History of Springfield, MA
Volume II
Pages 41 - 45

Continued

p.41

Green ribbin 23 yards at 8 pence the yard 00 15 04
Five peices & an halfe of tape at 2s a peice 00 11 00
One pair of woosted stockens 00 08 00
3 pair of old woosted stockens at 3 shillings the pair 00 09 00
A new fine shirt 10s, nine ouces of nutmegs 18s 01 08 00
Five ounces of mace at 3s & 2d the ounce 00 15 10
Nine peices & a halfe of narrow tape 00 11 08
Eighteen two penny boxes 00 03 00
Knitting needles - one pound & a half & three ounces 00 05 00
Two peices of tape at 2s per peice 00 04 00
Three thousand of pins at 2s the thousand 00 06 00
5 ounces of thread at 2s & 6d the ounce 00 12 06
One peice of narrow tape 2s - a few fine pins 1s 00 03 00
80 aul blades 6s, an ounce & quarter of mohair 3s 00 09 00
Three dozen of Belmettle buttons at 7d the dozen 00 01 09
8 ounces of sewing silke 01 02 03
13 pair of little black beads 00 01 01
Four pair of washleather gloves at 3s the pair 00 12 00
Eighteen hatbands 4 d the hatband 00 06 00
50 needles round & square 2s, a Quire (ream) of paper 1s 4d 00 03 04
One peice of blue ferriting 00 06 00
8 round short silke laces 00 08 00
9 long round silke laces 00 13 00
Three dozen of flat silke laces at 10s the dozen 01 10 00
14 Black & red silke laces 00 14 00
Three dozen & ten thread laces 00 01 04
Six dozen of long thread laces 00 06 00
Twenty one silke tape laces at 9d the lace 00 15 08
4 hundred sowing needles at 3s the hundred 00 12 00
Seven silke laces at 10d the lace 00 05 10
15 yards of red silke ferriting at 4d the yard 00 05 00
One hundred & twenty square needles 00 05 00
Sixty round stocken needles 00 03 00
Several sorts of fine needles 00 01 06
19 yards of red woosted ferriting at 3d the yard 00 04 09
27 yds of green woosted ferriting at 3d the yd 00 07 09
18 yards of woosted binding 00 06 00
8 yards of red woosted ferriting at 3d the yard 00 02 00
A peice of small cap wire 1s, a few fish hooks 1s 00 02 00
5 jeiuce harps 1s, 14 silke riding girdles 7s 00 08 00
9 pair of sizers at six pence the pair 00 04 06
A pair of shoe buckels 6d, a pair of money seals 6s 00 06 06
Linen thread 8 pence, scales & weights 00 02 08
Half an ounce of fine thread 1s, 3d, amber beads 00 07 03
4 raisors 8s & a hone 4s 00 12 00
Two leather bags & two linnin bags 00 04 00
A port mantle locke 1s, 4 bags & wallets 5s 00 06 00
A saddle & bridle & maile pillion 00 16 00
An iron gray horse 03 10 00
A port mantle & the lock & chain 00 16 00
One booke 00 01 00
A great coate 8s, a double breasted coat 6s 00 14 00
A coat 18s, a jackcoate 12s 01 10 00
A wastecoate 10s, a pair of leather breaches 8s 00 18 00
A pair of gloves 1s & 3d, a hat 10s 00 11 03
An old hat 2s and two old shirts 3s 00 05 00
Two old neckcloaths 00 04 00
Four old handkerchiefs 00 02 00
Three old silke handkerchiefs. 00 04 06

p.42

Three old linen handkerchiefs 00 04 06
A remnant of callico 1s 6d, a remnant of linen 6d 00 02 00
Three pair of old Stockins at 3 shillings the pair 00 09 00
Two pairs of shoes 00 05 00
A Remnant of kenting 00 00 06
A pair of Jackeboots 00 10 00
Eleven iron handled Jack knives 7d per knife 00 06 05
Ten little knives 00 01 00
Five leather glast inkhorns 00 05 00
Four horn inkhorns at 10d a peace 00 03 04
Eight tobacca tonges at 6 pence a peace 00 04 00
Three dozen & one of thimbles at 2d ye thimble 00 06 02
3 Graters, valued 00 01 04
14 pair of small knitting needles 00 02 04
18 pair of greater knitting needles 00 03 00
14 yards of gartering at 6 pence ye yard 00 07 00
2 dozens & two buttons at 1s 6 pence ye dozen 00 03 00
10 pair of shoe buckles at 12 pence ye pair 00 10 00
Eleven pair of shoe buckles at 00 11 00
A prospect glass 00 00 06
12 ounces of nutmegs at 2s ye ounce 01 04 00
A Yard & three quarters of speckled callico 00 14 00
A couple of peices of Beeswax 00 00 08
A pair of old Stockens 00 01 00

For sale also - Books Entitled:

Joy of Faith, three books 00 06 00
Thirsty Sinners invited to Christ, two books 00 01 06
The Best Friend Standing at the door. two books 00 02 08
Spiritual Disertions, two books 00 01 08
Pray always, two books 00 01 08
Tokens for children, three books 00 04 00
Willards Funeral Sermons, eight books 00 08 00
Jeneways Life, six books 00 08 00
Sighs from Hell, four books 00 05 04
Meditatios on Death, two books 00 02 00
Spiritual Treasure, one book 00 04 00
The Knowledge of God the Creator, by Calvine 00 08 00
The Poor Mans Family Book by Baxter 00 02 00
A Latin Bible 00 02 00
Meditations on the Glory of Christ, one book 00 01 04
Justification by Mr. Willard, one book 00 01 04
A Glimpse of Glory, one book 00 01 00
The Disciple concerning himself, owning his Lord, 1 book 00 01 04
The Blessed Hope, one book 00 01 00
Primitive Christians, two books 00 01 08
Mans Worse Carriage to God than One Another, two books 00 02 00
Practical truth to Promote Holiness, one book 00 00 10
Christian religion, one book 00 00 10
Psalms to Be Sung with Grace in the Heart, one book 00 01 00
A little Book for little Children 00 01 00
Sir Francis Bacon's Assays, one book 00 05 00

p.43

EXPENSES OF ADMINISTRATION

An account of Charges for taking the Inventory of the Estate of Mr. Mallifaud, Deceased Frenchman being taken by Dr. Sherman, Mr. Thomas Ingersol & Mr. Luke Hitchcock, Senior:


s p
To Mr. Luke Hitchcock for victuals & Chamber room 0 12 0
Expenses at Mr. Ingersols house for victuals & drink 0 12 06
To Mr. Luke Hitchcock for three days prizing 0 06 00
To Mr. Tho. Ingersole three days prizing 0 06 00
To Tilly Mirick three days 0 06 00
To John Miller three days 0 06 00
To Tho Horton one day & an half 0 03 00
To Mr. Holioke half a day 0 01 00
To Sergt Cooley for his time with the Judge 0 02 00
Eliakim Cooleys charges 3 10 00
Tenders & Watchers Charges 2 08 00
Funeral & Doctors charges 6 04 00
To Tilly Mirick for his charges abt funeral & 2 days going to the Meadow 0 07 00
To the Register 0 17 00
To Samuel Hitchcock & Jonathan Cooley 0 01 04
To Tilly Mirick Entertainment of administrators 0 08 00
To five administrators 0 10 00
To Dr. Sherman & Tilly Mirick copyig & comparing the Inventory 0 04 00
To administrators, Mr. Holioke, John Miller & John Sherman 0 09 00
To Tilly Mirick for a meeting at his house 0 04 00
To Mr. Holioke & John Miller 0 06 00
To Dr. Sherman 0 01 06
To Tilly Mirick for taking the Inventory 0 01 00
To John Miller & Tilly Mirick paying the debts 0 08 00
To three days delivering the goods 0 12 00
To loss in measuring with a shorter yard than at first 0 10 00
To Tilly Mirick going down country for debts 4 00 00
To Sergt Cooley for keeping the horse 0 06 06
The debt to Major Wallie at Boston 30 01 04
To Thomas Horton for one day in delivering goods 00 02 00
To Tilly Mirick & John Sherman to half day at Boston to pay Mr. Wallie & to seek for more of the deceaseds estate 00 02 00
To allowance to Tilly Mirick on waiting on the Judge at Northampton to pass this account 00 09 00

After the proceeds of the estate were turned over to the town, at a meeting held April 11, 1712, it was "Voted that Mr. Thomas Ingersol shalll have the whole sum of money and goods mentioned in the inventory of the estate of John Mashfield, late deceased, for the term of one yer, said Ingersol then paying the whole sum according to the inventory in money and he also paying the lawful interest for the money part, provided also said Ingersol give sufficient security for the whole to the Town of Springfield.

p.44

Four years later, November 2, 1716, the town "Voted to recover the Bond which the Town have of Thomas Ingersol and that if the Bond be not revived by the first of February the Selectmen shall sue it out."

It would appear that Thomas Ingersol secured his son David Ingersol and Tilly Mirrick as endorsers of his bond to the town, for on January 6, 1724, the Town "Voted that the Selectmen be impowered to receive of Major John Pynchon the Bond that Tilly Mirick & David Ingersol gave the Selectmen. Voted that if David Ingersol & Tilly Mirick do not pay to the Selectmen what Interest money is due to the Town from said Ingersol & said Mirick, the first day of July, 1724, then the Selectmen Doe Sue out said Ingersol & Miricks Bond." June 30, 1727, it was "Voted that the money be called in which is due to the Town by the Bond from Tilly Mirick and Thomas Ingersol."

At the same meeting it was "Voted that the security that was given by Thomas Ingersol for the money that belongs to the poor of the Town be accepted."

The next record concerning the money is under date of May 15, 1732, when it was "Voted that the money outstanding in the Hands of Thomas Ingersol and David Ingersol be still continued in their hands, provided they give further security to the Treasurer of the Town for the same, the said Treasurer taking advice of the Selectmen, and that the same be forthwith done."

Just what was the next proceeding is indefinitely stated, but on August 25, 1732, it was "Voted that the Treasurer of the said Town taking the advice of the Selectmen deliver up Daniel Baggs and Thomas Ingersols bond to the said Town, taking the bond of Pelatiah Hitchcock in liew thereof"

There is nothing in the records of the first century showing what finally became of this fund. Whether it passed to Hitchcock when his bond was accepted instead of Daniel Bagg's

p.45

and Thomas Ingersol's, it is not known. As no such fund is mentioned in much later records the inference is that the town lost it through loans to those who were unable to repay it. Writers of local history have made no mention of the Frenchman's bequest and the silent tombstone has ben his only memorial, as this was the first gift to the town in support of the poor or for any other purpose.

Only a few headstones were erected at graves of the first generation, not from indifference but from the great difficulty of getting suitable material of which to make them. Red sandstone was first used. As the town obtained the stone for Mr. Mallefuid's grave at Middletown, it is presumed others did the same. At Northampton, stone was obtained from Mount Tom for similar purposes. A few headstones erected to the second generation are occasionally seen in various cemeteries but they are more frequently noticed at the graves of the third generation. The accompanying engraving is of a headstone erected at the grave of Capt. Samuel Terry in the Enfield cemetery

Insert [to be added soon]

a son of Samuel, the immigrant ancestor. Capt. Terry was a man of marked ability and usefulness in the new settlement of Enfield. The engraving is from a photograph by Mr. H. W. Terry of Springfield, taken in 1898.

The Beginning of the Education of John Pynchon's Sons.

In the beginning of all the New England towns, and especially here in Springfield, there was need of better instruction than some of the children received, but the want was supplied



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History of Springfield, Vol. II
Hampden County
ALHN-Massachusetts
Created August 24, 2004
Copyright 2004

Kathy Leigh, Webmaster