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his education and lived until 1861, occupied in farming pursuits. In the fall of the year mentioned he left his native State, emigrating to the vicinity of Peoria, Ill., and purchasing a tract of land, which he operated a period of eight years. From there he came to Nebraska. In the meantime, during the Civil War, he enlisted, July 27, 1862, in the 86th Illinois Infantry, and met the enemy at the battles of Perryville, Chickamauga and other important battles, besides going partially through the Atlanta campaign. At Kenesaw Mountain he was wounded in his right shoulder, and sent to the hospital at Chattanooga, being later removed to Nashville, Tenn., and thence to Camp Joe Holt in Indiana. His hospital experience embraced a period of seven months, and he was then obliged to accept an honorable discharge for disability. From this wound he still suffers at intervals.
   Our subject chose for his bride a lady of his native State, Miss Ruth Fuller, to whom he was married in Guernsey County, Ohio, July 27, 1858. This union resulted in the birth of seven children, six of whom are living, namely: Jane, Margaret, Sally, Grant, George and Amy. The eldest daughter is the wife of Luke Lytle, of Kansas, and they are the parents of four children; Sally married Jefferson Stover, of Table Rock, and they have one child.
   Mrs. Ruth (Fuller) Brown was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, Jan. 21, 1830, and is the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Johnson) Fuller, the former of whom was also a native of the Buckeye State, and lived there with his family until the spring of 1861. Then he removed to Peoria County, Ill., where he carried on farming until his death, about the year 1876. The wife and mother passed away about three or four years previous to the decease of her husband. They were most excellent and worthy people, and members in good standing of the Baptist Church. Their family consisted of eight children.
    Henry Brown, the father of our subject, was born in Pennsylvania, about 1795, and in early manhood emigrated to Ohio, where he was married to Miss Jane Maple. They became the parents of eleven children, ten of whom lived to mature years. The father was one of the pioneers of Jefferson County, where he secured a tract of land and built up a homestead, upon which he spent the remainder of his days. His wife survived him several years. They were well-to-do, having by thrift and industry accumulated a good property.
   On another page the comfortable home and fine buildings of our subject are the subject of representation.

[The BROWN article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Carole Williams <williams@sunet.net>. Thank you, Carole.

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Letter/label or doodleARWIN H. BERRY. One of the finest homes in the little city of Tecumseh is the property of the subject of this biography, and consists of a substantial and tasteful residence and barn, with ample grounds around it, and all the evidences of comfort and enjoyment. To this place Mr. Berry retired in the summer of 1886 from the active labors of farm life, in which he had been engaged the greater part of his life. His home is situated on Broadway street, in the eastern part of town. He still retains ownership of his farm, which comprises 320 acres of valuable land in Helena Precinct, His career has been that of the self-made man, who from a modest beginning has built up a snug fortune, and at the same time such has been his integrity of character that he enjoys the highest respect of the community where the best part of his life has been spent.
   Our subject is a native of the Green Mountain State, his birthplace having been Alburgh, Grand Isle County, and the date thereof April 14, 1824. He lived there until a young man twenty-three years old, and on the 10th of May, 1847, started out to see something of the country around him. He traveled first all over New England, then visited the Middle States, and made his first halt in Newark, N. J. In the meantime he paid his expenses by teaching school. He resided in Newark one year, becoming owner of an eating house wherein temperance drinks were dispensed, and then having the opportunity to sell out to good advantage, he did so and started for the West.
   Young Berry, upon reaching Illinois, purchased a tract of land in Hancock County, began teaching school, and managed to pay for his property in this manner. In due time he had an improved farm of 240 acres which he had built up from the

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wild prairie. He brought the land to a high state of cultivation, planted a large orchard and many other trees around his homestead, and gathered about himself and family all of the comforts and many of the luxuries of life. He had married, Dec. 6, 1856, Miss Martha Wightman, of Hancock County, and of this union there were born four children. Of these but two are living, Allie, the elder, became the wife of Jirah S. Gordon, of Alburgh, Vt., and they are still living there, where Mr. G. is carrying on merchandising and farming. Harry S. married Miss Perintha Canon, of Pike County, Ill., and operates the home farm; they have one child, a son, Jirah S.
   Mr. and Mrs. Berry lived in Illinois until the spring of 1864, when our subject sold out, and on the 1st of March started for Linn County, Iowa. There he purchased an improved farm where they lived three years, but not being satisfied with their surroundings sold out once more, and in 1867 purchased land in Helena Precinct, this county, to which they removed in the spring of 1868. Here Mr. Berry purchased 640 acres, improved the entire tract, and later transferred to his brother-in-law one-fourth of it. For this land he paid the sum of $1,067.50, but it could not now be purchased for less than $18,000. Few but they who have performed it can realize the labor involved in placing the soil under cultivation, planting trees, building fences and the necessary structures connected with the homestead, and the numberless other conveniences gathered together on the premises. The orchard alone contains 400 apple trees, while the smaller fruits abound in almost endless variety. The lumber for the residence was hauled from Nebraska City with teams. After his journey hither from the Hawkeye State. Mr. Berry and his family lived in a tent until their house could be brought to the condition affording them a shelter. Our subject encountered the usual struggles with grasshoppers and drouth and many other discouragements, but pursued the even tenor of his way, and has met with ample reward. For a number of years he was largely engaged in stock-raising, keeping numbers of horses, cattle and swine, and feeding to them mostly the grain raised upon the farm.
   Amid these extensive interests Mr. Berry still found time to maintain his record as a good citizen, and gave his substantial support and encouragement to the enterprises which should be of benefit to the people around him. He has ever been the friend of progress and education, and while no office-seeker, has usually been the incumbent of some position of trust or responsibility. He served as Director in his school district, and held the minor offices when there appeared no one else who had time or could fill them to better advantage.
   Mrs. Martha (Wightman) Berry was born in Sandgate, Bennington Co., Vt., Jan. 11, 1835, and there developed into womanhood. Her parents, William and Martha Wightman, removed from the Green Mountain State to Illinois, where the father followed his trades of a wheelwright and contractor. He was a man of fine business capacities, and owned a farm, although he did not work upon it himself, simply superintending it. He lived to a ripe old age, and spent his last days in Linn County, Iowa, to which he had removed about ten years before his death, which occurred in 1875. The mother passed away two years before the decease of her husband, in 1873. Their family consisted of fifteen children.
    The father of our subject, Jirah S. Berry, a native of Connecticut or Vermont, was born April 24, 1784. He was one of the most successful. physicians of Alburgh, Vt., where he practiced many years, having the ride of that entire region for miles around. He was a man of property, a portion of it being in the shape of a good farm in Grand Isle County. He was graduated from the school of medicine at Castleton, Vt. He was well read, and a man of more than ordinary intelligence, keeping himself well posted upon the events of the day, and in all respects a prominent and praiseworthy citizen. He married Miss Ann Hyde, of Grand Isle County, and they became the parents of six children, five of whom lived to mature years, these all being carefully educated, and all of them for a time employed in teaching.
   The maternal grandfather of our subject, Jonathan Hyde by name, was a highly respected Vermont farmer. After the death of her husband the mother of our subject continued to live in Alburgh

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until 1852, then removed with her son Darwin H. to Illinois, where her death took place in Hancock County in the fall of 1864. Dr. Berry had died Jan. 10, 1834, aged fifty years. His excessive energy and industry were the direct cause of his taking off, as in pursuing the practice of his profession he was out early and late, giving himself little rest and no recreation. His generous disposition led him to serve those who perhaps would refuse to give him feed for his horse, much less his pay for his professional services. Upon his last exhaustive journey, after being out a day and a night, he returned to his home early in the afternoon, and at 5 o'clock was not able to stand upon his feet. He never passed beyond his own threshold again until carried out, dying in a few days.
   The paternal grandfather of our subject was Barnaby Berry, a Connecticut farmer who married a Miss Swift, and became the father of quite a large family. They removed from Connecticut to Vermont, and were among the earliest pioneers of Grand Isle County, where their children grew to manhood and womanhood before the War of 1812. The father was a physician and one of the first surgeons aboard the fleet at Plattsburg, engaging in the battle which was fought there Sept. 11, 1812. Grandfather Berry spent his last days at the home of his son in Northern New York, outliving his estimable wife many years.
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Letter/label or doodleOSEPH WHITHAM, a Johnson County pioneer of 1873, settled in the spring of that year on eighty acres of land embracing a portion of section 2.5, Spring Creek Precinct, and for which he paid $5 per acre. It was a stretch of raw prairie, destitute of cultivation or improvement, and presented a scene calculated to try the courage of any man in like circumstances. Our subject was unaccompanied by a wife or children to cheer him, coming alone, with a cash capital of $23 in money, a team of horses and a few farming implements. He established himself in a dug-out, eleven feet square, and for the first three years kept batchelor's hall. For a number of years thereafter he endured the hardships and difficulties incident to pioneer life, but from his toils and struggles he has come out with flying colors, having now one of the most valuable farms in this precinct, embracing now 100 acres. The dug-out, in 1886, was replaced by a more comfortable and commodious dwelling, and around it have arisen the various outbuildings for the shelter of stock and the storing of grain.
   A native of Broome County, N. Y., our subject was born June 18, 1849, and is the son of John and Caroline (Rowe) Whitham, the father a native of Yorkshire, England, and the mother of Connecticut. John Whitham emigrated to America when a young lad, about 1820, crossing the Atlantic with his parents, John, Sr., and Hannah Whitham, they locating in Broome County, N. Y., where the father engaged in farming and milling, and where the father of our subject was reared to manhood. The latter received a limited education, but was trained to those habits of industry and economy which have served him well through his later life.
   John Whitham was married, June 18, 1844, in Broome County, N. Y., to Miss Caroline Rowe, a native of Connecticut, and the daughter of Abijah Rowe, who was a New Englander by birth, and supposed to be of English ancestry. The Rowe family, as near as can be learned, came to America soon after the independence of the Colonists had been established, settling in Connecticut. To John and Caroline Whitham there were born six children, five of whom are living, namely: John, Jr., a resident of Warren, Ill.; Joseph, our subject; Eliza, the wife of B. C. Allen, of Dodge County, this State; William, a resident of Warren, Ill., and Jay M., of Fayetteville, Ark. The deceased child was a daughter, Hannah, who died when about eleven years old.
   The parents of our subject, about 1855, leaving the Empire State, emigrated to Jo Daviess County, Ill., settling among its earliest pioneers, where the father engaged in agriculture and spent the remainder of his life. His death took place at the homestead, March 1, 1880. He was a member in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church from early manhood, to the support of which he contributed liberally, and was a faithful laborer in the Master's vineyard, officiating as Class-Leader, and

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otherwise identified himself with the best interests of his church. He enjoyed a wide acquaintance in Jo Daviess County, where he was highly respected, and he left to his family a comfortable estate. In New York State he had been prominent in the affairs of his county, holding the offices of Assessor and Justice of the Peace, and filled other positions of trust and responsibility. He was a Republican from the time of the party's organization. The mother is still living, being now sixty-four years old, in good health and retaining her faculties unimpaired. She is a very estimable lady, and belongs to the same church as did her honored husband. She makes her home with her son William, at Warren, Ill.
   Our subject accompanied his parents in their removal from New York State to Illinois, and was reared among the scenes of pioneer life in Jo Daviees County. All the children of the family received a common-school education, and have distinguished themselves as upright and worthy citizens. Jay M., the brother who went South, is now a leading professor in the State University of Arkansas. His tastes incline toward military tactics, and he obtained entrance to the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis, from which he was graduated with honors, and thereafter served about four years in the United States Navy, resigning his position finally to take that which he now holds. In the meantime, in the performance of his naval duties, he had visited a number of foreign countries, and the expeditions proved both pleasurable and profitable.
   Our subject has been content to follow farming all his life. He remained under the parental roof until about twenty-one years old. He was married, Dec. 31, 1876, to Miss Sophia Hayden, who was born in Cumberland County, Ky., Dec. 25, 1855. They began their wedded life in Spring Creek, and of this union there were born five children, namely; Caroline, Hattie, Ella, Jessie and Sophia. This lady died at the homestead in Spring Creek Precinct, March 2, 1887.
   Mr. Whitham contracted a second marriage, July 17, 1887, with Miss Zerelda Mavity, who was born in Atchison County, Mo., Sept. 29, 1866. Her parents, Joseph and Evaline Mavity, were natives of Indiana and Illinois, and are now residents of this county. Of this union there is one child, a son, John J., who was born May 1, 1888. Mr. Whitham, in the fall of 1884, was elected one of the Commissioners of Johnson County, serving his term of three years in a creditable manner, and for four years has been a Justice of the Peace. He is now completing his seventh year as a School Director in his district. He is public-spirited and liberal, and uniformly votes the Republican ticket. Religiously, he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which he is a Trustee and one of its most active members.
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Letter/label or doodleR. PETER V. R. DAFOE, a retired physician, and at present enjoying the comforts of a pleasant home, is also proprietor of a fine drug-store at Tecumseh, and has connected with the drug business a stock of musical instruments, in which he has built up a good trade among the leading residents of the precinct. His store is located on the north side of Broadway, opposite the court-house. The Doctor has been a resident of this county for a number of years, and during this time has made many friends.
   Our subject was born in Hastings, Province of Ontario, Canada, Dec. 19, 1838, and there spent his boyhood days, completing his education in the Friends' Seminary at Picton, Prince Edward County. He then taught school for a number of years, and finally deciding to take up the study of medicine, entered the office of Dr. George Henry, of Sterling, with whom he read medicine until about twenty years old. He took his first course of lectures at Victoria Medical College in Toronto, in the winter of 1861-62, and later, making his way to Saginaw County, Mich., to visit friends, he was persuaded by them to settle there and begin practice. This he did with excellent results, both socially and financially. He was thus occupied five months, and at the beginning of the college year returned to Toronto, took another course, and again practiced as before. He was graduated on the 24th of May, 1864, and commenced his regular practice at Greensville, North York County, where he remained two

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years, built up as before a good business, and was then appointed by the Government as physician to the Snake Indians.
   In the spring of 1866 Dr. Dafoe located at Elmwood, Ill., where he remained until Sept. 1, 1879, and in connection with his practice, established a drug-store there also. In the same year he crossed the Mississippi, locating in Tecumseh, this county, and in 1880 established his present business, which has proved a great convenience to the people of this locality. He removed to Council Bluffs, but only remained there ten months. He only practices now among his old friends and patrons, who, having satisfactorily proved his skill, are unwilling to let him go.
   On the morning of Dec. 15, 1884, Dr. Dafoe after breakfast went out, key in hand, to open his store, and upon arriving upon the site found nothing but a few smoldering remains. The building and stock had been entirely destroyed by fire during the night. The shock could not be otherwise than great, but the Doctor recovered as soon as possible, and at once ordered a new stock of goods, having them on hand for the Christmas trade. The spring following he put up the this brick building the first floor of which is occupied by his store and the jewelry business of another party. This structure is an ornament to the. town, being built of brick, two stories in height, with plate glass front. The upper floor is arranged and occupied by offices. It was the second brick block put up on the north side.
   Our subject has been quite prominent in local affairs, and in 1886 was elected Alderman, serving two years acceptably, but although a man public-spirited and interested in the welfare of his community, he would much prefer relegating the responsibilities of office to others. He belongs to the Masonic fraternity, in which he has taken nine degrees, and also at different times been an officer in his lodge. He has been an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for a number of years, officiating as Steward and Sunday-school Superintendent, and laboring as he had opportunity to further the Master's cause.
   Miss Carrie Nelson, of Eugene, Knox Co., Ill., became the wife of our subject April 23, 1867, and of this union there were born three children, of whom but two are living. Albert N. was born Nov. 23,1870, at Elmwood, Ill., and was graduated from the Tecumseh High School in the spring of 1888; he proposes, however, in the near future to continue his studies in another institution. Frank was born Jan. 11, 1873, is an unusually bright and interesting boy, and is pursuing his studies in the High School. Mrs. Carrie (Nelson) Dafoe, was born at Eugene, Ill., in 1842, and is the daughter of Josiah and Margaret (King) Nelson. She was given a good education, completing her studies at Knox College in Galesburg, and made her home with her parents until her marriage. She is a very estimable lady, intelligent and refined, and a devoted Christian, having been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church for twenty-one years, and warmly engaged in Sunday-school work.
   Josiah Nelson, the father of Mrs. Dafoe, is a native of Pennsylvania, and when a young man removed, about 1837, to Knox County, Ill., of which he is still a resident. He entered the Prairie State a poor man, with no resources but his willing hands and courageous heart, and is now numbered among its moneyed men and leading land-owners, being proprietor of 800 acres, well improved and in a high state of cultivation. He is largely devoted to the raising of grain and stock, and is a man prominent in his community.
   Mr. Nelson married Miss Margaret King, whose parents live on the quarter-section adjoining, and they have traveled the journey of life together for a period of fifty years. The parents and the seven children form an unbroken family circle which has as yet been unvisited by the fell Destroyer. The elder children were daughters, and during the late war the father sometimes regretted that he had only one son old enough to enter the army and fight for the defense of the Union. That one became a soldier before he was of age.
   Michael Dafoe, the father of our subject, was born in Frontenac, Province of Ontario, Canada, in 1792, and moved to Hastings County soon after his marriage. He received a practical education and later followed farming. He married Miss Mary Wright about 1825, and they lived upon the farm where they first settled, and where all their children,

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twelve in number, were born. Of these seven are, living. The only one besides our subject who came to the United States was a sister, who is a resident of Dakota. His brother Michael died in the summer of 1858, leaving a good farm to his widow, who lived upon it until 1871, when her death took place. Both were active members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which Michael held the office of Steward and was one of its chief pillars. The property which he left remains in the family. The Doctor is a popular man in his community, one whose opinions are generally respected, and who is recognized as the possessor of more than ordinary capabilities.
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Letter/label or doodleOHN BEAL. Upon section 19 of Western Precinct is to be found one of the most admirably appointed stock farms in the county. It is the property of the gentleman whose history it is here sought briefly to set before the reader. He was born in Knox County, Ohio, on the 7th of December, 1837, to Jacob and Elizabeth Beal, of the above county. His father is a native of Somerset County, Pa., and his mother of Virginia. Mr. Beal, Sr., settled in Ohio as a young man just starting in life, when that country was in all its newness as a Territory, with its broad acres uncultivated and its resources undeveloped.
   The common school was the institution in which the subject of our sketch received the foundation of his mental development. Realizing that it was by no means the completion of his education, his efforts in that direction have been unceasing. In 1859 he went overland to Colorado and California, where he remained mining gold until 1865, meeting with quite fair success. At the end of that time he returned to Knox County, where he remained until the spring of 1868, when he came to Nebraska.
   Until the fall of that year Mr. Beal made his home in the city of Beatrice, when he removed to Tecumseh, and there made his home until he came to his present farm in the spring of 1869. Upon taking up his residence upon his property he realized that he was in the midst of a vast undeveloped country. As far as the eye could reach in any direction nothing could be discerned that would indicate any habitation of man, and very few signs were discernible of his handiwork. Beatrice and Tecumseh were the nearest points for trading and marketing, and either were at least twenty miles distant from him. He has watched with pleasure and pride the development of the country all around, and observed the growth of the present wealthy community. His farm is now 195 acres in extent and is one of the best in the district.
   Before leaving Knox County Mr. Beal was married. The event was celebrated in January, 1868; the lady who at the time allied herself with our subject was Maria J. Lovitt, the estimable daughter of Daniel and Deborah Lovitt, of Ohio. To Mr. and Mrs. Beal have been given four children, of whom three still survive, viz: Orvil, James A. and Eugene, all of whom make their home with their parents.
   For two terms Mr. Beal has served in the office of Assessor with much satisfaction to all parties concerned, but is quite reticent as regards political or any other office. He has always been a friend of the temperance cause, and is now a firm Prohibitionist. As a man and citizen he is much admired by reason of his high character; as a farmer and stock-raiser he is most successful, his specialty being the higher grades of stock of the best breeds. His farm is supplied with everything needed for successful operation, and his home is one of the most pleasantly situated and comfortable in the community.

[The BEAL article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Mary H Palser <mhpalse@megavision.com>. Thank you, Mary.]

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Letter/label or doodleLZIE COMBS, the proprietor of the extensive livery and sale stable on Third street in Tecumseh, and in that connection widely and favorably known, was born in Knox County, Ill. on the 7th of November, 1862. When he was about seven years of age his parents came to Nebraska. They made their home in this county for a short time and then removed to Bennet, in Lancaster County. Before our subject was ten years of age the home was bereaved of wife and

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mother, and our subject has therefore from that time been without the affectionate care, guidance and counsel of the nearest relation on earth.
   Left to fight his own battles to a large extent, the subject of our sketch has been more successful in every way than many who have had every advantage; possibly because he came to realize the situation, and therefore bent his energies with more determined effort to the task of making his own way. All the education he has received has been obtained in the common school, which, however, he attended but a short time. Early in life he engaged in farming, and continued to follow the same. For one season he was engaged in herding, attending the town herd at $1 a month a head. This gave him his start; after that he set up as a barber in this city.
   In 1882 Mr. Combs migrated to Wyoming Territory, and after remaining there about two years returned to this place, and was variously engaged until the 25th of July, 1888, when he secured the business in which he is now engaged. He has constant work for eighteen horses, and usually keeps a larger number on hand. In addition to his livery and sale stable, and the business connected therewith, Mr. Combs is the owner of two farms in Kansas; one is situated about four miles front Ft. Scott, in a northwesterly direction, is 160 acres in extent, well improved and possessing very fine buildings; the other is in Greenwood County, Kan., and comprises 160 acres.
   The marriage of our subject was celebrated on the 15th of November, 1887, the lady whom it is his happiness to have made the companion of his life being Miss Nellie Barrow of this city. She is the daughter of the Rev. R. C. Barrow, the well-known and efficient State Evangelist of the Christian Church, a popular, eloquent and effective preacher. This gentleman is a native of Pennsylvania, and was married to Miss Helen Harding. They are the parents of four children, who are still living. His connection with the State of Nebraska extends over a long period of years.
   Nelson D. Combs, the father of our subject, was born in Highland County, Ohio, Feb. 18, 1833. By trade he was a harness-maker and came to Nebraska when our subject was but seven years of age, as above noted. Since coming to the State he has been variously occupied, and since the death of his wife has been of somewhat nomadic disposition, never settling in any place for a great length of time.
   Our subject is a member of the Knights of Pythias, and also of the Sons of Veterans, his father having served in the army, holding a commission as First Lieutenant. Mr. Combs is a young man and has not yet lead much opportunity or time to manifest his true value, power and ability, but should he be spared, as judging from present appearances, he undoubtedly will, it is not too much to say that the future will be bright for him, and that he will fill an honored place in the community wherein he may reside.
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Letter/label or doodleILLIAM H. HOLMES. The subject of this sketch is familiarly known among the farmers and stock-raisers of Helena Precinct its one of the most prosperous men along the northern line of Johnson County, His property is pleasantly located on sections 27 and 34, and embraces a fine homestead 320 acres in extent, and with its neat and substantial buildings, and the other appurtenances of the modern estate, reflects great credit upon the industry and good taste of the proprietor.
   A native of Fulton County, Ill., our subject was born March 12, 1845, and is the son of Thomas and Rachel A.(Deary) Holmes. The father was a native of Green County, Ky., and the paternal grandfather Nathan Holmes, was one of the early Baptist preachers of the Blue Grass regions. The latter emigrated to Fulton County, Ill., during the early settlement of the Prairie State, locating in what was then designated as the Military District. He battled successfully with the wild prairie soil and there spent his last days.
   The father of our subject was born Dec. 7, 1813, and was a youth of nineteen years when he went to Illinois with his parents. He assisted then, in their endeavors to build up a homestead. and when about twenty-three years old was married, Dec. 1, 1836, to Miss Rachel A. Deary, who was born in

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