Village of Mayville

Taken from, "The History of Tuscola County," H. R. Page Co., Chicago, 1883. Transcribed by Bonnie Petee.

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Village of Mayville

January 15, 1865, the first bill of goods ever sold in Mayville was sold by H. K. Crittenden to a lady, now Mrs. George Crampton. His place of business was east of the village proper and a few rods east of the house of William Hamilton, and the building now stands a living landmark of the first commercial mart. At that time Mayville wasn’t thought of, the idea of its birth had not begun to grow. There was no Romulus to plow a furrow and say, "Here shall be builded a city." The winds sighed through the towering trees and the

sun looked down on an unbroken forest. Here the pioneer merchant opened his door and exposed to view his wares. He had only just returned from the war, and was doing a small business in groceries and general backwoods stock. He kept the store there until the following September when he built the long, low building, so well remembered, a part of which now forms the rear of D’Arcy’s drug store.

The first building of any kind in the village was the one referred to, and was built and owned by H. K. Crittenden. During the winter of 1865-66 he lived alone in the place; not a sound of habitation was heard or a sight of civilization seen. He was in the center of a howling wilderness as deep and dense and dark as can be woven in the warp and woof of fiction. This was a store in the wilderness, an oasis in the desert. Civilization sprung up around him, the trees were felled, and the glorious sunshine soon made the clearing smile. Mr. C. thinks the first child born in the village was a daughter of E. A. Shepard, born in the building where Mr. Crittenden first opened his store, but he cannot enumerate those that have followed.

In the spring of 1866 Walter Tubbs built the hotel and Curtis Coffeen built a store, which was destroyed by fire in 1867 and soon afterward rebuilt.

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July 1998

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