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childhood, named Clara. Annie is happily married to Henry Wakeman, of Tecumseh; they are the parents of four children, viz: Ralph, Bert, Allie and Jesse. Edward is in business in Lincoln, and James is at home. All have received good practical and business educations.
   Clarrissa (Shasteen) Jones, the wife, of our subject, was born in Ohio in the year 1844. Her father, Edward Shasteen, was a farmer. She was reared upon the home farm for the first eight years of her life, and then went to Illinois, residing at Irwin, Logan County, until the time of her marriage. Mr. Shasteen is still living, but has moved to this State, and is residing with his daughter in this county, his wife having died in the year 1867.
   The father of our subject, Harris Jones, was also a native of Ohio. He followed farming and lived in Ross County until his death, which occurred on the Atlantic Ocean at the time our subject was six months old. He had started to visit England, but the boat upon which he took passage, owing to a storm, went down, with the loss of all on board excepting two only. His wife died in 1880, in Ross County, Ohio. Our subject was bound out and was away from home for sixteen years, during which time he acquired the knowledge of his trade.
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Letter/label or doodleOHN KERSHAW, a well-to-do farmer of Nemaha Precinct, has been engaged in the successful cultivation of 240 acres of fine farming land a number of years, and by his industry and enterprise has surrounded himself with all the comforts of life and many of its luxuries. His property is located on section 16, and besides his farm includes a handsome and substantial set of buildings, a goodly assortment of live stock, and the machinery necessary for carrying on agriculture in a profitable manner. He has been a resident of Nebraska since the spring of 1870, and is numbered among the leading citizens of Johnson County.
   Our subject, of English ancestry, is the son of John Kershaw, Sr., who was born in England and when a small boy emigrated with his parents to America. They settled first in New York State, and thence a few years later pushed on further westward into DuPage County, Ill. The father of our subject lived with his brother until ready to go upon a farm of his own; and became proprietor in due time of a tract of land in Dane County, Wis. He remained a resident of the Badger State until 1870, a period of nineteen years. In the spring of the year mentioned he came to this county and located upon the land which he had secured six years before. In the meantime he had been married to Miss Alice Lee, of Illinois, and a native of England, and to them were born five children, only four of whom are now living, and all residents of Nebraska.
   After coming to this county the elder Kershaw put up a fine residence in Tecumseh, where he made his home until his death, which occurred Jan. 18, 1886. He was a man of more than ordinary capabilities, and prominent in the communities where he lived. In Wisconsin he officiated as Surveyor of Dane County and was also Treasurer of the School Board. His political sympathies were with the Democratic party, although he would not be confined to party lines, but aimed to support the men whom he considered best qualified for office.
   Mrs. Alice (Lee) Kershaw, the mother of our subject, like her husband a native of England, was born in the city of Manchester, and came to America, upon the same vessel which transported her future husband hither. The Lees settled first in Massachusetts, where they lived a period of fourteen years; thence they removed to Wisconsin. John Kershaw, Sr., and his wife began their wedded life together in Dane County, Wis., and there their son John, the subject of this sketch, was born Jan. 18, 1854. He was a youth of fourteen years when the family came to this State and completed his education in the schools of Tecumseh. While starting out for himself he secured a portion of the land which comprises his present homestead, and which he has now occupied for a period of ten years. The improvements which the passing traveler beholds to-day with interest have all been effected by the present proprietor. Many of the fields are divided with beautiful hedge fencing, which adds so greatly to the picturesqueness of the landscape, and Mr.

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Kershaw has planted an orchard of 450 trees with all kinds of the smaller fruits, which are mostly in good bearing condition. He has thirty acres of valuable timber. The residence would be an ornament to the modern city, being a tasteful structure of modern style of architecture, handsomely finished and furnished. It was erected during the summer of 1884.
   The farm of Mr. Kershaw is well stocked, he keeping a herd of from forty to sixty cattle and ten to fifteen horses, besides a goodly number of swine. The lady who has presided over his domestic affairs since the spring of 1880 became his wife on the 3d of May, that year, and is the mother now of three interesting children--Charles J., Theodore P. and Earl. One child, a son, Albert, died in infancy. The wife of our subject was in her girlhood Miss Anna Atkison, and was born Dec. 10, 1862, in Ohio, and is the daughter of James and Ruth (Darby) Atkison, who were natives of Virginia. The mother is still living, but the father is dead. They came to Nebraska and settled in Johnson County soon after the close of the late Civil War. The mother moved with her parents to Ohio, where she made the acquaintance of her future husband, Mr. A., who was a native of that State.
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Letter/label or doodleOSHUA GORE. Among the worthy and representative citizens of Spring Creek Precinct, and as such especially worthy a place in a volume of this description, is the subject of this writing, who is the owner of a splendid farm of 160 acres, situated on section 9, township 6, range 12 east. The birth of our subject occurred at Taylorsville, Spencer Co., Ky., on the 14th of June, 1829. He is the son of Rector and Amanda Gore, both of whom were born in Kentucky.
   The father of our subject was married three times, and became the father of ten children, five of whom survive, viz.: Joshua, John, Mildred, Cassia and Orville, the three latter residing in California. The father died in the year 1859. The mother of Joshua and John, who was his first wife, parted this life when our subject was about six years of age. After that event he made his home with his grandfather, David Graff, with whom he went to Morgan County, Ill., upon that gentleman locating there. He was numbered among the pioneers of that county, and continued there until his death.
   The education of our subject was acquired in the schools of Morgan County, Ill., and when not thus engaged he was working on the farm. At the age of eighteen he began to learn the blacksmith trade, and continued to follow the same for about six years, since which time he has been continuously engaged in farming. He was united in marriage with Priscilla Shuff, near Jacksonville, Morgan County, Feb. 11, 1852. This lady was born near Berlin, Sangamon Co., Ill., on the 9th of November, 1834, and is the daughter of John and Angelina Shuff. Her parents were both Kentuckians. To our subject and wife have been born ten children, three of whom now live. These bear the following names: George H., William E. and Mattie E. Those deceased are: Eva B., John R., James U., Edwin V., Clara B., Susan L. and Angelina.
   After his marriage our subject continued to live in Morgan County, working at his trade, with which he linked farming pursuits. Later, in 1854, he removed to Cass County, remaining until the year 1861, when he went to Menard County, living there until 1884, when he came to this county, settling upon his present farm, which he has brought to a very perfect state of cultivation and fertility, and which yields him under all ordinary circumstances a large return for the labor that is bestowed upon it.
   The parents of Mrs. Gore had ten children, of whom the following are living: Priscilla; John R., of Hodgeman County, Kan.; Ira, of Waverly, Ill.; Mary H., the wife of Alphonso White, of Hoxie, Ark.; Jesse L., who is in Nemaha County; Emma J., now Mrs. Joseph Smith, of the same county; Steven O. and Cynthia, both of Morgan County; and William, of Kansas City, Mo.
   Our subject and his devoted wife have passed the years of their companionship most happily in the oneness that makes such companionship desirable and helpful. Both are members and take an active interest in the Christian Church, of which our subject is an Elder. Politically, he is a member of the

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Republican party, and as such is energetic in the interests of the party when occasion demands. He is a man of high character and personal worth, public-spirited and much valued citizen.
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Letter/label or doodleRANT C. CATHCART is owner of eight acres of prime land on section 17 in Spring Creek Precinct, where he has diligently labored since the spring of 1877. He is comparatively young in years, having been born July 18, 1851, and possesses in common with the men around him the industry and perseverance necessary to success. He comes of a good family, being the son of Robert and Catherine (Marshall) Cathcart, who were natives of Pennsylvania, and the father is now deceased.
   The Cathcart family is of Irish ancestry, while the mother of our subject traced her descent to Scotland and Germany. The paternal grandfather crossed the Atlantic in time to do good service in the Revolutionary War, and spent his last years in Pennsylvania. Of the ten children born to the parents of our subject five survive, namely: Jennie, the wife of John Cobb, of Pocahontas County, Iowa; Samuel B., a resident of Hutchinson, Kan.; James A., of Harvey County, that State; Perry, in Hutchinson, and Grant C., of our sketch.
   Robert Cathcart served as a soldier in the Union Army during the late Civil War, and died in April, 1863, at Memphis, Tenn., the result of hardship and exposure, he having been of strong constitution naturally. Prior to this, however, the parents, when Grant C. was a child five years of age, had removed to Rock Island County, Ill., where our subject was reared to manhood mostly on a farm. He was given a practical education in the common schools, and when ready to establish a home and domestic ties of his own, was married, Sept. 28, 1876, in Red Oak, Iowa, to Miss Lena Cantrall.
   The wife of our subject was born in Whiteside County, Ill., Oct. 2, 1859, and is the daughter of John and Ellen (Straton) Cantrall, who were natives of Illinois and Vermont, and are now residents of Montgomery County, Iowa. To Mr. and Mrs. Cathcart there have been born five children, four of whom are living, namely: Alice, Ruth, Robert and Grace. In the spring of 1876 our subject came with his family to Nebraska, sojourning near Brock until the spring of that year, when they took up their residence in this county, and Mr. Cathcart began working as a farm laborer in what is now Vesta Precinct. Two years later he moved to Nemaha County, where he lived about seven years, operating mostly on rented land. From there he came to his present homestead, which was comparatively unimproved, and where, with the stimulus of ownership, he has labored to good advantage. His possessions are the result of his own perseverance and industry, and his career is watched with kindly interest by many friends, who bespeak for him entire success and a competence for the future. He votes the straight Republican ticket, and has served as School Director in his district, while lending his influence to those enterprises calculated to advance the welfare of his community. Both he and his estimable wife are members in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter/label or doodleOLON BACON. One of the finest farms in Vesta Precinct is owned and operated by the subject of this biography, who possesses the characteristics of industry and perseverance in a marked degree. He has good improvements, is out of debt, and thus should realize much enjoyment as a consequence. He is essentially a Western man, having been born in Marion County, Iowa, Sept. 17, 1857. His fattier, Daniel Bacon, now deceased, was a native of Illinois, and spent his last years in Harper County, Kan., where his death took place April 14, 1888. The family is of English ancestry and traced their descent from Lord Bacon, three of whose nephews crossed the Atlantic, it is believed, prior to the Revolutionary War, and settled in Massachusetts. One of these invented a torpedo which exploded upon pressure. In order to carry out an experiment with his invention, he laid one under a large rock, but failing of the desired result, he stepped upon the torpedo and was blown to atoms. The fragments of the body were gathered up by the two brothers and

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buried. One of these was the great-grandfather of our subject, and from them sprang the Bacons of America. The individual who met with this violent death was unmarried.
   The mother of our subject was in her girlhood Miss Elizabeth Note; she was a native of Ohio, and is a resident of Kansas. The parental household included eleven children, nine of whom are now living. Solon, our subject, acquired a common-school education in his native county, and at an early age became familiar with farm pursuits. He accompanied his parents to Page County, Iowa, in 1868, when a lad of eleven years, and twelve years later made his way to this county, settling in April, 1880, upon the land which he now owns and occupies. He was accompanied to this place by his young wife, having married, March 27, 1880, Miss Elnora Davis, who was born in Jay County, Ind., Oct. 18, 1859. Mrs. Bacon is the daughter of William and Ellen (Woten) Davis, the father deceased and the mother now a resident of Page County, Iowa. Her parents were natives of Indiana and Missouri respectively, and their household included seven children.
   To Mr. and Mrs. Bacon there have been born three children--Ora, Coy and Ona. The eldest is six years old and youngest ten months. Marshall Bacon, the elder brother of our subject, served as a Union soldier in the Civil War under command of Gen. John A. Logan. He is now engaged in farming in Gage County, Neb. Mr. Bacon, politically, votes the straight Republican ticket, but has carefully refrained from the cares and responsibilities of office, preferring to give his time and attention to his farming interests.
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Letter/label or doodleOHN E. BROWN. The subject of this sketch and his estimable wife represent property to the amount of a half-section of land in Helena Precinct, and have their pleasant and comfortable home on section 9. Of New England ancestry, Mr. Brown is a Western man by birth, his native place having been Aurora, Ill., where he first opened his eyes to the light April 18, 1838.
   The parents of our subject were Richard D. and Charity E. (Rowe) Brown, the father a native of New Hampshire and of English ancestry. He was reared in the Dominion of Canada, but came over into the States, and subsequently made his way to Nebraska Territory, settling among the earliest pioneers of this county. The year following he was joined by our subject, who came in July, 1858. The father died in Helena Precinct, March 12, 1879.
   Mrs. Charity E. Brown was born in New York, and traced her ancestry to Germany. The parents were married in New York, passing their wedded life in Illinois and Nebraska. Their union was completed by the birth of six children: John E.; James, who died when six months old; Phebe A., the wife of Delos Rogers, of Fremont County, Iowa; Charles J., a resident of Central City, Neb.; Josephine, Mrs. O. K. Rogers, of Otoe County, and Eveline, Mrs. S. S. Saunders, of Antelope County.
   The subject of this sketch, upon coming to Nebraska Territory, homesteaded eighty acres of land on the south half of the southwest quarter of section 9, and commenced in earnest his battle with the primitive soil. Over a wide stretch of country there was little to be seen indicating the presence of a white man, his neighbors being few and far between. He still owns and occupies the property which he then secured, although having doubled its original area. The year following he was married, June 26, 1859, and took up his residence with his bride in Helena Precinct.
   Mrs. Brown, before tier marriage with our subject, was Mrs. Marietta Campbell, the widow of W. A. Campbell, and the daughter of Charles and Rhoda Philpott. She was born time 5, 1833, in Kentucky. Her father was a native of Louisville, Ky.; after marring he moved to Carroll County, Ohio. He was a tailor by occupation, and spent his last years in Ohio. The mother of Mrs. Brown died when she was quite young, and she was reared by her stepmother. She was married to Mr. Campbell in Ohio, and they resided for a time in Scott County, Iowa, whence they came to Nebraska Territory in the fall of 1856, and settled on the land which now comprises the homestead of Mr. and Mrs. Brown. Of her union with Mr. C. there were born two children, one of whom died at birth. Her son Jesse J. is

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resident of Keith County, this State. Mr. Campbell departed this life at his home in Helena Precinct, in August, 1858.
   Mrs. Brown was one of the first white women in her neighborhood, and obtained an intimate acquaintance with the difficulties and hardships of life in a new settlement. She labored hand in hand with her husband in building up the homestead, fulfilling her duties as a pioneer wife and mother in the most admirable manner. Of her union with Mr. Brown there were born three children: Charles H., in Keith County; Mary E., the wife of Dr. T. C. Canine, a practicing physician of Shickley, this State, and Calvin E., who lives at home.
   Mr. Brown received only a limited education in his youth, but has been a reader all his life and kept himself posted upon current events. Both he and his estimable wife have watched with the warmest interest the growth and development of Nebraska, and in the building up of one of its most desirable homesteads have contributed in no small degree to its reputation as a prosperous commonwealth. The farm is in a highly cultivated condition, and supplied with good buildings. Mr. Brown has been quite prominent in local affairs, serving as Constable for a time, and has been a member of the School Board of his district a number of years.
   Our subject cast his first Presidential vote for Lincoln, and has always been a member of the Republican party. He is a strong advocate of temperance, and for a period of four years was Worthy Chief of a lodge of Good Templars in Helena Precinct, which was suspended some time ago.

[The BROWN article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Carole Williams <williams@sunet.net>. Thank you, Carole.]

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Letter/label or doodleSAAC IRWIN. Among the pioneers of Johnson County, who to-day occupy honored positions in the community, is the gentleman whose biography is herein sketched. His property is situated on section 4, of Nemaha Precinct, where he owns a first-class farm comprising 120 acres. Mr. Irwin first came to this county in July of the year 1867, and soon determined to settle in Todd Creek Precinct, and accordingly took up a homestead claim of 160 acres. This he improved, putting up a good set of farm buildings, fences, etc., first selling eighty acres to Mr. Bartle, retaining 120 acres until the year 1880, when he sold that in order to remove to his present property, which had a little breaking done to it, but which has been practically improved entirely by himself.
   Our subject takes pride in his stock, which is indeed quite good. His herds number about seventy-five head, and he requires nearly everything he raises for their feed. He is also engaged in the breeding of horses extensively, and owns seven head, which are chiefly of the best variety.
   Mr. Irwin remembers perfectly the first settlement made in the county, by his namesake and nephew, Isaac Irwin, Jr., who settled on section 3, in Nemaha Precinct, in 1859. He built the first house and made the first improvements perfected in the county. Rowan Irwin, brother of our subject, was with him, and became one of the early settlers of the county. The same year Mr. Rigal settled, and for a time all camped together.
   The subject of our sketch was born in Hardin County, Ky., on the 19th of April, 1817, and lived there for about thirteen years. Then accompanying his parents in their journeying to Putnam County, Ind., he finished his education in the common schools, which, although not extensive, was thoroughly practical. After leaving the school he remained with his father upon the farm until he was about twenty-seven years old. About that time his father died, and he continued upon the same farm until after the death of his mother, which occurred in 1856. After that event he sold the farm and came to this State, as noted above.
   In Putnam County, Ind., Dec. 21, 1844, Mr. Irwin was united in marriage with Miss Maria Brittan, of Indiana, who bore him four children, of whom three are living. Their names are as follows: Christian, Sarah and Susan. Newport, a son, died when twenty-two years old. Mrs. Irwin was the daughter of John Brittan, who was a farmer of Putnam County, Ind. She died after a wedded life of about seven years, on the 25th of March, 1851.
   The second marriage of our subject was celebrated on the 19th of April, 1852, the lady of his choice being Miss Jane Leathermann. Of this union there

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have been born thirteen children, of whom eleven are still living. Their names are recorded as follows: Maria, Mary, Smiley, Washington, Cicily, Rowan, Frances, John, Lavona, Nora and Isaac. Fourteen children in all are still living.
   Mrs. Irwin was born in Putnam County, Ind. She is the daughter of John and Mary Leathermann, also of Putnam County. Her father was a native of Kentucky, and by occupation a farmer. He died in the year 1880, at the age of seventy-five years, his wife having died about four years before him; she was four years older than he.
   The eldest daughter of our subject, Christian, is happily married to Mr. John Ball, who is now in Tulare County, Cal., and they are the parents of eight children; Sarah is married to Mr. Wallace Averett, a prosperous farmer on section 4, Todd Creek Precinct; they have three little ones, whose names are as follows: Clara, Othe and Maud. Susan is now Mrs. William Burlington, and resides in California; they have one child, whose name is Isaac.
   Of the daughters of his second marriage, Maria was the wife of Thomas Reynolds, of Tulare County, Cal.; her husband died in 1885, leaving her with four children, whose names are: Mabel, Arthur, Porter and Bessie. Frances married William Will, of Pawnee County, and they have one son, who bears the name of John; Rowan is married and living in California; he is a prominent lawyer. The remainder of the children are unmarried.
   Isaac Irwin, the father of our subject, was born in Virginia, and when a young man accompanied his father when he removed to Nelson County, Ky. There he met and married Miss Ellen King. There were born to them eleven children, nine of whom lived to attain years of discretion. Subsequently he removed to Hardin County, where he lived until he was fifty years old, then went to Putnam County, Ind. There he lived until his death, which occurred when he was eighty-four years of age. This event occurred just before our subject came to this State. Mr. Irwin followed agricultural pursuits nearly all his life. He was frequently called upon to fill various offices, and is one of the prominent citizens of his district. The grandfather of our subject, John Irwin, was the first member of this family to leave the old English home for the New World. He settled first in Virginia, afterward removing as above noted to Kentucky, where he died in Nelson County about the year 1818.
   The subject of this sketch is a member of the Predestinarian Baptist Church, and is an ordained minister of the communion, and has preached for many years in Kansas; and this State. He is an able and much valued citizen, much respected by all who know him, and looked up to by very many as one of the capable and educated men of the district. When in Indiana he served as Justice of the Peace for some time, and in this State has held the office of School Director. He is deeply interested in all questions that concern the American people, and usually votes with the Democratic party.
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Letter/label or doodleOHN E. McDANNOLD. In the northwestern part of Nemaha Precinct, and situated upon section 4, is a well cultivated farm of eighty acres, which is not infrequently the occasion of remark and favorable comment from visitors and strangers in the neighborhood. It is the property of the subject of this sketch, who is certainly a thoroughly practical and enterprising agriculturist. He was born in Henry County, Mo., on the 30th of October, 1854, and lived there about three years, then accompanied his parents to Springfield, Ill., living with them upon various farms in the county until 1884.
   From the time of attaining his majority the subject of our sketch had been farming upon his own account in the above district. His coming to Nebraska dates from 1884, since which time he has labored earnestly and indefatigably to make his farm in every regard a model, with most gratifying success. His dwelling is conveniently and comfortably arranged, and its site well selected. At least three acres are devoted to the orchard and fruit culture, and there may be found a large variety requiring special culture, in addition to those indigenous to the country and climate. Such fruits as apples, apricots, peaches and cherries are found in endless profusion. The remainder of his

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farm is attentively looked after and well worked, and is equally responsive to his efforts.
   In Miss Ella Baldwin, of Sangamon County, Ill., our subject conceived that he had found the one who alone could make his life and home complete, and their marriage was celebrated upon the 2d of December, 1884. Their union has been more firmly welded, and the happiness of their home more assured, by the birth of their daughter, whose name is Nellie. Mrs. McDannold was born on the 28th of February, 1860, and is the daughter of William and Mary (Parkinson) Baldwin. Her father, a native of Sangamon County, followed the pursuits of husbandry from his youth, and was known as an enterprising farmer.
   Mr. and Mrs. McDannold are earnest and efficient members of the Christian Church, of Tecumseh, and highly respected in the community at large, as they are in the religious circle. The father of our subject, Reuben McDannold, was a native of Bourbon County, Ky.; the date of his nativity is recorded as the 12th of February, 1831. When three years of age he was taken by his parents to Sangamon County, upon their migration thitherward. In 1849 he went overland from St. Joseph to California, accomplishing the journey in ninety days, then considered a very quick trip. There he remained four years, enjoying success beyond the average. Returning, he settled in Springfield, and engaged in the lumber business for a time, and then went to Missouri. He was the husband of Ann E. Dillon, to whom he was married on the 20th of October, 1853. Of the nine children born to them, it was their privilege to see six arrive at years of maturity. After three years in Missouri, Sangamon County again became their home, and continues to be. They are very devout members of the Church of the Disciples, at Springfield, and enjoy the respect of all who know them, by reason of their high Christian character, and also their social position.
   The subject of our sketch is a man who has made his way in the world as the result of laudable ambition, supplemented by intelligent endeavor. His character is of a high order, both demanding and gaining the esteem of his fellows. In the domestic and other relations of life, although perhaps not faultless, his endeavor is to approximate to that most desired plan of life; in society he is genial, courteous and affable, and enjoys considerable popularity.
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Letter/label or doodleALTER E. SANDIFER. The city of Tecumseh has, in the gentleman whose history it is endeavored succinctly, and yet clearly, to set forth in the following lines, a worthy representative, and one who is progressive, enterprising and capable as a business man. He was born in Carrollton, Ky., on the 16th of September, 1864. He received as good an education as was possible to be obtained at that place, supplementing it by a course of instruction at the William Jewell College, at Liberty, Mo. After graduation from that institution he went into the drug business at Whiteman, Mo., where he remained for two years, carrying on quite a remunerative establishment.
   Leaving Missouri, our subject went to Ft. Worth, Tex., where he engaged as a clerk for three years, during which time he obtained a thorough knowledge of the drug trade in its various departments, and became an expert prescriptionist. In the spring of 1883 he came to Tecumseh and bought a partnership with Mr. Glass. After about eighteen months he bought out a stock of drugs and moved into his present fine brick store, which is so admirably arranged for his business, having been especially designed to be adapted thereto. He has, perhaps, the finest drug-store in the city. It is situated on the corner of Third and Clay streets, having been for some five years located at the present place. He has become firmly established, and enjoys a very extensive patronage.
   The father of our subject, J. W. Sandifer, was born in Odenburg, Ky., and was one of the enterprising and prosperous dry-goods merchants of Graham, Mo. His early life was mostly spent in Carrollton, Ky. He was married to Allie Dougherty, who presented him with four children, of whom the subject of this sketch was the second child born. He was both Councilman and Mayor of the city, but was reticent in the matter of politics, although always cheerfully doing his duty as a citizen. He died at Ft. Worth, Tex., in Feb-

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