had hopes The end came peacefully Thursday evening after making hard struggle for life.

Miss Lottie Johnson was born in Sweden. February 3rd, 1861. when 20 years of age she came to this country and resided at Galesburg. In 1897 she was united in marriage to Louis Olson of this city, who died two years later.

In 1902 she was married to Andrew Anderson of Coldbrook and has since resided there. Besides the husband, Mrs. Anderson leaves two daughters, Louise and Lillie who are at home, and the following step-children: Edward Anderson of Abingdon. Mrs. Agnes Scott of Austin, Minn. Mrs. Gertrude of Bowling of Burlington, Ia; and George Emery and Clark Anderson, who live at home. There are also two sisters and a brother, Mrs. Henry Carlson, Mrs. Hannah Johnson and Charles Johnson of this city, and a brother and sister in Sweden.

****Mrs. Anderson had been a member of the Swedish Mission church ever since she first came to this city and was faithful in her beliefs, attending services as regularly as possible. No definite funeral arrangements have been made.

Berwick---Dec 26, 1939--Mr. and Mrs. Leslie Pratt and Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Pratt came from their home at New Market, Ia., to attend the furneral of their uncle, Ed Pratt, at Monmouth last week, and called on thier aunt, Mary Watson, Berwick.

Mrs. W. J. Sheldon and Charles and Mrs. Feaster were visitors in Monmouth Thursday.

The Rev. and Mrs. C. K. Dean called at the hjome of Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Carr Sunday evening.

Several men came down from Chicago Sunday to the Tommy Jensen farm, west of here,a nd shot 100 rabbits and took them back to Chicago with them.

There were 142 present at Sunday school Sunday morning.

Donald Simmons entertained the Junior B. Y. B. U. Wednesday evening with a Christmas party. A grab bag was enjoyed by the children. Refreshments were served.

William Cobb of Bushnell was a business caller here Wednesday.

Mrs. Thomas Skinner, a former Monmouth resident, passed away Saturday in Chicago.

Funeral services were to be held this afternoon at 2:30 o'clock from the Turnbull Funeral home in charge of the Rev. C. M. Webster, pastor of the Calvary Baptist church, with interment in the Monmouth cemetery.

Charles McClanahan death occurs today--

Charles McClanahan aged Monmouth resident at 821 West Archer Avenue, formerly Warren County superintendent of highways, died this morning at East Moline, where he was hospital patient.

Mrs. McClanahan preceded her husband in death only a few weeks ago. The body is being brought to Lugg & Holiday Memorial chapel, where funeral arrangements will be made.

Brother Executor in Allen $17,000 Estate

The will of Charles W. Allen, who died Nov 13, in Monmouth, was proven Saturday in Warren Court, and a brother, Everett E. Allen of Monmouth, names as executor of the instrument, filed his oath and bond.

According to the petition Mr. Allen left personal property of the value of $15,000 and real estate of the value of $2,000. The will drawn Aug 6, 1936, provide for distribution of property among his relatives and friends. Josephine Stewart of Chicago and R. W. Cowden of Monmouth were witnesses to the instrument.

Mrs. Lydia Hopkins Dies at Taylor Home

Mrs. Lydia Hopkins, 79, died at 1050pm Monday at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Leroy Taylor, west of Abingdon. She had been ill one month and death was due to complications.

Funeral services will beheld at 1:30pm Wednesday at the Tarrant Funeral Home, in charge of The Rev. H. R. Jay of Congregational church. Burial will be in the Berwick Cemetery. Berwick Cemetery, Berwick Twp., Warren Co., IL

 

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                                                                       ---Foxie Hagerty, Genealogist & Historian & Preserving IL GravesWednesday, September 26, 2007 08:40:34 AM