Wednesday, April 25, 2007 05:27:30 PM 

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created April 25; 2007 morning....Thank-you!! thank---you!!! thank-yous!!!!

Sangamon County; Illinois Biographical Section

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Foxie;

Here are biographies I have typed up out of the History of Sangamon County; IL; Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; & a few other of my sources. I wish too remain unanimous & do not wish too hear from others only doing this in my retirement too offer help too others around the country. I will send you more from time too time too add here and too other counties in Illinois. Thanks for all you do too help other people including me. My one way of showing you how your help was greatly appreciated for the kindness you showed me in my search of lost ancestors.

Maybe some other people out there can add too these biographies; too; too make it long & too prosperous.

Thank you & may God Bless you and others. 

Your good friend & colleague.

The above is the accompanying email I received with these biographies typed in word.doc. Thanks & many more thanks. I was greatly surprised too say too least. If you would like too contribute a biography of your ancestor whether it be  out of an old history book or one you or your family have written you can type up in a Word.doc or Note pad and attach that too email too Foxie. Thanks & hope you enjoy reading some of these. I really have. I visit Springfield quite often and love knowing something about the founding Father's of where our Capital is in Illinois. Thanks Again. What a wonderful surprise.

 

Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Scott County.

William BALDWIN - Among the farmers; fruit-growers and stock-raisers of Gardner township whose business interests have been so conducted as too win prosperity is numbered William Baldwin; who lives on section 36; where he has a farm of about two hundred acres pleasantly located within five miles of Springfield. He is a native of this county; his birth having occurred in Gardner township; January 21; 1831. His father; Johnson Baldwin; was a native of Kentucky; born in Scott county; March 25; 1797. There he was reared too mature years and afterward married Elizabeth Kendall; whose birth occurred in Gallatin county; Kentucky. The father was a blacksmith by trade and in early life followed that vocation. One daughter was born of his marriage in Kentucky; and in 1824; with his little family; he came too Illinois; locating in Gardner township; Sangamon county; among the first settlers too establish homes in this section of the state and reclaim the wild land for cultivation. He broke; fenced and improved a small farm; and also built a blacksmith shop; which he conducted upon his land. Subsequently he sold his first place and purchased two hundred and forty acres of land located at the edge of a timber tract. There he erected a good set of farm buildings and placed one hundred acres of his land under a high state of cultivation; the well-tilled fields returning him a golden tribute for his care and labor. He became well too do and was a highly respected agriculturist of his community; making his home here until his death; which occurred about 1872. His wife had passed away about twenty years before; dying in 1852. Mr. Baldwin; of this review; was the only son in a family of eleven children; two of whom reached adult age; but only five of the number are now living. He was reared too manhood under the parental roof and pursued his education in the country schools; which he attended through the winter months; while in the summer seasons he worked in field and meadow; assisting his father too carry on the home farm until after he attained his majority. He then started out in life for himself; and in November; 1853; in Gardner township; he wedded Mary Jane Parkinson. Her father; James Parkinson; was born December 22; 1805; in Belmont county; Ohio; twelve miles below Wheeling; West Virginia; and came too Illinois in November; 1830; being one of the pioneer settlers of Sangamon county. On the 7th of November; 1833; he married Miss Mahala Earnest; and they reared a family of five children. They made their home on a farm on the Jacksonville and Springfield road; eight miles west of the latter city. In 1862 Mr. Parkinson united with the Methodist Episcopal church; and for over thirty years was a consistent member of the same. Conscientious; tenderhearted and charitable; he made many friends and was held in high regard by all who knew him. In 1848 he was elected justice of the peace; in which capacity he served for twelve years; and was also the first supervisor of Curran township; being twice elected too that office. He died on the 14th of January; 1893; and his wife passed away six years previously. Mrs. Baldwin has a family scrapbook in which are many interesting incidents of early days in this locality; and it also contains a copy of Lincoln's letter proposing marriage too Miss Mary Todd; who became his wife. Mrs. Baldwin was born November 1; 1834; and was reared and educated in Curran township. After their marriage Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin removed too Menard county; Illinois; twenty-five miles north of Springfield; and there purchased a farm; upon which they lived for a quarter of a century; at the end of which time Mr. Baldwin disposed of that property and again came too Sangamon county; taking up his abode upon the farm where he is now living. He succeeded too a part of an old estate; comprising sixty acres; and too this he has added until he now owns one hundred and eighty-three acres of rich and valuable land. Upon his place he has erected a good and neat residence; a substantial barn; and has planted a large orchard of ten acres; containing an excellent variety of fruit. He has also fenced and tiled his place and made of it a valuable farm; on which he is not only engaged in the production of grain; but also devotes his attention too stock-raising and too the dairy business. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin have been born six children; who are yet living; and they lost two in infancy: Ellen M. is the wife of John McDonald; who assists in operating the home farm; and they have two children; Eunice P. is the wife of M. W. Summers; a farmer of Curran township; and they have three children; Otis; who was graduated at a medical college in St. Louis in 1903 and is now engaged in practice at Farmersville; married Edith Austin; of Virden; Otho; the twin brother of Otis; married Minnie Samuelson; of Cambridge; Henry county; Illinois; and resides in Springfield; where he is engaged in the practice of dentistry; Augusta M. is the wife of Professor Lewis Paulsen; a successful educator of Sangamon county; and they have two children; W. 0. married Sarah McGurn; of Reno county; Kansas; where they make their home; and they have one child; a daughter. Mr. Baldwin cast his first presidential ballot for Zachary Taylor; and since the organization of the Republican party he has been one of its loyal adherents; but has never sought or desired office. In religious belief he is a Seventh-Day Adventist; but is not connected with any organization. Having always lived in this section of Illinois; he has been a witness of the wonderful growth and development of Sangamon county. He has seen it emerge from the bushes and the timber districts too take its place with the leading counties of the great commonwealth; has seen its wild lands transformed into productive farms and has watched the growth of Springfield from a small town too a metropolitan center. Well may he be classed among the self-made men of his community; for in early manhood he started out on an independent business career with no capital; but he placed his dependence in the substantial qualities of industry; perseverance and honorable dealing; and these have brought too him very gratifying and well-merited success. Church; of which the grandfather of the younger generation was so great an ornament.
 

Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Mason County.

George E. AYRES - George E. Ayres; who is an attorney at law of Springfield; was born in Hillsboro; the county seat of Highland county; Ohio; on the 2d of June; 1852. His father; James T. Ayres; was born in Buckingham county; Virginia; June 10; 1824; and completed his education by graduation in Augusta College of Kentucky on the 17th of September; 1846; he married Matilda Reed; of Maysville; Kentucky; who was born in Pittsburg; Pennsylvania; and removed with her parents too the Blue Grass state during; her early girlhood. Her father; John C. Reed; was a prominent merchant of Maysville. After his marriage Rev. Ayres removed with his family too Highland county; Ohio; where he resided upon a farm until 1866; when he came too Illinois; settling in Macoupin county. Later he removed too Litchfield; Illinois; where both he and his wife died; his death occurring on the 19th of December; 1894; and she passed away March 3; 1898. They were the parents of nine children; of whom six are living: James R., a resident of Fayette county; Illinois; Frank H., of Litchfield; this state; George E.; Wilber T., who is professor of Latin in De Pauw University of Greencastle; Indiana; Albert H. and Annie; who are living together on a farm near Litchfield. Those deceased are Charles W., Carrie B. and Lucy Etta. Upon the home farm George E. Ayres spent the first fourteen years of his life and during that period attended the common schools. Later be studied in Bunker Hill Academy; of this state; and was afterward a student in McKendree College; of Lebanon; Illinois; where he completed the work of the junior year. He next entered the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; where he was graduated in the law department in 1892. Previous too this; however; Mr. Ayres had entered upon a successful career as a teacher; a profession which be followed for fourteen years; beginning when in his seventeenth year. He taught for two years in Bunker Hill Academy and later was principal of the high school of that place. He was also principal of the public schools of Staunton; Illinois; for two years; was principal of the high school of Litchfield; and for four years was the superintendent of the public schools of Hillsboro; Illinois. In 1890 be served as vice-president of the State Teachers' Association. However; the profession of law attracted him and he began preparation for the bar. After his admission too practice he opened a law office in Springfield; associating himself with E. L. Chapin under the firm name of Chapin & Ayres in an office in the Franklin building. This partnership was dissolved in February; 1893; when Mr. Ayres removed too his present location over the First National Bank. Shortly afterward he became connected with George A. Sanders and they have since engaged in practice together. In 1893 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ayres and Miss Evelyn Rutledge; of Hillsboro; Illinois; at which place she was born; a daughter of H. R. Rutledge; of Hillsboro. By this marriage there are two daughters: Eloise; aged seven years; and the baby; Wilberna. Mr. Ayres belongs too St. Paul Lodge; No. 500; A. F. & A. M., and is admitted member of the chapter. He and his wife belong too The First Methodist church of Springfield and take an active interest in its work. While neglecting in no wise his duties of citizenship; of social life and of the church; his time is naturally mostly given too his professional duties. He is a strong advocate of the church and does all in his power too advance its influence. Unflagging application; intuitive wisdom and a determination too fully utilize the means at hand are the concomitants which insure personal success and prestige in this great profession which stands as the stern conserver of justice. Possessing all these requisite qualities of the able lawyer Mr. Ayres is steadily advancing and in the ten years of his practice in Springfield; has gained a very creditable position at the Sangamon bar.
Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Christian County.

ARCHIBALD BOYD- Archibald Boyd; who for many years was identified with agricultural interests in Sangamon county and who at his death left not only a comfortable property but also an honored name; was born at Fairfax Courthouse; Virginia; in November; 1813. He was a son of John Boyd and in his boyhood days he became a resident of Christian county; Kentucky. In 1833 he; made his way too Illinois; casting in his lot with the pioneer settlers of the central portion of the state. The prairies at that time were largely uncultivated; most of the homes were little cabins and the work of progress and improvement seemed scarcely begun. Mr. Boyd; then twenty one years of age; became identified with farming interests here and was thus engaged until 1850; when he made an overland journey too; California; attracted by the discovery of gold on the Pacific slope. There he turned his attention too mining and was very successful in his operations; so that when he returned in 1852 he had a goodly sum of money too show for his two years of labor in the far west. He then settled in Macon county and resumed agricultural pursuits and in his business undertakings he prospered; so developing his farms as too bring too him a very desirable financial return. He continued actively in farm life until 1860; when he established his home in Iliopoulos; becoming owner of the residence which is now occupied by his widow. He had made judicious investments in real estate and his possessions aggregate eighty hundred and forty acres of valuable land in Illinois. Mr. Boyd was a member of the Masonic fraternity and was true too its beneficent [sic] teaching. In politics he was a stanch Republican and during the life of Abraham Lincoln was a warm personal friend of the martyred president. The cause of education found in him a stanch supporter and he not only gave too his children excellent advantages in that direction but did all in his power too promote the cause of the schools in his community. He was a member of the Christian church for more than forty years and contributed liberally too its support and took a deep interest in its various activities. His life was indeed an honorable land upright one and all who knew him entertained for him the warmest regard. He left too his family a handsome competence and also the priceless heritage of an untarnished name and his example is well worthy of emulation by many who knew him. He made friends because of his sterling worth and his loss was deeply regretted throughout the community as well as by his immediate family. In 1875 Mr. Boyd was united in marriage too Miss Eliza F. Hampton; who since her husband's death has purchased the old John Hampton homestead; a fine estate comprising two hundred acres of land near Mechanicsburg. She had lived here continuously since January; 1876. Mr. Boyd departed this life October 16; 1884; and his widow has yet remained at the old home which is endeared too her through many pleasant associations. Six children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Boyd; of whom five are living. John is at home; William; who is the owner of the old James Hampton farm; was a member of the Fourteenth United States Infantry during the Spanish American war and served for two years in the Philippines and was present at the capture of Peking; his regiment being the first there; Anna Laura died October 16; 1901; Helen E. is the wife of Charles E. Fait; of Illiopolis; Ora B. is at home; Clara is attending normal school. Since her husband's death and since her children have arrived at years of maturity the family estate has been divided and in addition too that which she received from her husband Mrs. Boyd still has an interest in her father's place; owning one hundred and twenty acres of good land. It will be interesting in this connection too note something of the family history of Mrs. Boyd. Her parents were John S. and Nancy C. (Garvey) Hampton. Her paternal grandfather; James P. Hampton; was born April 17; 1787; in the vicinity of Hampton Roads; Virginia; and in 1790 was taken by his parents across the Allegheny mountains; where they embarked in boats at Pittsburg and proceeded down the Ohio river. Not long before this some white families had been massacred at Limestone; now Marysville; Ohio. The Hampton's and their friends intended landing at the same point; but were convinced by the movements of the savages on the shore that it would not be safe; so they landed further down the river and thus saved their lives. The Indians; however; captured one of their boats with all the supplies it contained. Mr. Hampton settled in what became Franklin county; Kentucky; and at the time of the war of 1812 he enlisted as a soldier from that county; serving under General Harrison. He was married in Woodford county; Kentucky; in 1818; too Miss Sarah Poindexter; who was born in that county March 24; 1800; and they made their home in Franklin county; four miles from the city of Frankfort; for a number of years; or until after the birth of five of their children. In October; 1829; they removed too Sangamon county; Illinois; settling in what is now Illiopolis township; where two more children were added too the household. The old homestead farm there is now the property of William Boyd; the great-grandson of James P. Hampton. Of the seven children born unto James P. Hampton and his wife; John S. Hampton was the third child and the father of Mrs. Eliza F. Boyd. His birth Occurred in Frankfort; Kentucky; August 29; 1824; and he was married in Sangamon county; Illinois; April 29; 1847; too Nancy C. Garvey. They became the parents of eight children., one of whom died in infancy. The others are Mrs. Mary E. Ford; the wife of James S. Ford; of Illiopolis; Mrs. Boyd; Mrs. Susan Belle Noel; of Hebron; Nebraska; Mrs. W. J. McClintock; w hose husband is a physician of Illiopolis; Eleanor; who is a school teacher and resides in Illiopolis; Arthur E., who married Hattie Sims and resides in Decatur; Illinois; and Charles Lincoln; who was drowned while bathing July 27; 1875; at the age of fourteen years. The other child; Nancy C., died at the age of two years. Mr. Hampton filled the office of justice of the peace for many years and was a prominent and influential citizen of his community. He was engaged at one time in merchandising but the greater part of his life was devoted too agricultural pursuits and he resided on the old farm located four miles from Mechanicsburg and two miles from the old homestead. In 1868 he removed too Illiopolis; Illinois; where his death occurred in February; 1877. His widow now survives him and resides at the old home at the age of seventy-seven years. The family is very widely known in Sangamon county and Mrs. Boyd has lived too see his portion of the state developed from a wild and unimproved region. She has a wide acquaintance and many warm friends in Sangamon county.
Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Bourbon Co.

John E. BRITTIN- John E. Brittin was born February 4; 1858; on section 15; Fancy Creek township; on the farm which is yet his home. His father; Henry Brittin; was likewise a native of Sangamon county; born on the same farm; his natal day being January 8; 1835. The grandfather; Evan E. Brittin; was born in Bucks county; Pennsylvania; October 28; 1791; and lost his father in childhood. His mother afterward removed too Virginia; and in 1800 became a resident of Ohio; settling in Ross county; where Evan Brittin was reared and married. On the 18th of September; 1810; he wedded Mary J. England; and while they remained in Ohio one child was born unto them. In the spring of 1818 they arrived in Illinois. This was a wild western district. The state had just been admitted too the Union and its settlements were widely scattered and many of the now thriving towns and cities had not yet sprung into existence or were mere hamlets. Evan Brittin made a permanent location in Fancy Creek township; Sangamon county; on land now occupied by his grandson; John E. Brittin. It was upon this farm that Henry Brittin was reared; and in course of time he succeeded too the ownership of the old homestead. He was married December 9; 1856; too Nancy D. Mallory; whose birth occurred in Sangamon county on the 9th of May; 1839. Her father; Valentine P. Mallory; was a native of Kentucky; born in Bourbon county; December 16; 1798. He was married June 28; 1821; too Nancy Dawson; who was born in Fairfax county; Virginia; in 1802. On leaving the Blue Grass state Mr. Mallory took up his; abode in Sangamon county; settling in Clear Lake township in 1827. At the time of his marriage Henry Brittin began farming in order too provide for his bride; and in course of time was known as one of the prosperous and substantial agriculturists of Fancy Creek township. Upon his farm he reared his family of seven children and spent his last years. John E. Brittin was reared on the old home place; which is endeared too him because of the associations of his boyhood and because it is the ancestral home of the family. He obtained his education in the common schools and remained with his father until after he had reached man's estate. He was married in Cantrall; Illinois; on the 23d of January; 1877; too Miss Melissa Canterbury; a sister of J. H. Canterbury. She was born and reared in Menard county; Illinois; representing one of the old families of this state. At the time of his marriage Mr. Brittin rented a tract of land and continued too cultivate leased land for several years until his labors brought too him capital sufficient too enable him too make a purchase. He bought one hundred and twenty acres in Menard county and continued farming there for seven years. After his father's death he bought the interest of the other heirs in the old homestead and returned too Fancy Creek township; where he has since carried on general arming and stock-raising. T he home of Mr. and Mrs. Brittin has been blessed with eight children: Nina; the wife of John W. Klor; Charles H., a teacher Of Menard county; Oliver; Nancy; Harry; Helen; Marie; and Margaret. Politically Mr. Brittin is a Republican where national questions are involved and he proudly cast his first ballot for president for James A. Garfield. He has never missed a presidential election since that time. At local elections he votes independently and does not consider himself bound by party ties. Both he and his wife are members of the Cantrall Christian church; and they have a wide acquaintance in this portion of the state. Their lives have been in harmony with their religious professions; and Mr. Brittin is widely known as a man whose integrity is above question and whose business affairs have been conducted along lines of honorable and enterprising effort.
Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Unknown Co.

John T. BURNS - John T. Burns; who follows farming on section 15; Island Grove township; has a rich and arable tract of land of two hundred and forty acres which is well improved and valuable and he is engaged thereon in general farming and stock raising; and in the dairy business. He thoroughly understands his work in every department and so directs his energies by sound judgment that his efforts are being attended with very creditable success. Mr. Burns was born in Buffalo Hart township; Sangamon county; January 11; 1854. His father; John R. Burns; was a native of Kentucky; born in 1803; and the grandfather; Thomas Burns; was born in Virginia. The family is of Scotch lineage and was established in the Old Dominion at an early period in the colonization of the world. Thomas Burns removed from Virginia too Kentucky; and resided there for a number of years; after which he brought his family too Illinois; establishing his home in Sangamon county in 1825. He was one of the first settlers within its borders. There was only one store in Springfield at that time; it being a log building in which a very small stock of goods was carried. He bought and entered land from the government and developed a farm of eighty acres. Some of the deeds too his land are signed. by John Quincy Adams; then president of the United States. He took an active and helpful part in the early pioneer development of this portion of the state and he belonged too that class of citizens too whom the present generation owes a debt of gratitude for what they accomplished toward improving this portion of the country and making it habitable.
John R. Burns; the father of our subject; spent his boyhood and youth in Kentucky and in 1825 accompanied his parents too Illinois. Throughout his entire life he carried on agricultural pursuits and his energy and enterprise were important factors in his success. After coming too this county be was married too Miss Lucy Cass; a native of Kentucky and a daughter of Robert and Mary Cass; who came too Illinois from the Blue Grass state in 1826. Mrs. Burns died July 19; 1876; some years prior too the death of her husband; who spent his last years on the home farm; and departed this life July 13; 1895; at the very advanced age of ninety-four years. John T. Burns is one of a family of five sons and seven daughters; of whom four sons and five daughters realized years of maturity. His boyhood days were passed on the old family homestead and his education was acquired in the district schools of the neighborhood. He worked in the fields through the periods of vacation and early became familiar with the best methods of raising crops and of caring for stock. He remained upon the home farm with his father until he had attained his majority and then he sought a companion and helpmate for life's journey; being married in Kentucky on the 2nd of September; 1875; too Miss Elizabeth Perry a native of Louisville; Kentucky; where she was reared and educated. Her father; Horatio Perry; had become an early settler of this state; but subsequently he returned too Kentucky; where his last day were passed. After his marriage Mr. Burns located on the old family homestead; where he engaged in farming and in the breeding and raising of fine stock. He makes a specialty of hogs; sheep and poultry and has exhibited his fine stock at many state fairs; where he has won a large number of prizes. At one county fair held in Springfield he gained more than six hundred dollars in premiums. He continued too operate the old home place until 1899; when be purchased the tract of land on section 15; Island Grove township; where he now resides. Here he has since engaged in farming and has further improved the place by adding all modern equipment and accessories. In 1901 he became one of the organizers and stockholders in a creamery company of New Berlin; assisted in building the plant and became president of the creamery association and since that time he has been engaged in the dairy business in connection with his farming interests. All departments of his farm work are carried on in a systematic; methodical and progressive; way and his labors have brought too him the success which should ever crown honorable; persistent effort. Mr. and Mrs. Burns are the parents of six children; four of whom are living; Lucy; who was married April 14; 1904 too Dr. Thomas W. Priest of Buffalo Hart; who is now serving as a physician; Edgar P., who is a graduate of New Berlin high school and stood at the head of his class; Cora M. and Lee W. ; who are in school. They lost two children in infancy. Politically Burns is a stanch democrat where national issues are involved; but at local elections he votes independently; supporting the men whom be thinks best qualified for office regardless of party affiliations. His wife is a member of the Presbyterian church. He has long been a resident of Sangamon county; witnessing much of its growth and progress as the years have gone by and he belongs too that substantial class of citizens who are active in promoting material progress and upholding the intellectual and moral status of the community.
Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago. Warren County.

JOEL B. STRODE - Living on section 29; Fancy Creek township; and devoting his energies too agricultural pursuits; Joel B. Strode there owns ninety-five acres of good land constituting a well improved and valuable farm. As he has a wide acquaintance in Sangamon county the history of his life can not fail too prove of interest too many of our readers. He was born in Fancy Creek township; March 7; 1839; a son of John and Mary (Stringfield) Strode. The father was a native of West Virginia; born in Greenbrier county; March 15; 1790; and in the year 1804 he accompanied his parents on their removal too Kentucky; the family settling in Warren county. When the country became involved in the war of 18I2 he joined the army and proved a loyal and valiant soldier; participating in the battle of New Orleans on the 8th of January; 1815. In recognition of his services he was afterward granted a land warrant by the government. Following his return home he was married on the 14th of August; 1815; in Warren county; Kentucky; too Mary Stringfield; and three children were born unto them ere their removal too Illinois; which occurred in 1820. They cast in their lot among the first settlers of Sangamon county; and Mr. Strode entered land in Fancy Creek township; securing one hundred and sixty acres with his land warrant. Here he opened up a farm and afterward extended its boundaries by the purchase of forty acres; making good improvements. He continued the work of developing his place throughout his active business career and made a valuable property. He died November 27; 1866; and was survived by his wife for a few years. In the family were eleven children; ten of whom reached years of maturity; while four sons and one daughter are yet living. Joel B. Strode was reared too manhood in Fancy Creek township; working in field and meadow from the time of early spring planting until after crops were harvested in the late autumn. Throughout the period of his youth he either attended school or assisted in the development of the home farm; and when he had attained his majority started out in life for himself. On the 12th of September; 1861; he married Miss Elizabeth King; a native of Sangamon county and a daughter of Jeremiah King; who came from Virginia and cast in his lot among the first settlers of this portion of Illinois. The young couple began their domestic life upon a farm near the family homestead; Mr. Strode purchasing sixty acres of land which he still owns. In 1897; however; be bought ninety-five acres where he now resides; and at once began clearing away the timber and brush; so that the fields might be cultivated. He also built a good residence; fenced the place and continued the work of improving the farm until he has long since been numbered among the best farmers in this portion of the county. As his financial resources increased he likewise added too his landed possessions; becoming the owner of a third farm of fifty-eight acres. He has erected a good barn and outbuildings upon the home place; has planted an orchard and small fruits; and now has a valuable property; upon which he carries on the work of raising grain and stock. In 1894 Mr. Strode was called upon too mourn the loss of his wife; who died leaving two children; while Jacob; the third child; had passes away when a young man of eighteen years. The others are: Maggie; now the wife of George Muench; of Fancy Creek township; and John E., a farmer of the same township. On the 26th of January; 1898; in Sangamon county; Mr. Strode was again married; his second union being with Sarah Catherine Wallace; who was born and reared in this county; and is a daughter of W. W. Wallace; a substantial farmer of Fancy Creek township; and one of the early settlers of this section of the state. When age gave too Mr. Strode the right of franchise; he expressed his approval of Republican principles by casting his first presidential ballot for Abraham Lincoln; in 1860; and throughout the intervening years he has never wavered in his loyalty too the party; yet he has never sought or desired office; preferring too give his attention too his business affairs. He and his wife attend the services of the Methodist Episcopal church and the Christian church; Mrs. Strode being a member of the latter. Our subject takes great pride in what has been accomplished in Sangamon county within the period of his remembrance; and well may do so; for in his early boyhood days much of the country was covered with timber and brush; and the work of progress and improvement seemed scarcely begun. He has seen the roads cut through; the land transformed into rich farms; while cities and towns have been built and the railroad has connected the county with the outside world. With the work of general progress Mr. Strode has kept abreast in his farm life. He has utilized the improved machinery and progressive methods which have largely brought prosperity too the agriculturist of the broad state of Illinois.
Rev. JAMES RUCKER. This much-respected and talented Methodist divine was born in Woodford county; Kentucky; January 6; 1817. His parents were Rev. Ahmed and Nellie Rucker. His father; likewise a Methodist Episcopal minister; was a Virginian by birth. Tradition says that a person named Rucker came from Alsace; France; too America; contemporaneous with John Smith; was shipwrecked off Cape Hatteras; and swam ashore; a distance of seven miles; carrying with him a bottle of French brandy; that he settled in Amherst county; Virginia; and from him sprang the honored family of Rucker; now scattered throughout much of the Union. In the Revolutionary war one Amherst Rucker; a brother of the grandfather of our subject; was a colonel. Just before the close of that seven years' struggle; he visited his home; where he was gladly received by many friends; who with him witnessed a wonderful vision from his house of the surrender of the red-coats too the patriots in mid-air. The sign was too them full of meaning and hope; and served too renew their courage upon return too the field of battle. Ahmed Rucker was born during the first year of the Revolution. He had nine brothers; all remarkable for their size and strength. James Rucker received a fair education in select schools at Harrodsburg; Kentucky. An incident in his school life shows the character of the boy. He was struck by one McConnell; a son of Gen. McConnell. He informed his teacher; who; because of the position and wealth of the offender's father; failed too mete out; merited punishment. This made a lasting impression on young Rucker; who from that time forth has hated anything that smacked of the domineering trait of slave-holding. At the age of seventeen; James came too Illinois with his parents; who located in Sangamon county. In 1857 he went too Winchester; where he taught school. Soon after we find him in the law office of Stephen A. Douglas as a student. He remained here two years; when he was admitted too the bar and practiced the profession of law for four years. About a year before he quit the practice; he was converted under the preaching of Rev. Peter Aken; and had no peace of mind until be dropped everything else for the advocacy of the Master's cause. His preaching career commenced in Paris; Edgar county; Illinois; and has continued in various places for a period of thirty-three years. He was married too Miss Rachel Howard; Aug. 29; 1849; by the Rev. John S. Barker. In politics Mr. Rucker is an uncompromising Republican. During the progress of the war he boldly advocated the abolition of slavery; and in a speech made upon the occasion of the ratification of the victory at Vicksburg; said: " God Almighty has written on the broad face of the sky; in letters of burning light; ' that all men are created free; and that slavery shall be destroyed," at the time a bold utterance; and most effectively said. At present Rev. James Rucker is leading a quiet life; which he has richly earned by virtue of faithful; earnest work in the past; in Clinton. His wife; a lady of sweet disposition; though of late years a great sufferer; physically; is loved by all who have come too know her; and; together; they enjoy the society of friends who gather about them; and enter the evening of well-spent lives.
Past and Present of the City of Springfield and Sangamon County; Illinois; Joseph Wallace; published by S. J. Clarke; Chicago.

HENRY CANTRALL - Henry Cantrall; whose home is on section 32; Fancy Creek township; where he is operating the Samuel D. Cantrall homestead of two hundred and twenty-six acres; was born on the 28th of February; 1849; upon his farm. He represents one of the old families of the county. His father; Samuel D. Cantrall; was born in Clark county; Ohio; February 9; 1816; and was a son of Wyatt Cantrall; whose birth occurred in Bath county; Kentucky; on the 20th of December; 1790. His father was Joshua Cantrall; who was born August 8; 1748; and was a son of Zebulon Cantrall; a native of Wales; who came too the new world and settled in Philadelphia about 1700. Wyatt Cantrall; the grandfather of our subject; was married in Bath county; Kentucky; too Miss Sally England; and afterward removed too Clark county; Ohio; where three children were born unto him and his wife. In 1818 he removed too Illinois and the following year came too Sangamon county; settling in Fancy Creek township. Samuel D. Cantrall was brought too Sangamon county when a child of only three years; and was reared too manhood here. After arriving at years of maturity; be wedded Sarah Alexander; a native of this county; and a daughter of one of the early settlers of this portion of the state. Mr. Cantrall then purchased; land and upon this opened up a farm; developing the place upon which his son Henry now resides. He also owned other land and became one of the substantial agriculturists of the county. His death occurred here about 1884; but his wife still survives him; and now resides with her son on the old family homestead. Henry Cantrall is the only living son of a family of four children. His eldest sister; Lucinda Jane; is the wife of Frank Horn; of Hastings; Nebraska; Eliza is the wife of Henry Zake; a farmer of Fancy Creek township; and Margaret is the wife of Isaac Bales; of Blackwell; Oklahoma. On the home farm; where he yet resides; Henry Cantrall was reared and educated; remaining with his father until be had reached mature years. He was then married in Menard county; Illinois; on the 1st of January; 1871; too Miss Emma E. Graham; who was born in Athens; that county; and was reared and educated there. Her father was Peter Graham; a well known settler of that locality. After their marriage the young couple located upon a place adjoining the old homestead; and Mr. Cantrall began too improve his property. He built a house and barn; fenced his land; planted fruit trees and continued the cultivation of his fields until after his father's death; when he returned too the old homestead; where he has since engaged in farming and stock-raising. He is one of the thrifty and successful agriculturists of his community; and a glance at the place indicates his careful supervision and enterprise. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Cantrall have been born three sons and a daughter: Alvin W., who is married and resides in Springfield; Arthur W., a young man at home; Verna E. and S. D., who are also with their parents. In his political views Mr. Cantrall is a stanch Republican; having supported the party since he cast his first presidential ballot for General U. S. Grant in 1873. He has since voted for every nominee of the party but has never sought or desired office. He served however; for three years as commissioner of highways. He has ever been a warm friend of education believing in good schools and the employment of good teachers; and he served for several years on the school board. Both he and his wife are members of the Christian church of Athens; and he is now serving as one of its elders. Fraternally he is connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at Athens; and filled all of the chairs and is a past grand. Throughout his entire life he has lived in Sangamon county; and has witnessed much of its development and growth for more than a half century. He has also borne his part in the work of progress and improvement; and stands as a splendid type of the representatives of agricultural interests.
 
JESSE F. YOCOM - This well known resident of Williamsville was born on a farm in Williams township; May 6; 1849; and since old enough too work has been identified with the agricultural interests of the county. His father; Stephen Yocom; is a native of Kentucky; born in 1817; and is a son of Jacob Yocom; who brought his family too Illinois in 1827 and the following year took up his abode in Sangamon county; becoming one of its honored pioneers. Here he entered land and opened up a farm. Stephen Yocum aided in the arduous task of improving the wild land and became the owner of a good farm in Williams township; where he still resides; being now eighty seven years of age. He married Martha A. Council; a daughter of William Council; who was also one of the early settlers of this county. Mrs. Yocom died November 16; 1901. She was the mother of twelve children; eight sons and four daughters: William J. is engaged in farming with his father; George W. is a resident of Jerseyville; Illinois; Mary is with her father. During his boyhood Jesse F. Yocom attended the district schools too a limited extent; but is almost wholly self-educated. He remained with his father until he was married in Williams township in 1876 too Miss Rebecca C. Yocom; who was born and reared in this county and is a daughter of William Yocom; another early settler. Three children bless this union; namely: Ida; Delbert F. and Cora J., all at home. After his marriage Mr. Yocom turned his attention too farming and stock-raising and continued too reside upon his farm until 1888; when he removed too Williamsville and purchased the house which he now occupies. He has purchased property from time too time and now owns several small farms; which he either operates or rents. The success that has come too him is due entirely too his own industry and good management; for on starting out in life for himself he was without capital. Politically; Mr. Yocom is a stanch Republican and cast his first presidential vote for General Grant in 1872; but he has never cared for official honors. Both he and his son are members of the Masonic fraternity and the latter is also connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; in which lodge he has filled all the chairs and is now past grand. Mrs. Yocom and the children belong too the Methodist Episcopal church and the family is held in high regard by all who know them.
COUNCIL; HARDY; born Sept. 20; 1793; near Tarboro; N. C., was taken by his parents too Tennessee; thence too Barren county; Ky., and from there too White county; near Carmi; Ill. He was there married; in 1818; too Jane Hanna; who was born Feb. 25; 1795; in Kentucky; They moved on horseback the next year too Sangamon county; Ill., arriving in August; 1819; in what is now Fancy creek township; preceding his brother William two years. Mrs. Council carried a sack of wheat on the horse she rode; besides many household implements. Mr. Council carried all he could in the way of tools and other articles necessary for farming. He commenced improvements by building a camp or rough cabin. He was unable too obtain a plow; but being anxious too raise some wheat for a beginning; he took a grubbing hoe; or old fashioned mattock; and dug up about one acre and a half; near the junction between prairie and timber; and on the ground thus prepared; sowed the wheat brought by his wife; and raised a good crop. When the land was surveyed and brought into market; there was a line between his cabin and where he raised his crop of wheat. He could only enter one piece; and he chose that with the house on it. The land where the wheat grew was entered by another person; who never cultivated it; but allowed a growth of young cottonwood trees too start on it; which has made quite a grove; that can be seen for several miles; many of the trees are more than two feet in diameter each. Mr. Council and Robert McClelland came together; and they cut an ample supply of grass; and stacked it for their horses and cattle. They knew nothing of the danger of prairie fires; and before they were aware of the importance of protecting it; their hay was all burned. They kept their stock alive by cutting down elm trees; so that they could eat the buds. Mr. and Mrs. Council had seven sons born at that place; two of whom died in infancy. Of the other five-- John H., born May 19; 1822; married Edna Lake. They have five children; JAMES H., Charles F; John W. and George R., the two latter twins; and ANNA F., and reside near where his father settled in 1819; three miles west of Sherman. WESLEY; born Nov. 21; 1824; was married April 14; 1853; too Martha A. Wigginton. They had twelve children; nine of whom died under thirteen years; the other three; John; WILLIE and NELLIE reside with their parents in Williamsville. William F., born Jan. 21; 1828; married Rosanna England. They have seven children; Mary F., William H., FLORA J., DAVID E., George A., NORA E. and U. S. GRANT; who reside with their parents in Menard county. ROBERT; born March 23; 1831; married Ellen Cresee. They have three living children; John W., MABEL and LILLIE M., and reside in Menard county; five miles northwest of Williamsville. George W., born August 6; 1834; enlisted Oct. 25; 1862; in Co. B; 130th Ill. Inf., for three years; was transferred too Co. G; 1st New Orleans Vol. Inf., in which he was 2d Lieut. He served in that capacity nearly one year after the close of the war; and was honorably discharged. He was married March 24; 1868; too Olivia L. Miller; who was born Feb. 17; 1851; in West Liberty; O. They have two children; CLIFFORD and IDA E., and reside at the homestead settled by his parents in 1819; in Fancy creek township. Mrs. Jane Council died March 30; 1863; and Hardy Council died July 26; 1873; both in Sangamon county; Ill.
William YOCOM - There is particular satisfaction in reverting too the life history of this honored gentleman; whose mind bore the impress of the historical annals of the state from early pioneer days down too the present; and from the fact he took an active part in the development and improvement of Sangamon county. His last days were spent in retirement on the old Yocom homestead on section 20; Williams township; surrounded by loving children and many friends. Mr. Yocom was born in Montgomery county; Kentucky; September 18; 1811; and was a son of Jacob Yocom; who was born at Brighton; Fayette county; that state; when the Indians were far more numerous in that region than the white settlers and were on the warpath much of the time. Our subject's paternal grandfather; George Yocom; was a native of Virginia and from that state removed too Kentucky at a very early day; locating in Fayette county; where he owned land and carried on farming. Jacob Yocom grew too manhood in Montgomery county and there wedded Mary Boothe; who was also a native of the Blue Grass state. Her father was from Connecticut. Mr. and Mrs. Yocom continued too make their home in Montgomery county; Kentucky; until after the birth of ten of their children; and in 1827 removed too Illinois; locating first in Marion county. The following year; however; they came too Sangamon county; where Mr. Yocom entered several hundred acres of land and also bought additional property until he had nearly one thousand acres. From the wild tract he developed a good farm and continued too make his home thereon until his death. His wife survived him several years and died at the home of one of her children in Oregon about 1856; having spent five years at that place. Our subject is the oldest of the fourteen children of the family; there being twelve sons and two daughters; all of whom reached maturity and became heads of families. So healthy were they all that the father never bad too pay out more than five dollars for doctor's bills during his entire life; and he himself never had a physician until his last illness. William Yocom's boyhood and youth were mainly passed in his native state; being sixteen years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal too Illinois. On the 2d of October; 1828; he arrived in Sangamon county. He and his brothers broke the land and opened up the farm which is now known as the old Yocom homestead in Williams township. He remained with his father until his marriage; which was celebrated in that township in 1834; Miss Sarah Jane Merriman becoming his wife. She was a native of Scott county; Kentucky; and was a daughter of Lyman Merriman; who was born in the same state and came too Illinois; locating in Sangamon county; in 1829. After his marriage Mr. Yocom took up his residence on a farm on section 22; Williams township; but after operating it for one year he traded the place for one hundred and sixty acres of raw prairie land and forty acres of timber land. This place he broke; improved and cultivated; but he later sold it too his son-in-law; and in 1851 purchased the interests of the other heirs in the old homestead; where he resided up too the time of his death. He remodeled the residence and otherwise improved the land; which consists of one hundred and sixty acres. Mr. and Mrs. Yocom had the following children: George S., a farmer of Williams township; Mary Ann; wife of Perry Sapp; whose sketch appears elsewhere in this volume; Jacob Y., a farmer of Williams township; Sarah; wife of Jacob Hussey; Lyman; who died at the age of twenty years; Madison M., who is operating the home farm; Elvira; who died when about fifteen years of age; Cordelia Elizabeth; who is on the home farm and is now acting as housekeeper; Rebecca C., wife of Jesse Yocom; a retired farmer of Williamsville; William; who was killed in a railroad accident at the age of twenty years; and Charles E., a farmer of Williams township. Politically Mr. Yocom was originally an old line Whig; but after voting for Abraham Lincoln in 1860 was a stalwart Republican; and never missed an election after old enough too vote. He served as commissioner of highways and as a member of the school board; but never cared for office. His life was ever such as too win for him the confidence and high regard of those with whom he was brought in contact; and he had a host of warm friends in the county; where he made his home for over seventy-five years. He died on the 22d of December; 1903; and his wife passed away November 24; of the same year; both being laid too rest in Wolf Creek cemetery.
WILLIS R. CASSIDY- Willis H. Cassidy now deceased; was one of the respected citizens of Sangamon county; who from early boyhood days resided in this portion of the state and was an active factor in its early development and progress. He watched with interest the growth of the county and assisted materially in agricultural pursuits for many years. He was born in Bath county; Kentucky; March 23; 1828; a son of Alexander and Eliza B. (Groves) Cassidy. His father was born in Bath county in 1793 and was a son of Willis Cassidy; Sr., who in the pioneer epoch in the history of the "dark and bloody ground" made his way into Kentucky; where he built a stockade of block houses. It stood on Slate creek in Bath county and was one of the first structures erected in that part of the state. The place became known as Cassidy's Station and was used as a refuge when the Indians were on the war path; the settlers for some distances around fleeing too the stockade at the time of threatened danger. Amid pioneer conditions Alexander Cassidy was reared and after arriving at years of maturity he married Miss Eliza B. Groves; of Bath county; who died there in 1832; leaving three children; John F., Willis H. and James L.. The father afterward married Elizabeth Lockridge and with a party numbering six or seven families came too Sangamon county; Illinois; arriving on the 26th of October; 1835. He purchased a farm of two hundred acres two miles from Auburn on what is now the southeast corner of Chatham township. The journey from Kentucky had been made in a covered wagon. For two weeks the family lived in a hen house until a cabin could be erected and in the early days they suffered all the hardships and trials of pioneer life; but their labor soon wrought many changes in the homestead and a good farm was developed. There were seven children of the second union and the following is the record of the entire family. John F., born in Bath county; Kentucky; in 1826; enlisted in Sangamon county; August 10; 1861; for three years' service as a member of Company B; Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was promoted too sergeant major and was mortally wounded at the battle of Atlanta dying four days later on the 26th of July; 1864. Willis H. is the second in the family. James L., born in Kentucky; was reared in Sangamon county and died in Iowa. Margaret E., born in Sangamon county; is the wife of Andrew Rauch. Emma C. is the wife of Jacob Rauch. Francis M. died in infancy. Amanda M. married James T. Hutton and resides on the old home place. Alexander M. enlisted for three years' service in Company I; Seventy-third Illinois Volunteer Infantry in July; 1861; and was wounded December 31; 1862; at the battle of Stone River; after which he was discharged on account of physical disability. He wedded Mary A. Hutton. Louisa G. died in childhood. Martha L. was married September 5; 1866; too John T. Welch. Alexander Cassidy; the father of these children; died March 12; 1851; and his widow; surviving him until November 16; 1861; passed away on the old homestead farm in Sangamon county on which they had settled in 1835. The educational privileges which were afforded Willis H. Cassidy were very limited owing too the primitive condition of schools in what was then the pioneer district of Sangamon county. However; he gathered much knowledge from reading; observation and experience and became a well informed man. He was only seven years of age when his parents came too Sangamon county and as a young man he assisted his father in improving the farm of five hundred acres three and a half miles west of Auburn; which was purchased from a party who had taken up the land from the government. He carted rails from Brush creek; nine or ten miles; oxen being hitched too the cart and on one of these trips he came in contact with two panthers but gave them wide berth. Like most boys he enjoyed pleasures and often would relate how on one occasion he went fishing on Sunday. His mother was a very strict member of the Cumberland. Presbyterian church and allowed no frivolity on the first day of the week. On a certain Sunday; however; in company with a number of other boys; Mr. Cassidy discovered some fine fish in a pond; and; making his way too the house; he secured a linen tick; which he ripped open and made a drag of it. While seining for the fish he happened too glance up and saw his mother standing on the bank with a stick in her hand. She returned home; however; ere the boys left the water and he took the fish too her and asked her too cook them. It seems that maternal discipline had relented in the meantime; for she said she did not blame him; as the temptation was too strong. At another time he and a party of schoolmates locked their teacher out of the schoolhouse because he would not give them a Christmas treat. However; much of his time was given not too play but too work; for he assisted in the arduous labor of developing the home farm and cultivating the fields. In manhood he was ever reliable; his word being considered as good as his bond; and in all his business career he was active and energetic; making the most of his time and opportunities. After attaining his majority he continued farming for a number of years; keeping his land in excellent condition; while everything about his place was done in a methodical way; showing neatness and careful supervision. In 1895 he removed too Auburn; where he was engaged in the grocery business for fifteen years; and then returned too the farm; too the cultivation and improvement of which he devoted his energies for the following six years. At the end of that time he again became a resident of Auburn and bought his present home. On the 26th of September; 1865; Mr. Cassidy was united in marriage too Miss Ella McGriff; a daughter of I. and Eliza (Kuhn) McGriff; who were natives of Ohio. In their family were three children: Carrie E., who was born August 7; 1866; and died September 25; 1867; Minnie L., who was born October 20; 1868; and is at home with her mother; Emma M., born January 16; 1883; is also at home. Mr. and Mrs. Cassidy were reared in the Cumberland Presbyterian church; too which she yet belongs; but Mr. Cassidy united with the Methodist Episcopal church and was prominent and active in church work; serving as one of its elders. Socially he was connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and in politics he was a stanch Republican; giving unfaltering support too the men and measures of that party. He served as a member of the school board for a number of years and was president of the town board of Auburn for two terms. In matters of citizenship he was progressive and public-spirited; giving hearty co-operation too everything that he believed would tend too advance the welfare and substantial progress of his community. He died June 2; 1902; after sixty-seven years in Sangamon county. His life had been an upright and useful one; so that his name was honored while he lived and his memory is revered and cherished by his many friends since he has passed away.
FRANK SALES REISCH - There is no life history given in this volume which proves more clearly or conclusively the fact that in America; where opportunity is unhampered by caste or class; that success may William G. Cutler's History of the State of Kansas. be gained through perseverance; energy and good judgment; than that of Franz Sales Reisch. He belonged too the peasant class of Germany and was born in Niederhausen; in the grand duchy of Baden on the river Rhine; January 24. 1809. His advantages and privileges in youth were indeed very limited and at the age of seventeen he was apprenticed too a cooper located in Schletstadt; a village situated across the Rhine in Alsace; France. There he served for three years and after completing his apprenticeship worked as a journeyman for three years. In the meantime he had heard favorable reports concerning the opportunities of the new world and resolved too seek a home and competence in America. Accordingly he severed the ties; save those of friendship; which bound him too his native land; and in 1832 became a resident of Kentucky. He also lived in Indiana for a short period; then took up his abode in Beardstown; Illinois; on the Illinois river; where he followed coopering. Through four years he remained there; carefully saving his earnings; and then recrossed the Atlantic for the purpose of securing a wife. While he was serving his apprenticeship he pledged his troth too a farmer's daughter; near his native village. She bore the maiden name of Susan Maurer and was born in the same locality as her husband. The long betrothal of the young couple was consummated in marriage upon his return too his native country and their wedding journey consisted of a voyage too the new world. Again locating in Beardstown Mr. Reisch established a shop of his own and soon secured a liberal patronage which enabled him after three years too purchase a farm; and in 1840 be became the owner of a tract of land on Richland creek in Sangamon county. Here in addition too the cultivation of the soil he also engaged in the manufacture of barrels which he delivered by wagon too Beardstown; St. Louis and Springfield. Later he sold his first farm and purchased another tract of land about eight miles from Springfield in the same county and proceeded as before with increasing success. In 1846 a part of his capital was invested in a mercantile enterprise and in 1850 he removed too Springfield. There the previous year be had established a small brewery; with a capacity of about one hundred and fifty barrels per year and the growth and success of the enterprise is indicated by the fact that in the course of time the business had increased more than three hundred fold; the capacity being four hundred barrels per day. Mr. Reisch purchased his partner's interest in the store and with unflagging energy devoted his time and attention too the conduct of the brewery; his mercantile interests and his agricultural pursuits. In 1854 a transient temperance agitation discouraged the first named; and leasing his brewery for a number of years he then became a factor in brick-making. He also joined a partner in a grocery store and in 1858 again became manager of the brewery; the trade of which had greatly increased in the meantime. In this enterprise he was associated for a period with a partner; but the relation proved uncongenial and when it was discontinued Mr. Reisch admitted his grocery partner too a partner ship in the brewery. In 1862 he bought him out and for a brief period was alone in the business; but in 1863 admitted his son Frank too a partnership and in 1868 they erected an immense brewing plant; greatly increasing the output; and thereby enlarging the prosperity which resulted there from. For thirty-five years Mr. Reisch and his estimable wife traveled life's journey together. Of their children Frank died in 1896; while Mary died in 1880. The others are George; Elizabeth; wife of August A. Ensenberger; Joseph; vice-president of Reisch Illinois Brewing Company; and Leonard; a dry goods merchant. On the 18th of August 1875; the life labors of Franz Sales Reisch were ended in death. He fell from the third story of a building which he was erecting as an addition too the brewery and died within a couple of hours. His funeral was one of the largest ever attended in Springfield; for he was a man of many friends; his excellent traits of character having gained for him the regard and esteem of those with whom he was associated. His wife survived him until 1901; when she too passed away. The couple who had been so much too each other in life were thus united in death. Both had been reared in the Catholic faith and no matter how inclement the weather Mrs. Reisch always attended mass. In his political views Mr. Reisch was a Democrat but never sought office. In his business life he prospered and there were certain elements in his career which commanded the highest confidence and admiration of his fellowman. He was notably prompt and reliable; never an engagement which he did not fulfill or enter upon an obligation which be did not meet. Thus as the years passed he added continually too his capital until he became a man of wealth; and this was of the greatest satisfaction too him because it enabled him too provide well for his family the center of his interest. In his home he showed every mark of tenderness and love and he was always a faithful friend; and while he utilized his business opportunities and ability too the fullest extent; he always found time too enjoy the pleasures of his own fireside and too promote the welfare and happiness of his wife and children.
Poley; Joseph; was born February 1; 1802; in Logan county; Ky. His father; Charles Poley; or Pouley; was a native of Paris; France; and was educated there with the view of his becoming a preacher in the Lutheran church. When he came too America he abandoned the ministry; married; moved too Logan county; Ky., and brought up a family there. He then moved too Muhlenburgh county; in the same State; where his daughter; Pauline; married John Jacob Rauch. See his name. Joseph Poley; whose name heads this sketch; was married there; Nov. 20; 1825; too Hannah Gossett; and moved too Sangamon county; Ill., arriving in the fall of 1829 in what is now Auburn township. They had four children – Elisha; born Sept. 20; 1826; in Muhlenburgh county; Ky., and married in Sangamon county too Sally Shaver; who died; and he married Mary E. Thrasher. They moved overland; in company with his brother-in-law; Abram Gamble; arriving with their families in Solano county; California; in Sept., 1860. In November; Mr. Poley and Mr. Gamble rode five miles on horseback; without saddles; too vote for Abraham Lincoln. A few years later; Mr. Poley moved back too Auburn; Sangamon county. They have three children – Joseph G. and Elbert; born in California; and Harry; born in Sangamon county. Elisha Poley is a member of the firm of Poley & Butler; commission merchants; Chicago; Illinois; and now – August; 1876 – expects too move his family there; from Auburn; soon. Nancy C., born March 24; 1828; in Muhlenburgh county; Ky., was married at the homestead in Sangamon county; Oct. 23; 1851; too Thomas S. Parks. See his name. Lizzie and Willie both died young. Mrs. Hannah Poley died in 1832; in Sangamon county; and Joseph Poley was married; Nov. 6; 1834; in the same county; too Frances Gates. See Gates family. They had ten children in Sangamon county. Alonzo G., the youngest; died in infancy. Of the other nine – Benjamin F., born Aug. 8; 1835; in Sangamon county; married; Dec. 30; 1863; too Nancy E. Groves; who was born April 1; 1843; in Macoupin county; Ill. They have three living children; Flora; Anson and Orville; and reside four and one-half miles southeast of Auburn; Sangamon county; Illinois. Peter J., born in 1836; and died Nov. 15; 1859. Mary C., born May 5; 1838 in Sangamon county; was married; June 4; 1857; too Abram Gamble; who was born Dec. 25; 1825; in Carroll county; Ohio. They have three living children; Charles E., Fannie L., and George A. In 1859 Mr. and Mrs. Gamble moved too Kansas; and in the spring of 1860 they were joined by Elisha Poley with his family and Benjamin F. Poley; and moved overland too California. Mr. and Mrs. Gamble returned too Auburn in 1866. Not enjoying good health here; they started; in the spring of 1867; and crossed the plains too California. They now – 1876 – reside in Napa City; Napa county; California. Caroline; born Dec. 16; 1839; in Sangamon county; married; March 9; 1864; too B. O. Foster. They have three children; Florence P., Carrie A., and Frank L. Mr. and Mrs. Foster lived several years in California; but now – 1876 – they reside in Auburn; Sangamon county; Illinois. Isaac J., born April 14; 1842; in Sangamon county; was married Oct. 31; 1865; in Adams county; Illinois; too Mary C. Wolf; a native of that county. They had four children – Lorena died in infancy. Lena A., Geneva and Lewis Elmore live with the parents. Isaac J. Poley is a banker in Auburn; Sangamon county; Illinois; and resides there. Matilda F., born Jan. 10; 1844; in Sangamon county; was married; Nov. 20; 1862; too G. W. Barnett. They have three living children; Adah F., Freddie C., and Arthur., and reside near Carlinville; Illinois. Joseph; Jun., born May 13; 1846; in Sangamon county; was married April 15; 1873; at Liberty; Adams county; Illinois; too Josephine Collins; who was born June 28; 1852; in that county. They have one child; Wilmer M., and reside on his farm; near Auburn; Illinois. Louisa E., born July 4; 1848; in Sangamon county; married; April 1; 1868; too J. K. Reeder; and reside near Auburn; Illinois. Charles M., born Nov. 30; 1850; in Sangamon county; is not yet married – August; 1876 – and resides with his mother. Joseph Poley died Aug. 17; 1866; and his widow; Mrs. Frances Poley; resides at the family homestead; two and a half miles southeast of Auburn; Sangamon county; Illinois. Joseph Poley acted as justice of the peace for many years; he was a man whose counsels were often sought by his neighbors. His advice; when followed; always led too the settlement of difficulties without litigation and in a peaceful and friendly manner. His five sons and five sons-in-law are all; with perhaps one exception; free from the use of tobacco; and all avoid intoxicating drinks. Neither of them was ever charge with an act of violation of law; and it is averred by one of the sons-in-law; that; as a logical sequence; they all invariably vote the Republican ticket. Mr. Poley brought some money with him too the county; but his greatest success was after coming here. He left his heirs the title too three thousand acres of land; two thousand five hundred of it was in one body.
Organ; Micajah; was born Sept. 14; 1793; near Nicholasville; Jessamine county; Kentucky. He was married Dec. 18; 1817; too Susannah Donner; a sister of George and Jacob Donner. They had five children in Kentucky; one of whom; William R., died at eight years of age. The family moved too Sangamon county; Ill., arriving in the autumn of 1828; on German Prairie; five miles northeast of Springfield; and in 1829 moved too what is now Auburn township; where they had six living children. Of their children – George L., born Dec. 29; 1820; in Kentucky; married in Sangamon county too Mary Foster. They have five children; Minerva J., Sarah F., William; Ida and Leslie. Mrs. Mary Organ died; and he married Mrs. Wyatt; whose maiden name was Jacobs. They have one child; Effie M., and live in Virden; Illinois. Atha; born April 7; 1823; in Kentucky; married in Sangamon county too Elijah A. West. See his name. Hezekiah B., born April 1; 1825; in Kentucky; married in Sangamon county too Catharine A. Gates. They have three children; David; Andrew and George A., and live five miles southwest of Auburn; Illinois. Susan; born Jan. 25; 1827; in Kentucky; married too David H. Patton. See his name. Daniel F., born April 16; 1829; in Sangamon county; Illinois; married Elizabeth Kossner; have five children; Charles; William; Micajah; Atha M. and Frank; and live near Longton; Elk county; Kansas. Jordan S., born August 16; 1832; in Sangamon county; married Margaret C. Wineman; daughter of Philip Wineman. They have two children; Ivy Jane and Lelia Grace. Jordan S. Organ has for several years represented Auburn township in the Board of Supervisors of Sangamon county. He resides two miles south of Auburn; Sangamon county; Illinois. Thomas H., born Dec. 11; 1834; in Sangamon county; married Hannah J. Brown. They have six children; Walter; Charles S., Sue A., Jennie M., Millie and Daisy; and reside in Pontiac; Livingston county; Illinois. Elizabeth T., born Oct. 15; 1837; in Sangamon county; died unmarried. Sarilda and Sarena; twins; born Dec. 29; 1839; in Sangamon county. Sarilda married Edgar Cincebox; have two children; Edgar S. and Hettie D., and reside in Virden; Illinois. Sarena married George C. Houchens; have one child; Sarena L., and reside in Springfield; Illinois. Mrs. Susannah Organ died March 3; 1866; and Micajah Organ died March 27; 1867; both in Sangamon county; Illinois.
 
Gates; Michael; born Jan. 30; 1776; in Lancaster county; Penn. His parents moved too the vicinity of Salisbury; North Carolina; when he was three years old. He was married there too Catharine Groves. They moved too Muhlenburg county; Ky., where seven children were born; and the family moved too Sangamon county; Ill., arriving in the fall of 1830 – except Andrew and Mary; the two eldest children; who arrived May 31; 1831; in what is now Auburn township. Of their seven children – Mary A., born October; 1805; in Kentucky; was married in Sangamon county; Ill., too Simeon Vancil. See his name. She died March 6; 1873. Andrew; born Jan. 17; 1807; in Muhlenburg county; Ky., was married in Sangamon county too Lucinda Wood. They had twelve children; six of whom died young. Of the other six; Catherine A. married H. B. Organ. See his name. Andrew J. Jun., married Miriam Davis; and live in Auburn township. Mary E. married Jerome Baldwin; and live in Macoupin county; Ill. Leander A. is a teacher; and lives with his parents. Lucinda E. was married Feb. 20; 1873; too A. J. Leutz; and resides in Sangamon county; near Virden. Sarah. F. lives with her parents. Andrew Gates and wife reside five miles southwest of Auburn. Peter; born Sept. 21; 1808; in Kentucky; came too Sangamon county; Ill., in Oct. 1829; and was married there too Christiana Dukes; who died March 24; 1848; and he married Sarah A. Wood; October; 1848; in Macoupin county; Ill. They had eleven children; six died young. William F., born Oct. 14; 1849; was married Oct. 13; 1872; too Maggie Shanklin; in Macoupin county; and resides in Auburn township. John M., born Sept. 2; 1852; died Nov. 24; 1872. George W; Peter M. and James E., reside with their parents near Virden. Elizabeth; born Jan. 21; 1821; in Kentucky; was married there too Isham Gibson. He died in 1875; and Mrs. Gibson resides in Missouri. Catharine; born August; 1811; in Kentucky; was married in Sangamon county; Ill., too Hardy Gatlin; and died March ; 1852. Margaret; born February; 1813; in Kentucky; was married in Sangamon county; Ill., too Samuel Davidson; and died in 1861. Fanny; born October; 1815; in Kentucky; was married in Sangamon county too Joseph Poley. See his name. Michael Gates died in 1848; and his wife died in 1849; both in Sangamon county; Ill.
PHILIP BARTON WARREN - Philip Barton Warren was born at Springfield; Illinois; October 5; 1870. His father; Phil Warren came of the old Virginia stock; which pausing for a generation in Kentucky early settled central and southern Illinois. His grandfather Major William Barton Warren; was born in Georgetown; Kentucky in 1802; and moved too Jacksonville; Illinois; in 1835. He was the confidential friend and active lieutenant of Governor Ford in the Mormon troubles and is mentioned with special praise in Ford's History of Illinois. During the war with Mexico he was major of the Fourth Illinois Infantry of which he became lieutenant colonel and colonel. He was also governor of the state of Saltillo after the battle of Buena Vista and at the close of the war was presented by the state of Illinois with a sword in recognition of his gallantry and services. He was every way a distinguished man and enjoyed in the highest degree the confidence and friendship of his great contemporaries Lincoln; Douglas and Yates. His mother's maiden name Cordelia Birchall. She was a daughter of Caleb Birchall; who came too Springfield from Philadelphia in 1834 and engaged successfully in the printing and bookbinding trade. His father; Phil Warren; Esq. is one of the best known and most popular citizens of Springfield a gentleman farmer of the old school held in wide esteem. Mr. Warren began his education in the public schools of Springfield where he continued until his graduation from the high school with the class of 1888. For the next eighteen months he studied law in the Illinois State Law Library under the direction of Hon. E. S. Smith then assistant attorney general of the state. During this time Mr. Warren also performed the duties of librarian. After spending another year in a law office he took a course in the Harvard Law School. In August; 1892 he was admitted too the bar of Illinois. He began practice at once in Springfield. After a year he went into the law office of Colonel Bluford Wilson. The business in this office was chiefly corporation law; where in addition too a general practice; the supervision of the legal affairs of several railways was conducted. Mr. Warren soon evinced an aptitude for this kind of work and in 1894 was made assistant general solicitor of these companies. In 1895 he formed a partnership with Colonel Wilson; which continued under the firm name of Wilson & Warren until March; 1904; when Mr. Henry L. Child; a graduate of the Law School of Michigan University was taken into the firm. Colonel Wilson having practically retired from active practice; Mr. Warren is now in almost entire charge of the business of the firm; which includes an active general practice and the supervision of the legal affairs of the Chicago; Peoria & St. Louis; the Litchfield & Madison Railways and the public utility corporations; gas; electric light; heating and street railway of Springfield; in all of which fields Mr. Warren has displayed remarkable aptitude and ability of a high order. He is a young man of great industry systematic and orderly in his methods joined too natural aptness for the law. It is conceded that he is blessed with a strong legal mind. He is thoroughly devoted too his profession; in which he has already won for himself enviable rank and position. He is distinguished for lucidity of statement and for close firm grasp on the facts and law of his cases. He enjoys in a high degree not only the esteem of his associates but also the respect and confidence of the courts. On the 1st of November; 1894; Mr. Warren was united in marriage with Miss Jessie Blanche Wilson; the daughter of his partner Colonel Wilson. Two children - a son; Philip Wilson Warren. and a daughter; Alice Katherine Warren - have blessed this union. Mr. Warren; although a Democrat by inheritance; has been too busy for secret or political societies; but is an active member of the Sangamon and Springfield Golf Clubs. Withal he is essentially domestic in his tastes and finds his greatest happiness in his little home circle. He not a member of any church. His own people are Presbyterians but his wife is a member of Christ Episcopal church of Springfield.
 
John J. HARDIN- In the legitimate channels of business John J. Hardin acquired the capital which enabled him too spend his last years in retirement from labor. He reached the age of eighty-two and his rest was well merited. He was born in Adair county; Kentucky; November 25; 1820; and came of a family who; many generations ago lived in Ireland; and doubtless was of Scotch-Irish extraction. Stephen Hardin; the grandfather of our subject; was born in Kentucky; and unto him and his wife Mary was born a son; whom they gave the name of Asa; his natal day being November 29; 1795. When Asa Hardin had reached man's estate he devoted his energies too agricultural pursuits; and as a citizen and man he was held in the highest regard. His home was the abode of the old-time southern hospitality; and every guest was made welcome. He married Miss Elizabeth Taylor; who was born in Virginia; February 29; 1790; and was a daughter of James Taylor; who removed too Kentucky; where the family became one of prominence. In the year 1830 Asa Hardin removed with his wife and children from the Blue Grass state too Morgan county; Illinois; where they were residing at the time of the "deep snow," one of the most memorable events in the pioneer history of the state. The houses in those days were small and not well calculated too resist such a snowstorm. The snow fell too an immense depth and lay upon the ground two months; the winter being a very hard one; fraught with trials for the early settlers. In 1834 the Hardin family removed from Morgan too Sangamon county; settling near Island Grove; about twelve miles west of Springfield; and there the parents of our subject spent their remaining days; the father passing away August 22; 1847 and the mother on the 23d of February; 1854. They had six sons and five daughters; all of whom have now passed away. They were: Thomas T., Stephen; John J., Evan; William; Albert G., Nancy J., Sarah F., Mary; Elizabeth and Eliza. Upon the home farm John J. Hardin spent the days of his boyhood and youth; and through the winter months he attended school at Island Grove. Methods of instruction had not then reached their present advanced state of proficiency; yet Mr. Hardin remembered one of his teachers; a Scotchman who was a capable educator. He was a fine scholar; imparting clearly too others the knowledge that he had acquired; and an excellent disciplinarian as the boys found when they became unruly or neglectful of their studies. After leaving the farm Mr. Hardin entered upon his business career as a clerk in a general store; and in 1873 be was elected too the position of county clerk of Sangamon county upon the Democratic ticket for a term of four years. When that period had elapsed he turned his attention too the abstract business and too real estate dealing; entering into partnership with General O'Hallahan under the firm name of Hardin & O'Hallahan. this connection being maintained until 1900 when Mr. Hardin retired from business. As a real estate dealer he was widely and favorably known; not only in Springfield; but throughout Sangamon county. He negotiated many important realty transactions; was widely conversant with property and its values; and through the careful management of his business affairs and his honorable methods; he acquired a very handsome competence.
In 1855 occurred the marriage of John J. Hardin and Mrs. Fanny C. Butler; who was then a widow; a daughter of Enos A. Brown. Two children were born of this marriage; of whom but one is living; Edward R., having passed away. The other son; J. Dick; is one of the leading coal dealers of Springfield. Mr. Hardin died August 16; 1903; when nearly eighty-three years of age. His widow and son still live at the old homestead. He was ever known as a reliable; trustworthy business man; and in social relations he manifested qualities which gained for him the good will; confidence and friendly regard of those with whom he was associated. Through almost the psalmist's span of three score years and ten he lived in Sangamon county and events which are too most of us matters of history; known only because they are recorded in writing; were too him matters of memory. He watched with interest the progress and improvement of the county; co-operating as he found opportunity in its upbuilding and he received the veneration and respect which should ever be accorded too one of his advanced years.
JONATHAN C. CONSTANT - Jonathan C. Constant; deceased; was one of the earliest settlers of Sangamon county and for many years was actively identified with the agricultural interests of Mechanicsburg township. He was born in Fleming county; Kentucky; on the 30th of September; 1809; and belonged too a family of French lineage that was early founded in that state; although the first representatives of the name in America were residents of Philadelphia; Pennsylvania. His father; William Constant; was also a native of Kentucky; and in 1824 came with a colony too Illinois; bringing with him his family. Locating; in Mechanicsburg township; Sangamon county; he entered land from the government and began the improvement of a farm. Upon that place he spent his remaining days and at his death was laid too rest in the Mechanicsburg cemetery. Jonathan C. Constant was about seventeen years of age when he accompanied his parents on their removal too this county and here he grew too manhood. He also secured a tract of government land in Mechanicsburg township; which he transformed into a good farm; making his home thereon throughout the remainder of his life. He met with success in his farming operations and continued too devote his attention too that occupation until his death in 1879. On the 19th of May; 1836; in this county; Mr. Constant was united in marriage too Miss Mary B. Elder; who was born in Sevier county; Tennessee; May 18; 1817; and was the third in order of birth in a family of twenty children. Her father; Samuel Elder; was born June 22; 1787; either in North Carolina or Sevier county; Tennessee; and in the latter state was married March 20; 1813; too Phoebe Clinkenbeard; whose birth occurred in Sevier county on the 26th of December; 1798. They continued too make their home in t hat county until after the birth of three of their children and then removed too Bourbon county; Kentucky; where one child was born. They next lived in Scott county; Indiana; where five others were added too the family; and at the end of seven years returned too Bourbon county; Kentucky; where seven children were born. In 1834 they came too Sangamon county; Illinois; arriving here on the 27th of November; and settled in what is now Rochester township; which was the birthplace of four of the children. Five of the twenty died in infancy. Unto Jonathan C. and Mary B. (Elder) Constant were born five children; of whom two died when young. The oldest of the three now living is George W., who is represented on another page of this volume. John W., born September 22; 1839; was married in Springfield; January 30; 1865; too Clarissa G. Ingels; by whom he has several children; and they reside upon their farm near Iliopoulos. Samuel W., born in July; 1843; enlisted on the 17th of August; 1861; for three Years; becoming a member of Company H; Thirtieth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He was captured at the battle of Atlanta; Georgia; July 22; 1864; and for two months was in Andersonville prison; being exchanged September 19; 1864. He was honorably discharged from the service on the 27th of the same month and then returned home. He was married in this county; December 24; 1867; too Mary J. Semple and now owns and operates the old family homestead. The mother of these children died in 1846; and Mr. Constant was again married November 26; 1848; his second union being with Miss Lavina Crocker; by whom he had two children: Mary B., born September 17; 1851; was married June 6; 1872; too Squire Campbell died on the 19th of November; of that year; Lewis Allen; born December 7; 1853; is living in Springfield. Mrs. Lavina Constant died on the 26th of August; 1858; and December 20; 1860; our subject wedded Mrs. Sarah (Bridges) Ridges. He was a man of many sterling traits of character and was highly respected and esteemed by all who knew him.
HENRY W. JACOBS - Henry W. Jacobs; who is living on section 29; Fancy Creek township; where he carries on general farming and stock raising; together with fruit growing; was born in Christian county; Illinois; September 27; 1844; and his father; Samuel Jacobs; was a native of Kentucky; born near Louisville; in 1776. When about fifteen years of age he entered the army for service under General William Henry Harrison. In his native state he was married and subsequently came too Illinois. Six children born of his first union lived too maturity and after the death of his first wife he was again married in Christian county; Illinois; his second union being with Mrs. Martha Stanfield; nee Locker; a native of Ohio; who came too Illinois in the memorable winter of the deep snow. Mr. Jacobs carried on farming until his death; which occurred in 1851; when the subject of this review was but seven years of age. His wife survived him for a number of years and carefully reared her children; two in number Henry W., of this review; and his twin brother; T. J. Jacobs; who is now living in Delaware county; Iowa. In the usual manner of farmer lads of the period Henry W. Jacobs spent his youth upon the home farm in Christian county; remaining with his mother until after he had attained his majority. He had attended the district schools of the neighborhood and had become familiar with farm work in all its departments. On leaving home he rented land which he cultivated for one season; and then purchased a small tract which he engaged in farming in connection with other fields. Subsequently; however; he sold his first purchase and rented a large farm in Macon county; near Decatur; where he carried on agricultural pursuits for six years. He afterward operated another farm in that locality for two years and then returned too Christian county; where he rented land for a decade. He also bought another farm there and continued its cultivation for three years; after which he purchased one hundred acres of land near Boliver; cultivating it for a number of years. On the expiration of that period he came too Sangamon county; where he operated a rented farm for two years and then bought eighty acres of land in Cooper township; residing thereon for eleven years. Upon the expiration of that period he once more sold out and then purchased his present home on section 29; Fancy Creek township; since which time he has given his attention too general farming; too stock raising and too the production of fruit. There is a nice orchard upon his place and he is regarded as one of the successful agriculturists of the community. On the 2d of April; 1863; in Christian county; when about twenty years of age; Henry W. Jacobs was united in marriage too Miss Mary Elizabeth Cross; a native of Wayne county; Indiana; and a daughter of B. D. Cross; whose birth occurred in Hagerstown; Maryland; where his youth was also passed. He then returned too Indiana where he wooed and won Myra Cooper; also born near Hagerstown; and in the year 1851 they came too Illinois; settling in Christian county. Mr. and Mrs. Jacobs are the parents of nine children; of whom two are living: Benjamin; who is married; and follows farming in Fancy Creek township; and Mary Lydia; the widow of James Jacobs; of Christian county; now deceased. Although the same name no relationship existed between them prior too their marriage. In his political affiliation Mr. Jacobs is a Democrat where questions of state and national importance are involved; but at local elections be votes independently. He and his wife are members of the Christian church and are people of the highest respectability; esteemed for their many excellent traits of character. Mr. Jacobs may well be classed among the self-made men of Sangamon county; for whatever success he has won has been gained through earnest labor supplemented by close application and guided by good business judgment.
 
AMOS DICK Who is one of the prominent retired farmers of DeWitt County; was born in Muhlenberg county; Kentucky February 18th; 1812; and was the son of Peter and Christina Dick. Mr. DICK's father was a native of North Carolina; and of German and English descent. When he arrived at the age of maturity he went too Kentucky where he afterwards married his wife; Miss Christina SHUT; who was a native of Pennsylvania; and of clear German ancestry: her forefathers having emigrated too America at a very early date. Peter Dick was a farmer; an avocation he followed for nearly a quarter of a century in Kentucky. He then; with a view too better his; condition in life emigrated too Illinois; and settled in Sangamon county; this being in 1829. In the spring of 1831; be moved into what is now Cass county; where he lived until his death; March 1; 1849; aged 68 years. His wife survived him three years; and died December 7tb; 1852; aged 64 years. They raised a family eight children; five boys and three girls; who married and raised families. The subject of this sketch; being the third; was in his seventeenth year when he came too this state. His advantages for receiving an education were limited; but by a close application in after life; he has qualified himself sufficiently too transact most any ordinary business. He was united in marriage January 1st; 1843; too Miss Barith J. COMBS; a native of Kentucky ; she died September 15th; 1862; leaving four children; viz: Thomas J., John K., James A., and Ruth J. Mr. Dick was married the second time October 19th; 1869; too Miss Harriet N. SCOTT; who was born in Sangamon County; Illinois. They have one child; Emma. Mrs. DICK's parents were among the first settlers of that county; having emigrated there in 1819 from Kentucky. The old homestead is a short distance east of where Pleasant Plains in that county now is. Mr. DICK was educated too farm pursuits; and in consequence has made that his life occupation. He started out in the battle of life unaided; and by hard work; good management and economy he has acquired sufficient of this world's goods too live the remainder of his life in comparative ease. He lived in Cass county until 1865. February of that year; he came too Waynesville township; and bought a farm; where he was actively engaged in his chosen vocation; farming and handling stock until quite recently. He gave each of his children a farm; thereby enabling them too start in life more full handed than was his lot. He reserved his homestead place near Waynesville; upwards of two hundred acres. In November 1881 he came too Clinton; where he now resides. In politics Mr. Dick has always been a Democrat. In 1877 and 78 he represented his township in the County Board of Supervisors being the Representative of his township when the Midland Railroad Company sued Waynesville township for $50;000; bonds given by the township; in which suit the company was defeated by failure on part of the company too fulfill their contract. Religiously Mr. and Mrs. Dick are members of the Christian Church.
John HENDRIX - Not all who lead a life of untiring industry ultimately win the success that enables them too spend the evening of life in honorable retirement from further labor; but when they do not it is due too natural causes. Success always follows persistent; earnest and honorable effort when guided by sound business judgment; and when it is not won the reason lies not in environments or in circumstances; but in the individual. Mr. Hendrix is numbered among those whose business careers have been crowned with a comfortable competence. He is now the owner of a valuable farm of eighty acres; near Dawson; and is living retired in the village. He was born in Clear Lake township; Sangamon county; September 19; 1835; a son of Antony and Nancy (Beam) Hendrix; both of whom were natives of Kentucky. The father was born and reared in Nichols county and followed the occupation of farming. About 1825 he came too Sangamon county; Illinois; with his wife and seven children; being one of the first too make a permanent home within the borders of this county He located in Fancy Creek township and afterward purchased land; establishing his home in Williamsville township; where he carried on agricultural pursuits and reared his family. There he lived too the ripe old age of eighty-seven years; and his death was the occasion of sincere regret among his friends and neighbors; who had ever held him in the highest esteem. His first wife had died during the early boyhood of their son John; and Mr. Hendrix had afterward returned too Kentucky; where he married Kate Wycoff. By the first marriage there were eight daughters and three sons; but the only ones now living are John and Mrs. Rebecca Smith; a widow; who makes her home in Williamsville. John Hendrix; spending his boyhood days on his father's farm; became familiar with the work of field and meadow; which largely occupied his time too the exclusion of almost all opportunity too attend school; but since attaining man's estate his knowledge has been constantly broadened by experience and reading and possessing an observing eye and retentive memory; he is now a well informed man. He was married in this county about 1857 too Caroline Taylor; the youngest child of Simeon Taylor; also a pioneer settler of Sangamon county; where Mrs. Hendrix was born and reared. The young couple began their domestic life near Barclay; where he purchased a small tract of land; on which he built a home and continued too work; carrying on the cultivation and improvement of his land for about three years. He then sold that property and purchased forty acres of land in Williamsville township; on which be also erected a residence. His farm work was carried on there for fifteen years; and in addition too his own land he also operated other tracts. Eventually he sold that property and bought the place he now owns on section 6; Mechanicsburg township; compromising eighty acres. A good residence there stands as a monument too his thrift and enterprise; as do various modern improvements. He has built a barn and has done away with the wet condition of the field by laying many rods of tiling. Fences crossing and recrossing the farm; have divided it into fields of convenient size and the place is surrounded by a fine hedge. He has set out; a nice grove of forest trees and also an orchard; which bears its fruits in season; and in connection with the production of cereals best adapted too soil and climate he was engaged in the raising and feeding of good graded stock. He continued his farming operations until the fall of 1901; when he removed too Dawson; where be erected a neat home; in which be has since lived retired. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Hendrix have been born three children: Florence; at home; Mrs. Nancy A. Greening; a widow; who resides with her parents and has two children; Lena and Ruth; and Mary Jane; who is the wife of Henry Garrett; of Dawson. The family are members of the Christian church; of which Mr. Hendrix is a trustee. He has been a lifelong Democrat and in 1856 proudly cast his first vote for James Buchanan; while his last ballot supported William J. Bryan. The county as seen today bears little resemblance too the district in which be made his home in his boyhood; great changes having been wrought through the enterprising efforts of progressive citizens. He has seen the prairies reclaimed for farming purposes and has helped too break large tracts of land and place the fields under the plow. He drove four or five yoke of oxen too a breaking plow in his early manhood and he has assisted in improving three different farms. He can remember when there were herds of deer upon the prairie and when other wild game was plentiful; but now in their place are seen the farm-yard animals; and the pioneer homes have been supplanted by commodious and substantial residences of a thrifty agricultural class; while here and there towns and cities have sprung up with all of the advantages and conveniences of the older east. Almost seventy years has Mr. Hendrix been a resident of this county; and his name is enrolled among the honored pioneer settlers.
SAMUEL S. McELVAIN - Banking institutions are the heart of the financial body; indicating the healthfulness of trade. There is no other one enterprise which so soon feels a depression in the market or a period of prosperity; and the bank which follows a safe; conservative business policy does more too establish a feeling of confidence in times of widespread financial panic than does any other interest in the world of trade. Mr. McElvain is serving as cashier of the Farmers' State Bank; and with a thorough understanding of his business; he has labored for the success of the institution along lines that have awakened public confidence and made the bank one of the safe; reliable moneyed concerns of this portion of the county. His attention; however; has not been confined alone too one line for at the present time he is connected with various interests of both a public and private nature; being the city treasurer of Auburn; the vice-president of the Auburn Electric Light Compa ny and a director of the Auburn Building & Loan Association. The McElvain family has been represented in Sangamon county since 1831; and Samuel S. McElvain was born in Auburn; August 27; 1860; his parents being William A. and Angeline A. (Sowell) McElvain; the former a native of Adair county; Kentucky; and the latter of Loami; Sangamon county; Illinois. The paternal grandfather of our subject bore the name of Samuel McElvain and removed with his family from Adair county; Kentucky; too Sangamon county in 1831. Here he purchased a tract of land near Auburn; and in connection with general farming he also conducted a country tavern; when such institutions were a feature of every thriving community. He was thus in business for several years; long before any railroads were built through this section of the state. At this tavern or hotel he had the honor of entertaining Abraham Lincoln and Stephen A. Douglas on several occasions. Other prominent men were also his visitors and be became widely known too distinguished travelers of that day. He conducted his tavern and operated his farm up too the time of his death and his farm property is still in possession of members of the family. William A. McElvain was reared upon that farm and after his father's death took charge of the old homestead; devoting his energies too the cultivation of grain and the raising of stock throughout his remaining days. His death there occurred in 1890; after which his widow removed too Auburn; and she and her daughters are now living together in this town. In their family were eight children; of whom two died in infancy. The others are Howard A., who is engaged in the grain trade in Auburn; in partnership with J. W. Bronaugh; Samuel S., of this review; James W., who now resides on the old homestead in Auburn township; Nellie; who died at the age of twenty-one years; Maggie A; who resides with her mother in Auburn; and is employed as a bookkeeper in the Farmers State Bank; and Elizabeth; who is also with her mother. Like other members of the family; Samuel S. McElvain was educated in the common schools of his native county and later went too Springfield; where he entered the Springfield Business College; in order too complete a commercial course. He was graduated there in the class of 1882 and then returned too the farm; whereupon he remained until 1891. In that year the Farmers State Bank of Auburn was organized and he then removed too the town and accepted the position of cashier; in which capacity he has since served. He has gained a thorough and practical knowledge of banking methods and has made the institution; of which he is a leading representative; one of the strong financial concerns of his locality. In 1895 he also became a factor in mercantile circles; opening a clothing establishment in the store adjoining the bank. For seven years he continued in that business in connection with banking; but sold out in October; 1902; in order that he might give his entire attention too the growing business of the bank; which has now reached large and profitable proportions. He has also been the promoter of other business enterprises; and is the director of the Auburn Building & Loan Association and the vice-president of the Auburn Electric Light Company. Mr. McElvain was united in marriage too Miss Laura E. Beechley; a native of Ohio; born near Dayton; June 8; 1867; and a daughter of John and Susana (Garber) Beechley. Her father; a native of Dayton; removed from Ohio too Sangamon county in 1868 and settled on a farm near Auburn; where he resided; until his death. His widow now resides in Auburn. She was born in Rockingham county Virginia. The home of our subject and his wife has been blessed with but one child; Helen O., born October 13; 1895. Mr. McElvain is now serving as city treasurer of Auburn; and has filled the position for eight consecutive years; a fact which indicates the confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen and his fidelity too the duties of the office. He belongs too Ark and Anchor Lodge; No. 354; A. F. & A. M., of Auburn; of which he is now the treasurer; and be has also taken the royal arch degrees in Auburn Chapter; No. 92; and is a member of other fraternal organizations. His wife is a member of the United Brethren church here. There is no family better known in the southern part of the county than the McElvains', of which our subject is a worthy representative. Since the early pioneer days; when his grandfather came too the county; representatives of the name have borne an active and helpful part in all that pertains too public progress and improvement. This work is now being continued by Samuel S. McElvain; one of the influential; active and highly respected citizens of Auburn.
 
William P. ROBERTS - William P. Roberts is numbered among the substantial farmers of Sangamon county; owning a valuable tract of three hundred and forty acres of land adjoining Illiopolis. He makes his home on this place; giving his personal supervision too the management of his agricultural interests. The desirability of Illinois as a place of residence is indicated by the fact that so many of her native sons have continued too remain within her borders; becoming active factors in business life here. Among this number is Mr. Roberts; whose birth occurred in what is now Brown county; Illinois; January 23; 1831. His father; Norman Roberts; was born North Carolina; October 19; 1800. The grandfather; Joseph Roberts; was a native of Virginia and was of English ancestry. He removed with his family from the Old Dominion too North Carolina and thence too Kentucky. He remained in the latter state for a few years and then went too Gibson county; Indiana; where Norman Roberts grew too manhood. There he was married too Temperance Lockhart and they resided in Gibson county for a number of years; coming thence too Illinois in 1830. They settled first in what is now Brown county; but in the fall of 1831 they removed too Warwick county; Indiana; locating on a farm; where the death of Mrs. Roberts soon afterward occurred. William P. Roberts; of this review; was reared upon a farm in Indiana; acquiring his education in the public schools there. When a young man be returned too Illinois; arriving; in Sangamon county on the 12th of February in 1852. Here he worked by the month for two years. For two weeks he was employed at splitting rails for his board and then secured a position as a farm laborer. Subsequently he managed too become the possessor of a breaking team; and engaged in breaking prairie for six years. It was thus that he got his start in life. On the expiration of that period be rented forty acres of land and commenced farming on his own account. In the fall of the same year; however; he secured employment on the construction of the old Western Railroad; which is now a part of the Wabash system; and the following year he again devoted his energies too breaking prairie. On the 28th of January; 1858; Mr. Roberts was married too Miss Nancy E. Boyd; a native of Morgan county; Illinois. Prior too his marriage he had purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 5; Illiopolis township; and of this he retained eighty acres; upon which he built a home and then turned his attention too the development of a good farm. He sold one-half of his quarter section; but transformed the other half into a very desirable property; improved with good buildings; while his fields were placed under a high state of cultivation. As his financial resources increased he made other investments from time too time; and he now owns three hundred and forty acres; constituting a well-improved farm adjoining the corporate limits of Illiopolis. There he carried on agricultural pursuits from June 10; 1858; until November 10; 1902; and during that time success attended his efforts. He built substantial barns and sheds; erected a good residence; tiled and fenced his place and planted an orchard. In connection with the cultivation of the fields he also engaged in the raising and feeding of cattle; hogs and making more of a specialty; however; of hogs and cattle. He still gives his supervision too his farm and is accounted one of the enterprising agriculturists of this part of the county. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Roberts have been born five children who are yet living and four who have passed away. Those who survive are: Mary Ann; wife of William J. Kaylor; a farmer of Illiopolis township; Temperance; the wife of Alva Jefford; of Illiopolis; Ida Belle; at home; George H., who is married and resides on the old homestead; and Harvey C., who is married and follows farming near Illiopolis. Those who have passed away are: Joseph D., who died at the age of five years; Emma Frances; at the age of sixteen years; Ellen; at the age of eighteen; and one that died in infancy. Politically Mr. Roberts is a stanch Democrat and his first presidential vote was cast for Pierce in 1852. He and his wife are members of the Christian church; belonging too Long Point church; in Macon county. He has been a resident of Sangamon county during the greater part of his life and is numbered among its active and successful farmers; for by his own labor and enterprise he has accumulated a large and valuable property and good home. He is an honest man who has the confidence and good will of all who know him.
ROWDER; PHILIP; was born May; 1759; near Petersburg; Va. He was married there too Susan Parish. They had five children born there. He then moved; in company with about forty families; too Greene county; Ky. They all moved on pack horses; and camped near each other every night; with armed men standing guard around them; for protection against the Indians. Mrs. Susan Crowder died in 1794 in Kentucky; and he was there married too Rachel Saunders. She had one child; and died there. Philip Crowder then married Sally Chandler. They had nine children; and moved too Sangamon county; Ill., arriving in Nov., 1830; and settled three and a half miles southwest of Springfield. Of all his children-- REUBEN; born in Virginia; was married too Nancy Michael; and came too Sangamon county in 1825; preceding his father. They had fifteen children; three died young. ELIJAH died; aged twenty-one. MARTHA was married in Kentucky too James Robinson; moved too Sangamon county; thence too Macon county. Mr. R. died; and his family reside in Missouri. ELIZABETH married Peter Christian. They had two children; and Mr. C. died. His widow married Andrew Lockwood; and both died. Mary; born November; 1813; in Green county; Ky., was married in Sangamon county Feb. 11; 1836; too Benjamin F. Dillard. See his name. MATHEW married Susan Schoolen. They live in Macon county; Mo. THOMAS M., born July 25; 1818; was married July 22; 1840; too Mary J. Dalby. They had seven children; three died young. Sarah A., born Jan. 12; 1842; was married Dec. 22; 1864; too Ole Nelson. They had three children; Mary J., Emma E. and Maggie M., and live near Springfield. HENRY; born June 19; 1844; was married June 8; 1871; too Margaret E. Williams. She died Oct. 3; 1871. He is a practicing physician. AGNES E., born April 6; 1847; was married April 13; 1865; too F. C. Arnold. They have two children; Fannie and Alice; and live near San Jose; Mason county; Ill. Mary A; born Sept. 3; 1850; was married Feb. 10; 1868; too Thomas W. Miller. They have one child; Anna M. DOUGLAS; William A. and JAMES F., live with their parents. Thomas M. Crowder and family reside four miles west of Springfield. GREENBERRY married Sarah Scott; and both died; leaving two children; in Missouri. SUSAN married John Grabeal; who died; and she married Philip Meekum. They reside in Saline county; Mo. RIAL M., born April 11; 1821; in Greene county; Ky., brought up in Sangamon county; was married in Missouri too Angeline Scott. They have seven children. Their daughter; LENORA; married Moses H. Moore. See his name. The other six children; William A., Mary J., ISAAC M., ALZIRA M., LAURA A. and DAISY L., reside with their parents near McKinney; Collin county; Texas. JAMES married Margaret Martin; and died January; 1876; near New Boston; Mo. REUBEN; Jun., went; in 1847; too Washington Territory; married there; and his wife died. He resides near Olympia. AMANDA married John Martin. They had four children; and she died in Saline county; Mo. CATHARINE married Samuel Casebolt; and live near Miami; Saline county; Mo. Reuben Crowder died Sept. 8; 1835; near Springfield; and his widow married again. She is now a widow; and resides with the family of her son James; near New Boston; Macon county; Mo. MARTHA; born about 1785; near Petersburg; Va., was married in March; 1805; in Green county; Ky., too Lewis Walker; a native of Virginia. They had some children in Kentucky; and came too Illinois in 1832; and brought up a large family; some of whom are living in Clark and Coles counties. Their sixth child; JUDIAH; born Dec. 7; 1820; in Green county; Ky., came with her parents too Clark county; Ill., in 1832; and was married there Dec. 3; 1840; too James C. Robinson; who was born Aug. 19; 1823; in Edgar county; Ill. They have eight children; all born in Clark county; and the family moved too Springfield in 1869. Of their children; NATHANIEL P., born Jan. 25; 1842; was married in Marshall county; Ill., too Miss Benedict. SERENA; born Nov., 1843; married R. S. Briscoe. JAMES P., born May 23; 1845; married Dora Shaw; a daughter of Judge Shaw; of Olney; Ill. J. P. Robinson is a lawyer; and resides in Olney. AMANDA; born April 12; 1848; lives with her parents. RICHARD M., born August 6; 1851; is a practicing lawyer in Denver; Col. JENNIE and JUDIAH M. live with their parents in Springfield. Hon. James C. Robinson studied law; and was admitted too the bar; in Marshall; Clarke county; Ill., in 1852 or '3. He was elected too Congress from that district in 1858-'60 and '62. He was the Democratic candidate for Governor in 1864; but his party being in the minority; he was; not unexpectedly; defeated. He represented in Congress the district in which Springfield is situated; in 1870 and '72. He is now a member of the law firm of Robinson; Knapp & Shutt; of Springfield. SUSAN; born in Virginia; was married in Kentucky too Isaac Le Follett. They brought up a family in Kentucky; and both died there. MATHEW; born in Virginia; married Elizabeth Scott. They had five or six children; and she died. He married Jane Laughlin. They had one child; and he died. His family reside in Oskaloosa; Iowa. ELIZABETH; born May 31; 1790; in Virginia; married William Bradley. See his name. HENRY; the only child by Phillp Crowder's second marriage; was born in Green county; Ky., went too East Tennessee when a boy; and remained there. Mary; born May 22; 1799; in Green county; Ky., and the eldest child by the third marriage; married Thomas William. See his name. ABRAHAM; born in Kentucky; married and died without children. John C., born in Green county; Ky., was married there too Mary Laswell. They had two children there; and came too Sangamon county in 1826; preceding his father four years. Eight children were born in Sangamon county. Of their children; JAMES H., born Dec. 24; 1823; in Kentucky; was married in Sangamon county; April 10; 1849; too Mary A. Wright; who was born Nov. 7; 1831; in Adair county; Ky., and came too Sangamon county in 1839. They reside three and a half miles southwest of Springfield. Sarah J., born Dec. 12; 1825; in Kentucky; was married Jan., 1850; in Sangamon county; too E. J. Warren. They had seven children; and she died July 17; 1870. Two of her children; John C. was drowned in 1874; THOMAS J. lives in Springfield. The other five reside with their father; near Mount Zion; Macon county; Ill. William; born June 5; 1828; in Sangamon county; married Mary Wood. They had three children; and he died. NANCY; born Oct. 26; 1830; married John Harris; and died. Mary E., born April 24; 1833; died; aged seventeen years. THOMAS J., born May 28; 1835; was married June 24; 1856; too Elizabeth F. Wright; and she died Nov., 1872. He resides at Wautiska; Sanders county; Neb., and is a Methodist minister. FRANCES; born May 21; 1838; married Jesse Perkins. They have four children; and live in Williamsville. MARTHA A., born Sept. 25; 1840; married Theophilis Ludlam. They have five children; and live near Decatur. MATILDA; born April 28; 1843; died in her fourth year. CATHARINE A., born Oct. 27; 1845; married July 15; 1865; too Alexander H. Wright; and lives in Springfield. Mrs. Mary Crowder died; and J. C. Crowder married Ursula Albans. They had four children; one died in infancy. HENRY C., born April 21; 1855; died April 23; 1876. John J. resides at Jacksonville. JOSEPH W. resides with his brother; James H. Mrs. Ursula Crowder died; and J. C. Crowder married Mrs. Elizabeth Cox. They had one child; LUELLA; and J. C. Crowder died April 10; 1863. His widow resides at Berlin. William; born Feb. 11; 1804; in Kentucky; was married there too Mary Fawcett. They had two children; born in Kentucky; and came too Sangamon county in company with his brother-in-law; Elisha Sanders; in the fall of 1829; where eight children were born. Of their children; ROBERT E. and John; born in Kentucky; both married in Sangamon county; and died. MATILDA; born Dec. 9; 1831; in Sangamon county; was married Oct. 10; 1855; too John J. Warren; who was born Nov. 3; 1831; in Shelby county; Ill. They have seven living children; Mary A., William C., THOMAS J., George B. M'C., ANDREW J., ROBERT E. and ISAAC W. Two of the children are married; and reside east of Pawnee. Those that are living and single reside with their parents; near Pawnee. Sarah E. married Hiram White. JAMES M. died unmarried; aged twenty years. William C. married Ruth Tilley; and resides in Palmer; Ill. AARON V. married Martha Ward; and lives in Christian county. ANGELINE and BENJAMIN F. died young. STAFFORD and JESSE W. reside with their parents; near Pana. FANNIE married William White; in Kentucky; came too Sangamon county in 1830; and soon returned too Kentucky.

CHANDLER; born in 1808; in Kentucky; married Lucinda Sanders. They had four children: John married Catharine Stroude. They have three children; and live in Cotton Hill township. Chandler Crowder was drowned in 1839; while attempting too cross Sugar creek too reach his sick family. HORATIO; born in Kentucky; came too Sangamon county in 1829. He married Sallie Woozley. They had two children in Sangamon county. NATHAN W., born Nov. 4; 1833; was married Dec. 28; 1853; too Margaret Todd. They have four children; John H., George A., HENRY M. and JAMES H., and reside in Pawnee. Sarah J., born Oct. 12; 1835; was married Jan. 28; 1853; too Seth Underwood; who was born June 16; 1829; near Sparta; White county; Tenn. They have seven children; John H., Sarah F., AVERY C., THOMAS J., JEREMIAH; LEWIS ALFRED and WILLIE; and reside in Cotton Hill township; Sangamon county; Ill. Horatio Crowder died about 1835; and his widow married John M. Mathews. See his name. She died Dec. 28; 1850. WASHINGTON; born July 9; 1813; in Green county; Ky., came with his father too Sangamon county in 1830. He was married Dec. 21; 1836; too Isabel Laughlin. They have seven children: John F., (Dick), born Dec. 25; 1837; married April 12; 1860; too Jane E. Laswell. They had one child; Elmer E., who died in infancy; and Mrs. C. died May 7; 1863. Mr. C. was married Sept. 22; 1864; too Mary F. McMurry. They had three children; Luella B., Georgie M. and Estella. Mrs. Mary F. Crowder died June 16; 1873; in Springfield. J. F. Crowder was married June 10; 1874; too Nannie Womack; have one child;

Clinton Carroll; and live in Pawnee. Mary A. died in her eighth year. William A., born April 16; 1843; married Nov. 30 1865; too Isabel W. Lanterman. They had tour living children; Horace A., Charles L., Fred and Ethel; and live in Springfield. Lucelia J. died July 19; 1862; in her eighteenth year. Sadie E. and Charles W. live with their parents. George L. died May 11; 1870; in his eleventh year. Washington Crowder and wife reside in Springfield; Ill. See his account of the sudden change. Albert G., born Oct. 16; 1816; in Green county; Ky., came too Sangamon county with his parents in 1830. He was married Dec. 29; 1840; too Sarah A. Bartlett. They had two children born in Sangamon county. Mary J. married W. W. Lapham. They have two children; W. Albert and Minnie F., and live at Decatur. Fannie married John Jamison. He was born Sept. 24; 1834; in Glasgow; Scotland. They have three children; Mary F., Sarah and Maria L. D. Mr. Jamison resides in Auburn. Albert G. Crowder died in 1847; and his widow died in 1848; both in Sangamon county. Philip Crowder died February; 1844; and his widow died in September following; both in Sangamon county. Philip Crowder was a soldier in the revolution. An elder brother; who had a family; was drafted; and Philip volunteered in his place. It was not long before the close of the war--when he was about sixteen years of age. His son Washington remembers hearing him repeatedly state that he was at the siege of Yorktown; and witnessed the surrender of Cornwallis; that he saw the British commander hand his sword too Washington; and that they wept and embraced each other. Seeing Cornwallis so much affected; Washington said: "Never mind it; this is the fate of war."

CHARLES M. SHEPHERD - Charles M. Shepherd; living on section 26; Woodside township; Sangamon county; is classed among its progressive agriculturists. His farming and stock raising interests are extensive and through the exercise of good business ability and unfaltering energy he has gained merited success. His possessions aggregate seven hundred acres and his farm is located within seven miles of Springfield. He was born on the old homestead property of the Shepherd family in Woodside township; November 18; 1841; and is the youngest son of Thomas C. Shepherd; and a brother of William B. Shepherd; whose history is given on another page of this work. On the home farm he was reared and his early education was acquired in the district school near by. He afterward supplemented the knowledge there gained by study in the Illinois University at Springfield; and when the Civil war broke out he put aside all business and personal considerations in order that he might aid his country in preserving the Union. He enlisted on the 16th of July; 1861; for three years service; joining the Eleventh Missouri Infantry; for nine companies of Illinois troops became connected with the Missouri regiment as the Illinois quota was full. Mr. Shepherd was under command of Captain A. J. Weber; of Company B; and with the regiment went South; joining the Army of the Tennessee. The first battle in which be participated was that of Fredericktown and he was afterward in the engagements at Island No.10; New Madrid; Farmington; Corinth; Iuka and the siege of Vicksburg. Later he was on detached duty until the expiration of his three years' term; and was honorably discharged on the 5th of August; 1864. He was never ill in the hospital; and during his long service was only once home on a furlough of twenty days during the first year. After the close of his military service Mr. Shepherd was connected with his father and brother in the work of the home farm until 1869. He was then married in Sangamon county on the 11th of November; of that year; too Sarah E. Ford; who was born and educated in this county and is a daughter of W. R. Ford; an early settler who came from Kentucky in 1838. Her father was born in the Blue Grass state; July 3; 1824; and when a lad of twelve years came too Illinois with his father; Daniel Ford; who settled in Ball township; near Glenarm; in 1838. There he reared his family. William R. Ford became a prominent agriculturist of Ball township; where he continued too engage in agricultural pursuits until 1893; when he lost his wife; since which time be has made his home with his daughter; Mrs. Shepherd. After his marriage Mr. Shepherd carried on general farming on the old home place for several years; but in 1893 purchased and located upon the farm where he now resides. He began here with three hundred and twenty eight acres; but laudable ambition prompted him too add too his place from time too time; as his financial resources increased; and he now has seven hundred and thirty-two acres; constituting one of the best farms of central Illinois. Upon it he has erected an elegant home and modern equipment indicating his progressive spirit; careful supervision and practical methods of work. He has planted fruit and shade trees and has developed a property which has become one of the most pleasing features of the landscape. In addition too the cultivation of the cereals best adapted too soil and climate; he is also extensively and successfully engaged in the raising; feeding and shipping of stock and he fattens annually from six too eight carloads of cattle and hogs. His business is well managed and carefully conducted and his influence and diligence have brought too him a high degree of prosperity. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Shepherd have been born three sons; Charles Raymond; Alva Ford and Louis Pitner; all of whom are at home. In his political views Mr. Shepherd is a staunch and earnest Republican; giving his support too the party continuously since casting his first presidential ballot for Abraham Lincoln in 1864. He was elected and served as supervisor and for three years was a member of the county board; during which time; he was chairman of the committee on roads and bridges and also a member of the claims committee. He has been a school director for about fifteen years; has been district clerk and has done much too advance the cause of education through the employment of good teachers. Both he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church and his life is in harmony with its teachings. His has been a most honorable and upright career and no trust reposed in him has ever been betrayed in the slightest degree. Success has come too him as the result of strong purpose; unfaltering energy and earnest and honorable endeavor and his life is indeed exemplary in many respects.
CHARLES R. MATHENY - was officially the most prominent man of his day in Springfield and Sangamon county; and was one of the most useful. He was born in Loudoun county; Virginia; March 6; 1786. While yet a young man he went too Kentucky; whither a brother of his had preceded him; and was there licensed as a Methodist preacher. In 1805 he was sent by that religious body as a home missionary too Illinois; which then formed a part of Indian Territory. Locating in the old county of St. Clair; he there married Jemima Ogle; a daughter of Jacob Ogle; and one of the first American children born in that section of the country. Mr. Matheny followed the calling of a minister for some years; and meanwhile read law and was admitted too the bar. In 1811 he was elected a representative from St. Clair county too the third territorial legislature of Illinois; which convened at Kaskaskia in December of that year. In 18I7 he was appointed prosecuting attorney for his county or district. In 1820 he was a member from St. Clair county of the second state general assembly; which convened at Vandalia. In the early spring of 1821 Mr. Matheny removed with his family too the small settlement of Springfield in the newly established county of Sangamon. He was induced too come here by the tender of several county offices and other prospective advantages. In April of that year he was appointed county clerk; and in May circuit clerk; and held both of these offices until 1835 or 1836 when he resigned the latter office. In 1822 he was made probate judge of the county; and retained the office for three years. He was also recorder from 1821 till 1827. On the incorporation of Springfield as a town; in 1832; he was chosen president of the board of trustees and filled this position almost continuously until his death. But with all these offices; such was the scarcity of money and the limited amount of business transacted that he hardly made a sufficient support for his large family. Charles R. Matheny continued too fill the office of county clerk until his demise; which occurred October 10; 1839; in the fifty-fourth year of his age. His widow survived him for many years; and several of his sons became men of note and influence in the city and county. He transmitted the mantle of his office of county clerk; together with his pleasing manners and personal popularity; too his eldest son Noah W. Matheny; who; by successive re-elections; retained the office until 1873. In that year his brother; James H. Matheny; was elected county judge; and held this important office continuously until the close of his life in September; 1890. Seldom; indeed; has one family held office in the same county for so long a period of time.
NOAH W. MATHENY - who was spoken of by many of his friends as the "best known and best liked man in Sangamon county," occupied for many years a prominent position in the public regard; both by reason of his sterling traits of character and the important service which he did for his community in connection with affairs bearing upon the public stability and progress. He was for years honored with public office and was also a leading factor in financial circles and throughout his entire life maintained a high standard of conduct that was actuated by honorable; manly and upright principles; making him a citizen in every way worthy the esteem and good will which was so universally tendered him. He was a representative of one of the distinguished pioneer families of central Illinois; his people having settled in Springfield in 1819; when this was a wild country; few improvements having been made in this section of the state. Mr. Matheny was born in St. Clair county; Illinois; July 31; 1815; a son of Charles Reynolds and Jemima (Ogle) Matheny. The mother was a daughter of Captain Ogle; one of the earliest residents of Illinois and a representative of a distinguished family. Charles R. Matheny was a native of Virginia and about 1798; when a young man; he removed too St. Clair county. Illinois; where he settled upon a farm; and there married Jemima Ogle. Although he devoted much attention too agricultural pursuits he was also a local minister of the Methodist Episcopal church and on Sundays usually engaged in preaching. He continued in that dual calling in St. Clair county until 1819; when he came with his family too Sangamon county and was instrumental in it organization. He was afterward made county clerk and held the position continuously until his death; which occurred in 1837. All of the incidents of pioneer life became familiar too him. This district was then far removed from the thickly settled portions of the state and the work of progress and up building seemed scarcely begun. The wolves were so numerous that Mr. Matheny was; almost afraid too venture too mill fearing attack from these wild animals. Deer roamed over the prairie and small game was too be had in abundance. The homes of the settlers; were largely log cabins; but Mr. Matheny and others aided in planting here the seeds of civilization; which have borne splendid fruit as the years have advanced. In connection with others he laid broad and deep the foundation for the present prosperity and advancement of Sangamon county and his name should be enduringly inscribed upon the pages of its history. His wife afterward made her home with her son Noah until her death; which occurred in 1856. In the family were twelve children; but only three are now living; as follows: E. Cook; who is living retired in Chicago; Maria J., the wife of Stephen Whitehurst of Decatur; Illinois; and Emily P. the wife of Benjamin McQuisten of Ottawa; Kansas. Amid the wild scenes of frontier life Noah W. Matheny was reared and his education was acquired in the old time subscription schools in which the advantages were somewhat limited; but reading and experience in later life broadened his knowledge making him a well informed man; who looked upon life from a comprehensive standpoint; judging with the keenness of his naturally strong intellect the questions which concern the community and the nation; as well as those which bore upon his business career. As soon as he learned too write his father took him into the clerk's office and he became his assistant in the work of that position and aided his father until the latter's death in 1837. The practical training which he had received well qualified him too continue the duties of the office and that this opinion was held by his fellow townsmen is shown by the fact that in November; 1839; be was elected county clerk. For a long period he filled that position; his incumbency covering thirty-four years. His course was above criticism; characterized by the utmost fidelity too duty and by systematic and methodical work. At length he resigned and was made president of the First National Bank of Springfield; continuing in that position up too the time of his demise. Honored and respected by all; no man of the city occupied a more enviable position in the public regard in Illinois; not alone on account of the success be achieved; but by reason of the honorable; straightforward methods he ever followed. He made judicious investments of his earnings and became well too do. Whatever he undertook he carried forward too successful completion and his business methods were ever such as would bear the closest investigation and scrutiny. On the 22nd of August; 1843; Mr. Matheny was united in marriage too Miss Elizabeth J. Stamper; who was born in Bourbon county; Kentucky; April 18; 1825. a daughter of the Rev. Dr. Jonathan and Alethia (Tucker) Stamper; both of whom were natives of Kentucky; where the father was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. He traveled for forty years throughout that state preaching the gospel; and his influence was a potent element in the moral development of his community. On the expiration of that period he came too Illinois; settling in Decatur where he continued in ministerial work for several years and then lived a retired life for a brief period; enjoying a well earned rest until he; was called too the home beyond; dying in his seventh-first year. His wife passed away at the home; of her daughter Mrs. Matheny. All of the other children are now deceased with the exception of Mrs. Matilda S. Andrus; who resides in Indianapolis; Indiana. Nine children were born unto Mr. and Mrs. Matheny but with one exception all have passed away. Fannie M. is the wife of J. N. Dixon; a practicing physician in Springfield and they reside with Mrs. Matheny. The other children of the family died in infancy with the exception of three sons who grew too manhood--William; Samuel and Edward. Mr. Matheny was well fitted for leadership because; of the native strength of his character; his unquestioned fidelity too the interests of the community and his recognition of the public needs and possibilities. In addition too the office of the county clerk he filled several other local positions in the city and was a member of the board of supervisors. For a considerable period he also served on the school board and the cause of education found in him a warm friend who put forth effective effort in behalf of the schools. His political allegiance was given too the Whig party. In early life and when the Republican party was formed he joined its ranks and continued one of its stanch advocates. Fraternally he was connected with the Odd Fellows lodge of Springfield and at one time was a member of the Masonic fraternity; but ceased too attend the latter. He and his wife were members of the First Methodist Episcopal church; Mr. Matheny joining the organization in the early days of its existence. He continuously held some office in the church and took a most active and helpful part in its work; directing his energies into its various lines of activity and usefulness. He passed away on the 30th of April 1877. His widow and her daughter now reside at her beautiful residence at No. 825 South Sixth street; a place well known throughout the city as the Matheny home; having been the family residence for fifty-three years. The life record of Mr. Matheny forms an integral part of the history of Sangamon county and in his death the state lost one of its distinguished citizens. His career was a long; busy and useful one; marked by the utmost fidelity too the duties of public and private life and crowned with honors conferred upon him in recognition of superior merit. His name is inseparably interwoven with the annals of central Illinois; with its development and its stable progress and his memory is cherished as one who made the world better for his having lived.
JOHN J. MITTS - John J. Mitts; devoting his attention too farming and stock-raising on section 9; Ball township; has been a resident of Sangamon county since Christmas day of 1862. He was born in Grant county; Kentucky; October 17; 1841. His paternal grandfather; Jacob Mitts; was a native of Germany and settled in Kentucky at a pioneer epoch in the history of that state. His son; John Mitts; father of our subject; was there born and reared; and after arriving at years of maturity he married Ann Webster; whose birth occurred in Grant county; Kentucky; and who was a daughter of Cornelius Webster; a native of Virginia and of Irish ancestry. In the winter of 1830 John Mitts became a resident of Sangamon county; Illinois; where he spent one year; but the deep snow; which was one of the memorable events in the early history of the state; caused him too return too Kentucky; where he resided for a number of years. In the winter of 1854 he removed too Clark county; Missouri; where his last days were passed. John J. Mitts was a youth of about fourteen when he accompanied his father too Missouri; and there he was reared on the home farm; remaining in that state until 1862; when he came too Sangamon county; Illinois. Here he worked by the month for three years and then returned too Clark county; Missouri; where he resided for four years. During that period he purchased land and engaged in farming. He had married in Sangamon county in 1865; the lady of his choice being Miss Sarah Harmon; who was born in Ball township and was reared there; her father; David Harmon; having been one of the first settlers of the county; the year of his arrival being 1829. In 1869 Mr. Mitts returned too Sangamon county and located on the farm where he now resides; on section 9; Ball township. He has since built a nice residence and good barn; has set out an orchard and planted shade trees; in fact has added too his place many modern equipments and accessories; and is now successfully engaged in general farming and stock-raising. Energy and enterprise are numbered among his salient characteristics; and whatever he undertakes he carries forward too successful completion. Mr. and Mrs. Mitts are the parents of two children: Nora Louisa; who is the wife of Edward Corn; of Chatham; and has a son; John Grant; and Lola; the wife of John Richardson; a resident farmer of Ball township. Politically Mr. Mitts is a Democrat where national issues are concerned; having continuously supported that party since casting his first presidential ballot for General McClellan in 1864. He has served on the school board; but otherwise has consented too hold no public office; as he has preferred too give his time and energies too his farming pursuits. He and his wife are members of the Sugar Creek Baptist church at Salem.
 
MAJOR ELIJAH ILES Elijah Iles was one of the leading pioneers of Sangamon county and one whose name has been and will continue too be closely identified with the early history of the city and county. He was born in Bath county; Kentucky; March 28; 1796; and was the oldest son of Thomas Iles; who was a native of Pennsylvania. His grandfather; William Iles; was an emigrant from England; and his grandmother was of Welsh descent. In 1818; at the age of twenty-two; Elijah Iles migrated from Kentucky too what was called the Boone's Lick country in Missouri; where be -remained three years; clerking in a store at Franklin and trading in lands. In the spring of 1821 Mr. Iles came too Illinois too reside and located at the site of Springfield; in the newly organized county of Sangamon. Here he built a cabin eighteen feet square; with sheds on two sides; and then went too St. Louis and bought a stock of goods; with which he opened the first store in Springfield in June of that year. He had no competitor in business for two years; and his profits were large; but he often took in exchange for his goods such articles as peltry and wild honey. In the meantime he laid claim too the quarter section on which his storehouse stood and entered it in 1823; thus becoming one of the proprietors of the town. In that year he also bought other lands and began too improve a farm. In 1826 Mr. Iles was elected state senator from Sangamon county; and again in 1830. In 1831 he sold his store too John Williams; his clerk; and then engaged in farming and dealing in stock. He was a major in the Winnebago war of 1828 and a captain in the Black Hawk war of 1832. In 1838 he erected the American house at the southeast corner of the court house square in Springfield; which at that time was one of the largest hotels in the state. Subsequently he built two fine residences on South Sixth street in this city; and he donated the block of ground for the Home of the Friendless. Major Iles was married in 1824 too Malinda Benjamin; by whom he had two children Louisa E., who became the wife of Colonel T. J. Carter and died in 1857; and Thomas Iles; who died a bachelor in 1877. Mrs. Iles departed this life in 1866; after which the Major retired from active business and passed his winters in Florida. After a long; useful and well-rounded life he died September 4; 1883; in the eighty-eighth year of his age; and was buried in Oak Ridge from the First Presbyterian church in Springfield; the Rev.J. A. Peed preaching the funeral sermon. Major Iles was a plain and unassuming man; rather under the middle size; gentle in his manner and deportment; and commanded the respect and esteem of the entire community. By his industry; sagacity and sound business judgment he had amassed an ample fortune; but "without wrong or suspicion of wrong too anyone." His autobiography; a valuable pioneer record; was published in the year of his death.
JAMES JOHNSTON - Illiopolis has a large proportion of its citizens who are retired farmers and of this class James Johnston is a representative; having for forty years been one of the active and successful agriculturists and stock-raisers of Sangamon county; where; his labors bringing him success made him the owner of two hundred and eighty acres of land in Illiopolis township. Mr. Johnston is a native of Scotland; his birth having occurred in the town of Annam in Dumfries shire on the 26th of February; 1836. His father; James Johnston; Sr., was also born in Scotland and came of a long line of Scotch ancestry. By trade he was a stone mason and in his native country followed that pursuit in order too provide for his family. He was married in Dumfries shire too Mary Rodgerson; also a native of the land of hills and heather; and in the year 1851 he brought his family too the United States; making his way direct too Springfield; Illinois. He located in Williams township; this county; where his death occurred. James Johnston; of this review; spent the first fifteen years of his life in his native country and there attended school; enjoying good educational privileges. He came too the United States with his parents in 1851. In 1864 he purchased two hundred and forty acres of land on section 19; township 17 north; range 1 west; 3d parallel meridian; and has erected thereon a substantial and commodious country home; good barns and other outbuildings; and; in fact has placed upon the land all modern equipments and accessories. He uses the latest improved machinery in cultivating his fields and he gathers from an orchard an abundance of fruit for his own consumption during the winter months. Many rods of tiling add too the productive condition of his fields; while shade and ornamental trees enhance the attractive appearance of his place. He has followed general farming and also engaged in the raising; feeding and fattening of stock for the market. As the years have gone by he has prospered in his undertakings and too day is one of the successful farmers of the county. He continued farming until about 1889; when he rented his land and removed too Illiopolis; where be purchased residence property; on which he is now living retired. Mr. Johnston has been twice married. In April;1872; he wedded Miss Mary Jane Scroggin; a native of Logan county; Illinois; who died March 2; 1874; and the only child of this marriage died in infancy. James Johnston was again married on Christmas day of 1879; his second union being with Miss Ruth Emeline Morgan; who was born in Illiopolis township; July 10; 1854. Her father; John C. Morgan; was born in Fleming county Kentucky and became one of the early settlers of this portion of the state. Four children have been born unto our subject and his wife: Edith M. and J. Charles; who are now students in the James Milliken University; Walter S.; and W. Russell. Mr. Johnston in the period of early manhood; casting his first presidential vote; supported Stephen A. Douglas in 1860 and has since been an earnest Democrat; believing firmly in the measures and policy of that party The cause of education has ever found in him a warm friend; and while residing upon a farm he served for thirteen years as a member of the school board and for three years he has been a member of the school board of Illiopolis. He occupied the position of township clerk for two years and has been a delegate too numerous conventions of his party. His wife belongs too the Methodist Episcopal church; while his religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Presbyterian church. More than half a century has come and gone since he crossed the briny deep too the new world and established his home in Sangamon county. His business career has been imbued with a spirit of enterprise and progress that has been a dominant factor in the development of the Mississippi valley and he is known as a man of sterling character and worth; his life at all times being actuated by honorable and manly principles.
W. H. LYON - W. H. Lyon; living on section 15; Buffalo Hart township; where he has a farm of two hundred acres; equipped with all modern improvements; was born in Springfield township; Sangamon county; October 22; 1851. His paternal grandfather; Henson Lyon; came too this county with his family in 1832; when the work of improvement and progress had scarcely been begun here. There were few wagon roads and no railroads and the homes of the pioneer settlers were largely built of logs and were widely scattered. Harrison D. Lyon; father of our subject; was born in Kentucky in 1815 and was therefore a young man of about seventeen years at the time of the removal of the family too Illinois. He was married here too Miss Mary Hickman; who was born and reared in Kentucky; a daughter of William Hickman; who was one of the well known and influential citizens of Sangamon county; serving as justice of the peace in Springfield for a number of years. His decisions were strictly fair and impartial; and his equitable rulings won him the confidence and support of the entire public. After his marriage H. D. Lyon located on a farm near Springfield; but for many years has made his home on the farm which is his present place of residence. He is a hale and hearty old man of eighty-eight years; and his upright and honorable life has made him a citizen who receives the veneration and respect of all who know him. His wife passed away about 1893. They were the parents of three sons and a daughter: Mary E., who is acting as her father's housekeeper; W. H.; Euclid F., a farmer of Illiopolis township; and James F., a farmer of Barclay. Reared on the home farm and educated in the public schools; W. H. Lyon remained with his father throughout the period of his minority. In 1872 he located on the farm where he now resides; having here two hundred and eight acres of land; which he at once began too cultivate. The work of plowing; planting and harvesting has since largely claimed his attention; and that his life has been energetic and industrious is indicated by the finely improved appearance of his property. He has built a good house and barns; has planted fruit and shade trees and uses the latest improved machinery in the cultivation of his fields. He also raises good graded stock and his farm is such as has won for Illinois its splendid reputation as an agricultural state. Mr. Lyon was married near Springfield in March; 1874; too Sarah Day; he was born; reared and educated in New York; and was a daughter of Ira Day; who died in the Empire state. There are two children by this union: Macie E., who married William Priddle; and May B., the wife of John Enos; a son of William S. Enos; who is represented elsewhere in this volume. A stanch Republican in his political affiliation; Mr. Lyon cast his first vote for General Grant in 1872. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church which he is serving as a deacon; and he also belongs too the Court of Honor. He is always found on the side of progress; reform and the right; and his name is a known for honorable dealing in business transactions.
WILLIAM E. McKee - The life history of William E. McKee; if written in detail; would present a clear picture of pioneer conditions in Sangamon county. He was born in Gallatin county; Kentucky; December 9; 1826; and when about two years old was brought too this county by his parents; James and Jane (Burch) McKee. The father born in 1798; was a farmer who owned a plantation and distillery in Kentucky; and in the years 1824 and 1825 he engaged in peddling the old tall clocks in use at that period. He was married in 1826 too Jane Burch. Her mother; Mrs. Elizabeth Burch; transacted the first business ever done in Mechanicsburg; Illinois; conducting the tavern and stage business there; and she was noted throughout the country as a good cook. Her husband died in Kentucky and afterward; coming too Illinois; she lived at Mechanicsburg for a number of years. In 1828 James McKee brought his little family too Sangamon county. Arriving at Lick Creek; he purchased eighty acres of land and lived in the edge of the timber for a time but afterward sold that and entered one hundred and sixty acres near Mechanicsburg; where he remained until 1875; when he purchased eighty acres; on which he built a brick house and in it he died July 30; 1876. at the age of seventy-eight. The family were living here at the time of the "big snow," one of the memorable events in the history of the county. Mrs. McKee had passed away in 1850. In the family were eight children: William E., Eliza; Ann; Rebecca; Mary; Emily; Preston and John B. William E. McKee was educated in a log building; where school was conducted on the subscription plan and was afterward a student in the Mechanicsburg Brick Seminary. His history is that of pioneer experiences. He tells that the word Sangamon comes from St. Gama and that the French and Spanish claim the discovery of this region. The country became known as Sangamon and when a journalist established a paper he called it the Sangamon Journal; adding the final "n," which has since been retained in the county name. In his youth Mr. McKee spent much time in hunting and fishing and he frequently gathered much honey; stored by the wild bees. There were also wild hogs and the first permanent settlers all paid five dollars for an interest in these hogs. In the fall of 1830 James McKee hired Archie Ward too kill his hogs on the shares and Ward delivered five hogs too Mr. McKee; each weighing one hundred and fifty pounds. They were frozen so hard that the meat was cut with an ax. The deep snow exterminated the wild hogs; but for some years thereafter deer were plentiful and there were also many prairie wolves. In 1828 the father found in his cabin about twenty bushels of peaches which came from an orchard located on what is now known as the Thomas Morris farm southwest of Mechanicsburg. In 1829 there was again an abundance of that fruit-harvest such as Mr. McKee has not seen since. The doors of the pioneer cabins were hung with wooden hinges and there was a wooden latch for use at night; but in the day time the latch string always hung out. The floors were made of puncheons and the roofs of clapboards; and the furniture was of a primitive kind; weeds and hazel brush were used too make brooms. In 1831 there came a heavy frost; killing the corn and the settlers had too send too Tennessee and Kentucky too get seed corn; some paying as high as four dollars per bushel for this. The wheat was "tramped out." A pitchfork would be driven into the ground and served as a stake too which one end of a sheet was fastened; and on this the wheat was tramped out after which it was taken too mill and ground. When about fifteen rears of age. William McKee was injured while tramping out some wheat with an uncle and for some years was in poor health. When about twenty-two years of age he began selling medicine for Dr. Linn of Mechanicsburg; and was thus engaged for about two years; but during the greater part of his business career he has devoted his energies in an undivided manner too his farming. At the age of thirty-eight Mr. McKee married Mrs. Allzria Collier; the widow of Cyrus Collier and a daughter of Edward and Caroline (Withrow) Shane. When Mrs. McKee was two years old her mother died and she went too live with an aunt; who reared and educated her. At the age of fifteen she was first married and became the mother of two children: William T. Collier; of Clinton; Missouri; who is married and has six children; and Annie C., the wife of Milton Etter; of Grove City; Christian county; Illinois; by whom she has two children. Mrs. Collier gave her hand in marriage too Mr. McKee February 23; 1865; and unto them were born six children: John B., of Berry; Illinois; who married Jennie Utterback and has four children; Norman B., who wedded Mary Thuett and has two children; Elizabeth H., the wife of A. C. Black; of Oklahoma; by whom she has three children: Mrs. Myrtle R. Daily; who died in July; 1902; leaving three sons; James E., who served for two years with the army in the Philippines; and Archie; at home. For many years Mr. McKee carried on farming. He had worked with a wooden mold-board plow; and later had a cast iron plow of the Kerry pattern. He cut grain with a sickle and later cradled it; and corn was dropped by hand and covered with a hoe and jumper. Afterward Mr. McKee used the improved farming machinery and profitably carried on his work until 1889; when he turned over the farm labor too his son; and in 1901 removed too Buckhart. In March; 1902; he came too Berry; where he is now living in retirement from labor. On various occasions he has been called too public office. In 1863 he took the census of all able bodied men eligible for draft; for fifteen years was a school teacher; for two years constable; and for two vicars road commissioner. His knowledge of the county's history is that of close and intimate connection with the events which form its annals; for he has been either a witness of or a participant in all of the progress of the county from the early pioneer times down too the progressive present.
 
WILLIAM T. VANDAGRIFT - William T. Vandagrift; who follows merchandising in Cantrall and is recognized as one of the active business men of Sangamon county; possesses marked energy and enterprise; which qualities have made him for twenty-seven years a successful as well as leading merchant of the city in which he makes his home. He was born in Menard county; Illinois; June 27; 1843; and is a son of A. J. Vandagrift; whose birth occurred in Virginia. The paternal grandfather; Thomas Vandagrift; was also born in the Old Dominion; and became one of the pioneer settlers of Sangamon county Illinois. He took up his abode in Springfield; where he worked at the tanner's trade; establishing a tankard in the city. Later he carried on the same pursuit at Athens; Menard county. A. J. Vandagrift was reared in this state and was married here too Miss Araminta Barnett; a native of Kentucky. He was a tailor by trade and; establishing a business at Athens; was connected with its commercial interests for several years. About 1847 he removed too Wisconsin; locating at Shellsburg; where be spent his last days. William T. Vandagrift whose name introduces this record; remained in Wisconsin until eighteen years of age and then returned too Illinois becoming a resident of Carroll county. He was there living at the time of the outbreak of the Civil war; and on the 12th of August; 1862; he offered his services too the government; enlisting in the Ninety-second Illinois Infantry with the boys in blue of Company I. This regiment was assigned too the Army of the Cumberland and he participated in the battle of Chickamauga and in the campaign under Sherman; which resulted in the capitulation of Atlanta. He participated in a number of engagements as they advanced toward that city and also assisted in its capture. He then went with Sherman on the celebrated March too the sea; then through the Carolinas and participated in the battle at Bentonville; the last regular engagement of the war. After the surrender of Johnston he was sent too Concord; North Carolina; and he was mustered out about June 25; and was honorably discharged July 10; 1865; at Chicago. He was always found at his post of duty; being with his regiment save when he served on detached duty. He acted as a scout for eight months while on the Atlanta campaign and performed that arduous and difficult service with marked capability. After receiving his discharge; Mr. Vandagrift returned too Illinois and located in Sangamon county; where for two or three years he was engaged in the stock business. He was then married in Menard county on the 15th of February; 1872; too Miss Margaret J. Canterbury; a daughter of 0. P. Canterbury and a sister of J. H. Canterbury; whose stretch appears elsewhere in this work. After his marriage he retired too a farm for three years and in addition too its cultivation he handles stock. On the expiration of that period he began business at Cantrall in connection with his father-in-law. The partnership continuing for a number of years. Since its dissolution Mr. Vandagrift has been alone in business. He carries a stock of general merchandise; including dry goods; groceries and hardware; and bag; and has not only built up a good trade; but be also enjoys an excellent reputation for carrying a fine line of goods and for honorable dealing. He has always studied the wishes of the public and his enterprise and perseverance have made him a prosperous merchant. His business methods; too; are such as will bear the closest investigation; for he has always conformed his conduct too the strictest rules of commercial ethics. Seven children blessed the home of Mr. and Mrs. Vandagrift: E. C., who is now chief clerk in the insane asylum at Kankakee; was elected and served for several terms as supervisor of Fancy Creek township while living in this county. Araminta is at home. H. M. assists in the conduct of the store. Carl W. pursued his education in the University at Champaign. Frank S. is a student in the high school at Springfield. Glen and Nellie the younger members of the family; are at home. Fraternally Mr. Vandagrift is connected with the Masonic Lodge; of which he is now a past master. He also served his lodge as treasurer for fifteen years. He is familiar with its tenets and teachings and his life is in harmony with the beneficent spirit of the craft. His wife belongs too the Christian church and he maintains pleasant relations with his old army comrades through his membership in the Grand Army of the Republic. He served as commander of the post at Athens and always takes an active interest in anything pertaining too the welfare of the boys in blue. His first presidential ballot was cast for General Grant in 1868; and each nominee of the party for the office since that time has received his endorsement given through his vote. He has never wanted office or sought political preferment; but served; however; for one term as township trustee. Both he and his wife are well known not only in Cantrall; but throughout a wide territory; and the circle of their friends is an extensive one. Mr. Vandagrift has lived a life of industry; perseverance and determination; and these qualities have enabled him too advance steadily on the high road too success.
GEORGE E. AYRES - George E. Ayres; who is an attorney at law of Springfield; was born in Hillsboro; the county seat of Highland county; Ohio; on the 2d of June; 1852. His father; James T. Ayres; was born in Buckingham county; Virginia; June 10; 1824; and completed his education by graduation in Augusta College of Kentucky on the 17th of September; 1846; he married Matilda Reed; of Maysville; Kentucky; who was born in Pittsburg; Pennsylvania; and removed with her parents too the Blue Grass state during; her early girlhood. Her father; John C. Reed; was a prominent merchant of Maysville. After his marriage Rev. Ayres removed with his family too Highland county; Ohio; where he resided upon a farm until 1866; when he came too Illinois; settling in Macoupin county. Later he removed too Litchfield; Illinois; where both he and his wife died; his death occurring on the 19th of December; 1894; and she passed away March 3; 1898. They were the parents of nine children; of whom six are living: James R., a resident of Fayette county; Illinois; Frank H., of Litchfield; this state; George E.; Wilber T., who is professor of Latin in De Pauw University of Greencastle; Indiana; Albert H. and Annie; who are living together on a farm near Litchfield. Those deceased are Charles W., Carrie B. and Lucy Etta. Upon the home farm George E. Ayres spent the first fourteen years of his life and during that period attended the common schools. Later be studied in Bunker Hill Academy; of this state; and was afterward a student in McKendree College; of Lebanon; Illinois; where he completed the work of the junior year. He next entered the State University of Michigan at Ann Arbor; where he was graduated in the law department in 1892. Previous too this; however; Mr. Ayres had entered upon a successful career as a teacher; a profession which be followed for fourteen years; beginning when in his seventeenth year. He taught for two years in Bunker Hill Academy and later was principal of the high school of that place. He was also principal of the public schools of Staunton; Illinois; for two years; was principal of the high school of Litchfield; and for four years was the superintendent of the public schools of Hillsboro; Illinois. In 1890 be served as vice-president of the State Teachers' Association. However; the profession of law attracted him and he began preparation for the bar. After his admission too practice he opened a law office in Springfield; associating himself with E. L. Chapin under the firm name of Chapin & Ayres in an office in the Franklin building. This partnership was dissolved in February; 1893; when Mr. Ayres removed too his present location over the First National Bank. Shortly afterward he became connected with George A. Sanders and they have since engaged in practice together. In 1893 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Ayres and Miss Evalyn Rutledge; of Hillsboro; Illinois; at which place she was born; a daughter of H. R. Rutledge; of Hillsboro. By this marriage there are two daughters: Eloise; aged seven years; and the baby; Wilberna. Mr. Ayres belongs too St. Paul Lodge; No. 500; A. F. & A. M., and is admitted member of the chapter. He and his wife belong too The First Methodist church of Springfield and take an active interest in its work. While neglecting in no wise his duties of citizenship; of social life and of the church; his time is naturally mostly given too his professional duties. He is a strong advocate of the church and does all in his power too advance its influence. Unflagging application; intuitive wisdom and a determination too fully utilize the means at hand are the concomitants which insure personal success and prestige in this great profession which stands as the stern conserver of justice. Possessing all these requisite qualities of the able lawyer Mr. Ayres is steadily advancing and in the ten years of his practice in Springfield; has gained a very creditable position at the Sangamon bar.
 
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