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Gen. John Eaton, 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry

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The History of Sutton, NH by Augusta H. Worthen. pages 1060-1065. Transcribe by Don Davis 8/1/00

John Eaton (b, Dec. 5, 1829), like all his brothers and sisters, was kept at hard, manual work through his youth when not attending school. In addition to his schooling in his district, and a few extra terms at Warner and Bradford, he was educated at the academy at Thetford, Vt., under Hiram Ocrcutt, LL. D., Dartmouth college, and Andover (Mass.) Theological Seminary. He graduated from Dartmouth college in 1854 and became principal of a school in Cleveland in the same year. He was superintendent of schools of Toledo from 1856 to 1859.

His educational work was begun in sixteenth year, and before entering Thetford academy be teaching one term i the Morgan district, near his home. the school-house still stands unchanged. With the exception of $243 dollars furnished by his father, young Eaton paid the entire expense of his education from his own earnings.

He was ordained minister of the gospel, and in August, 1861, he became chaplain of the 27th Ohio Volunteer Infantry. In the fall of 1861 he was taken prisoner at Lexington, Mo. When our troops retired from Springfield, MO., he volunteered to stay behind with Colonel, now Major-General, J. W. Fuller, of Toledo, O. , who was sick and expected to die, becoming again a prisoner in the Confederate lines, and while there was called upon to preach to the Confederate soldiers. The colonel, however, recovered, and they were both allowed to reach the Union lines at Rolla in safety.

In 1862 he became brigade sanitary inspector. He was appointed by General Grant in Nov., 1862 superintendent of the colored people, who came into the lines of his army by the thousands and tens of thousands in northern Alabama, western Tennessee, and northern Mississippi. His supervision extended with the operations of the Army of Tennessee from Cairo to the mouth of the Red river, and up the Arkansas to Fort Smith, and came to embrace also the care of thousands of white refugees that flocked to the Federal lines, and were furnished food, clothing, and medicines, and sent to places of safety. He had an office and force of assistants at each military post. Under his administration the colored people were, as far as possible, made self-supporting, and all possible forms of industry were devised for them. They were cooks, nurses in the hospitals, laborers in the army; thousands and thousands of cabins were built, wood cut, cotton, corn, and vegetables raised. marriage obligations were enforce, schools were established in benevolent teachers from the North did great service. These schools became largely self-supporting. His camps, it is estimated, furnished over 70,000 colored soldiers.

Chaplain Eaton became colonel of the 63rd Colored infantry, and was made brigadier-general by brevet, and May, 1865, assistant commissioner of the FreedmanŐs Bureau, and was ordered to Washington, D.C.

In 1866, General Eaton founded and was editor of the Memphis Post, a daily, weekly and tri-weekly Republican paper. In 1867 he was elected state superintendent of public instruction for Tennessee and accrued the attendance of 185,000 pupils in new schools. He was appointed United States Commissioner of Education by General Grant, and assumed the duties of the office in March, 1870, when the office had only two clerks, not over a hundred volumes belonging to it, and no museum of educational illustrations and appliances. He served as commissioner till August, 1886, though in the fall of 1885 he had tendered his resignation and had been elected president of Marietta (Ohio) college, and had moved there with his family; but, at the request of the administration, he retained the responsibilities of the Bureau of Education till the date noted. under his direction the bureau became exchange of educational thought and fact for the entire country. It noted the progress, experience, and methods of education the world over, and conveyed its information to school officers, teachers , educational workers and writers in every county and city of the United States. The clerical force of the bureau was increased to thirty-eight, the library was enlarged to 18,000 volumes and 46,000 pamphlets. His publications and opinions were sought in every part of the world where there is progress in education, and were translated into most remote languages as those of Finland and Japan.

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Lucien Bonaparte Eaton (brother of John Eaton), 65th Ohio Vol Infantry.

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The History of Sutton, NH by Augusta H. Worthen. pages 1070-1. Transcribe by Don Davis 8/1/00

Lucien Bonaparte Eaton was so named from his father's brother. He worked on the farm, attending the commons school in the Eaton district (of Sutton), and sometimes in the Morgan district, and in the Gore until fifteen years of age, when he went to the academy at Thetford, Vt. He afterwards attended the academy at Orford couple of terms. He entered Phillips academy at Andover, Mass, in 1854, and graduated in 1855, and thereupon entered Dartmouth college and graduated in 1859. While in college he taught school winters. He spent the fall of 1859 reading law with Hon. George Collamer, at Woodstock, Vt. In December, 1859, he became principal of the Hudson street grammar school, in Cleveland, Ohio. Early in October, 1861, he resigned and entered the 65th Ohio Vol. Infantry as a second lieutenant. The teachers of Cleveland presented him with a sword. He raised a part of a company in Cleveland, and, reporting to his regiment at Mansfield, Ohio, was commissioned first lieutenant. His regiment served with the 'Army of the Cumberland.' He participated in nearly all the campaigns and battles in which that army was engaged. He was the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stone River, Chickamauga, Missionary Ridge, Rocky Face Ridge, Resaca, New Hope Church, and many skirmishes and minor engagements. After the battle of Stone River he commissioned captain, and served as brigade inspector on the staff of Gen. Charles G. Harker, who was killed at Kenesaw Mountain. In 1864, just before the last named battle, having been appointed leiutenant-colonel of the 69th U.S.C.Q., he was ordered to Arkansas, and was afterward appointed colonel of that regiment. He served as inspector of the freedmanŐs department for that state.

At the close of the war he settled in Memphis. He became interested in mercantile houses in Memphis and Lagrange, Tenn., and in Cornith, Miss., but devoted himself to the study of law. In 1866 he joined his brother, Gen. John Eaton, then editing and publishing the Memphis Daily Post, as an assistant, and in 1867, on Gen. Eaton's being elected state superintendent of public instruction for Tennessee, he became editorial and business manager of the Post. In 1868 he was elected and served as a member of the board of education for the city of Memphis. Early in 18709 the Post was discontinued, and he appointed by President U. S. Grant united States marshal for the western district of Tennessee, and serve till April, 1877, when he resigned. His term of service as U. S marshal was during the reconstruction and ku-klux era, and four of his deputies marshals were killed. In 1872 he was admitted to the bar; in 1877 he began the active practice of the profession. He, however, devoted much of his time to the purchase and improvement of real estate. He was one of the very few who had the courage to buy real estate in Memphis after the great yellow fever epidemics of 1878 and '79. He now owns several thousand acres of cotton land in Shelly county, and hundreds of houses in the city of Memphis, and has one of the largest rent-rolls on any of the capitalist of Memphis and Shelly counties, and of the firm of Eaton & Smith, lumber dealers. He is a member of the Knights of Honor, of the Historical Society, of the American Public Health Association, and of the American Social Science Congress.

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Dr. George H. Hubbard. 2d. NH Regiment.

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The History of Sutton, NH by Augusta H. Worthen. page 1110. Transcribe by Don Davis 8/1/00

‘.Sally M. (Jones) , m. Sept. 26, 1844, Dr. George H. Hubbard, b. in Sutton. He was then practicing medicine at Bradford Centre. Later the moved to Manchester. When the war broke out he went as surgeon with the 2d N.H. Regiment, was promoted to brigade surgeon and medical director, and was ordered to the valley of the Mississippi. Toward the close of the war he was commissioned to establish and have charge of a hospital for convalescents at Lansingburgh, N.Y., and soon afterward moved his family there.’ He died Jan. 18, 1876 in Lansingburgh.

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John C. TWOMBLY

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"The History of Bristol, NH" by Richard Musgrove, and John's war record and pension record from Washington, DC. Submited by poealexan@altavista.net

John C. Twombly, father of George Twombly, enlisted in Hill, NH. He lied about his birth
date, probably because he was to old to be accepted in the Army.  He was wounded on May 3rd at Chancellorsville, was captured by the Rebs, and was part of a prisoner exchange at US Ford, VA on May 15th.  He lost his left arm, and was mustered out of the Army on Oct. 26, 1863. 

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Lieut. Charles H. FARLEY

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History of Hollis New Hampshire, Samuel T. Worcester, Press of O. C. Moore, 1879. Transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Son of Dea. Leonard W. and Clarissa (Butterfield) Farley, was born in Hollis July 31, 1835, and died at Lake City, Florida, February 24, 1864, aet. 28 years and six months. Calmly weighing the consequences, and acting from a deep sense of duty, he was among the first of the young men of Hollis to enlist in the service of his country. Early in the fall of 1861 he volunteered as a private soldier in the 7th New Hampshire regiment, and on the organization of Company H he was appointed Orderly Sergeant. June 30, 1862, he was promoted to 2nd Lieutenant, and to 1st Lieutenant August 6, 1863. He faithfully served with his regiment in Florida and South Carolina through the years 1862 and 1863, and till mortally wounded at the battle of Olustee, Florida, February 20, 1864.

Lieut. Farley was one of the gallant band who fought their way into Fort Wagner on the night of July 18, 1863. Wading the ditch and scaling the parapet under a raking fire of the enemy, he stood by the side of the brave and lamented Col. Putnam, when he fell, fighting the enemy hand to hand with his revolver. He was twice

struck with balls, one passing through his clothes, without serious injury, the other warded off by the testament in his pocket which probably saved his life. He remained till the fall of Col. Putnam and the retreat ordered.

The battle of Olustee commenced on the afternoon of February 20, and Lieutenant Farley was mortally wounded in the first part of it. The Union troops were soon driven from the part of the field where he fell, and he was taken prisoner, and carried by the enemy to Lake City, about twenty miles distant. He was found the next day in a confederate hospital by two ladies formerly from New Hampshire, taken to their own home and kindly cared for by them, and also by the rebel Surgeon. But all efforts to save his life were unavailing, and he expired four days after the battle. His funeral was attended by the Mayor of Lake City, his remains kindly interred in the public burial ground, and afterwards removed for burial at Hollis in the family burial lot. Rev. Dr. Day in a tribute to his memory, delivered at his funeral at Hollis, says of Lieutenant Farley, "That at the early age of sixteen he made a public profession of religion and united with the Baptist church in Hollis, and ever after till his death lived a consistent Christian life. He never fell into any of the vices so common in the camp, never resorted to the gaming table, to the intoxicating cup nor to the fumes of the poisonous weed. As an officer he was a universal favorite. The soldiers knew him so well, that for him to indicate his wishes, was authority. He never threatened, censured harshly nor spoke defiantly. His courage was never doubted, and no one ever saw him agitated, hurried or disconcerted on the eve of battle. He was calm, self-possessed and trustful in that Providence in which he had been taught to believe, and which was a cardinal point in his religious faith."

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Lieut. John H. WORCESTER

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History of Hollis New Hampshire, Samuel T. Worcester, Press of O. C. Moore, 1879. Transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Son of John N. and Sarah (Holden) Worcester, was born in Hollis, January 18, 1839. In his boyhood he attended the public schools in Hollis, and afterwards had the benefit of a good academic education. Before the Southern Rebellion he had been a student at the law school at Cambridge, and at the commencement of the civil

war he was nearly ready to engage in the practice of his intended profession with flattering prospects of success. But when the nation summoned its young men to its defence, his love of country and stern sense of duty found from him a prompt response.

In the summer of 1861, he enlisted as a private soldier in Company H, of the Seventh New Hampshire regiment, and upon its organization was chosen Second Lieutenant of his company. In June, 1862, upon the resignation of the First Lieutenant, (Potter,) Lieutenant Worcester was promoted to his place, and was afterwards constantly in the service with his regiment, in Florida and South Carolina, till his decease at Hilton Head, S. C., July 26, 1863, aet. 24 years and 6 months.

The Seventh regiment was present and took part in the fearful and bloody assault upon Fort Wagner, S. C., on the evening of July 18, 1863. Lieutenant Worcester having succeeded, at the head of his men, in gaining the top of the parapet of the Fort, while cheering them on, was severely wounded in his left leg, so that when the order to retreat was given, he was unable to leave the field. Having remained all night on the battle ground, he was taken prisoner, the next morning, carried into Charleston, his leg amputated, and on the 25th he was returned under a flag of truce, sent to Hilton Head and put on board a vessel to be sent north with other wounded men. But the following night the gangrene struck his limb, and before morning he breathed his last. When he found he could not live, he calmly resigned himself to his fate, and said to a wounded comrade lying at his side, "Give my love to my men, and say to them that I shall be with them no more, and tell my friends at home all you know of me." His remains were buried at Hilton Head, under a military escort, and afterwards disinterred, taken to Hollis and buried in the family cemetery.

In a tribute to his memory on the occasion of his funeral at Hollis, Rev. Dr. Day said of him, "Lieutenant Worcester was just the man the country wanted. Firm in his convictions, active and forcible, he was a right arm of strength in her service. Nature had fitted him for a popular and successful officer. His form was large and commanding. He had a happy faculty of mingling with his men freely and socially, and yet maintaining a complete command of them. It was a command, not common in the army--that of respect and love. He endeavored to make the most of his men by increasing their virtues. His counsel and example were always against the use of intoxicating drinks, tobacco, profanity and gambling, and he knew how to urge his views upon others without giving offence."

Dr. Boynton, the regimental Surgeon, wrote of him, "No officer in the regiment was before Lieutenant Worcester in promise. He was a general favorite with officers and men, and no one whose lot it was to fall on that fatal night was more universally lamented." Lieutenant Potter, to whose place Lieutenant Worcester was promoted, in a short obituary notice says of him: "Lieutenant Worcester in the discharge of every duty was faithful and persevering. No effort was too great for him if he could benefit the condition of a private soldier or serve a friend. Such honesty--such fidelity--such energy and such kindness won for him the highest esteem of all who knew him. His character was unexceptionable--his habits strictly temperate--his principles unwavering. His service short, faithful and earnest, is ended. But his example still lives, and will be felt so long as a remnant of his company shall survive."

The JOHN H. WORCESTER Post of the Grand Army, composed of his surviving comrades in the war, in and about Hollis, was so named, on its organization, from an affectionate and respectful regard for his memory.

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Lieut. Milan D. SPAULDING

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Son of Dauphin (the elder), enlisted, Sept. 10, 1861 mustered in, Sept. 17, 1861, as a private; appointed sergeant; re-enlisted and mustered in Jan. 1, 1864; appointed 1st sergeant, July 1, 1864; 1st lieut., Nov. 4, 1864; discharged, May 11, 1865. He was a Sullivan boy, but was credited to Keene, unfortunately, at his re-enlistment. He had a marvellous record of good health, bravery, and endurance. These dates are taken from Ayling's Register. The dates he gave himself were: enlisted, Sept. 11, 1861; promoted to corporal, July 1, 1863; to sergeant, Dec. 4, 1863; re-enlisted, Jan. 1, 1864; promoted to 1st sergeant, July 8, 1864; 1st lieut., Nov. 30, 1864. He was in command of his company from the latter date to May 11, 1865, when he was honorably discharged. "With the exception of chills, he did not see a sick day in the service. He was in every engagement (and the list is an exceedingly long one) in which his regiment was engaged, except 1st Bull Run and Drury's Bluff. He was never in the hospital, never rode a step on any march, and came home without a scratch." This regiment was in many of the greatest battles of the war. No Sullivan man ever had a finer war record. He resided at Fitchburg, Mass.

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Corpl. David W. COLBURN

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Credited to Manchester, Hillsborough; claimed esidence in Goffstown, elisted 9 may 1861, age 21, promoted Sergeant Jan 1 1863, promoted First Sergeant May 1 1863; killed Gettysburgs, PA July 2, 1863. 
The 2nd New Hampshire Infantry was ordered forward at about 1 'clock on the afternoon of July 2. The officers, waving swords and shouting commands, directed the men toward the edge of Joseph Sherfy's peach orchard. The men lay down as Union artillery behind them fired shells over their heads. Confederate guns responded and the men hugged the ground attempting to escape the storm of iron that flew inches above them. As a brigade of South Carolina soldiers approached, the shaken New Hampshire men rose and fired their first rounds into the gray shadows ahead of them. David stood at his post directly behind his men, encouraging them to keep up their fire. Sometime during the fighting, Sgt. Colburn was at his post when he was struck in the head and died within seconds.
The regiment was forced to retreat, leaving their dead and wounded behind and to the mercy of the Confederates. His comrades never recovered David Colburn's body, though his remains probably lay in the Gettysburg Soldiers National Cemetery as an unknown. He was just 21 years old.      

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Private Charles T. BATCHELDER

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Pittsfield, NH in the Great Rebellion Author: H. L. Robinson (1893), transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Born Northwood, son of John Batchelder and his wife, Martha C. (Willard), were natives of Loudon, subsequently moved to Pittsfield, where Charles learned the trade of shoemaking; but his taste for musical instruments led him to construct violins, of which he made quite a number. He enlisted Sept 7 1861 mustered into the service Sept 18, 1861. While doing guard duty he contracted a severe cold, which produced pneumonia, and he was honorably discharged disabled Hilton Head, SC Dec 5 1861; He immediately returned home, and died from the effects of the disease March 27, 1862, aged 19 years, 4 months. This being the first death of a soldier in town, it created much interest. At his death the military guard was selected from the citizens of the town who could procure a musket. Some of these guns were of the old-fashioned flint-lock kind. The services were held in the Congregational church, and all the clergymen of the town took part in the exercises.

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Private William Knight COBB

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Pittsfield, NH in the Great Rebellion Author: H. L. Robinson (1893), transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Credited to Manchester, Hillsborough; for whom the G. A. R. post in Pittsfield was named, was a son of John B. and Elizabeth (Knight) Cobb, and was born in East Pittsfield near Jenness pond, Dec 6, 1843. When he was six years old, in 1849, his father bought a house on Watson street in the village. Here Willard lived, attending school and working at his trade, shoemaking, until he enlisted Sept 18, 1861. He entered this battalion as a private, afterwards was promoted to corporal, then to sergeant. He was with the regiment in South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, and Virginia. He was in over twenty engagements, many of them regular battles. He was wounded at Drury's Bluff, Va., May 16, 1864. He was then on his second term of service, having reenlisted Jan 30, 1864. After his wound healed he obtained a furlough, came home, and after a short visit returned to the army, and in the next engagement was killed at Chapin's Farm, Va., Sept 29, 1864. An old lady, speaking of one of the Revolutionary soldiers in this town, said, "He was a good Christian, a good soldier, and a good citizen." This is the highest eulogy that can be bestowed upon any man. Everything is combined in these words. But the same remark will apply to Willard Cobb. Perhaps he was not a communicant of any church, nor a subscriber to any creed, yet he followed the precepts of the Christian faith, and, as a boy and young man, was worthy of all positions to which he was called. As a citizen he was exemplary, as a soldier he ranked with the best, and it was eminently proper that his name should be chosen with which to christen our Grand Army post. He was a representative of the rank and file,--of the men who carried the rifles, who built the fortifications and fought the battles, but, alas, got but little of the honor and none of the glory. These were reserved for the officers of high rank.

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Private William T. BATCHELDER

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Pittsfield, NH in the Great Rebellion,  Author: H. L. Robinson (1893);  transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Came to Pittsfield about 1854 to work on a farm for a Mrs. Berry who lived on the east side of Catamount, and whom he subsequently married. He was a native of Loudon, where he was born Sept 25, 1823. His parents were Jonathan and Lois (Wells) Batchelder. Enlisted in Aug 22, 1862. He was in all of the battles that this distinguished battalion participated in until the Battle of Cold Harbor, where he was severely wounded in his left shoulder, and rendered unfit for further service. He was one of those soldiers who would always grumble; if everything was going smoothly he would find fault, if anything went wrong he would scold harder than ever. At Chancellorsville he was wounded in the head, but still he kept on fighting and when the order came to fall back, though the blood was running over his face and clothes, he called out,--"What is the use of retreating? I thought we came out to fight, and we might as well fight now as any time." When told that it was orders from headquarters he said,--"I thought Joe Hooker knew something! Call him-`fighting Joe'--he do n't half fight;" and turning to his comrades he said, "Let us go back and give them rebels the d--l." He was a man of rather small stature, yet from the Wilderness to Cold Harbor he carried a musket and a spade. When ordered to intrench, he would stick his bayonet and gun in the ground and scold because he could not fight; then when the rebels would attack before his trench was done, and he had to seize his gun to drive them back, he would scold because he could not finish his trench. In private life he was a good citizen and a very quiet man. He died in Pittsfield, June 24, 1891, of disease contracted in the army.

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Capt. Asa W. BARTLETT

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Pittsfield, NH in the Great Rebellion,  Author: H. L. Robinson (1893);  transcribed by Fred Kunchick

Born at Epping, N. H., Augt 29, 1839. His parents moved to Pittsfield when Asa was quite small. Here he got his education in the town schools and academy, working on a farm and studying for the profession of law until the spring of 1859, when he went West. There he taught school and continued his studies. Being a ready speaker, he took an active part in the political campaign of 1860 in behalf of Abraham Lincoln, and in other campaigns until 1886. He returned home in 1862, and August 21 of that year he enlisted in Company F, Twelfth New Hampshire volunteers, as a drummer, being of too small stature to go in the ranks. He was soon detailed as clerk, and served in different departments until he became sergeant-major of his regiment. March 3, 1864, he was made a second lieutenant of Company G, and on July 15, 1864, he was made first lieutenant, and, finally, he was commissioned as captain of Company C, same regiment, September 28, 1864. He was with his regiment in the battles of Chancellorsville, Swift Creek, Relay House, Drury's Bluff, and Port Walthall. He had a thrilling experience in the fight and retreat from the first-named battle, when he took the national flag from the hands of a wounded color-bearer and succeeded, in spite of rebel Mini‚s and a sweeping storm of shot and shell, in carrying the flag safely from the field. During his term of service he acted in many different capacities, besides performing his duties as a line officer in command of a company, some of which were quite important and responsible. He was selected by General Wistar to act for some time as judge advocate general. For a while he performed the duties of chief signal officer for the Army of the James, having had but three weeks' instruction, although all the old signal officers had had six months' study and drill. He was the only one of several examined who was found able to do quick signalling, and in a few days was given charge of the important transmission and observation station on the Bermuda Front, known as Butler's or Cobb Hill tower, where he was for several days a target for Whitworth projectiles. A picture of Bartlett and this tower appears in Butler's book, page 680. Later, while in charge of Crow's Nest tower near Dutch Gap, he was under fire of five of the enemy's guns, three of them 200-pound rifles, from nine o'clock a. m. until four p. m. During that time the tower received one hundred and sixty-five shot, and he was standing in it one hundred and thirty feet from the ground. A soldier who visited this tower soon after said,--"I don't believe there was a whole stick left in the structure; all were either splintered or broken. Even the boards of the platform on which Bartlett and his companion stood were broken by pieces of shell that had burst below them." At the battle of Chapin's Farm, Bartlett found that two cannon had been planted the night before just across the river on purpose to knock him out of the tower while the heavier guns of Howlett's battery were trying to knock it down. No wonder that when the "ball" opened on that eventful day, he turned to his flagman and remarked, "We might as well make our peace with God, for we shall never get out of this alive." Yet, strange to say and impossible as it seems, though the platform, posts, ladders, and braces were rent, splintered, and broken, the tower stood, and they did get out of it not only alive but unhurt. Captain Bartlett has informed the writer that though it was a mighty "uncertain balance of chances," he has once or twice stood in places of greater danger, but never where it required greater nerve power to control himself. "To keep your eye," said he, "steadily on the glass and keep cool enough to catch and interpret every switch of the distant flag through the smoke of battle, while a 200-pound shell explodes within the tower directly beneath you, and spiteful percussion 10-pounders are flying around your head, is not, as you can imagine, a very easy thing to do. There is an almost irresistible impulse to let the message, however important it may be, go to the d(???)l, and look around and see if you are not going the same way yourself." He continued in the signal service until December, 1864, when by reason of sickness and meritorious conduct he was given a three-months furlough by General Ord. At the end of that time, March 18, 1865, he wrote his resignation while lying sick, as he had been most of the time during his furlough, on what it was thought would be his death-bed. It was two years before he was able to resume the active duties of life. After serving for a time as judge advocate on General Wistar's staff he was recommended by that officer for promotion as post judge advocate, with rank of lieutenant-colonel. At nearly the same time a position as signal officer was tendered him, which he accepted, preferring an active life at the front to a station at Fortress Munroe. Comrade Bartlett is still living in this town, and is well known throughout the state as a vigorous speaker. A comrade tells the following incident: "The Twelfth regiment was being moved from one part of the field to another, when they passed a signal tower, at the foot of which General Devens (I think) sat on his horse, fretting because no officer could stay in it long enough to take a dispatch without being wounded. `I can take that dispatch,' said Bartlett to a comrade. `Very well then, my little man, go up and take it,' said the general, who overheard the remark. Bartlett ran up the ladder like a squirrel, took the dispatch and repeated down, and then came down as fast as he could. The men had nearly all passed, and in the meantime the enemy had brought another battery to bear, and before Bartlett had gotten away they knocked it over, so that the timbers in falling struck near him, while the amateur signal officer ran away, clapping his hands and laughing like a school boy at a game of ball." Rev. J. A. Chamberlin, a member of the Christian Commission, tells the following story: "I was sitting in General Wistar's tent when Capt. A. W. Bartlett was announced, and a slight boyish figure entered. Had I seen him anywhere I should have thought him the young son of some officer who had taken his boy out to let him see something of the war. General Wistar motioned him to a seat, and commenced to ask him questions. These were readily answered--in fact before I could comprehend them the answer came, and it proved always correct. When the examination was through Bartlett said, "General, may I ask a question?" "Yes, sir," was the answer. Then Bartlett stated his question. "I don't know," General Wistar replied, "what would you do in such a case?" "I don't know either," answered Bartlett; "if I had known I should not have asked the question. It occurred to me such a case might arise and I asked for information." As Bartlett left the tent the general turned to Mr. Chamberlin and inquired, "Have you any more such little boys up in New Hampshire?"

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John Ed. BROWN, 15th New Hampshire, Co. G

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History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens by John Scales, editor Dover Daily Democrat, published by Richmond-Arnold Publishing Co., F.J. Richmond, Pres; C.R. Arnold, Sec and Treas., Chicago, Ill., ©1914 Chapter XLVII, History of Strafford III, Strafford's Patriotic Record (1861-1863); transcribed by Cathy Parziale

In July, 1860, John E. Brown married Miss Lizzie Leeds. He was in the tin business, and had a shop on Main street. He was a native of Pittsfield, born August 2, 1834; a son of Lowell and Hannah (Lane) Brown. He enlisted and was mustered Oct 11, 1862. After he went into camp a son was born to him. He served with his regiment until his term expired, and was mustered out Aug 13, 1863. While at Camp Parapet near New Orleans, he was taken sick from exposure, and when the regiment moved up the river he was left at the convalescent camp, and did not rejoin his company until some time in July. He is with the Dover Stamping company, Dover, N. H.

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Albert F. BERRY, 15th New Hampshire, Co. G

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History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens by John Scales, editor Dover Daily Democrat, published by Richmond-Arnold Publishing Co., F.J. Richmond, Pres; C.R. Arnold, Sec and Treas., Chicago, Ill., ©1914 Chapter XLVII, History of Strafford III, Strafford's Patriotic Record (1861-1863); transcribed by Cathy Parziale

He was a son of John and Mary A. (Hogan) Berry, born in Pittsfield, Sept 8, 1841. He attended the public schools and Pittsfield academy. In 1861 he entered the Chandler Scientific school at Hanover. One day in Aug 1862, while at home on a vacation, a friend who had been in the service was with him in his father's store. The old man was very patriotic, and declared that if he was not more than fifty years old he would enlist, as none of his family had done so. Albert said, "I will enlist, father, if you will let me leave college." "Let you leave college!" roared his parent. "D--n it, sir, I will give you five hundred dollars in a minute if you will go." Albert said nothing, but winking to his friend they went to Remick's store, where there was a recruiting office, and enlisted. Returning to his father's store he said very quietly, "I have enlisted." His father rose from his seat, and taking a bunch of keys left the room. In about half an hour he returned, and handing a bank book to Albert, said in his forceful way, "There, my son, I have put a thousand dollars in the bank for you. Now do your duty like a man; if you get injured or are sick come home, I will take care of you as long as you live, but damn you, sir, do n't you run. Remember, if you get shot in the back do n't you ever let me see your face again." This admonition the old man often gave his son before he left for the war. One day at Long Island we crawled out of our "pup" tents, where the rain had kept us for two days, to stretch ourselves and dry our clothes by the campfire, when the sergeant passed down the street with the mail. Among others Albert had a letter from home; after reading it he said, "Father has not got over worrying for fear that I shall get shot in the back." He was mustered in Oct 11, 1862, as a corporal, and was soon after promoted to be sergeant, and was mustered out with his regiment Aug 13, 1863. He was of rather spare build, and he had a pale complexion. Soon after landing in Louisiana, the regiment was inspected by one of those West Point officers who thought he had all the knowledge the world possessed. Coming to Berry, who stood in his place as a file closer, he roared out, "When did you come from the hospital, sir?" "I came from there this morning, sir," replied Berry. "Who is your captain?" demanded the officer. "Captain Osgood," Berry answered. "Captain Osgood," roared the West Pointer, with a look evidently intended to sink that individual into the ground, "how dare you bring a sick man out on inspection?" "I did not know that I had a sick man here," replled Osgood. Berry, seeing that there was a misunderstanding, interposed and said, "I am not sick. You asked me when I came from the hospital; I told you this morning. I had charge of the sick squad and took them over there; but I am not sick, and have not seen a sick day since I was eight years old, when I had the measles." The West Pointer looked him over, as much as to say, "You are a liar, sir," and passed on. Berry stood the trying service finely, never being sent to the surgeon during his term of service. He was a good soldier and a model officer, very cool under fire. During one of the battles at Port Hudson his gun became so foul that he could not ram the ball down. It stuck fast near the muzzle. Taking his knife from his pocket he sat on the ground and began to cut it out. Just then one of his comrades was killed. Berry threw away his gun, and taking that of the dead man continued the fight. though the inspector general considered Comrade Berry a sick man, yet he proved to be one of the hardiest soldiers. During the siege of Port Hudson, which continued forty-six days, and during which time he was constantly under fire, when any one of his comrades became disabled or exhausted he would take his place and do double duty. At one time he was on guard for twenty-four hours without being relieved, and a large part of the time walking the beat of a private who had been obliged to give up from exhaustion. Yet the next day he went into the trenches and did a hard day's work with pick and spade, although according to army regulations he should not have done so. He died at some fort in British America.

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Edgar L. CARR, 15th New Hampshire, Co. G

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History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens by John Scales, editor Dover Daily Democrat, published by Richmond-Arnold Publishing Co., F.J. Richmond, Pres; C.R. Arnold, Sec and Treas., Chicago, Ill., ©1914 Chapter XLVII, History of Strafford III, Strafford's Patriotic Record (1861-1863); transcribed by Cathy Parziale

One of our best known citizens is Dr. E. L. Carr, who was born in Gilmanton, May 12, 1841, a son of Isaac S. and Lucinda J. (Osgood) Carr. When six years old his parents moved to Pittsfield. He worked on his father's farm, and attended the town school at "Upper City" and Pittsfield academy. At the academy he ranked among the best for scholarship. He devoted a large portion of his time to the study of Latin, to fit himself for his chosen profession, and attained great proficiency in the use of the language. In 1861 a large class was formed under the preceptorship of Dr. John Wheeler for the study of medicine. Carr was one of this class. In 1862, however, he laid aside his books, and enlisted in Company G, Fifteenth New Hampshire volunteers, and soon after he was made hospital steward, and served in this capacity until his regiment was mustered out August 13, 1863. At Camp Parapet, La., he was taken sick with malaria, yet when his regiment went up the river to take part in the capture of Port Hudson, so anxious was he to relieve his suffering comrades that he went with them, and performed his duties through that long and terrible siege of forty-six days, his regiment being constantly under fire. When he reached home he was so reduced in strength that he could hardly walk, but the bracing air of New Hampshire soon brought back in a measure his former vigor. He then took up his studies where he had laid them down, and entered Bowdoin Medical college, whence he was graduated in 1864. As all the New Hampshire regiments were supplied with surgeons he went to Boston, and was appointed as assistant surgeon in the Twenty-first Massachusetts infantry. He joined this regiment at Petersburg. At the end of two months, the service of the original members having expired, the remaining men were consolidated with another regiment, and the officers mustered out. Carr had hardly reached Boston when he was appointed as assistant surgeon in the Thirty-fifth regiment Massachusetts infantry, with which he served until the close of the war. He was recommended for promotion as surgeon with the rank of major, but the cessation of hostilities prevented this. When the Thirty-fifth Massachusetts regiment was sent home there was need of a surgeon in the Twenty-ninth Massachusetts infantry, and Carr was appointed to the place June 7, 1865. He served until the regiment was discharged, July 28, 1865. Comrade Carr kept a diary while he was with the last two regiments.

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John CATE, 15th New Hampshire, Co. G

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History of Strafford County, New Hampshire and Representative Citizens by John Scales, editor Dover Daily Democrat, published by Richmond-Arnold Publishing Co., F.J. Richmond, Pres; C.R. Arnold, Sec and Treas., Chicago, Ill., ©1914 Chapter XLVII, History of Strafford III, Strafford's Patriotic Record (1861-1863); transcribed by Cathy Parziale

Was an old man, too old in fact to go to the war, but by the use of hair dye, etc., he managed to elude the vigilance of the mustering officer, and enlisted. Although his hair grew white very fast, he performed his duties like a good soldier. Before the first battle of Port Hudson he gave away all of his little property that he had with him, saying that he should have no further use for it. That day, May 27, 1863, he was wounded, and died at Baton Rouge, La., June 8, 1863.  While in Pittsfield he worked as a farm hand in the eastern part of the town. He was a son of Eben Cate, was born in Chichester, and was grandson of Deacon John Cate, one of the most prominent men of Epsom.

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