Clark County Clipper, January 21, 1886

Fatal Shooting.

A fatal shooting scrape occurred at the Star Bakery last night, which resulted in the death of Charles H. Roby, one of our oldest settlers.  It seems Ed Foster, and Carrie Roberts had hired Charlie Roby to take them to Dodge City today, the former being called back to Missouri by a telegram that his mother was lying at the point of death, and Roberts was to return to his former home at Winfield.  After buying their passage tickets of Roby the three, accompanied by Bob Lyons and Robert Mitchell, went to the Star Bakery about 12 o'clock, to have an oyster stew, but Charlie Tague and John Glassock who were sleeping in the store, refused to get up, so they went up to J. L. Wade's residence and had him come down and fix their oysters.  After eating, and we are sorry to have to add, drinking considerable whiskey, Roberts stepped out on the walk and began firing his revolver and Foster stood in the doorway and did likewise, with a 45 caliber, and in throwing it up to cock it, the revolver went off over his shoulder and shot Roby through the bowels.  He dropped down on a pallet and said he was shot, and lived only about twenty-five minutes.

Dr. Workman and Taylor were summoned immediately, but could do nothing.  The coroner summoned a jury consisting of T. E. Berry, G. E. Gage, A. Hughes, N. J. Walden, John Cooper and E. A. Fearing, who returned a verdict of manslaughter and Foster was placed under arrest.

It is a repetition of the old, old story of whiskey and the reckless use of firearms.

We hope to soon see our town incorporated and the firing of pistols on our streets forever stopped and the lives and property of our citizens protected.

 

Clark County Clipper, January 28, 1886
 
The funeral service for Charley Roby was held at the court house on Sunday, Rev. Swartz officiating.  A goodly number of our people attended.



Submitted by ~Shirley Brier~ in September 27, 2005.

 

 

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