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of the enterprising and intelligent people about him, he feels amply repaid for his toil and sacrifice
   For the last eighteen years there has presided over the household of our subject a lady who in her girlhood was Miss Frances Emery, and to whom he was married in Todd Creek Precinct, this county, April 23, 1871. This union resulted in the birth of three children, two only of whom are living: Hattie E. and Carlton C. They are giving them a good education, and they still remain under the parental roof.
   Mrs. Frances (Emery) Fuller was born in the Province of Upper Canada, March 26, 1850, and is the daughter of George and Sarah (Robbins) Emery. The father was born in Canada, April 14, 1819, where he was reared and married, and where he lived until the fall of 1866. He then came to Nebraska with his family, living the first year in Nemaha County, and then moved to Lincoln Precinct, in this county, where he homesteaded a good farm of sixty acres, and occupied it until 1884. He then retired from active labor and took up his residence in Crab Orchard, where he is still living, and is now quite well advanced in years. The mother is living with her husband at Crab Orchard. The parental household included six children, all of whom are living, and are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church. Mr. Emery was a prominent man during the earlier years of his life, and especially active in church work, officiating as Steward, Class-Leader and Trustee in the Methodist Episcopal Church since a young man twenty-one years of age.
   Alexander Fuller, the father of our subject, was born in Coshocton County, Ohio, Sept. 13, 1817. He left the Buckeye State about the time of reaching his majority, and located among the pioneers of Peoria County, Ill. There he secured a tract of land from which he eliminated a good farm, where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away in January, 1886. There also the children were reared, receiving careful parental training, and always considered their childhood home as the dearest spot on earth. Alexander Fuller was married to Miss Hannah Corvgill, in his native State, and they took their bridal tour to Illinois, overland with a team, and spent their honeymoon in a humble dwelling in the timber, where they lived happily until moving into a more pretentious residence. The household circle was completed by the birth of eight children, six of whom lived to mature years. They are now living, and are mostly residents of Illinois.
   The mother of our subject was born in 1819, and departed this life at the old homestead in Peoria County, Ill., in the fall of 1856. The father was subsequently married, and of his second union there were born other children. James Fuller, the paternal grandfather, was a farmer by occupation, and also emigrated from Ohio to Illinois, spending his last days in Peoria County.
   Our subject and his estimable wife have labored hand in hand in the building up of their homestead, the education of their children, and in the effort to benefit these around them as opportunity afforded. Their hospitable roof is the resort of hosts of friends, to whom they extend those courtesies which will long be remembered after they have departed hence. In the growth and development of Johnson County Mr. Fuller has been no unimportant factor, and he has by an honorable career built up a monument for himself upon which his descendants will look with pride in later years.
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Letter/label or doodleLONZO B. NOBLE is prosperously engaged in the livery business in Sterling. He is well known as an early pioneer of Johnson County, has been identified both with its agricultural and mercantile interests, and is now numbered among its solid and well-to-do citizens. Much of the growth of the county has taken place under his eye since he became a resident of Nebraska, and he may well be proud that he has had a hand in the development of such a prosperous and wealthy region.
   Mr. Noble was born in Wayne County, N. Y., April 15, 1841, and when he was eleven years old his parents, Ozem and Ophelia (Birdsey) Noble, moved with their family to Whiteside County, Ill., There the remaining years of his boyhood and youth were passed, and there the breaking out of the war found him just twenty years of age, ready

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and willing to assist his companions in the defense of the institutions of our country that were so seriously menaced by the Rebellion, and Nov. 2, 1861, he enlisted in Company E, 46th Illinois Infantry, as a private. For two years and ten months he took part in many hardly contested battles, and was present at Shiloh on the 6th and 7th of April, 1862; he was at the siege of Vicksburg that lasted about forty days, and in action in various other important engagements. He was finally sent home on sick leave, reported at Chicago, was sent to the city hospital, where he was discharged, and returned to his friends sound, excepting the results of sickness and exposure, and the measles, from which he hall suffered while in the army, had somewhat impaired his health.
   The next decisive step in the life of our subject, and one that had an important bearing on the establishment of a home, was his marriage to Miss Bellmina Kline, daughter of Jacob and Margaret Kline, which took place in Whiteside County, Ill., June 24, 1865. After the birth of two children, Iola B. and Victor A., both of whom are living, Mrs. Noble's pleasant wedded life was brought to a close by her death in February, 1873. She was a lady whose many kindly traits of character endeared her to all who came under her influence. Mr. Noble was married to his present wife, Margaret Kline, a sister of his first wife, in February, 1874. She is a kind and devoted wife and mother, caring tenderly for her sister's children and for those born to her and her husband, of whom the following is recorded: Florence died at the age of eight months, and then came Flora V., Charles F., Cynthia C. and Horace C., the latter dying at the age of eight months.
   During the Christmas holidays of 1867, our subject left his old home in Illinois to seek a new one under the sunny Nebraska skies, bringing with him his family. Under the provision of the Homestead Act, he took up a 160-acre tract of land in what was then Sterling Precinct, but is now known as Vesta, on sections 14 and 15, township 5, range 10. He was actively engaged in its improvement until the fall of 1872, when he received the appointment of Postmaster at Vesta, and moved into the village, and during his stay there of ten years in that capacity, was also engaged in general merchandising, having a pioneer store of dry-goods, groceries, hardware and drugs. His store was then the only one between Tecumseh and Beatrice, except the one kept by J. M. Nelson, who closed out soon after our subject opened his, leaving his rival a clear field. In the fall of 1882 Mr. Noble came to Sterling, and was engaged in buying and selling grain for about four months. We then hear of him in Crab Orchard, where he built a stable and conducted a livery business for six months. At the expiration of that time he returned to Sterling, and established himself in the mercantile business, which he carried on for four years, and the last year and a half was also engaged in the livery business in connection with his store. He sold the latter Aug. 1, 1888, disposing of the stock and good-will but retaining his ownership of the building. He is now giving his exclusive attention to his livery business, which is quite extensive, he having a first-class establishment, with good horses and neat and comfortable vehicles.
   Mr. Noble is an active, wide-awake man, whose success in life is due to industrious habits and good business principles. He stands well in this community as a citizen, as a husband, father and neighbor, and is well liked by all who come in contact with him. Politically, he is a Republican, and socially, belongs to Sill Post No. 99, G. A. R., of Sterling.
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Letter/label or doodleILLIAM L. DUNLAP. In the present sketch it will be endeavored to present in compendious form the biography of the County Surveyor, who held that office from 1865 to 1875 continuously, and also from 1878 to 1883, returning to the office in 1885, and is still holding it. A record almost we believe unparalleled, and including a period of twenty-one years. In 1884-85 Mr. Dunlap was County Clerk. To this office he was elected on the Independent ticket, but in every other instance by the Republican party. The first map of the county was drawn by his hand, still he is perhaps one of the best known citizens and most popular men in the county.
   Mr. Dunlap was elected delegate to the Consti-

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tutional Convention at Lincoln, where the present State Constitution was drawn up. The county which he has surveyed so much is eighteen miles north and south, and twenty-one east and west. It was he who platted the village of Tecumseh in 1869, and also Sterling. Previous to drawing the map of the county he conducted a special survey of it in every part with that object in view.
   Our subject was born in Westmoreland County. Pa., on the 22d of April, 1824, where he lived until he reached his sixteenth birthday, when he moved to Butler County, in the same State. His education was received at the Butler Academy, which was situated at the county seat. His residence in Butler continued until 1845, when he migrated to Adams County, Ill, to teach school, which profession he followed for some time, after which he taught in Rock Island and in Bureau County. He was compelled, however, to make some change, as his health threatened to give way under the confinement and constant application necessary to the maintenance of the high grade of efficiency which he deemed essential to success. As a result he took up surveying, with which he had made some acquaintance in his youth, for a time linking with this work that of millwright and carpenter, which he prosecuted in Chicago until the fall of 1861.
   In September of that year Mr. Dunlap enlisted in the defense of the Union in Company I, 56th Illinois Infantry, and was appointed First Lieutenant. He served with that regiment until January, 1862, when he was mustered out, and again resumed working at his trade in Chicago until 1864. On the 22d of March in that year he went back to the army, and served as Quartermaster's clerk until March of the year following. Then he came direct through to Tecumseh, and was among the first to make farm improvements in the county. He also put up the first frame buildings and dwelling-house west of Yankee Creek. This property is still standing, although he has had hard work to save it from forest fire on many different occasions.
   After seven years of farming, interspersed with surveying, Mr. Dunlap was elected in 1865 County Surveyor, from which time, as above noted, he has continued to work in connection therewith. He removed to the city of Tecumseh in February, 1872, both on account of business, and in order to give his children the benefit of its schools. He was the contractor who erected the schools, both common and High, and also the jail. He built the fine residence owned by Mrs. Wright, the John Beattie building, and many other of the larger and better houses and business blocks. From the time of his removal to the city he has been a prominent resident, being thereby the better able to attend to his official duties, and finding it more convenient for headquarters.
   Mr. Dunlap is an energetic member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and holds the office of Trustee in the same. As a worker in the Sunday-school he has always been among those most deeply interested, taking great pleasure therein. In the Masonic fraternity he is always welcomed as a worthy and esteemed brother. He was united in marriage with Miss Martha Beattie, March 22, 1849, and there were born of the union two children, viz: Samuel W. and Alice, the latter being now deceased; the former is in Missouri. After the death of his first wife he became the husband of Miss Ellen J. Calvin, who bore him three children, all of whom are living, viz.: Luella, William A. and Emma J. The eldest child was united in marriage with J. W. Law, of Nonpareil, Box Butte Co., Neb.; they are the parents of two children. William A. also is married, and lives at Rushville, Neb. The younger daughter is now Mrs. Snyder, and also resides at Rushville. Mrs. Dunlap, after a short illness. died on the 8th of January, 1864.
   Our subject, subsequent to the above sad bereavement, married Miss Lucinda Storm, of Nemaha County. The event was celebrated on the 16th of November, 1865. Ten children were born to them, all of whom are living. Their names are recorded as follows: Anna B., Mary B., Melissa, Josephine, Clarence, Dora. Grace, Ruth. Roxie and Helen. These are all receiving a good education, and live at home with their parents.
   James Dunlap, the father of our subject, was born in 1793, in Westmoreland County, Pa., and there made his home until he was forty-six years of age, when he removed to Butler County, in the same State, continuing there until his death, in 1864. The life occupation of this gentleman was agricult-

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ture. His wife was Mary Van Dyke, of Pennsylvania. They were the parents of twelve children, all but one of whom came to mature years. His wife lived until 1879.
   William Dunlap, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of Ireland, and was born near the city of Londonderry in the year 1740, and came to this country in 1766, when he established the old Dunlap homestead in Pennsylvania. He was the father of nine children, most of whom settled in Pennsylvania, and are the progenitors of the Dunlap family in this country, members of which have migrated to almost every State in the Union.
   The subject of our sketch has built a fine residence in the city, on Twenty first and Garfield streets, and retains his farm in Nemaha County. He is undoubtedly a man of finely developed character, progressive, a lover of good morals, loyal and public spirited.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleOL. NICHOLAS F. HITCHCOCK. Prominent among the business men of Johnson County, who are sustaining and advancing its financial interests, is the gentleman who forms the subject of this biographical notice. He is one of the leading citizens of Sterling, and the proprietor of the Johnson County Bank of that place. He was born Dec. 29, 1832, in Perry County, Ohio, and is a son of John F. and Rosana (Kelly) Hitchcock, natives respectively of New York and Virginia. He is derived from a mingled Anglo-Celtic ancestry. His paternal grandfather, Isaac Hitchcock, came from England with two brothers about 110 years ago, and located in Maryland, one of his brothers settling in Alabama and the other in New York. Henry Kelly, the maternal grandfather of our subject, was a native of Ireland, who emigrated to this country and settled in Maryland, near Baltimore, and there the mother of our subject was born and reared, and there, also, his father was reared, but they moved to Ohio prior to their marriage, which occurred in 1828, in Perry County, Ohio. Of this union there were born eight children, four sons and four daughters, as follows: Elizabeth, Nicholas F., Henry K., Isah, Susannah, Salathiel A., Leah A. and Rebecca J. Elizabeth died at the age of ten years, and Isah in infancy.
   Our subject was reared in his native county, and was there united in marriage, March 6, 1854, to Miss Jemima Engle, a native of Ohio, and the daughter of Paul and Mary (Petty) Engle, who were of German descent, and went from New Jersey to Ohio, where they spent their last years. While yet a young man our subject began to take part in the public life of his native State, and also became prominently identified with its educational interests, he having received a liberal education, and when the war broke out he was engaged in the profession of teaching, and also held the office of Justice of the Police. But this quiet life was not destined to continue much longer, as his country had more important work for him to do, and in the stirring scenes of battle he was to win a military record of which his children and his children's children for many generations to come might well be proud. He soon began with all his energy and spirit, to organize a company, known as Company H, 90th Ohio Infantry, and through his influence it was equipped and ready for service in the spring of 1862, he receiving the commission of Captain. When he marched into camp on the 9th of July with his regiment he received deserved promotion to the office of Lieutenant-Colonel for gallantry and efficiency in the trying scenes of deadly conflict, when it required the utmost coolness and courage to face the foe. He took an active part in many of the most important engagements of the war. He was at Richmond, Ky., and at Louisville, that State, from whence he and his command, with other regiments, followed the rebel General, Bragg, to Perryville, and from there on his retreat to Stone River, where a heavy battle was fought. They still continued to pursue Bragg, and to watch and counteract his manoeuvres (sic) as far as Chattanooga. After that the Colonel's regiment was engaged in the Atlantic campaign until the fall of Atlanta, and then, while Sherman made his famous march to the sea, our subject and his men returned to Nashville, where they had the noted engagement with the confederate General, Hood, and captured several of his men, and then pursued him

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into Georgia, and there had several encounters with him. When the rebel General left for the Carolinas our subject gathered together the fragments of his regiment and marched to the French Broad, where he staid until after Lee's surrender to Grant, and then, with his regiment, retired to Camp Harter, near Nashville, where his active services ceased. He was subsequently mustered out at Camp Division, June 24, 1865, and returned home unscathed by a wound, although he had been in the heat of so many battles.
   After the war the Colonel returned to his old home in Perry County, Ohio, and for several years was prosperously engaged in the general merchandise, milling and tobacco business. But in 1880 he settled up his affairs in that State, and on the 29th of January, 1881, started with his family for Sterling, Neb., having resolved to make his home for the future in this genial, health-giving clime. He arrived here February 2, and soon established himself in his present business as a banker and real-estate dealer. Col. Hitchcock and his estimable wife have one of the most attractive homes in Sterling, and they and their family occupy the highest social position. Ten children have blessed their happy married life, of whom nine are living, as follows: John H. is still living in Stoutsville, Ohio, where he is successfully engaged in farming; J. Hall is one of the leading attorneys of Sterling; Salathiel C. has taken up land in Kansas, but is still an inmate of the parental home; Ellsworth R. is a teacher in the schools of Sterling; Harvey F. is with his father as cashier of the Johnson County Bank; Mary is now Mrs. Joseph Sain, of Harper, Kan.; Rosanna is Mrs. Lafayette Grimes, of this city; Alice and Ura, who are at home with their parents, are two bright young misses just budding into womanhood, and are the pride of the family and general favorites in the community. They are attending the graded school of the city preparatory to entering a higher school for the purpose of finishing their education, it being the high motive of the parents to give their children a finished education, and the young ladies give the family great encouragement in the progress in their studies, promising to become efficient in all the branches, and making themselves the equals of the elder members of the family in point of education. They are both accomplished young ladies, and give promise of casting sunshine into the lives of their parents in their declining years, and assuring them that their efforts have not been in vain.
   John H. Hitchcock was married, March 1, 1876, to Miss Mary A., daughter of Benjamin and Eliza Reed, Rev. L. W. Laukey, of Stoutsville, Ohio, officiating. This lady was born in Fairfield County, Ohio, April 19, 1857. Her father, a native of Pennsylvania, was born in Moonshine Township, Schuylkill County, where he lived until a youth of sixteen years, and was married to Miss Leah Klar, Feb. 8, 1844. Benjamin Reed departed this life Oct. 25, 1887, at Stoutsville, Ohio. The mother is now with her daughter in Stoutsville, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Reed were both members of the Evangelican Association, to which John H. Hitchcock and his wife also belong. This gentleman, politically is a Democrat "dyed in the wool." He is the father of one child, a daughter, Cecil R., who was born Jan. 10, 1880.
   Miss Mary H. Hitchcock was born March 28, 1855, and married at her father's residence in Perry County, Ohio, to Joseph W. Sain, May 27, 1877. Mr. Sain, a native of that county, was born Dec. 30, 1848, and began teaching when a youth of seventeen years, continuing until his marriage. The young people soon afterward took on their residence in Ringgold County, Iowa, where Mr. Sain improved a farm from a tract of wild prairie, and where they lived a period of seven years. They then changed their residence to Harper County, Kan., and later removed thence to Kiowa County, where Mr. Sain pre-empted 160 acres of land, and took up his residence in Harper City, where they now live in a very pleasant home. Mr. Sain is the son of Peter and Elizabeth (Wright) Sain, the former of whom was born April 8, 1822, and married Miss Elizabeth Wright, Dec. 14, 1847. He died at his home in Perry County, Ohio, Feb. 1, 1865, from disease which he contracted in the army. He was a member of Company C, 160th Ohio National Guards, and participated in the battles of Monocacy and Maryland Heights. Mrs. Elizabeth (Wright) Sain was born Oct. 25, 1826, in Perry County, Ohio, and died March 14, 1879, in the latter county. Both

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she and her husband are buried in Otterbein Cemetery, that county. They were the parents of five children, namely: Joseph W., Sarah S., Emma C., William E. and Thomas H., all of whom are living. Mr. and Mrs. Sain were most excellent and worthy people, and members in good standing of the United Brethren Church. Joseph W. Sain and his wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal Church, and Mr. Sain, politically, is a stanch Republican.
   Rosanna Hitchcock, now Mrs. Grimes, was born March 30,1858. This lady is highly educated, being a graduate of the select school at Junction City, under Prof. James Conner, of Ohio. She, like the balance of the family, occupies a high position in society, being an expert in instrumental and vocal music. The marriage of Rosanna Hitchcock to LaFayette Grimes was celebrated at the residence of the Presiding Elder, Rev. L. F. Britt, of Nebraska City, Oct. 30, 1882. Of this union there are two bright and interesting children, Gracie E. and Harvey S., who bring sunshine into the household, and in whom the parents take great pride. LaFayette Grimes was born in Decatur, Macon Co., Ill., Dec. 5, 1852, and is the son of George W. and Sarah A. (Smoot) Grimes, natives respectively of Ohio and Virginia. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are still living, named as follows: LaFayette, Alexander, William L. and Josiah. The parents are now residents of Sterling, this county.
   Harvey F. Hitchcock, now connected with his father as cashier of the Johnson County Bank, is a graduate of Mallalien University, of Bartley, Neb. He is a young man of more than ordinary ability, having assumed the responsible position of teacher at the age of sixteen years, in which calling he attained the same high honors that are accredited his brother in another part of this volume. In his present position he is discharging his duties to the entire satisfaction of parties having business connections; with the Johnson County Bank. He is yet unmarried, and a great favorite among the elite of the city and community, being of a very affable disposition, always courteous, with a pleasant word for all who come in contact with him, socially or in a business way. He is one of a few young men who have a bright future before them, and is trying to make out of it all there is in it, and the present outlook bespeaks for him a place in business, as well as social, circles that will be honored by all.
   The Colonel is eminently deserving of the honor and confidence in which he is held by all who come in contact with him, either socially or in a business way, as in his conduct he is conscientiously guided by the loftiest principles of right. As a citizen he has ever been loyal and patriotic in his acts, and his private life is irreproachable. In his capacity of financier and as a prompt, enterprising business man, he is doing much to build up the city and county. Politically, he and his sons, with the exception of John H., are firm supporters of the Republican party. Religiously, he and his wife are among the leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, their forefathers having been identified with that denomination almost from the very founding of Methodism.

[The HITCHCOCK article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Carole Williams <williams@sunet.net>. Thank you, Carole.

Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleDWARD F. BELL, a prosperous farmer and leading land-owner of Vesta Precinct, has a fine homestead on section 31, comprising a well-developed farm of 340 acres with substantial buildings. He is a Western man by birth and education, his native place being in Peoria County, Ill.. where he first opened his eyes to the light June 14, 1856. He completed a thorough education in the Presbyterian College at Highland, Kan., and came to Nebraska in 1871, settling at once in Vesta Precinct. He became familiar with agricultural pursuits in his boyhood, and has made this calling his through his entire life.
   The parents of our subject, John and Rachel (Paddock) Bell, were natives of Ohio, and the father a farmer by occupation. They are still residents of Doniphan County, Kan. The parental family included ten children, eight of whom are living and residents of Kansas and Nebraska.
   Our subject in the spring of 1873 went into El Paso County, Colo., and secured 160 acres of land along the Wet Mountain Valley, two and one-half miles from Rosetta, where he operated a stock ranch two years, but in 1875 returned to Kansas, and thence came back to this county in the fall of 1877. He is a fine judge of live stock and makes a

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