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to procure means to enter college. His educational and professional schemes were sadly interfered with when the Confederate cannon were discharged at the Nation's banner on Ft. Sumter, and on the 4th of June, 1861, not then twenty-one years of age, under the first call for three-years troops, he marched into Camp Chase, Ohio, to offer his services to defend his country's honor, and it was not until after the 18th of June, 1866, that he was mustered out, making a continuous service of five years and fourteen days. During those trying days his valor, patriotism, fortitude and ability were proved in many a hard-fought battle, and he has a distinguished military record as a soldier, and later as an officer, receiving promotion not through the influence of others, but purely on account of his competence. He was a member of the 25th Ohio Infantry, and belonged to Company A until May, 1865, when he received a commission as Lieutenant and was assigned to Company E. During his long term of service he was always in good health, always with his regiment to the front, thus giving him all opportunity to participate in a score of hotly consisted engagements, in which he was often slightly wounded but never wholly disabled. The 25th Ohio was ordered to West Virginia and endured much loss through exposure in many campaigns in that rough, mountainous country, taking an active part in the battles of Cheat Mountain, Greenbriar, Allegheny Summit, Monterey, Huntersville, McDowell and Cross Keys. It was then transferred to Pope's army and sustained a heavy loss in the unequal and disastrous battle of the second Bull Run. There our subject was made a prisoner, taken to Richmond, passed but one night in Libby Prison and but a few days on Belle Isle, was soon paroled, sooner exchanged, and ordered to his regiment, which he joined in the morning at Centreville, Va., where it had been encamped since the battle of Bull Run. Early the next morning Mr. Iden and his fellow-soldiers started on another expedition, and having been assigned to the Potomac Army, his regiment joined it at Fredericksburg one day after the defeat of Burnside in December, 1862. Our subject took part in the campaign and battle of Chancellorsville, under Gen. Howard, whose corps, the 11th, sustained the shock of the grand flank movement of the Confederate chieftain, Gen. Jackson. The historical campaign and battle of Gettysburg soon followed, during the first day of which the division in which our subject marched, Gen. Barlow's, was almost destroyed, the colors of the 25th Ohio changing hands seven times. On the 5th of July, when his regiment was formed to go in pursuit of Gen. Lee, but sixty-eight were in the ranks, commanded by a Second Lieutenant. Mr. Iden was Orderly Sergeant of the regiment, an unusual position in military organizations. The next move and last transfer of our subject's company was to the department of South Carolina, where he took part in the seige (sic) of Ft. Wagner and all the operations in front or Charleston. Mr. Idea veteranized Jan. 1, 1864, and remained in the department just referred to until the close of the war, engaging in many raids and severe encounters with the enemy. He carried a rifle to the end of the struggle, and in May, 1865, was made a Lieutenant, and was soon assigned to duty in Columbia, S. C., by order of Gen. Sickles, as Provost Judge of what was called a "Superior Provost Court." This court was established for the settlement of many cases that needed early attention after the collapse of Confederate law and authority. Our subject was also for a short time ordnance officer on the staff of Gen. Ames, who afterward achieved notoriety as Governor of Mississippi during reconstruction days. The last duty to which Mr. Idea was assigned previous to being mustered out was that of Acting Assistant Adjutant General, under Brevet Brigadier General N. Haughton, who was in command of a district, with headquarters at Columbia, S. C. It is needless to say that in these various responsible and onerous offices our subject acquitted himself with honor and proved to be an invaluable officer, whose services were highly appreciated by his superiors in command.
   After leaving the army in 1866 Mr. Iden passed three years in Indiana quietly engaged in teaching and farm labor. On the 11th of November 1869, he was united in marriage to Miss Alice Disher, and they moved at once to their present farm in Nebraska, where they have ever since lived. Mr. Idea has been very successfully engaged in agriculture, and has his farm, whose soil is rich and

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productive, under good improvement, well supplied with neat and tasty buildings and all the conveniences for carrying on farming to a good advantage. The married life of our subject and his wife has been exceedingly pleasant, and to them have been born two children, one of whom died in infancy. Their daughter Zella is in her fifteenth year. Mrs. Iden's parents and grandparents were natives of Kentucky, but she was born in Whitewater, Ind. Her parents and brothers are now living near Bourbon, Marshall Co., Ind.
   Mr. Iden is endowed with a vigorous, well-cultivated intellect, and a deep tender nature, and he holds strong and sensible convictions on all subjects of general interest. He is a quiet, unassuming man, careful and considerate in his dealings with others, and none know him but to respect and esteem him. We learn from his fellow-citizens fit this county that he has frequently been urged to accept legislative honors and other positions of trust and responsibility, but that he has positively declined office, preferring the quiet home life of the farm to the turmoils and attendant discords of the political arena.
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Letter/label or doodleILAS L. BROWN, one of the representative citizens of Tecumseh, and resident on Webster and Tenth streets, is the son of Horace Brown, a native of the Keystone State, where he was born in the year 1820, and continued to make his home for about thirty years. In 1850 he went West to Illinois, settling near Decatur, where he followed his trade, which was that of a shoemaker. He received the hand of Mary A. Bradley, of Warren County, Ohio, in marriage, in the year 1846. Their union was consummated by the birth of six children, of whom three survived to mature years.
   Horace Brown enlisted in Company F, 14th Illinois Infantry, and was in the Army of the Potomac. He was taken prisoner at Atlanta while on the historic march to the sea. He was thrown into Andersonville Prison, and succumbed to the horrors of that place. Captured in the month of October, he had passed beyond the reach of the hatred and cruelty of man, and was at rest before the spring again exerted its power on the earth. The family could only get the number of the grave where he was laid. His wife had died in the spring of 1861, when only thirty-two years of age, when the husband and father with four children were living our subject being the second child.
   Silas L. Brown, our subject, was born in Mercer County, Pa., on the 3d of October, 1848. For two years after this event the family continued to reside there, but at the end of that period migrated to Illinois. He remained at home until 1861, in which year the mother was removed by death, and shortly after he started and began life for himself. He found employment upon a farm, and continued thereon until 1879, when he sold out and came to this State. Here he for the greater part of the time worked as a carpenter. For five years he has had complete charge of the main and High School buildings, at the same time working at his trade. For two years he filled the office of Street Commissioner, and was very diligent and thorough in the execution of his duty.
   The marriage of our subject with Miss Sarah C. Watts, of Lovington, Ill., was celebrated on the 29th of December, 1872. They have become the parents of six children, who are all living; their names are recorded as follows: John H., Walter L., Lily F., Joe D., Ida May and Elmer E. They are all receiving the best educational advantages to be obtained in the city, and manifest a disposition and aptitude that are most promising. Mrs. Brown was born on the 15th of September, 1850, at Salina, Lancaster Co., Pa., and is a daughter of John and Sarah (Stackhouse) Watts. She went with her parents to Illinois in 1870, and continued to make her home with them until her marriage. Mr. John Watts, father-in-law of our subject, is a native of Pennsylvania, and continued to reside in his native county until going to the State of Illinois, where he still resides. By trade he is a cooper, and followed the same while a resident in the East, but in Illinois he has followed agricultural pursuits. His wife died in March, 1884, aged fifty-four years.
   The grandfather of our subject, Silas Brown, was born in Mercer County, Pa., about 1785. He made his home there for the greater part of his life, fol-

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lowing agricultural pursuits. and holding a very high place in the esteem of the community at large. In the subject of this sketch there are reproduced many of the virtues and family characteristics of this worthy citizen, and like him also, he is by them so commended to the community as to enjoy its unqualified esteem.

[The BROWN article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Carole Williams <williams@sunet.net>.
Thank you, Carole.]

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Letter/label or doodleRS. DESIRE J. KING, widow of the late Horace King, properly speaking holds a place in the community as a farmer, being the owner and director of an exceedingly fine farm of 127 acres on section 6 of Todd Creek Precinct. Her first introduction to the State was in January, 1881, when, with her husband, she left Illinois, and coming by way of Lincoln settled upon the place she still occupies, their son William L. (see sketch) having previously purchased it for them. It was at the time partly improved, but had to be supplied with a house before it could be settled upon.
   On the 16th of September, 1885, Mrs. King's husband died, and although until then unused to the management of such affairs, she bravely took hold of the farm and continued as her husband had begun. She chiefly runs a stock farm, never feeding less than ten to twelve head of cattle and twenty-five to thirty of hogs per year.
   The subject of our sketch was for many years a member of the Free Methodist Church while living in the East, but since being here, there being no organization of that body she has become attached to the Free-Will Baptists, and attends the church near her residence, in which she is highly regarded as one of the generous supporters and consistent members.
   Mrs. King was born in Columbia County, N. Y., on the 16th of February, 1818, and there lived until after her marriage. She is the daughter of Asa Burton, of Columbia County, N. Y. She received the best education within the power of her parents to provide, and was very carefully trained by her parents in the home. Her father was born in the county and always lived there. The maiden name of his wife, the mother of our subject, was Abigail Wright. They were the parents of four children, all of whom attained to mature years, their daughter Desire being the youngest. Her father died when she was about two years of age; her mother continued to live at the old home until after the marriage of our subject; she then made her home with her daughter until her death, which occurred in Niagara, N. Y., on the 16th of January, 1855, when she was sixty-three years of age.
   Columbia County, N. Y., was also the native county of Mr. Horace King. He was born on the 24th of April, 1811, and continued to make his home there until after his marriage, when he moved to Niagara County and followed agricultural pursuits until March, 1868, then, with his family of three children, removed to Henry County, Ill., and there was extensively engaged as a farmer. He was a man fond of his home, of his business and his family, but did not take a leading part in political affairs, although always ready and anxious to do his duty as a citizen, usually voting with the Republican party. He was a man of fine character, ability and enterprise, successful as a farmer and much esteemed by all who knew him. He was a devout member of the Free Methodist Church, connected therewith for many years. He had the reputation of being firm, thoroughly honest in every business transaction, and most reliably a man of his word.
   Mr. and Mrs. King were the parents of five children, three of whom are still living, viz: William L., Charles L. and Edward H. (sketches of the two latter are presented elsewhere in this volume). Edward E. was united in marriage with Miss Mary Whilholland, of Illinois, in June, 1867; they became the parents of three children, all of whom are living and whose names are as follows: Willis, A., Sarah Anna and Mary Jane, the eldest and youngest with our subject. His wife dying in 1874, he subsequently became the husband of Miss Anna Osmond, of Galva, Ill., who has presented him with four children, who bear the following names: Alice E., Mabel G., George M. and Emma. He is interested in land in Colorado and has been in that State about eighteen months. He also owns a good farm in Todd Creek Precinct, and is shortly expected to return to it.
   Amos King, the fattier of Horace, was a native

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of Massachusetts, and was born in the year 1756. He settled in Columbia County, N. Y., shortly after the close of the Revolutionary War, through which struggle he had passed, bearing arms in defense of his country, entering the ranks when about sixteen years old. His first wife died after a very brief married life, and he was subsequently married to a Miss Bassett, of New York, who presented him with nine children. Horace King was the youngest of the nine children, seven of whom came to years of maturity. By his first marriage there had been six children born.
   The father of our subject, Isaac Burton, was born in Massachusetts and there lived until he attained to years of manhood. When a young man he settled in Columbia County, N. Y., and cleared for himself a farm in the vicinity of the King homestead. This of course happened at a time when the Far West was an unknown district, and when the frontier was not far removed from the Atlantic. He was married and continued to live in the county and became the head of a considerable family. His first wife dying, he was married a second time, and two other children were added to the home circle. Religiously, he was a member of the Presbyterian Church, and filled the office of Deacon for Many years.
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Letter/label or doodleSRAEL CARMAN, a well-known resident of Spring Creek Precinct, and numbered among its representative farmers and stock-raisers, a gentleman in the prime of life, and the midst of his usefulness, operates a good farm on section 30, to which he came in February, 1866, and which embraces 350 acres of well-improved land. He has a substantial dwelling, with suitable barns and outhouses, and his homestead presents a peaceful picture of quiet country life, which is very pleasant to contemplate.
   Our subject was born in Mason County, Ill., June 22, 1844, and is the son of Hon. Alfred A. and Elizabeth (Wheelock) Carman, a sketch of whom appears elsewhere in this volume. He was reared in his native county, and received his education in its common schools, which at that day afforded a wide contrast to the educational system of the present day. Upon the outbreak of the Civil War young Carman, then a little over seventeen years of age, enlisted, in December, 1861, in Company K, 33d Illinois Infantry, being assigned with his regiment to the Army of Missouri, and operating mostly in the Southwest and the State of Missouri until the spring of 1863, when they were transferred to the Department of the Mississippi. In the fall of that year they were transferred to the Department of the Gulf, with which division of the army they remained until the spring of 1865, then returned to the Department of the Mississippi. Young Carman fought with his comrades at the battles of Port Gibson and Jackson, Miss., Champion Hills, the siege of Vicksburg, Black River Bridge, Ft. Esperanza, the siege of Mobile, and in numerous other minor engagements and skirmishes, until the close of the war. Some months after the surrender of Gen. Lee he was mustered out, Nov. 24, 1865, and received his honorable discharge.
   In the meantime the parents of our subject had moved to Nebraska, and taking in his old home on the way thither Israel soon joined them, being accompanied from Mason County by his father. The latter, in January, 1866, had returned to Illinois to take care of a crop of corn, and the father and son made the journey to Nebraska in a wagon, arriving in this county the latter part of the month.
   The marriage of Israel Carman and Miss Mary Allen was celebrated at the home of the bride in Spring Creek, Dec. 17, 1868. Mrs. Carman was born in Columbia County, Wis., March 31, 1848, and is the daughter of Alson and Catherine (Dolan) Allen, who were natives of Vermont and England respectively, and are now residents of Tecumseh, this State. They came to this county in June, 1867, and were among its earliest settlers, locating in Lincoln Precinct, the father being now seventy years of age, and the mother sixty-six. Mr. Allen has been a farmer all his life, but the parents are now retired from active labor, and surrounded by life's comforts are enjoying in their declining years the fruits of their early toil and sacrifice.
   To Mr. and Mrs. Carman there was born one

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child only, a son, Orvil, Sept. 13, 1869. They have labored hand in hand in the building up of their homestead, our subject admitting that his estimable wife has been a most efficient assistant and helpmate in his struggles for not only a livelihood, but a competence. They have gathered around them many friends during their long sojourn in Nebraska, and their roof has been a hospitable shelter from whom none are ever turned empty away. Mr. Carman, politically, is a stanch Republican. He has served as School Director in his district a number of years, and socially, belongs to the G. A. R., Roberts Post No. 104, at Talmage. Mrs. Carman is a member of the Baptist Church.
   The mother of Mrs. Carman came to America with her mother and stepfather when eleven years old, and lived with them in Canada until a maiden of sixteen. They then came to the States, and settled first in Ohio, removing later to Adams County, Ill. Mrs. Allen is also a member of the Baptist Church, and politically, Mr. Allen is a Democrat.

[The CARMAN article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Ray W. Justus <rwjustus@cox.net>, 1331 West Folley Street, Chandler, AZ 85224-7511. Thank you, Ray.]

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Letter/label or doodleDWARD COOK, of Spring Creek Precinct, is a gentleman held in due respect by the people of his community, and is pursuing the even tenor of his way at a pleasant homestead on section 14. He was born in Racine County, Wis., Oct. 5, 1848, and is the son of Andrew and Hannah (Clulow) Cook, the former of whom died at her home in Tecumseh, in July, 1878. Further particulars of the family history are given under the name of our subject's father, Andrew Cook, on another page in this volume. Andrew Cook spent his boyhood and youth in England. After his first marriage he came to America, and coming directly West settled in Racine County, Wis., where he lived until 1858, and then with his family came to Nebraska. He settled first in Otoe County, but several years later came to Helena Precinct, this county, securing a tract of land on section 10. The family resided in that locality several years, and about 1872 the father took up his abode with his wife in Tecumseh, where he is still living, and where, until the spring of 1886, he was engaged in business. He has been married three times. Of his first union, with Miss Clulow, there were born seven children, namely: John W., Charles C., Edward, Andrew, James W.; Elizabeth, the wife of Donald McCuaig, of Nebraska City, and Lucy J., Mrs. Samuel H. Fullerton, of Atchison, Kan. Mr. Cook, during the more active years of his life, was a man prominent in local affairs, and among other offices of trust he was a Commissioner of Johnson County, and Justice of the Peace. He is widely and favorably known throughout Tecumseh and vicinity, and ranks among the honored pioneers of this county, who have borne no unimportant part in its growth and development. He has been a member in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church for forty years.
   Edward Cook, our subject, has been familiar with farming pursuits since his boyhood, and most of the time has been a resident of this county. His school advantages were limited, the educational system of Johnson County having not yet developed to its present condition. He has, however, kept his eyes open to what was going on around him, and is a man generally well informed, both in regard to business matters and current events.
   Our subject has been three times married, first in Nemaha Precinct, to Miss Mary Brooks, who became the mother of one child, a daughter, Minnie A., who was born Sept. 23, 1872, and is now with her father. His second wife was Miss Mattie R. Brooks, an aunt of the first, who also became the mother of one child, the latter of whom died in infancy. Mrs. Mattie R. Cook died in 1875.
   To the present wife of our subject, who in her girlhood was Miss Susie B. Durham, our subject was married in California, July 10, 1878. This lady was born May 15, 1855, and is the daughter of J. H. and Burnetta C. Durham, who were natives of Kentucky, and are now residents of Colusa County, Cal. Of this marriage there are four children, namely: Hannah N., born Aug. 2, 1879; Jessie, Sept. 7, 1881; Ethel M., Nov. 3, 1884; and Georgie L., Jan. 29, 1886.
   The homestead proper comprises 110 acres of land, but aside from this Mr. Cook owns land to the amount of 240 acres elsewhere. He has good improvements on his farm, the fences and buildings being creditable alike to his industry and good

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taste. The live stock and farm machinery are of first-class description, and the whole comprises one of the most valuable estates in the county. Mr. and Mrs. Cook are prominent and popular in the social circles of their community, and the latter is a member in good standing of the Baptist Church. In his stock-raising, Mr. Cook makes a specialty of Hambletonian and draft horses, exhibiting some of the finest specimens of the equine race to be found in this section.
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Letter/label or doodleUGH L. COOPER, of the firm of Pool & Cooper, publishers and proprietors of the Johnson County Journal at Tecumseh, was born in Lewistown, Ill., on the 10th of November, 1850, and lived there with his parents until a lad of seven years. Thence they removed to Page County, Iowa, where Hugh L. completed his education and began his business career as a printer boy in the office of the Page County Herald at Clarinda. There he remained until 1868, and was afterward variously employed as a journeyman until the year 1885. He then purchased the Page County Democrat, which he conducted until November, 1886, then sold to secure an interest in the Johnson County Journal, with which he became connected in March, 1887.
   Mr. Cooper was married, July 11, 1876, to Miss Mabel Lavaux, of Atchison, Kan. To Mr. and Mrs. C. there have been born two bright little girls, Eva L. and Wilma E.

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Letter/label or doodleACOB FINZER is one of the practical, progressive and successful farmers of Helena Precinct, and is the owner of a valuable property of 322 acres, situated on sections 29 and 32, township 6 north, range 11 east. He was born at Capalon, Switzerland, on the 21st of March, 1847. He was the seventh child of eleven born to his parents, Benedict and Anna Finzer, who were natives of the same country. The ten named are; Benjamin, now in Tuscarawas County, Ohio; Nicholas, in Defiance County, that State; David, in Tuscarawas County; John, who fell while in the service of the Union in the late war; Frederick, deceased; Jacob, our subject; Mary, now the wife of John Urer, of Tuscarawas County; Elizabeth, Mrs. W. E. Brown, of Clay County, Ind.; Rosa, who is married to C. Winger, also of Tuscarawas County; and Margaret, who is deceased.
   In 1853 the father of our subject, with his family came to America by way of Antwerp, where they took passage on a sailing-vessel, and after about forty days landed in the city of New York, settling, as has already been surmised, in Tuscarawas County, Ohio. The county was at that time very sparsely settled, and almost entirely undeveloped. He is now about eighty years of age, and is enjoying the result of former years of labor in the comparative quiet of a retired life. His wife, the mother of our subject, died in the year 1872, being then sixty-three years of age.
   Our subject was educated and brought up in Ohio, living at home until he attained his majority. He learned the trade of stonemason, and continued to follow the same for some nine years. About the year 1877 he went to Defiance County, Ohio, continuing to follow his trade, and also engaging in agricultural pursuits until 1881. It was then he decided to turn his face westward, and accordingly made his way to this State, and settled upon the farm he still owns and occupies.
   Mr. Finzer turned his back upon single life in 1878, celebrating his marriage with Elizabeth Cutavern, on the 15th of March of that year. There have come to them four children, whose names are mentioned as follows: Veva A., Della E., Manford C. and Venus. The first mentioned, however, is the only surviving child. Mrs. Finzer is the daughter of John C. and Anna Cutavern, and was born in Ohio, Nov. 19, 1843.
   Whatever prosperity and financial success have come to our subject, it is but the harvest reaped as the result of industry, intelligence and thrift. He has 322 acres of land, well improved, highly cultivated and most satisfactorily productive. He owns a good set of farm buildings, and has his farm supplied with the needed implements, etc.
   In all questions regarding Government and po-

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