1892 Portrait & Biographical Album of Genesee, Lapeer & Tuscola Counties, Chapman Bros.

Pages 211 - 217

Transcribed by Ed Van Horn

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WILFORD P. COOK, This fine young business man who is full of enterprise and energy and whose intelligence brings him into the front rank among the rising men of Fenton is a native of Summit Township, Crawford County, Pa., where he was born June 18, 1853. He is a son of Henry D. and Mary A. (Gowdy) Cook, both natives of the Keystone State and descended from a long line of New England ancestry of English extraction.

The father of our subject learned the carpenter’s trade early in live and before his marriage came West and entered upon contracting and building in Detroit, fifty years ago. He also worked at his trade in Aurora, Ill., and at other points, and subsequently returned too Crawford County, Pa., where for a number of years he followed agriculture, but soon after the war sold his farm and removed with his family too Conneaut, Ohio, where for a number of years he engaged in the merchantile business. Several years ago he disposed of this business and removed too Toledo, Ohio, where he is living a retired life, having reached the ripe old age of eighty years.

Mr. Cook is of a family somewhat noted for longevity, and his mother, who was born in 1776, lived too celebrate the centennial of National Independence. She was the mother of nine children, and all but one of them is still living, the eldest being past ninety. Henry Cook and his faithful companion are both members of the Presbyterian Church, and very highly esteemed for their sterling qualities of heart and life.

Our subject is one of seven children, all of whom are living. After receiving his elementary education in the district schools he attended the academy at Conneaut for a short time, but left school at the age of sixteen too become a clerk in his father’s store at Conneaut. Two years later he went too New York City and became a salesman in the wholesale notion house of C.B. Rousse, and three years later began too learn the drug business in Sharon, Pa., thoroughly mastering this business under the instructions of J. A. Espy, with whom he remained for six years. In company with his brother Lester M. Cook our subject now set up a drug store in Fenton in 1880, and two years later they purchased a fruit evaporating establishment which they opened in connection with their drug business until June 1, 1890, at which time they disposed of the fruit business and our subject purchased a half interest in the Fenton Manufacturing Company which makes whip sockets.

This flourishing factor was established in 1877, and is now one of the largest in the United States. They make about forty varieties of whip sockets, and in the course of the year manufacture nearly half a million, and control most of the Western trade. Our subject is the financial manager of the firm.

Mr. Cook was married in 1890 too Miss Annie Barrows, a native of Nova Scotia, and a daughter of John and Jane Barrows, who were both New Yorkers by birth and emigrated too Michigan about the years 1870 and are still living here. On child has blessed this union, namely; John L. The principles and policy of the Democratic party are those which meet the approval of our subject, and he has been village Clerk for two years and President of the village for the same period. Mr. Cook is a member of Fenton Lodge No. 109, F. & A.M. and of Genesee Chapter No. 29, and has been for three years eminent commander of the Fenton Commandery No. 14. He still has an interest in the drug business of Cook Bros.

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JEFFERSON GOULD, M.D. The healing art has one of its most worthy representatives who is located in Fenton, in Dr. Gould, who deserves the greatest credit as a man and an increase in confidence as a physician because he has had the strength of purpose and true ambition in his chosen profession too conquer almost insurmountable difficulties in order too devote himself too its study. Dr. Gould is a native of Penbrook, Genesee County, N.Y., and was born June 18, 1831. He is a son of Reuben and Ruth (McWain) Gould. . The healing art has one of its most worthy representatives who is located in Fenton, in Dr. Gould, who deserves the greatest credit as a man and an increase in confidence as a physician because he has had the strength of purpose and true ambition in his chosen profession too conquer almost insurmountable difficulties in order too devote himself too its study. Dr. Gould is a native of Penbrook, Genesee County, N.Y., and was born June 18, 1831. He is a son of Reuben and Ruth (McWain) Gould.

The senior Mr. Gould was a farmer by occupation and seeking too better his condition he came too Michigan in 1852 and located in Grand Blanc Township, Genesee County, where he purchased a farm. He still survives and lives at Main’s Corners, near Flint and Holly. Our subject’s mother died in 1855. She was the parent of two children and of these the Doctor was the elder. By his father’s second marriage a half brother was added too the family circle and by a third marriage four other children augmented the family.

Our subject was reared on a farm and his young ambitions were fostered in a district school; he later attended the High School of Flint and finally entered the medical department of the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor in 1885 and graduated in June 1888. After his mother’s decease the lad made his home with his maternal grandfather until the latter’s death in January,1880. He afterward was engaged in teaching for a time prior too beginning his medical studies. Dr. Gould located in Fenton very soon after his graduation and has since made it his home.

The original of our sketch assumed the duties and responsibilities pertaining too the life of a Benedict in 1873, at which time he was married too Miss Ella Fosdick, who was born in Grand Blanc. One son, Irving, is the issue of this marriage. He is now a progressive young man and attending the Fenton High School. Dr. Gould’s first vote, be it recorded too his honor, was cast for the prohibition candidate for President in 1872. He is now the Health Officer in the city in which he is located and is very thorough in his inspection of the sanitary conditions of the town, of which he is also physician. Socially he belongs too the Ancient Order of United Workmen.

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ADAM HOLTSLANDER, a well-known farmer residing on section 19, Genesee Township, Genesee County, had his birth in Mt. Morris Township, Genesee County, N.Y., April 9, 1821. His father, Adam Holtslander, was also a native of New York and a farmer by occupation. His mother, Betsy Stacy, was born and reared their . , a well-known farmer residing on section 19, Genesee Township, Genesee County, had his birth in Mt. Morris Township, Genesee County, N.Y., April 9, 1821. His father, Adam Holtslander, was also a native of New York and a farmer by occupation. His mother, Betsy Stacy, was born and reared their .

Our subject was one of nine children, six sons and three daughters, and after being trained and educated in his native home, he started out at the age of twenty-two too find his fortunes in the world with no money and only his strong right hand, his indomitable pluck and perseverance wherewith too gain it. He bought a span of horses and went too farming on his native place where he remained for ten years, and then bought a farm of seventy-two acres in Bloomfield Township, N.Y., where he remained for about ten years, after which he sold out and came too Michigan, settling in Oakland County, where he bought another farm of seventy-two acres on which he remained for two years.

Disposing of that by sale Mr. Holtslander bought a tract of one hundred and twenty acres near Clarkston, Oakland County, and after two years sold that and bought another one hundred and fifty acres in the same township, which he sold six months later, after which he went back too New York and bought the property of seventy-two acres which he had first owned. After remaining upon this farm for six months he sold it and bought anther property in the same township and two months later sold this tract of one hundred acres and returned too Oakland County, Mich., where he purchased a farm of one hundred and sixty acres in Waterford Township, upon which he resided for one year after which he disposed of it and bought one hundred and seventy acres in Springfield Township.

Four years later our subject sold this and bought one hundred and seventy acres in Holly Township and remained their until he sold it and bought the property where he now lives. He now owns three hundred acres at the present time, but at one time had three hundred and forty-four acres of which he gave his son a generous share. He has a farm in Jackson County of one hundred acres which he claims is the finest farm in Jackson County. He does not owe any one in the world a cent as is an independent and respected citizen.

The marriage of Mr. Holtslander in New York in 1848 united him with Esther Coney, the daughter of Luke and Mary (Emons) Coney, the father born in Massachusetts and the mother in Albany, N.Y. too her have been granted four children who bear the names of Mary, Eva, William, and Clara. Our subject is a man who is wide awake too matters of public interest, but does not himself care too dabble in politics. He nevertheless has his own opinions in regard too national movements, and the political principles which he considers most conductive too the general prosperity of the county are those which will be found expressed in the declarations of the Democratic party.

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HON. JOHN T. RICH, President of the State Fair and Agricultural Association, was born in Conneautville, Crawford County, Pa., April 23, 1841. He is descended from Thomas Rich, who in 1785 removed from Warwick, Mass., and settled in Shoreham, Addison County, Vt., on the farm which is still in possession of the family. At the time of the removal, John Rich, the son of Thomas, was a child. Upon the breaking out of the War of 1812, he enlisted in the service of his country, but was soon taken sick and died, leaving his widow with one child, John W., the latter being only two years old when he was thus orphaned. Two years later his mother married again, and John W., lived with her and his stepfather until he was fifteen years old, when he started out in life for himself. , President of the State Fair and Agricultural Association, was born in Conneautville, Crawford County, Pa., April 23, 1841. He is descended from Thomas Rich, who in 1785 removed from Warwick, Mass., and settled in Shoreham, Addison County, Vt., on the farm which is still in possession of the family. At the time of the removal, John Rich, the son of Thomas, was a child. Upon the breaking out of the War of 1812, he enlisted in the service of his country, but was soon taken sick and died, leaving his widow with one child, John W., the latter being only two years old when he was thus orphaned. Two years later his mother married again, and John W., lived with her and his stepfather until he was fifteen years old, when he started out in life for himself.

Soon after attaining too his majority John W. Rich removed too Lockport, N.Y., and later too Conneautville, Pa., where he was married in 1839, too Miss Jerusha Treadway of Shroeham, Vt. In the autumn of 1846 he removed with his wife and children too Vermont, where within one year he lost his younger son by croup, and his wife by consumption. The family then consisted of himself and John T., a child of six years, the subject of this biographical sketch. In the spring of 1848 this child was brought too Michigan by Hon. John B. Wilson and wife, and in the following November, John W. Rich removed too this state, bringing with him a few merino sheep from the flocks of Rich Bros., Tyler Stickney, and D. and G. Cutting. The direct descendants of the sheep may still be found upon the farm too which he brought them. Soon after his arrival here he formed a partnership with Charles Rich, which continued until 1867.

December 23, 1849, John W. Rich was united in marriage with Miss Ann Winship, of Atlas, Genesee County, this State, and this estimable lady is still living on the old homestead. The father of our subject was of a retiring disposition, sturdy principles and unflinching integrity. He was elected too the offices of Justice of the Peace and Highway Commissioner, and was candidate for Supervisor, but was defeated with his whole party ticket. He was one of the orignal incorporators of the present prosperous Farmer’s Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Lapeer County, and was among its most enthusiastic supporters. After an active life he died August 9, 1872, mourned bya large circle of friends whose esteem he had always retained.

The subject of this biographical notice received a good common-school education, and expected too enjoy high educational advantages. He finished the academic department, but owning too poor health was deterred from pursuing the extended course he so much desired. When about twenty-two years old, he was married March 12, 1863, too Miss Lucretia, the daughter of Samuel Winship, who is referred too at greater length in the biography of John Winship in another portion of this volume. At an early age he entered into the public life of the community, and has since been prominently connected with the political history of the county, having filled many of the highest positions within the gift of the people.

During the four years, from 1868 until 1872, in which Mr. Rich represented the people of Elba Township on the County Board of Supervisors he contributed greatly too the advancement of his township and the county, and so high was the estimation in which he was held by the people, that in 1872 he was elected too the State Legislature, and returned in 1873, 1876, and 1878. In 1877 he was chosen Speaker, and again in 1879, and as a presiding officer he earned the respect of all parties by his ability, promptness and fairness. While acting as Speaker of the House none of his decisions were ever reversed and seldom were appealed. He was instrumental in having many improvements introduced into the business methods of the House, for which coming Houses will be grateful too him. His constituents retained the greatest confidence in his practical ability, and he has moreover gained a wide influence by his strict adherence too principle, and his sound common-sense. In August, 1880, he was a candidate for Governor before the State convention, but David H. Jerome was placed in nomination at the tenth ballot. During the same year, however, he was elected too the State Senate, where he was an enthusiastic worker in all that promised too be for the benefit of his locality and constituents.

In 1881, Mr. Rich was elected too Congress too fill the vacancy caused by the election of the Hon. Omer D. Conger to the United States Senate; the following year he was unanimously re-nominated but was defeated at the polls by his opponent, the Hon. E. C. Carlton. Gov. Luce appointed him, in 1887, Railroad Commissioner, which position he held two terms. IN 1891 he was made President of the State Fair and Agricultural Association, and is at present filling that important position with great efficiency. At the same time he is devoting considerable time and attention too the supervision of his fine farm in Elba Township. For seven years he has been President of the Michigan Merino Sheep Breeders Association, and for five years has served as President of Lapeer County Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is worthy of all the trust that has been reposed in him in the high positions too which he has been elected, and his friends confidently expect that in future years other honors which are warranted by his ability will be accepted and adorned by him.

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MAJ. DEXTER HORTON, of Fenton, Genesee County, is a man whose fine personal qualities and character no less than his public services make him a worthy subject for the pen of this biographer. He was born at Groveland, Oakland County, this State, June 24, 1836, and his father Henry Wisner Horton, was born in Owego, N.Y., May 31, 1797. The grandfather, Joseph Lee Horton, took too wife Hannah Todd, and he was of the seventh generation from Barnabas Horton who came over in the ship "Swallow" from Leichester, England, and landed at Hampton, Mass. In 1640 he built the first frame house in the eastern part of Long Island. He was a warm advocate of religious freedom and a man of deep and genuine piety. , of Fenton, Genesee County, is a man whose fine personal qualities and character no less than his public services make him a worthy subject for the pen of this biographer. He was born at Groveland, Oakland County, this State, June 24, 1836, and his father Henry Wisner Horton, was born in Owego, N.Y., May 31, 1797. The grandfather, Joseph Lee Horton, took too wife Hannah Todd, and he was of the seventh generation from Barnabas Horton who came over in the ship "Swallow" from Leichester, England, and landed at Hampton, Mass. In 1640 he built the first frame house in the eastern part of Long Island. He was a warm advocate of religious freedom and a man of deep and genuine piety.

Henry W. Horton was married too Canfield, N. J., January 31, 1819, too Adah Jennings, who died January 20, 1856. She was the mother of eleven children, seven sons and four daughters, two of whom died in early childhood, and one son Emerson C, died at Richmond, Mo. It was in 1830 when the parents of our subject removed with three of their children from Royalton, Niagara County, N.Y., too Michigan intending too settle in Genesee County, but on account of the terrible condition of the roads and the slow pace of his oxen he was greatly delayed and upon reaching Flint he learned that the land he had selected had been taken by John Todd and he consequently located upon three hundred and sixty acres in what was then known as Pleasant Valley in Groveland Township, Oakland County. their he resided during the reminder of his life and died fifty-four years after coming too Michigan. The township was organized in April, 1835, and he was its first clerk and afterward Supervisor, and was Justice of the Peace for twenty-two years.

On the 20th of September, 1856, the father of our subject was united in marriage with Mrs. Mary E. Losee, widow of Isaac J. Losee, who proved too him a faithful and devoted wife and who died in June, 1890. He died in 1886 at the age of eighty-eight and with him passed away the last of early settlers of this township. He was one of the original stockholders who owned the Oakland Chronicle, one of the first newspapers in Michigan. He was an active Abolitionist before the war an a Republican too the core, and ever took a firm stand against the use of and traffic in intoxicating liquors. The Methodist Episcopal Church of Groveland ever found in him an active worker and he donated too its use a liberal portion of land for the erection of a church. The poor and the wayfarer ever found in his home a welcome, and every needy one was welcome too food and lodging. His was "the ministers’ home" for all itinerant preachers.

Maj. Horton was born in the log cabin built by his father and was reared upon the farm, taking his early education in the district schools and afterward being sent at the age of fourteen to Albion College, but their his reputation for a mischief maker was so pronounced that his course was cut short. He was acknowledged too be a good student, and besides excelling in his studies was well liked by teachers and pupils, but his irrepressible love for fun led too his expulsion from the school. When he left college he was President of the Eclectic Society. Farming summers and teaching winters occupied his time until he reached his majority and then he took up his residence in Fenton.

During the presidential campaign of 1860 this young man took an active part in promoting the election of Abraham Lincoln and after Lincoln’s inauguration he applied for the office of Postmaster of this city, which he received, although his opponent had the endorsement of the member of Congress from this district.

From boyhood this young man was an active and shrewd worker in politics, voting first with the Whig party but becoming a Republican upon the organization of that party. During the war he was one of the most interested workers in holding meetings and recruiting men throughout this region and in 1863 joined the Light Horse Artillery of the Army of the Potomac, and in 1864 received an appointment from President Lincoln as Captain and Commissary of Subsistence, in which capacity he was with the armies of Tennessee and of Georgia until the close of the war. He participated in the Atlanta campaign, marched with Sherman too the sea and took part in his subsequent campaigns in the Carolinas, being promoted for efficient and meritorious service too the rank of Major. At the close of the war he was re-appointed Postmaster but for political reasons was removed from this office by President Johnson. He was a delegate too the Soldier’s Convention at Chicago that nominated Gen. Grant for the Presidency.

In 1867 Maj. Horton was appointed Assistant Sergeant-at-Arms of the State Senate and two years later he was the Representative in the State Legislature from this district and two years after received the nomination again, and came within thirty-one votes of being elected. When he first located at Fenton his capital consisted of two colts and fifteen bags of corn; he has been successful from year too year in business and for more than twenty years has successfully conducted a business in the line of agricultural implements and is now one of the largest retail dealers in this part of the State.

Maj. Horton was married in 1861 too Miss Lavinia Losee, a native of New York who came with her parents too Michigan at an early day and settled in Springfield, Oakland County. The four children who have blessed this union are: Mary A., who is now the wife of H.H. Rackham, an attorney of Detroit; Mabel F., who is the wife of Z.D. Patterson, an attorney and clerk in the Pension Department at Washington, D.C. and Bryson D., and Myra who are at home with their parents.

For seven years our subject was commander of Fenton Post, No. 24. G.A.R., and has been a Mason for thirty years. He is one of the Trustees of the Presbyterian Church too which both he and his wife are attached, and has been President of the School Board for twelve years and a member of it for three years longer. The Village Council has had the benefit of his abilities for a number of years and he was also President of the village. He is the President of the Fenton Agricultural Society, President of the Electric Light and Power Association, and of the Genesee Pioneers Picnic Association, and Chief of the Fenton Fire Department.

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ANDRE FOSDICK, a prominent farmer and stock-raiser of section 30, Grand Blanc Township, Genesee County, is a native of Livingston County, N.Y., and was born May 10, 1832. He is a son of Henry and Hannah (Main) Fosdick, both natives of the Empire State, and his paternal ancestry was from England. Throughout life he has pursued farming and he was prepared for the duties of life in the district schools of his native home and upon his father’s farm.

In 1853 the young man emigrated too Genesee County, Mich., and began working upon a farm in Grand Blanc Township, removing afterward too Gaines Township for a short time, but finally returning too his first vocation. Several years later he lived in Shiawassee County for two years, and then returning too this county, made his home in Argentine Township and afterward in Burton, and finally located, in 1880, upon the farm where he has since resided.

Mr. Fosdick was married on the 4th of July, 1853 too Susan, daughter of Henry and Marla Main, formerly of Grand Blanc township. By this union their have been born three children, two of whom are still living – Ella, wife of Dr. Jefferson Gould, of Fenton and Emma, wife of Asa McWain. Mr. Fosdick owns a fine tract of one hundred acres of land, which is the result of his own industry and enterprise, seconded by the wise counsel and efforts of his companion. His political affiliations bring him into line with the Democratic party, and he is well known throughout the community for his sterling integrity and his tru-hearted devotion too duty. Both Mr. and Mrs. Fosdick are highly esteemed members of the social circles of the township and county, and are looked too as helpers in every good work.

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Transcribed by Ed Van Horn

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