Cumberland County ...NJ


On

November 3, 1868

172 women

 (including 4 "colored" women)

voted in Vineland, NJ

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------

The "Women of Vineland" decided to show the world that women not only should vote,
 but could (without disastrous consequences).

      It is hard to imagine that one of the arguments against giving women the right to vote was that it would injure them or cause them great distress. It would upset the orderliness of society and there would be dire consequences.      

     After the Civil War and the ending of that "peculiar institution," slavery, one of the items on the political agenda was suffrage. Should the newly emancipated slaves be given the vote? What about women?

    For the majority of the population giving women the right to vote was not even a consideration. But to some progressive people, it was, absolutely, the right thing to do and the right time to do it. Some of those people lived in Vineland, New Jersey.

-------------------------------------------------------

Why was Vineland, so different?

   Because Vineland was a newly formed community, many progressive people saw it as an opportunity to live in a place where they could help form the community norms. People moved to Vineland from all over the country. Many moving from the West, back East.

    The women deciding to vote was a part of a long series of events.

   

Who were these women and where did they come from?

That is the question I am working on.

I am posting the list of voters.

Note: I was transcribing a handwritten list, spelling could be wrong.

Please be patient it may take a couple minutes to load the list.

If you can help identify any of these women or think that you might be a descendant, please get in touch with me.

Susan Ditmire

 Home ] Up ] Why did it happen in Vineland ] VineVote/voteList.htm ]
 

Return to Cumberland County ALHN Homepage

"History Belongs to All of Us"
Help it come alive,  participate in your local Historic Society.

Site created and maintained by Susan Ditmire, comments & suggestions, always welcome.

The American Local History Network - This site generously hosted by USGenNet(tm)