Edgar C. Emerson's
Town of Hounsfield Family Sketches
excerpted from "Our County & Its People" (1898), Part III

The following seventy family sketches were selected from pages 1 through 276 of Emerson's "Personal References" for their details about individuals with connections to the Town of Hounsfield, Jefferson County, New York.

Online at: http://www.usgennet.org/usa/ny/county/jefferson/hounsfield/emersonfamilies.html
or at hounsfieldhistory.net under "Families"
 
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See also Emerson's History of the Town of Hounsfield

 

Surnames Included:  Use your browser's "Find" function to locate mentions of names that interest you; search thoroughly as many names appear more than once.

Abbey
Abbott
Allen
Augsbury
Ayers
Bagley
Baker
Barnes
Bates
Beattie
Bechtel
Bell
Benjamin
Betts
Bliss
Blodgett
Blood
Bloodgood
Borden
Boulton
Boyce
Brockway
Brown
Buchanan
Burdell
Burgoyne
Burlingame
Burnham
Burns
Cady
Camp
Campbell
Carter
Case
Caulkins
Chadwick
Clarke
Cleveland
Cobb
Conroe
Countryman
Coventry
Crandall
Crouch
Currier
Daily
Davis
Day
De Wolf
Delancey
Desmore
DeWitt
Diets
Dietz
Dillon
Dodge
Dudley
Duffield
Emerson
Eveleigh
Evens
Faulks
Fawdrey
Field
Fish
Fitz Randolph
Foote
Ford
Foster
Fox
Frasier
Freeman
Frelinghuysen
Frink
Fuller
Gillett
Gilmore
Goodrich
Gould
Graham
Grant
Grata
Gray
Green
Grimshaw
Grow
Gurney
Haines
Hale
Hall
Halstead
Hammond
Hancock
Harrington
Harris
Hart
Haskins
Hatfield
Hawes
Hay
Hazen
Helmer
Henry
Hicks
Hinsdale
Hitchcock
Holden
Holdridge
Holloway
Hooker
Hooper
Hoover
Houghton
Hovey
Howard
Hull
Hunt
Hunter
Ingalls
Inglehart
Irvin
Jeffers
Jewett
Johnson
Joiner
Kellogg
Kennedy
Kent
Knight
Lamar
Lamon
Lamphear
Lane
Lawrence
Lee
Leffingwell
Lemke
Lewis
Littlefield
Love
Lowe
Luff
MacGowan
Manley
Marsh
Martin
Mason
McDowell
McGlauchlin
McKee
McMullen
McMurray
McWay
McWayne
Membery
Merz
Metcalf
Miller
Moffatt
Moore
Morgan
Morse
Mould
Mullen
Munn
O'Brien
Olmsted
Orchard
Palmer
Parke
Parrott
Pease
Peck
Pecock
Pennock
Perry
Pettit
Phelps
Phillips
Pickering
Pierce
Pike
Potter
Preston
Putnam
Quael
Read
Reader
Reed
Reynolds
Richardson
Rodgers
Royce
Salisbury
Sargent
Sawyer
Scroxton
Shaw
Sherman
Simons
Smith
Soules
Sparks
Spencer
Starbuck
Steinhilber
Sterling
Stevenson
Stokes
Stone
Stoodley
Sullivan
Swick
Taft
Taylor
Thompson
Thrall
Town
Tracy
Trumble
Tucker
Tyler
Utter
Van Alstyne
Vance
Vanolinda
Wadsworth
Wallace
Walling
Walradt
Walrath
Walsworth
Walter
Ward
Warren
Washburn
Waterbury
Wayne
Weld
Wentworth
Wescott
Westcott
Wheat
Whiley
Whitaker
White
Whittier
Wicks
Wilcox
Wilder
Willard
Wilson
Witt
Woodruff
Wooliver
Woolsey
Wright
Wyeth
Young


Field, B. A., son of Safford E. and Phoebe (Allen) Field, was born in Houndsfield in 1853, which place was his parents' native town. His grandparents were natives of Vermont, and his father's father located at Field's Settlement in 1806. On his mother's side his ancestors were descendants from the old Ethan Allen stock; on his father's, they were a branch of that family of which David Dudley and Stephen Field are members. Brayton A. was graduated from the Watertown High School in 1873, and from Dartmouth College in 1878. He then became principal of Proctor Academy, Andover, N. H., and in 1883 began the study of law with O'Brien & Emerson. He was admitted to the bar April 20, 1886, and has since been in practice in Watertown.

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Willard, Edward S., M. D., was born at Fairfield, Herkimer county, N. Y., September 3, 1853, and was educated at Fairfield Academy and Dansville Seminary, He began the study of medicine in 1875 with his brother, Dr. Isaac N. Willard, and was in attendance on lectures at Albany Medical College during 1878, 1879 and 1880, graduating from there March 3, 1880. He practiced for two years and three months in Adams, six years and a half at Fairfield, and for the past eight years has been located in Watertown, N. Y. Previous to, and during lectures, he was engaged in teaching school. Dr. Willard held the office of coroner three years in Herkimer county, and served as health officer while in Adams and Fairfield. Dr. Willard comes from a family of physicians, having three uncles, two cousins and a brother who have been or are engaged in the practice of medicine. He is the youngest son of Charles W. Willard, late of Fairfield, Herkimer county, N. Y., and grandson of Col. Charles Willard who was doing service at Sacket Harbor when peace was declared in the war of 1812. The family are of colonial stock, tracing their descent from Major Simon Willard who came to this country from England in 1634, and was one of the founders of Concord, N. H., and for thirty-five years a member of the General Assembly of the colony.

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Olmsted, William P., the eldest son of Jabez and Orpha (Knight) Olmsted, was born in the town of Houndsfield, Jefferson county, N.Y., February 27, 1836. He removed with his parents to the town of Watertown when he was an infant and where he was educated and has since resided. After obtaining' a liberal education from the public schools he was employed by his father on the farm and at the age of twenty-one began business on his own account. He now makes a specialty of raising sheep and calves, in which he has been very successful. Mr. Olmsted has never been married, preferring a quiet, single life. He has the happy faculty of making friends and is highly esteemed by all who know him.

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Hooker, George S., a native of Jefferson county, was born in 1848 at Sacket Harbor, his ancestors on both sides being among the first settlers of that village. He commenced the study of law with Starbuck & Sawyer and was admitted to practice in 1877, which he still continues in and has served as city attorney for three years. He has also served three terms as member of the Board of Education and is now president of the board.

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Greene, A. J., was born in the town of Adams, December 15, 1832. His father, Joseph Greene, was a native of Berlin, Rensselaer county, and went from there to Brookfield, where he married Clarissa, daughter of Oliver White. In 1817 they moved to Jefferson county and settled at Greene's Settlement, where he was identified as a farmer He was one of the founders of the Seventh Day Baptist church and died in 1864. A. J. Greene was educated at Adams Seminary, and carried on farming until 1861, when he engaged in the hotel business and in 1866 engaged in the mercantile business, continuing up to 1891, then gave his attention to farming and dealing in horses and stock. In 1855 he married Mary L., daughter of Joseph Hull; she died in 1889, and he then married Terressa V. Greene, and they have two children, Benjamin M. and Janie B. Mr. Greene traces his descent from John Greene, who landed on the Rhode Island coast about 1639. Joseph Greene and Oliver White, grandfathers of Mr. Greene, both served in the Revolutionary war, and his father served in the war of 1812 at Sacket Harbor.

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Walrath, Walter H., the subject of this sketch, was born in the town of Orleans, June 9, 1845, a son of Alonzo Walrath and Kate M. (Walter) Walrath. His grandfather, Martin Walter, was a soldier in the war of 1813 and was at the battle of Sacket Harbor, having marched from the Mohawk and saw the British retreat at that battle. His grandmother, Polly Walter, survived to the good old age of ninety-six years. His father, Alonzo Walrath, was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, a member of Co. E, 186th Regt, and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Mr. Walrath at the age of sixteen years began teaching and followed that occupation till his twenty-third year. In 1868 he married Marion E. Henry of Depauville, N. Y, Two children were born to them: Ethel B., wife of C. A. Snell, and Charlie A., who died in 1888. Mr. Walrath followed farming in the towns of Lyme and Clayton, being a noted breeder of Jersey cattle, till 1888, when he went into the mercantile business at Lafargeville, N. Y., which he has successfully conducted to the present time. Mrs. Walrath, in connection with her husband's business, has a millinery department which attracts an extensive trade in Lafargeville and vicinity. At the first organization of the Grange in Jefferson county, Mr. Walrath identified himself with the order and was master of Three Mile Bay and also of St. Lawrence Grange for several years. He was also director of the Jefferson County P. F. R. Insurance Company for sixteen years and helped to place that institution on a firm basis. He has been a member of the M. E. Church for twenty-two years and has been a member of the official board of the church nearly all of the time. Politically Mr. Walrath was a Republican prior to Grant's second term, since which time he has worked with the Democrats and the Prohibitionists, For several years he has been the efficient secretary of Lafargeville Lodge No. 171, P. & A. M., and is a consistent believer in the principles of the order. He is an esteemed citizen and enjoys a large circle of acquaintances in the county and State.

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Grow, William R., was born in the town of Watertown, September , 1852, a son of Oliver W. and Luthera (Rodgers) Grow. Oliver W. was born in Hotmdsfield, April 16, 1818, a son of Oliver Grow, born in Vermont, and was among the first settlers at Houndsfield, where he died in 1859. Oliver W. was married December 31, 1839. He spent forty-six years on the old homestead and then moved to Oswego county and at East Boylston was in the mercantile business. In 1866 he moved to the village of Lorraine and there lived until his death, which occurred on September 6, 1886. In politics he was a Republican and was postmaster for several years. Mrs. Grow died July 12, 1895, The maternal grandfather was killed by lightning about 1832. To Oliver W. Grow and wife were born four sons: Alonzo W., of Iowa; E. J. D., a hardware merchant of Lorraine; William R. and George F. William R. Grow was educated in the common schools and at the age of twenty engaged in pickling eggs at Lorraine in partnership with L. F. Caulkins and carried on a very successful business for about twenty-one years, having done the largest business in the State. In 1892 Mr. Grow bought out Mr. Caulkins and has since continued the business alone. This is one of the oldest and most successful firms in the State. Mr. Grow has a farm of fifty acres and also has a fine residence and a store building occupied by a brother for a hardware store, and in 1880 built in partnership with Mr. Caulkins an egg building 26 by 104, afterward arranged for the store now occupied by C. L. Tucker & Co., and owns an interest in the Lorraine Village Cheese Factory. Mr. Grow was first married in 187S to Polly Grimshaw, adopted daughter of Joseph Grimshaw; she died in February, 1884, and in November, 1886, he married Anna Hitchcock, widow of Adelbert Hitchcock. Mr. Grow is a member of Rising Sun Lodge No. 234, F. & A. M. In politics he is a Republican and was town clerk several years and supervisor four years. They attend and support the M. E. church, of which Mrs. Grow is a member. Mr. Grow and Mr. Caulkins were for some years with F. D. Pierce in the egg business at Limerick, where they did an extensive business, and at present Mr. Grow is engaged with D. C. Dodge of Pulaski, in the same business and has been for about fifteen years.

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Fawdrey, William C., M. D., was bom in Albany, N. Y., December 23, 1860, & son of Henry and Sarah (Cady) Fawdrey; Henry was a son of Daniel Fawdrey, a native of England; he and his wife, a Miss Fox, came to the United States and located at Sacket Harbor about 1834, and there lived and died. Henry Fawdrey was born at Sacket Harbor, and educated at Union Academy of Belleville and Union College. He engaged in teaching for a time and was then in the commission business at Albany for about thirty years, and in 1894 came to Sacket Harbor and located on the old homestead, where he lives retired. He was a very prominent Mason in the city of Albany, also a member of K. of P. Dr. Fawdrey was reared in Albany and educated in the public schools and was graduated from the Albany High School in the class of 1881. He studied medicine with Dr. T. K. Perry of Albany, and graduated from the Albany Medical College March 4, 1885. He began his practice that same year at Barnes Corners, Lewis county, N.Y., and after three years came to Lorraine, where he has since had a very successful practice. Dr. Fawdrey is a Republican in politics, a member of Rising Sun Lodge No. 234, F. & A. M., and of Jefferson County Medical Society.

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Helmer, Albert E., was born on his father's farm in Leray township two miles north of Evans Mills, December 18, 1860. When eleven years old his parents moved to the village, where he attended school until he entered the employ of J. Philip Steinhilber in the drug and grocery business, where he remained four years, succeeding Mr. Steinhilber February 21, 1885, and has continued the business ever since. Mr. Helmer is also extensively engaged in farming, dairying and cheese-making; in the latter business he is associated with his cousin, Leonard Helmer, the two operating a factory near Evans Mills, the output of which is enormous, while the quality, owing to the care used in production, is of the finest and commands an extensive as well as ready sale. In politics Mr. Helmer has always been a Democrat and is one of the leading men of that party in his section, and only for the great political odds numerically against his party, would have enjoyed its honors to a very high degree. He was town clerk for ten years, from 1882 to 1892, was delegate to the State Convention in 1888, a candidate for member of assembly in 1892, and served as postmaster of Evans Mills from 1892 to 1897. He is a member of the Jeffersonian Club of Watertown and was for several years its vice president. Mr. Helmer's maternal grandfather, Peter Hoover, served his country against the British during the war of 1812 and fought at the battle of Sacket Harbor. September 30, 1890, Mr. Helmer married Frances A., daughter of Leonard Peck of Evans Mills, and they had three children: Albert (died in infancy), Gertrude M. and Alice Irene. The oft quoted saying, "A prophet is not without honor save in his own country" does not apply to Mr. Helmer's case. It is at home, in the community where he was born and reared, that he is held in the highest esteem as a politician, business man and honored citizen.

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Fawdrey, John, was born in the town of Hounsfield, September 22, 1836; was educated in the district schools and is one of the town's best farmers. June 21, 1861, he married Caroline Harris of Wolf's Island, Canada, and they had four children: Alice G., George (died at age of twelve), Walter and May. Mr. Fawdrey's father, Daniel Fawdrey, was born in Oxfordshire, England, December 10, 1810; he was educated there and is a farmer by occupation. In 1833 he married Sussana Faulks of his native place, and came to the United States and located in this town; they had seven children: Henry, John, David (who is a noted physician in Watertown), Elizabeth, James, Mary Ann and Caroline. Daniel Fawdrey died January 5, 1880, and his widow December 1, 1880, Mrs. Caroline Fawdrey's father, John Harris, was born in Oxfordshire, England, in 1810; was educated there and was a millwright by occupation. In 1833 he married Ann Faulks of his native place and came to the United States in 1834, locating in the town of Houndsfield. They had six children: Caroline, John J., Luther, Christopher, Maria and William. Mr. Harris died in 1882 and his widow in 1888.

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Read, G. Daniel, was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., December 30, 1830. He was
educated in the public schools, and upon the death of his father, at the age of sixteen, he took charge of the general merchandise business which his late father had carried on, assisted by his sister Susan, until the death of his mother in 1893, when the business was discontinued and he was made executor of her will and the estate was settled up satisfactorily to all parties interested. In 1894 he erected his store and is conducting a fine grocery business. He is also doing a large fire insurance business for the best companies in the State and in Hartford, Conn. March 10,1894, he married Grace S., daughter of John and Fanny Tyler, of Sackets Harbor, and they have one son, Harold E., born August 29, 1896. Mr. Read has held the office of town clerk now in his fifth year, is treasurer of the village and has been one of the trustees. In his political choice he is a thorough Republican. The ancestry of his family is English and Scotch, Mr. Read's father, Robert C., was born in Sackets Harbor, N. Y., February 8, 1832; he received his education in the common schools, was a sailor and afterward a general merchant by occupation. He married Sarah A. Trumble of Sackets Harbor, N. Y., and they had seven children: Herbert C., Susan S., Sarah J., G. Daniel (as above), Lucien S., Harold C. and Emily S. Susan S. married Henry H. Hall of Hillsboro, North Dakota, March 1, 1892. Robert C. Read died February 1, 1888, and Sarah A. Read, his wife, September 18, 1893.

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Van Alstyne, Miles, was born in Canada, August 25, 1858. He was educated at Newburg Academy, Canada, and came to the United States in 1868 and learned the blacksmith's trade at Adams Center. In June, 1884, he moved to Sackets Harbor, where he is doing a first-class general blaeksmithing trade in all its branches, horseshoeing, carriage ironing, wood work and repairing. He also owns a bicycle livery and repair shop, with his son, Everett H., as manager of repairs. September 14, 1877, he married Ella D. Ivory of Adams Center, and they have four children: Everett H., Arthur G., Myrtle, Jennette. Mr. Van Alstyne is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 368, K. of P., the Red Men No. 286, and of Jefferson Union Lodge No. 134, I.O.O.F. He and his wife are members of the Presbyterian church. In his political choice he is a staunch Democrat. The Van Alstynes were prominent in the Revolutionary war in the Mohawk valley. Ancestry of family is Dutch, Scotch and English. Mr. Van Alstyne's father, Bernard, was born in Schoharie county, N, Y., in 1807, and removed to Canada with his parents when a child. He married Esther Allen of this State, and they had ten children: Sarah J., Secord, Charles, Alexander, Amanda, Wallace, Rhoda, Martha, Miles (as above), and one died in infancy. Mr. Van Alstyne died in 1894, and his wife in 1865.

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Day, Lewis W., was born in Sackets Harbor, N. Y., December 25, 1849. He finished his education at Htmgerford Collegiate Institute, Adams, N. Y., and was in the drug business in Sackets Harbor twenty years, until 1893, and now lives a retired life. In 1879 he married Anna McGuin Walling, and they have one son, Edward L., born September 13, 1884. Mr. Day has been supervisor of his town two terms, which is a compliment to him personally as a Democrat, for the town has a large Republican majority; he has been president of the village one term and trustee several terms. He is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. and A. M., and Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68. R. A. M.. of Watertown Lodge of Perfection, of Watertown Commandery No. 11, K. T., and Media Temple A. A. N. M. S.; was one of the delegates of Media Temple to the Imperial Council at Detroit, Mich., in 1897. He is one of the directors of the National Bank and Loan Company of Watertown, N. Y. Mr. Day's father, Lewis W. Day, was born in New Jersey, October 12, 1801, was educated in the schools of that early day and came to this State and county in the year 1840, where he was a successful merchant. October 23, 1848, he married Sarah J. Gray of the town of Rodman, and they had one son, Lewis W. He died in June, 1855, and his widow May 10, 1885.

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Tyler, William W., was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., Sept. 28, 1838. He was educated in the public schools and was an accountant by occupation. October 14, 1861, he enlisted and took an active part in recruiting and organizing a company for the war of the Rebellion. That company was assigned to the 94th Infantry, N. Y. Vols., as Co. E. He was promoted first lieutenant Co. B, May 20, 1862, promoted captain Co. I, March 2, 1863. He participated with his regiment, in the Army of the Potomac, in the battles of Cedar Mountain, Manassas, Chantilly, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and others of lesser note, and was honorably discharged on account of disability resulting from wounds received in the battle of Fredericksburg, Va., March 17, 1863. He again entered the service as first lieutenant Invalid Corps, U. S. Vols., June 6,1863, was promoted captain, 19th Regt., Veteran Reserve Corps, U. S. Vols., December 10, 1863, and served to September 30, 1867. He was appointed a second lieutenant 9th Cavalry, U. S. Army, August 13, 1867, promoted first lieutenant December 9, 1871, was transferred to the 13th Regt. U. S. Infantry August 1, 1881, promoted captain February 24, 1891. His service in the U. S. A. was on the Texas and New Mexico frontier and was active and arduous, wholly in the then Indian country. He was retired on account of disability incurred in the line of duty in 1891, and returned to his native town, September 11,1866, he married Mary A. Grata, of Harrisburg, Pa,, and they had five children, two of whom are now living, Sarah Wyeth and Elizabeth Grata. Ella Louise, their eldest child, married Captain William D. Diets, Medical Department, U. S. Army, 1887, and they had one son, Wallace Druvo Dietz, born November 1, 1888, now residing in Sackets Harbor, N. Y. Captain Dietz and his wife both died at Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Harbor, January 29, 1891. Captain Tyler's father, Dr. William E. Tyler, was born in town of Hounsfield September 16, 1811. He was a graduate of Geneva Medical College in 1848, and was a beloved physician at Sackets Harbor for nearly fifty years. He married Pheobe C. Hunter of his native town in 1837, who died in 1874. Dr. Tyler married afterwards Mrs. Mary D. Metcalf; he died August 24, 1890. His widow survives at this date.

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Hunter, Mary S.Archibald Hunter was born in Saratoga county, N Y., in the year 1796. He was educated there and was a blacksmith by trade. He married Sarah Halstead of his native county, and they had eight children: Phebe, Mary S. (as above), Seth, John, Thomas, George, James and Elizabeth. They came to this county in 1855, and he carried on the business of blacksmithing until his death. Mr. Hunter was a soldier of the war of 1812 at Sackets Harbor, N. Y. The ancestry of the family is English and Scotch.

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Orchard, Mrs. Armenia.—The late Benjamin Orchard was born in Dorsetshire, England, March 19, 1804. He came to the United States in 1832, locating in the town of Hounsfield, where he bought a farm, and in process of time erected a fine residence thereon. June 7, 1888, he married Armenia, daughter of Rev. Enock Barnes, and they had twelve children, eight of whom grew to maturity: Mary M., Sarah S., Elsie J., Julia A., Martha A., Effie E., Ada R. and Ida M. Mary M. married D. Esting Moore; Sarah S. married John B. McMullen, and they have four children: George, Charles, Ettie and Sadie; Elsie J. married Marcellus Read, and they have one daughter, May; Julia A. married Myron Holden, and they have three children: Flora, Orilla and Benjamin O.; Martha A. married Jefferson Brockway; Effie E. married Dyer Harris, and they have two daughters: Pearl and Ethel; Ada R. married Emmet Holden, and they have three children: Cloid, Avis and Floyd; Ida M. married J. D. Phillips, and they have two children: De Wayne and Ella. Mrs. Phillips died February 19, 1891. Benjamin Orchard died September 11, 1890, in his eighty-seventh year. Mrs. Orchard's father, Enock Barnes, was born in Little Falls, in 1791; he was educated in their schools and was a Methodist Episcopal misister; he married Anna Hazen and came to this county when his daughter Armenia was less than two years old. They had four children that grew to maturity: Luke H., William H. T., Armenia and Julia. He was a soldier in the war of 1812 at Sackets Harbor, and died in 1877, his widow in 1881.

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Lamar, Charles, was born in the city of New York, June 28, 1845. His boyhood days were passed in the wilds of Wisconsin, where he received a very limited education in the public schools. At the breaking out of the Rebellion, he entered the volunteers under the name of Charles Lemke, as bugler in the 3d Wisconsin Light Battery, and shared in the life of the camp, the march and the battlefield in which the battery participated, till August 10, 1864, when he was promoted to second lieutenant Co. K, 43d Wisconsin Infantry, and served as such officer to the close of the war. He entered the regular army in 1873, as bandmaster in the 14th U. S. Infantry. Joined the 6th Cavalry in 1882, the 31st Infantry in 1886. and the 9th Infantry at Madison Barracks, Sackets Harbor, N. Y., June 26, 1896. On the 20th day of February, 1882, he married Alice Buchanan, of California, a relative of the late President Buchanan, and John H. Reagan, ex-confederate postmaster-general. Lieutenant Lamar is a member of Rawlins Post No. 23, Department of California, G. A. R. In his political choice he is a Republican.

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McKee, A. G. C.Wilbur Lawrence McKee was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., July 7, 1846. He was educated in the public schools and by occupation is a machinist. David McKee, his father, in 1840 established a foundry business, be erected a a new building in 1843, and formed a copartnership under the firm name of McKee & Hammond, which was continued until 1859. They manufactured the first mowing machines in northern New York. Wilbur was taken in as a copartner in 1870, under the firm name of David McKee & Son, which has continued until this date, 1897. December 16, 1874. he married Arabella G. Coventry, formerly of Utica, N. Y., and they have one living daughter, Julia Graham McKee. David McKee was born in Whitestowa, N, Y,, September 22, 1813; he was educated in Utica, and came to Sackets Harbor in 1831. He learned several trades, but his final choice was machinist. September 1, 1845, he married Mary Ann Lawrence of Clinton county, N. Y. and they had three children: Wilbur Lawrence (as above), Mary H. and Frank E. Mrs. McKee died in May, 1876. David in his political choice is a thorough Republican. Mrs. Wilbur L. McKee's father, George Coventry, was born near Geneva, N. Y., in 1792. He was well educated and married Julia Graham of Deerfield, N. Y., and four of their children grew to maturity: Elizabeth, Sarah M., George and Arabella G. Mrs. McKee's grandfather, Dr. Coventry, was a distinguished physician in Utica.

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McWayne, Jay D., was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., June 21, 1834, and was educated in the common schools. He is a farmer and horse breeder; in the spring of 1861 he enlisted in Co. K, 35th Infantry, N. Y. S. Vols., was promoted sergeant, second and first lieutenant of his company, which he commanded from the 13th of September, 1862, until discharged June 5, 1863. He was also captain of Co. B, 186th Infantry, N. Y. S. Vols., and was honorably discharged at the close of the war. Before he entered upon his duties as captain he had recruited many men for different commands; he was always ready for duty, a devoted and truly loyal citizen soldier, ready for duty under all emergencies. October 23, 1867, he married Sarah E. Walsworth, and they had three children: Eva, who died at the age of ten years; Arthur died at the age of four; and Ella who resides at home. Capt. McWayne's father, Kimball De Forest Wayne, was born in the town of Houndsfield about the year 1810; was educated in the schools of that day, and was a farmer by occupation. He married Betsey E. Wallace, and they had five children: Jay D. (as above), Phoebe, Charlotte, Justus and Elizabeth. He died in 1844; his widow survives at this date, 1897. Captain McWayne's grandfather, Josiah McWayne, was born in 1780; he married Phoebe Abbott, and they had seven children. His grandfather, John Wallace, was born in 1777; he married Anna Pecock and was in the war of 1812. Capt. Jay D. McWayne is a member of Julias Broadbent Post of Dexter, N. Y., G. A. R., Department of New York; also Sackets Harbor lodge, No. 135, and Royal Arch Chapter, No. 68. He has held the office of deputy collector of Dexter Port (of entry) two years, and highway commissioner two years.

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Camp, Walter BickerGeorge Camp, father of the subject of this sketch, was born in the historic town of Glastonbury, Conn., August 8,1790, and came to Sackets Harbor in the winter of 1816-17, where he established the first printing press and issued the first newspaper, "The Saekett's Harbor Gazette." In 1814 he married Elizabeth Hitchcock, formerly of Connecticut, then of Utica, N. Y. Walter B. Camp was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., October 1, 1833; he received an academic education in his own county and has always resided in Sackets Harbor, through its various changes until this date, 1897, being interested and identified with its progress and prosperity and always ready to help those who are worthy of such assistance. Mr. Camp has always been loyal to his native place and it has been his ruling passion that it may advance into importance, such as its natural surroundings seem to justify. The commercial and military spirit in this locality was so happily combined and each of foremost importance that Mr. Camp imbibed its influence with the younger generation that stamped the earlier civil and military history of the village, and he has not ceased in his endeavors to save as far as possible the prestige of this historic locality. To that end all the enterprises that were calculated for its elevation obtained a large share of his time and means. The construction of the first railway, which extended from Sackets Harbor to Pierrepont Manor, enlisted his earnest endeavors, hoping for the completion and successful accomplishment of an enterprise that would retain the commercial importance hitherto enjoyed at the port of Sackets Harbor. About the sum of 1400,000 was spent in its c onstruction by the enterprising citizens of this town, Henderson and Ellisburg, to which Mr. Camp was no small contributor and acted in the capacity of custodian and local director for two years before it became extinct, affected largely by unfriendly influences of the officials of the railway with which it made connections. That portion of his means realized from the sale of the above railway was donated by Col. Camp to the Presbyterian church society, as a perpetual fund for the purchase of books for the Sunday school library and for repairs of the church edifice. When the war of the Rebellion broke out, Col. Camp was chosen by Gov. Morgan to manage the direction of the military depot to be opened at Madison Barracks, Sackets Harbor, N. Y., and appointed him to that command with the rank of colonel, October 17, 1861. Col. Camp considered the appointment not only complimentary, but almost obligatory because unsolicited. He entered at once upon his duties and in twenty-four hours one company had been enrolled into the service and in eighteen days the 94th Infantry, N. Y. Vols., had perfected its organization and moved from camp March 14, 1863, reaching Albany the following day. Col. Camp went with them to the capital; Gov. Morgan called upon the colonel the same day and complimented him, saying "he was proud of the 94th Regiment, that it had given him little or no trouble during its organization, was composed of splendid material, was in magnificent form and discipline, had been recruited and maintained at $20,000 less expense than any like regiment in the State, and instead of losing nearly thirty men, had a gain of two upon leaving camp." This depot now being established, it became the active center for enlistments and organization of volunteer regiments during the war. The 10th H. A., N. Y. Vols., was at once organized and Col. Camp was appointed the town of Hounsfield war committee, and with Senator Bell of Brownville, took the quotas of that town and Hounsfield and formed the company commanded by Capt. H. O. Gilmore. After the war Gen. Sherman was disposed to abolish the post here, there being no railway for the effective transportation of troops. To meet this objection measures were taken at once to extend the Utica and Black River Railway to Sackets Harbor. Col. Camp was untiring in his efforts to prevent the removal of this military station, and to secure the completion of the road, meetings were held in the towns on the contemplated route, and with the hearty co-operation of the enterprising citizens secured the completion of the road in 1873. During the occupancy of the barracks by Gen. Ayers, the north half of the officers' quarters was burned; Gen. Sherman was opposed to any outlay, but with the valuable influence of Congressman Bagley, Col. Camp succeeded in securing an appropriation of $25,000 to rebuild the quarters. Unfavorable influences continued to operate for years, until Gen. Grant was seen by Col. Camp, with whom for a long time he had retained an intimate acquaintance; with his proffered and valuable services in presenting to Gen. Sherman the desirability of retaining the military station here, there came a marked change and from that time Madison Barracks has received the attention from the government that its important position demands. Upon the arrival here of Gen. Sherman with the 12th U. S. Infantry, under the command of Gen. Wilcox, he expressed himself captivated with the location. Since then Madison Barracks have been progressing, first under Gen. Wilcox, and other commanders, and now in 1897 is one of the most complete in reservations in the service. In this matter Col. Camp has been a thorough friend of the institution, and considers himself fortunate in having the acquaintance in the army and navy of many of its illustrious characters that have figured in the former and more recent history of our wars, being related to Admiral Foote and Commodore Hitchcock on his mother's side, and upon his father's side looks back to that most conspicuous member, Jonathan Hale, who sacrificed his life upon the altar of his country at Jamaica Plains, Boston, 1776. The descendants of the Hale family have left the footprints in the path of honor in deeds of patriotism and valor, at which he himself has contributed an honorable share, at which he has reason to look upon with a degree of satisfaction upon his own part in the role of honor; of services honestly and conscientiously rendered to the nation, to the State and his native town and village. In May, 1885, he was unanimously elected with the title and associate member of the military service institution of Governor's Island, of which the late Gen. Hancock was president. Col. Camp continued the business his father had established after he disposed of the newspaper business in 1821, from 1850 until 1884. In the meantime Col. Camp traveled extensively upon the continent of Europe and far and wide over his native country bounded by the different oceans. In 1844 the family came into possession of the mansion and grounds formerly owned and occupied by Commodore Melancton T. Woolsey, aud although never married the colonel has entertained for many years with a refined and generous hospitality. In 1879 he completed the erection of a chapel which was presented as a Christmas gift to the Presbyterian society, with which he has been identified from infancy and for which he has retained an affectionate attachment. In this connection we cheerfully give space to his liberality in money, time, and supervision of construction of the tower of the Presbyterian church for the reception of a chime of nine bells given by Mrs. Marietta Pickering Hay of Tarrytown, to this historic village, as a living memorial of her father, Captain Augustus Pickering, who commanded the first vessel that ever entered the port of Chicago. He also was deeply interested in the Jefferson County Historical Society, of which he was the first vice-president. In 1885 he succeeded in securing as executor of the estate of the late Elisha Camp from the heirs, as a gift to the Jefferson County Historical Society and the village of Sackets Harbor, the old battle ground of several acres fronting on Black River Bay, where the first battle was fought between the Americans and British in the war of 1813-15 (earth works can be seen even to this day), which was dedicated with imposing ceremonies under the auspices of the 12th Infantry, U. S. A., G. A. R. organization, village authorities and representatives of Jefferson county and Oneida county, historical societies and gentlemen of this and neighboring counties of the State and Canada. He was elected president of the society in January, 1893. Colonel Camp has given much time to the study of aboriginal history of the county of Jefferson, upon which subject he has written some valuable papers and has secured a choice selection of relics that characterize the race that occupied this locality and were extinct at the time of the advent of the white race to their shores, and which too has brought him in friendly relationship with the Smithsonian Institution at Washington, D. C., and other historical societies, which brought him in contact with many distinguished men of like tastes. Colonel Camp has an inherent talent for music; in visiting his delightful home we find it supplied with the accessories to give it expression. With one favorite instrument, however, he is better known in refined circles where he finds enjoyment in the concord of sweet sounds. A motto in the family is the following: "Whatever we possess is doubly valuable when we are so happy to share it with others." It is pleasant to contemplate generous deeds so that when the donors pass away coming generations will arise and call them blessed.

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Baker, Orville W., was born at Stowell's Corners, March 27, 1827. He was educated in the public schools and was graduated from the State Normal School at Albany, N. Y., in April, 1849. He taught several terms in winter, also taught select schools and is now an independent farmer. March 2, 1852, he married Olive Read of Sackets Harbor. Mr. Baker in his political choice is a thorough Republican. He was a justice of the peace in his native town sixteen years, and was also secretary of the "Patrons Fire Relief Association" of Jefferson and Lewis counties over twelve years, having been annually elected. His father, John Baker, was born in this locality in 1803; he was educated in the schools of his day and was a farmer by occupation. He married Roccena Weld of the town of Sodus, Wayne county, N. Y., and they had seven children: Orville W., Edwin R., Chloe A., Zilpha A., Sarah D., Lucy D. and Maria A. Mr. Baker died in November, 1880, and his widow in 1891. Mrs. Orville W. Baker's father, Garrett Read, was born in the town of Hounsfield, June 28, 1798. He was educated in the schools of that day and was a farmer by occupation. He married Huldah Westcott of his native town and they had ten children: Willard, Susan, William, Stephen, Olive, Marcellus, Eunice, Sarah, Whitley and George. Mr. Read died May 13, 1867, and his widow December 9, 1867.

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Holden, Walter B., was born on the Holden homestead near Campbell's Point, March 9, 1858. He was educated in the district school and is by occupation a thorough market gardner. November 29, 1888, he married Eunice A. DeWitt, of the town of Henderson, N. Y., and they have three children: Clifford C.. Genevieve and Karl W. Mr. Holden in his political choice is a thorough Republican. His father, Aaron Holden, was bora in Hadley, N. Y., in the year 1813 and was educated there; he married Orrilla, daughter of Israel and Lydia (Conroe) Root, of Mechanicsville, Saratoga county, and they had ten children: Clay, Frelinghuysen, Winfield, Theodore, Seward, Myron, Emmett, Walter B., Talcot and Jessie. Mr. Holden died September 15, 1870, and his widow March 11, 1892. Mrs. Holden's father, William De Witt, was born in Canada, February 9,1843, and her mother was born in Canada March 4, 1841, and both were educated there; he came to the United States in 1865; he married Eliza Hicks, daughter of James and Nancy (Boyce) Hicks of Canada, and they had six children; Charles E., Eunice A., Elva R., Seymour, Rosella and Clay E. Mr. and Mrs. De Witt are both living at this date, 1897. The Holdens are of New England origin and the De Witts of Scotch Canadian.

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Thompson, Samuel E., was born in the town of Hounsfield, Jefferson county, N. Y., son of Samuel E. and Elvira (Salisbury) Thompson. His grandfather, Piam Thompson, was a soldier in the war of 1812, as was his father, who was accepted as a substitute when but fourteen years old. Samuel E., the father, was born in Connecticut, January 28, 1799, and came to this State with his parents when a child, locating in the town of Rodman. He was educated in the schools of his day and was always a farmer. He married twice, first to Fanny Foster, by whom he had one daughter, Alvira. He married for his second wife Mrs. Elvira Salisbury, and they had two children, Fanny and Samuel E. As before stated, Samuel E., sr., served in the war of 1812, for which he received a land warrant; he died February 38, 1861, and his widow survives, residing on the farm occupied by her husband while living with his first wife, and is a pensioner of the war of 1813. Samuel E. Thompson, the subject of this sketch, was educated in the public schools and Adams Academy, and is a traveling salesman for the Cleveland Baking Powder Co. October 19, 1871, he married Miss Celia Parrott, of Sackets Harbor, and they have two living children, Charles A. and V. Adah, both students at this date, 1897. Mr. Thompson joined Sackets Harbor Lodge F. and A. M. and was in good standing until 1890, when he joined Dalhouse Lodge F. and A. M., of Newtonville, Mass. He is also a member of Newton Chapter, R. A. M., of Newtonville, Mass.; Holyoke Council, R. and S. M., Mass.; Gethsemane Commandery, K. T., Newtonville; the Consistory of Boston, Mass., and the Shrine of Bridgeport, Conn.

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Lamon, Lester, was born in the town of Hounsfield, September 27, 1834, educated in the district schools and by occupation is a farmer. He has married twice, first in 1849 to Lucy A. Blood, who died August 5, 1890, and on December 16. 1891, Mr. Lamon married Mary C. Campbell. Mr. Lamon is a Democrat, and the ancestry of his family is Scotch and Irish of New England origin. Mr. Lamon's father, James Lamon, was born in Salem, Mass., in 1774, and came with his parents to this State soon after the Revolutionary war. He married Mrs. Polly Burdell of Hounsfield, and they had five children: Esther, Alice, Mary A., Lester and Elizabeth. Mr. Lamon died in 1852, and his wife in 1845. Mrs. Lamon's father, William Campbell, was born in Canada in 1792. He married Mary Duffield, who was born in England in 1798, and they had ten children: John A., Mary C., Priscilla, Ira, Edwin, William R., James A., Florence T., Harriet and Louise. Mr. Lamon's mother's son by her first husband, Dr. Harvey Burdell, was murdered in New York city. Mr. Campbell died in 1879 and his wife in 1872.

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Sargent, Washington, was born in the town of Hounsfield, January 24, 1841. He was educated in the public schools and has always followed the honorable occupation of farming. January 7, 1862, he married Mary J. Harrington of the town of Brownville. and they have five living children: Almon J., Minnie A., C. Jay, Elva M. and Elsie M. C. Jay married May McWayne of Dexter, N. Y., and they have one son, Harold E. Mr. Sargent and family are members of the Presbyterian church of Dexter, and he is one of the elders. In his political choice he is a Prohibitionist. Mr. Sargent's father, John Sargent, was born in Hastings, England, in 1782. He was a carpenter and contractor by occupation; he married Susanna Luff and they had five children: John, George, Salina, Henry and Walter. They came to the United States in 1820 and soon afterward located on the homestead. His wife died and he married Mr. Sarah Whiley, and they had six children: Lois, Laura, Lydia, Luthera, Sarah and Washington. Mr. Sargent died February 1, 1803, and his widow January 7, 1884. Mrs. Sargent's father, Almon Harrington, was born in the town of Rodman, July 5, 1811. He was well educated and married Polly Palmer and they had two children, Mary J. and David, who died in his seventh year. Mr. Harrington died December 9, 1895, and his wife March 29, 1875. Mrs. Sargent's grandfather, Cyrel Harrington, was a soldier in the war of 1812, as was also her grandfather, Zebulon Palmer.

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Inglehart, Hiram F., was born in Hounsfield, March 38, 1846, a son of Cornelius W. and Emmeline (Foote) Inglehart. Mr. Inglehart has been a merchant of Watertown for several years and was one of the original stockholders in the Westminster Park, and has been proprietor of the hotel there since 1884. In 1888 he was elected alderman of the Fourth ward. He married Nettie Blodgett, and they have eight children. He is proprietor of the Columbian Hotel at Thousand Island Park and formerly proprietor of the Thousand Island House at Alexandria Bay. He was mayor of the city of Watertown in 1893 and 1894. He is vice president of the Watertown Street Railroad Co., a director in three banks of the city and of the Agricultural Insurance Company, and is on the finance committee in these institutions Mr. Inglehart is man of remarkable esecutive ability, whose opinion and advice is sought upon important financial matters. He has been for many years an active member of the Odd Fellows and is a past grand in that organization, besides being prominent in other societies.

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De Wolf, Mrs. Louisa—The late David De Wolf was born in Madison county, N. Y., in February, 1817, and came to this county when a boy. He was educated in the schools of his day and was a blacksmith by trade; he was also custom house officer here for many years. He enlisted in the 94th Infantry, N. Y, Vols., and held the office of quartermaster, being afterwards quartermaster in Kentucky, and was honorably discharged January 15, 1865. He married Louise Wright of the town of Adams, and they had five children: Edward S., Henry D., Mary L., Frederick D. and Ione H. Edward S. married Rhoda Dye of Utah, and they had one son, Cleveland; Henry D. married Lizzie Henry of Wyoming, and they have five children: Jennie D., Ione H., Henry D., jr., Minnie and Hobart H.; Mary L. married Dr. Edward H. Taft of Sackets Harbor; Frederick D. married Anna McGlauchlin, and they have one daughter, Mary L.; Ione H. married Joshua Wentworth of the State of Maine, and they have two daughters, Helen W. and Dorris F. David De Wolf died in 1884, mourned by a bereaved wife and family. Mrs. De Wolf's father, Stephen B. Wright, was born in the town of Deerfield, Mass., and came to the town of Adams when a young man, living and dying on the farm he cleared from the wilderness. He married Hannah Kellogg, formerly of Connecticut, and they had five children: Deborah K., Charles B., Harriet A., Louise (as above) and Edwin S. Mr. Wright died in 1875 and his wife in 1873. Mr. De Wolf held the office of supervisor of the town and village trustee.

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Washburn, Silas R., was born in the town of Hounsfield, May 21, 1838, was educated in the district schools and follows the honorable occupation of farming. April 24, 1863, he married Esther Stoodley, and they have two sons: William W. and Homer T., both farmers at home with their parents. Mr. Washburn's father, Robert Washburn, was born in Greenbush, Saratoga county, N. Y., in 1804, and came to this county when fourteen years old. He married Emeline Manley of Hounsfield, and they had eight children: Hiram, Stephen, Silas R.. Newton M., George L., Theodore, Wallace and Lydia. Mr. Washburn died in the fall of 1876 and his widow in 1888, Mrs. Washburn's father, William Stoodley, was born in Devonshire, England, in 1803; was educated there, and married Elizabeth Lane of his native place and came to the United States, locating in Jefferson county. They had these children: Sarah, Jane, Esther, Fannie, Amos, Minerva and Charles. Mr. Stoodley died in 1883 and his widow in 1885.

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Metcalf, Francis, was born in the town of Hounsfield, April 24, 1812. He was educated in the common schools of his day and is a farmer by occupation. October 14,1834, he married Sarah Marie Case of this town. They had seven children: The oldest dying in infancy, Walter A. (Company I, 10th N. Y. Heavy Artillery), deceased, Lucy A., Edwin F., Sarah J., deceased, Ella M. and Elva M. Mrs. Metcalf died August 10, 1855. Mr. Metcalf is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. & A.M. His father was a soldier in the war of 1812. The present occupant of the old homestead, Oliver W. Burnham, was born in the town of Ellisburgh, Jefferson county, N. Y., January 18, 1835. His education was obtained in the common schools. He is a farmer by occupation. August 28, 1862, he enlisted in Company E, 10th N. Y. Heavy Artillery, was mustered out of service June 34, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia, and honorably discharged July 7, 1865, at Sackets Harbor, N. Y. Mr. Burnham is a member of Piper Post No. 273, Dept. of N, Y., G.A.R., Henderson, N.Y. February 18, 1871, he married Lucy A., daughter of Francis Metcalf. They had three children: S. Marie, Frankie, deceased, and Lena M. Mr. Burnham's father, William Burnham, was born in New Hampshire in 1809, and came to this State when a young man. He married Abigail Whittier of Henderson, N. Y. They had five children: two sons, Emory and Oliver W., and three daughters, all deceased, Samaria, Charlotte and Harriet L. William Burnham died in 1882 and his widow in 1884.

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Cleveland, Mrs. Mercy—The late Philander B. Cleveland was born in the town of Rutland, Jefferson county, N. Y., August 29. 1823. He obtained his education in the common schools and came to the homestead in the town of Hounsfield in 1833 and was one of the town's best farmers. October 2, 1848, he married Mercy Richardson and they had six children: Merritt A., Milo L., Stephen R., Artencia, Vaker D. (died in his second year) and Flora. Merritt A. married Ellen E. Smith of Sodus, Wayne county, N. Y., and they have four children: Milo, Helen, Harold and Florence M. Milo L. married Lucy Warren of Hounsfield and they have one daughter, Carrie. Stephen R. married Emma Baker of Watertown and they have two children: Korleen and Louis B. Artencia married Prescott B. Potter of the town of Adams; Mrs. Potter died September 20, 1887, in Leola, South Dakota. Flora resides at home with her mother. Mr. Cleveland died February 24, 1895, mourned by a bereaved wife and family. Mrs. Cleveland's father, Stephen Richardson, was born in New Hampshire, April 15, 1795, and came to this State when nineteen years old, where he always followed the honorable occupation of farming. He married Lydia Benjamin, and they had seven children: Edmund, Jonas, Nancy, Dorothy, Lucy, Mercy and Alvira, Mrs. Cleveland's grandfather, Jonas Benjamin, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war and her father in the war of 1812, Mr. Cleveland's father, Harvey Cleveland, was in the war of 1812, and his grandfather, Isaac Cleveland, was in the Revolutionary war and was among the first settlers in Jefferson county.

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Stoodley, Amos, was born in the town of Hounsfield, April 13, 1845. His father, William Stoodley, was a native of Devonshire, England, and came to the United States in 1832, settling at Sackets Harbor with his wife Elizabeth Lane Stoodley; they afterwards moved to Hounsfield, where he was identified as a farmer, taking an active interest in educational and religious institutions; he died in 1883. Amos Stoodley in 1868 married Frances M., daughter of Welcome Clarke, and they have one son, Clarke A. Stoodley. Mr. Stoodley is one of the practical and successful farmers of Jefferson county, taking an active interest in both school and church matters and has ever advanced the best interests of his town and town's people.

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Clark, William Hatfield, was born in New York city, July 22, 1826, was educated in the public schools and Irving Institute at Tarrytown, and in his early days was a real estate operator, afterward in railway construction in Venezuela, South America. July 16, 1861, he enlisted in the 5th N. J. Vols., which was consolidated with the 7th N. J. Vols. He held the office of first lieutenant in Co. F, commanding the company, and was honorably discharged at Trenton, N. J., August 1, 1865. He has married twice, first in 1849 to Elizabeth H. Munn, of Newark, N. J. They had two sons, William Brewster, who is a practicing physician and surgeon in New York city, and Robert Bruce, pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Goshen, N. Y. Mrs. Clark died in June, 1865, and on April 14, 1869, Mr. Clark married Fannie M. Betts, formerly of Rhode Island. Her father came to this county from Bristol, R. I., at the age of nineteen. He served in the war of 1813-15. Mr. and Mrs. Clark had two children, Sarah Freeman, who died November 14, 1886, in her sixteenth year, and Edgar Lake Miller, born in November, 1871, who is in the drafting department of the Owego Bridge Company, at Owego, N. Y. Mr. Clark is a charter member of Joseph K. Barnes Post of Sackets Harbor, N. Y., No. 360, G. A. R., department of New York, and is now commander, having served in that capacity seven terms; he was justice of the peace for several years, and has also served as clerk of the examining board of pensioners. His father, Israel Clark, son of William and Sarah H. Clark (his father having served in the war of the Revolution), was born in Westfield. N. J., in 1793, was educated in the schools of that day, and was a contractor and builder. He married Sarah Freeman Evens of Woodbridge, N. J., granddaughter of Captain Asbur Fitz Randolph of the Continental army, and they had six children; three died in infancy and the others were as follows: Lewis Evens (died in 1894), Frances Henrietta Fitz Randolph (died in 1895), and William Hatfield (as above). Mr. Clark's father died in November, 1884, and his widow in December, 1872.

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Stokes, John L., was born in Devonshire, England, August 13,1851, and came to the United States when four years old with his parents, locating in Hounsfield. He was educated in the district schools, is a self-made man and follows the honorable occupation of a farmer. December 1, 1875, he married Lydia Kennedy of the town of Henderson, and they have four children: Ada May, Reta Bell, Edward and John. Mr. Stokes in his political choice is a thorough Democrat; the ancestry of his family is English and Scotch. Mrs. Stokes's father, John Kennedy, was born in the north of Scotland in the year 1829, and came to Canada with his uncle when he was a boy and to the United States about 1861, locating in the town of Henderson. He married Caroline Chadwick of Canada, and they had five children: Emily, Lydia, Linna, Allen and May E. Mr. Kennedy died in 1885, his widow survives now in 1897.

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Lee, John T., Sackets Harbor, was born in Herkimer county, N. Y., August 18, 1822. His parents removed to this county when he was a boy, and he was educated in the common schools. He has had a variety of occupations, has been a speculator and a traveling salesman. February 1, 1849, he married Emily B. Burlingame of Pillar Point, and they had three children: William H. (died in infancy), Charles A. (was drowned in the bay in 1871, at the age of thirteen), and Ida E., who married William S. Lowe of Brownville, and they have two children: Blanche M. and Charles A. Mr. Lee's father, Samuel W., was born in Frankfort, Herkimer county, N. Y., about 1794; he married Lucretia Spencer of Utica, N. Y., and they had ten children who grew to maturity: Cordelia, John T. (as above), Levi S., George H., Andrew J., Samuel, Albert E., Margaret, James A., and Celestia. Samuel Lee died about the year 1871, and his widow in 1873. The ancestors on the Burlingame side were represented in the early wars; Mr. Lee had two brothers in the late war. The family are of New England stock.

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Whitaker, Cornelia S.—The late chief engineer, Ezra J. Whitaker, son of Ezra D. of North Adams, was born at North Adams, Mass., April 12, 1839; he studied at Drury Academy and finished his schooling at Williston Seminary, Easthampton. He was a mechanical engineer in the United States navy, was appointed third assistant engineer February 19,1861, was assigned to duty on the Frigate Minnesota, and participated in several engagements beginning with the splendid victory of the Monitor over the Merrimac. December 17, 1863, he was promoted second assistant engineer and served all through the war with great credit, taking part in the naval engagements at Mobile and Fort Fisher, and was promoted first assistant engineer on December 1, 1864. After the close of the war he did duty in many different stations, in China, Japan, and made one voyage around the world; he also did special duty in various navy yards and was recognized as one of the most valuable officers in the service, and was promoted chief engineer in 1873. He was a Mason of high degree, also a member of the Loyal Legion, and several technical societies. He was a man of high character and the strictest integrity and was held in the highest esteem by his associates in the navy and the above societies. He had a long and honorable career of thirty-five years in the service of our country, which by his retirement and death, sustained the loss of a skillful, faithful, competent and trusted officer. August 15, 1865, he married Cornelia S., daughter of W. Morris Clark of the town of Hounsfield, and they had one son, Morris Mortimer, who was born in Boston, February 24, 1873, and is being fitted for a naval architect. Mr. Whitaker died at Sackets Harbor, August 20, 1895. Mrs. Whitaker's father, W. Morris Clark, was born at Edmeston, Otsego county, N. Y., in October, 1813; he married Lodemia Clark of Brookfield, Madison county, N. Y., and they had one daughter, Cornelia S. (as above). He died December 7, 1853, and his widow January 23, 1890.

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Lee, Ellen.—The late L. George Lee was born in the town of Hounsfield, December 39, 1832. He was educated in the common schools and was by occupation a farmer. He married twice, first to Jane Sterling, and they had three children: Anna, George S., and Washington H. Mrs. Lee died about the year 1860, and on May 9, 1869, he married Ellen Carter; they had five children: James, Jessie M., Maud (all deceased) and two survive, William F., and James A., who are farmers at home. Mr. Lee died in 1888. Mrs. Lee's father, James Carter, was born in Ireland in 1805, and came to the United States in 1826, locating in this town. He married Ellen Vance, and they had six children: William, Margaret J., Ellen, James, Eliza A., and Francis A. Mr. Carter died in 1846 and his widow in 1883. Mrs. Lee is a member of the Episcopal church. The sons' political choice is Republican; the ancestry of the family is of New England origin.

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Reed & Foster, masons, contractors and builders, masons' supplies and all kinds of coal. The firm of Reed & Foster is well known, having been engaged in their present line of trade too long to need an introduction to the majority of the readers of this work. Their success in business and the wide range of their operations is an evidence of the sterling worth, honesty, good workmanship and fair dealings which has from the first characterized all their operations. The industrial members of this firm are both skilled mechanics and it can be truthfully said of them that (their coal business excepted) neither has ever been engaged in any other pursuit since his boyhood days. The present copartnership was entered into in 1880; the business though worthy of a local nature reaches at times over a large extent of territory and commands the services of many skilled workmen. Of the copartners, Willis P. Reed was born in 1849 and his early years were spent on a farm in the town of Hounsfield. His mother dying while he was very young, he was brought up by Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Baker of Stowell's Corners. He learned the trade of a mason while a young man. and removed to Dexter in 1878, where he has since resided. He has served several terms as trustee of the village and one year as village president. He is a member of the village fire department and served six years as chief engineer. The formation, of the Jefferson County Volunteer Firemen's Association greatly interested him and he was made its first vice-president and is now its president. When Court Dexter, I. O. F., was instituted he was a charter member and is now filling the chair of chief ranger for the second term. Upon the institution of Konoskioni Tribe, 296, I. O. R. M., he was made the first prophet of the tribe; in less than a year after becoming a Red Man he was honored with the appointment of district deputy great sachem and has served two years in this position. He is one of the charter members of the recently instituted Dexter Lodge, 767, I. O. O. F. In 1870 Mr. Reed married Emogene Jeffers, of Copenhagen, Lewis county, and they have three children: Harry, Orville and Edith, all residing at home. Mr. Foster is also a native of Jefferson county, born in the town of Brownville in 1848, and is his partner's senior by some six years. His early education was evolved from the public schools of the neighborhood until he reached his eighteenth year, when the first shot at Fort Moultrie aroused his youthful patriotism, and in 1861 he enlisted in Co. K, 35th N. Y. Vols., and served in McDowell's corps in the early operations of the Army of the Potomac, and was wounded at second Bull Run and discharged by reason of his term of service expiring, in June, 1863. He immediately re-enlisted in troop M, 18th N. Y. Cavalry, served in the department of Louisiana until June, 1865, was in the Red River expedition and finally brought up in Texas with headquarters at San Antonio. Here the regiment remained until May, 1866, when it was mustered out. Upon receiving his final discharge Mr. Foster's actual time in the service was five and one-half years. He participated in many of the prominent battles of the war, and has an army record of which he may well feel proud. In 1871 he married Josephine Moffatt of Dexter, and they have one son who resides at home. Mr. Foster is held in high esteem at his home in Dexter. He has served the village as president, being elected in 189(5, and has served three terms on the Board of Trustees. He is a member of Dexter Lodge No. 888, I. O. G. T.; of Court Dexter, 490, I. O. Foresters and has been for five terms chief ranger of the lodge. He is also a Mason and holds membership in Brownville Lodge No. 53, F. & A. M. Mr. Foster was among the earliest to help institute the G. A. R. in 1867. He is a member of Broadbent Post No. 188 of Dexter and has occupied the chair of commander four terms and holds the position of county inspector on the staff of department commander A. D. Shaw.

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Smith, D'Estaing A., was born on the old homestead in the town of Hounsfield, December 1, 1859. His education was obtained in the public and select schools and he is one of the town's best farmers. February 23, 1886, he married Nellie E. Reed, of Adams, and they have four children: Willett C., Roy R., George W. and Mildred J. Mr. Smith's father, Willett E., was born in Hounsfield, October 28,1834. He was educated in the schools of his day and was also a farmer. He married Zelpha A. Baker of his native town, and they had four children: D'Estaing (as above), Fred M., John B. and Viola (who died at the age of four years). Mr. Smith died August 11, 1887, and his wife September 6, 1881. Mrs. Nellie E. Smith's father, Chauncey Reed, was born in the town of Watertown, in 1831. He was educated in the district schools and followed farming through life. He married Emeline Bates of Hounsfield, and they had eight children; two died in infancy, the others are Merrick, Ida, George, Nellie E., Burt and Emma. Mr. Reed died in 1885; his widow survives at this date, 1897. Mr. Smith in his political choice is a thorough Democrat. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members of Star Grange No. 9, P. of I. The ancestry of the family on both sides is of New England origin.

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Phelps, Riley H., was born in the town of Hounsfield, March 17, 1849. He was educated in the public schools and Adams Collegiate Institute. Nineteen years of his life were spent in mercantile business and he is now one of the town's thorough farmers. August 7, 1877, he married R. Dell Brown of Great Bend, and they have ten children: R. Monroe, Howard B., Grace D., Lulu S., I. Amelia, Melinda S., Ethel H., George C., Victor J. and Lottie L. Mr. Phelps in his political choice is a thorough Republican and a good worker in the cause. He is a member of Rising Sun Lodge at Adams, No. 334, F. and A. M., and of Painsville (Ohio) Chapter, R. A. M. His father, Riley Phelps, was born in Herkimer county, January 5, 1807, and came to this county when a boy. He was bound out and became a very successful farmer. He married Sabra Hunt of the town of Adams, and they had four children: Lucy A., Amelia A., George R. and Riley H. Lucy A. and George died young, Mr. Phelps died August 14, 1876, and his widow April 15, 1882. Mrs. Riley H. Phelps's father, Joseph Brown, was born in England in 1828, and came to the United States at the age of twelve years. He was a blacksmith by trade; he married Harriet Borden, and they had six children: Mary, Emma, R. Dell, Hattie, William and J. Fred. Mr. Brown died in October, 1889, and Mrs. Brown in 1878.

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Hoover, George, was born in the town of Hounsfield, N. Y., April 26, 1841. His education was obtained in the public schools, and he was engaged in the lumber trade until he retired in 1888. In his political choice he is a thorough Republican. His father, Eli Hoover, was born at Evans' Mills in 1812. He was educated in the schools of his day, and in 1830 married Catherine Walradt of his native place, and they had ten children: John, Alexander, Enos, Josiah, Nelson, Hiram, George (as above), Dinah, Maryette and Catherine. Mr. Hoover died in August, 1888, and his wife in July, 1888. Mr. Hoover's grandfather, Peter Hoover, was born in the Mohawk valley, whence the family came to this county. Ancestry of the family is of good old Dutch stock on both sides.

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Hunt, Edward, was born on the old homestead in Hounsfield, November 6, 1850. He was educated in the district schools and is one of the town's good farmers, December 31, 1874, he married Ida A. Pike, formerly of Lewis county, and they have one son, Charles E., born July 13,1876, and is a farmer at home with his parents. Mr. Hunt in his political choice is a thorough Democrat; the family are of New England origin. Mr. Hunt's father, John Hunt, was born in Lancaster, Mass., January 29, 1802; he was educated in the schools of that day and was a farmer. He came to this State when a boy with his parents. He married twice, first to Hannah Warren, and they had two children: John T. and Lovinia. Mrs. Hunt died in 1842, and for his second wife he married Laura Joiner, and they had four children: Emma, Asel, Hannarette and Edward. Mr. Hunt died in 1865 and his widow in 1892. Mrs. Ida A. Hunt's father, Royal Pike, was born in Bennington, Vt., in 1830. He was educated in the district schools, and was by occupation a farmer. He married Celestia Pease, and they had ten children: Ida A., Julianna, William O., Andrew J. and Albert L. (twins), Emmarary, Lucy A., Dora, Maria and Elmer. Mrs. Pike died in 1883.

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Field, James T., was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., December 9, 1832, He was educated in the public schools aad follows the honorable occupation of farming. Mr. Field's father, Joseph Field, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, August 10, 1800; he married Sarah Wright of his native county and came to the United States in the year 1839, locating at Sackets Harbor, N. Y. They had eight children, five of whom still survive: John W., James T., (as above), Jane E., Jennette G., Joseph W., Martha A., Lucinda S. and Maggie E. Mr. Field died October 9, 1878, and his widow February 9, 1883, John W. married Amelia Simons of Hounsfield, and they have four children: Carrie, George, Harry and Jessie M. Joseph W. was a soldier in Co. B, 186th N. Y. Vols., and was killed in the battle of Five Forks in April, 1865. Jane E. married twice, first to Alfred Stevenson, and had ten children; after Mr. Stevenson's death she married William Thrall, now of Niagara county. Jennette G. married O. L. Wilton of Niagara county, and they have one daughter, Sarah M., now Mrs. Weaver. Martha A. married William E. Pettit of the town of Hounsfield, and they have three children, Albert A., Minnie S. and William F. Lucinda S. married John T. Hooper of Hounsfield, now of Chicago, Ill., and they have two children, Edith S. and Wallace T. Maggie E. is now keeping house for her brother, James T. Joseph Field was care taker and guard of the old ship Orleans for ten years. The family are members of the Presbyterian church and they came to reside on the Field homestead in 1845 and have owned it for sixty-seven years. Indians were located on it when they first purchased it.

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Marsh, A. Membery, was born in Whitesboro, Oneida county, N. Y., February 19,
1836, and came to the town of Hounsfield with his parents in 1844. He was educated
in the public schools of Sackets Harbor, and taught school six winters and farmed
summers until he retired in 1894. September 35, 1861, he married Mary E. Eveleigh of Sackets Harbor. Mr. Marsh's father, Amos Marsh, was born in Dorsetshire, England, November 10, 1810; he was educated in the schools of that time and came to the United States in the spring of 1832, locating in Whitesboro, N. Y., where he carried on a blacksmith business. He married Elizabeth Membery, and they had three children: A. Membery (as above), Giles L., and Ira P. Ira P. died in his tenth year. Amos Marsh died January 1, 1892, his widow survives at this date, 1897. Mrs. Marsh's father, Bernard Eveleigh, was born in the year 1813 and came to Sackets Harbor about the year 1884, where he was a hotel keeper; he married twice, first to Lydia Champlin, and they had one daughter, Mary E. Mrs. Eveleigh died April 1, 1880, and for his second wife Mr. Eveleigh married Mrs. Margaret Membery. Mr. Eveleigh died January 19, 1894, and his widow survives at this date, 1897.

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Cobb, Mrs. Elijah.—Elijah Cobb was born in the town of Alexandria, Jefferson county, N. Y., July 22, 1833, and came to Hounsfield when ten years of age. He was educated in the district schools and is a farmer. November 13,1858, he married Mrs. Emily Frink of Hounsfield, and they had four sons: Herbert C., George H., Eugene F., and Edward E. Mrs. Cobb had one son by her first husband, Franklin P. Frink, who married Minnie E. Waterbury of Hounsfield, and they had two children: Perrin H. and Clara Emily. Herbert C. married Olia Putnam of the town of Adams and they have one son, Ray Putnam. Mr. Cobb is a resident of South Dakota and has held several town offices. George H. married Louisa Wenzel of Watertown; he holds the office of city recorder at this time. Eugene F. married Sadie Wadsworth of Adams Center, they have one daughter, Florence E. Elijah Cobb in 1864 enlisted in Co. B, 186th N. Y. Vols., and was wounded April S, 1865, in front of Petersburg, Va., and was honorably discharged June 2, 1865. He is a member of Joseph K. Barnes Post of Sackets Harbor, No, 360, G, A. R. In his political choice he is a thorough Republican, The ancestry of the family is Scotch, Dutch and English. Mr. Cobb's father, Joseph Cobb, was born in Onondaga county, June 8, 1800. He was educated in the schools of that day, and June 5, 1821, married Margaret Soules; they had ten children that grew to maturity: Mary, Eli, Perry, John, Elijah, Philena, Carsendana, Julia, Elsie and Orlando (who was drowned at the age of eight years). Mr. Cobb died December 25, 1887, and his widow January 17,1897. Mrs. Cobb's father, William C. Crandall, was born in the town of Brookfield, Madison county, N. Y., July 13, 1808; he married Maria Moore of his native place, and they had three children: William D., Henry C., and Emily M. Mr. Crandall died August 13, 1856, and his widow in 1876.

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McWayne, Josiah A., was born in the town of Hounsfield, April 33, 1833. He was educated in the district schools and was accountant and bookkeeper for the Ontario Milling Co. of Dexter nine years, a general merchant many years, and is now a prosperous farmer. He has married twice, first, February 4, 1854, to Eveline Smith of Dexter, and they had five children: F. Addie, Albert D., Eda M., Frank E. and Jessie E. Mrs. McWayne died November 2, 1807, and on March 15, 1871, Mr. McWayne married Delilah Washburn of Hounsfield, and they have four children: Geraldine, Harry W., Mark W. and Kent W. F. Addie married J. Bowles Smith of New York city, and they have two children: Lucius W. and Junius A.; Edna M. married Dewitt S. Peck of this county, and they have four children, Wayne C., Ray, Bertha and Bessie; Frank E. married Kittie Mullen of the State of Wisconsin, where they now reside; Jessie E. married Frank Whitaker of Hounsfield. Mr. McWayne's father, Delos A. McWayne, was born in Wayne county, N. Y., August 12, 1808, and came to this county when a boy about the year 1820. He married Angelina Johnson in 1831, and they had four children: Josiah A., Johnson P., Delos A. and Edwin E. Edwin E. was a soldier in the late war in the 10th H. A., N. Y. Vols., and was honorably discharged at the close of the war, Delos A. McWayne died May 4, 1883, and his widow January 21, 1883. Mr. McWayne's grandfather, Josiah, was born in Massachusetts in 1780, and his great-grandfather, Samuel, was born in Scotland in 1751. J. A. McWayne is at the present time supervisor of his town, was elected in 1889 and has served his town continuously up to the present time.

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Augsbury, David Duane, was born in the town of Theresa, Jefferson county, N.Y., December 22,1846, and is a son of David, jr., and Elizabeth Augsbury. David Augsbury, the grandfather, was born February 9, 1788, and in 1807 married Hannah Young and nine children were born to them. In 1811 Mr. and Mrs. Augsbury, with two children, came from Minden, Montgomery county, to Pamelia, Jefferson county, N. Y., settling on a farm of 120 acres. Mr. Augsbury served in the war of 1812, and took part in the battle fought at Sackets Harbor, May 39,1813. He was assessor of the town of Pamelia several years and died May 20, 1853. David Augsbury, jr., father of David D., was born in Minden, Montgomery county, November 10, 1810, married October 3, 1830, Elizabeth, daughter of George and Roeena Countryman. Elizabeth was born in Duane, Herkimer county, N. Y., October 10,1811, and was mother of eight children, of which two are now living, George D., born January 23, 1837, and David D. David and Elizabeth Augsbury lived with his father the first six years of their wedded life. In 1836 they came from Pamelia to Theresa, cleared a farm of 180 acres and in 1866 removed to the homestead in Pamelia, where, October 27,1874, Mrs. Augsbury died and Mr. Augsbury died November 2,1885. David D. Augsbury was educated in the common schools, going two miles to school, and commenced laboring on the farm at an early age. When but twelve years old he took the position of a man in many works on the farm, at fourteen he invented and made a horse fork to unload hay and grain with a team, which was the first fork for this purpose known to him, and the following year other forks of the kind were introduced. At fifteen he accidentally fell thirty feet, breaking his skull, also one leg and dislocated one shoulder; when found a few minutes later he was taken up as dead, but soon gave signs of life and lay unconscious three days, but having a strong constitution he recovered very rapidly. In August, 1864, Mr. Augsbury enlisted in Co. K, 91st N. Y. Infantry, and served until the close of the war. He took part in three engagements, at Gravelly Run, March 31, 1865, Five Forks, April 1, following a few days later in the capture of one of R. E. Lee's wagon trains. He was present at the surrender of R. E. Lee and his command to the Union forces and was mustered out of the U. S. service June 10, 1865. After the close of the war Mr. Augsbury returned to Theresa and engaged in farming until 1879, when he took up the carpenter's trade and since 1881 has been engaged in selling and erecting wind mills and pumps and is very successful. It has always been his custom in whatever he did to do it well. In politics he is a Republican; is a member of St. James Episcopal church and of St. James Chapter No. 1,127, St. Andrew's Brotherhood, also of G. W. Flower Post No. 306, G. A. R., department of New York. February 20, 1867, he married Sarah Jeanettie Delancey of Sterlingville, N Y, a daughter of Thomas and Phoebe Delancey. Thomas Delancey was born in Dutchess county, N. Y., August 18, 1802, was a cousin to Bishop Delancey, and died August 2, 1879. His widow now resides at Black River, N. Y. To Mr. and Mrs. Augsbury was born one son, Bert Delancey Augsbury, born January 5, 1874 educated in Theresa, and is in business with his father. Bert is a member of St. James Episcopal church, Theresa Grange No. 660, St. James Lodge, I. O. G. T., No. 10, and of the Brotherhood of St. Andrew.

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Wilder, Mrs. Ellen M.—The late Philo D. Wilder was born in Henderson, in 1839, and came to Dexter with his parents when a child. He was educated in the public schools and by occupation was a captain on the lakes. August 22, 1864, he enlisted as sergeant in Co. B, 186th Infantry N. Y. Vols., was honorably discharged June 5, 1865, and returned to his old home at Dexter. In May, 1868, he married Ellen M, Vance. He was a member of the G. A. R., also a member of Brownville Masonic Lodge, F. & A. M., and of Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68, R. A, M. He died December 4, 1878. Mrs. Wilder's father, William Vance, was born in County Down, Ireland, in 1804, and came to the United States in 1826, locating in Hounsfield; he returned to Ireland in about two years and married Ellen Quael, returning to the United States with his wife. He was captain on the lakes and afterwards a farmer. They had four children: Mary A., Sarah J., William S. and Ellen M. (twins); Mary A. and William S. are dead. William S. was an honorably discharged soldier of the late war. Mrs. Wilder is now president of the Woman's Relief Corps of Sackets Harbor.

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Holloway, Horace G., was born in the town of Hotmsfield, December 25, 1835, He obtained his education in the common schools, and early in life was a farmer. August 9, 1862, he enlisted in Co. H, 10th Heavy Artillery, N. Y. Vols, was wounded in the right hand in front of Petersburg, April 2, 1865, and was honorably discharged May 28, 1865, holding the office of first duty sergeant. October 4, 1854, he married Victoria E. Utter of his native town, and they had three children: Edwin D., Ella M. and Ione G. Edwin D. married Helen Washburn of the town of Adams, and they have two sons, Artie and C. Harold; Ella M. married George S. Waterbury of this town, and they have a baby girl not named; Ione G. married George H. Ward, also of this town, and they have two sons, Edwin G., born December 13, 1895, and Oswald H., born January 2, 1898. Mr. Holloway is a member of Joseph K. Barnes Post, Sackets Harbor, No. 360, G.A.R., Department of New York. Mr. Holloway was appointed lighthouse keeper under President Arthur and has held the position ever since. His grandfather, Daniel Holloway, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and his father, Charles, was also a soldier in the war of 1812. Mrs. Holloway's father, John Utter, was born in Rhode Island, September 20, 1806, and came to this locality when young. He married Ann C. Bloodgood of this town, and they have five children: Elizabeth A., Victoria E. (as above), Ann O., James De Esting and Mary E. Mr. Utter died May 3, 1872, and his widow survives at this date (1897).

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Mason, C. C., was born in Antwerp, N, Y., June 29, 1848, a son of Asa Mason. His father was born in Massachusetts and came to Le Ray with his parents when a mere child. He was educated in the common schools and came to Antwerp when a young man and here spent his days. He was a well-to-do farmer and made his own property and at time of his death owned 330 acres of land. He married Lucena Ingalls, daughter of Jonathan Ingalls, a graduate of Dartmouth College. He was born in 1787 in New Hampshire. In 1811 Jonathan Ingalls came to Watertown; he married Delecty Jewett and they had seven daughters and two sons. His wife died in 1864 and he died in 1878, aged ninety-one years. Mr. and Mrs. Asa Mason had five children: Wright W., Cyrus C., Emma A., Luther R. and Libbie J. Mr. Mason died July 23, 1880, and his widow is now living in Antwerp. Cyrus C. Mason was educated in the common schools and Ives Seminary, Antwerp, and is a farmer. He owns the homestead of 140 acres and Seventy-five acres adjoining the homestead where he lives; he has a dairy of thirty-five cows. In politics he is a Republican, and a member of Court Philadelphia, No. 503, I. O. F., also a member of Antwerp Grange. February 18, 1874, he married Martha Ford, who died April 3, 1888, and on February 5, 1890, he married Laura M. Lewis of Watertown, N. Y., daughter of John S. and Martha Lewis. John S. Lewis was a son of Abel P., son of Nicholas, son of Dr. Arnold Lewis, one of the first settlers of Champion, taking up 400 acres of land; he was a surgeon in the French and Indian war and also in the Revolutionary war.John S. Lewis was born November 15, 1823, and has spent about eighteen years in Watertown. He and his wife now live with their daughter, Mrs. Mason. His wife was Martha Ford, and they had two sons and one daughter. Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Mason have one daughter, Martha L., born February 28, 1893. C. C. Mason was one of the jurors in the noted case of George Allen alias Edward G. Haines, for the murder of Mary Daily and Mary Crouch of Sackets Harbor, committed April 15, 1897, commencing September 6, 1897, and lasting fifty-four days, terminating in a verdict of murder in the second degree.

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Grant, Capt Philander B., was born in Lewis county, N. Y., March 9, 1827. He removed with his parents to Pillar Point, from thence to about four miles from Clayton village, where he remained on a farm until about eighteen years of age. Here be received his education at the district school. He then commenced sailing on the lakes until 1830. On the first day of April he left Sackets Harbor for California by way of New York. On the llth day of April he sailed from New York on the James K. Polk to go around Cape Horn and arrived in San Francisco on the 18th day of September, same year; from thence he went to the mines; worked in mines for a year and a half: then he went into the general grocery and miner supplies, conducting that business with a partner. Came east in the spring of 1853 and June 9, 1853, married Maranda S. Stone of Sackets Harbor and then returned to California in September following. There continued business until 1856, then came east with his wife. Remained in Sackets Harbor for two years, then went to California again by way of the Panama route. Remained there one year and then closed out business and returned east again, and in 1862 enlisted in the 10th N. Y. H. A. Vols. as a second lieutenant, and in September was ordered to Washington and from there went into the forts around Washington, and in 1863 was promoted first lieutenant and the following year as captain. May, 1864, was ordered to reinforce Grant at Cold Harbor and served in defense of Richmond and Petersburg, and in 1864 was ordered to Washington and then down to the Shenandoah Valley. February, 1865, was discharged on account of disabilities and returned to Sackets Harbor. In 1868 removed to Watertown and engaged in the grocery business on Public Square and continued in that business until about 1876 when he sold out and in 1878 engaged in the same business with a partner named S. W. Reynolds. In 1884 W. H. Mould took the place of S. W. Reynolds and the firm name was P. H. Grant & Co., and in 1886 J. W. C. Sparks bought Captain Grant out and in 1890 Captain Grant bought Sparks's interest and then the firm name was Grant & Mould, which copartnership still exists. Mrs. Grant died May 19,1887, and in 1890 he married Libbie L. Abbey. His family consists of Ida May Mould, Jennie E. Witt and Frederick H. Grant.

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Houghton, William A., was born in the town of Antwerp, November 12, 1862, on his father's farm, known as the Elijah Houghton homestead, seven miles west of Antwerp village. He was educated in the common schools of the vicinity, and at Ives Seminary and Eastman's Business College at Pougfakeepsie. After finishing his education he entered the employ of Ira C. Hinsdale, general merchant of Antwerp, as bookkeeper. He left Antwerp in 1891 and came to Dexter, purchasing the opera house block and engaged in general merchandise business in which he continued six years, when he disposed of the business to Messrs. Luther Bros. & Co. During the time Mr. Houghton was in business in Dexter, he was also the owner of a livery business which he ran in connection with his other line of trade. He still continues the livery business and the buying and selling of produce and dealing in carriages and farm implements. In 1888 Mr. Houghton married Alice M. Wicks, daughter of Samuel Wicks, and they have three children: Charles W., I. Fernie and Grace. Mr. Houghton's paternal grandfather, Elijah Houghton, served through the war of 1812 and was at the battle of Sackets Harbor. Mr. Houghton has five brothers: Dr. E. M. Houghton of Detroit, who holds the position of superintendent of the extensive laboratory of Parke, Davis & Co., manufacturers of medical and pharmaceutical preparations; James, who resides on the old homestead at Antwerp; Edwin S., a mining expert of Fountain, Col.; Dr. C. A. Houghton, a prominent dentist of Philadelphia, N. Y., and Roy, a student at the Philadelphia (N. Y.) Academy.

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Howard, Thomas H., was born in Ireland, in 1833, a son of William and Mary Howard. He was reared on a farm and came to America when twenty years old and and here attended school. He has always been a farmer and has 100 acres of land and a dairy of fifteen cows. Mr. Howard enlisted in Co. C, 10th N. J. Regiment, in January, 1862, and served until the close of the war, serving in twenty important battles: Fair Oaks, Savage Station, Hanover C. H., Mine Run, Wilderness, Spottsylvania C. H., Fredericksburg, Weldon R. R., North Anna River, Cold Harbor, Chapin's Farm, and many other small battles. Mr. Howard was in the Crimean war in 1853 to 1855, serving with the British army, and assisted in taking Sebastopol, fought at Inkerman Valley and also at Balaclava. In politics Mr. Howard is a Republican and takes an active part. He has been assessor of his town for six years. In 1865 he married Mary A. Irvin, native of Ireland, who came to America when young and they have six children: Edward W., Henry, Carrie E., Ervin C., Gilbert F. and Eugene H. They have lost by death two children—Charles E., died July 10, 1876, and Freddie, died July 4, 1876. When Mr. Howard came to Sackets Harbor he had but twenty-five cents in his pocket which he gave for his dinner. He has made his own property, and is now one of the representative farmers of his town. He and his wife are members of the Episcopal church at Fredericks Corners.

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Smith, Herbert H., M. D., a leading physician and surgeon of Watertown, was born in the town of Hounsfield, Jefferson county, N. Y., March 13, 1860. His education was obtained from the Ives Seminary at Antwerp, and the Rochester Business College, from which he was graduated in I860. He then began the study of medicine at the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore, but finished his professional course in the University of the City of New York and received his degree in 1889. He immediately began the practice of his profession in Watertown, where he has since resided. He is a member of the Jefferson County and City Medical Societies, of the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. He was married in April, 1885, to Mary E. Burns of Jefferson county, and she died January 26, 1893.

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White, George W., was born in the town of Pamelia, Jefferson county, N, Y., December 4, 1861. His early days were spent on the farm and in 1880 he entered the service of the Knapp Lumber Co., which firm was succeeded by White & Sullivan, Mr. White being the senior member. This firm manufactures doors, sash and blinds and give employment to from fifteen to twenty-five workmen. Mr. White is a son of Lyman and Marcia (Town) White, who came to this county from Massachusetts in 1836. Mr. White has always taken an active interest in public affairs, being at one time town clerk of the town of Pamelia. May 18, 1881, he married Eva A. White of Hounsfield, N, Y.

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Potter, Harrison C., was born in Adams, N. Y., December 20, 1864, a son of P. C. and Luthera (Gould) Potter. P. C. Potter was born in Paris. Oneida county, in 1824, and his wife was born in Lorraine, a daughter of Amos Gould, a native of Massachusetts, who came early to Jefferson county. Mr. and Mrs. Potter had two children, Harrison C. and Celia, wife of F. W. Dixon of Dexter, N. Y. Harrison C. was educated at Adams Collegiate Institute and Ives Seminary, and was graduated from the University of Buffalo in 1894; he came to Mannsville, N. Y., the same year, where he has had a very successful practice. Dr. Potter was married June 13, 1895, to Rhoda F., daughter of Hon. H. J. Lane of Sackets Harbor. Dr. Potter is a member of Mannsville Lodge No. 175, I.O.O.F., and of the Jefferson County Medical Association. Dr. Potter has traveled in twenty-six different States and seen considerable for a young man. He is a Republican and has been health officer for two years. He is now chairman of the Republican town committee and was president of the McKinley and Hobart Club and has for two years been chief of the fire department, being the organizer of it.

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MacGowan, Alexander Bartholomew, was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, December 16, 1830, and came to Canada with his parents in the year 1836, He was educated in Montreal and from there went to New York. He was private, corporal and sergeant in the 7th Infantry, N. Y, Militia, from May 10,1849, until November 30, 1859; then went to California, December 1,1859, recruited Co. H, 1st Cal. Infantry, as first lieutenant. August 16, 1861, he was transferred to Co. A, 6th Infantry, Cal. Vols., was mustered out October 31,1865; February 23, 1866, was made second and first lieutenant of 12th U. S. Infantry, and captain August 30, 1871, and brevet major U. S. army February S7, 1890, for gallant service in the field against Indians in their attack on Fort Apache, Arizona, on September 1, 1881. Retired December 16, 1894, being sixty-four years old. He was present at all the riots in New York from May 10, 1849, until November 30, 1859 inclusive; served in and scouted over Arizona, California, Washington, Oregon, New Mexico, South Dakota, South Carolina, Kentucky, New York and Washington, D. C., in the volunteer and regular service. At various times commanded posts and in field acted as A. A. Q. M., A. A. C. S., ordnance officer, signal officer, Indian agent and often as doctor in the field. He has made his home in Sackets Harbor since 1864, serving with his company at this post five years. His father, Alexander MacGowan, was born in Scotland in 1801; he married Isabella Swick of his native place, and they had four children: Alexander B. (as above), Kate, Isabella and John; he died in 1868 and his wife in 1865. Major MacGowan has married twice, first to Frances A. Currier of New Haven, Conn., November 1, 1858, and they had two children, Charles D. and George P. Mrs. MacGowan died December 22, 1875, and in 1882, he married Sarah E. McMurray, and they have one son, Francis. Major MacGowan is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. & A. M.

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Tracy, Capt. James M., sr., was born in the town of Hounsfield, Jefferson county, N. Y., March 16, 1818; he was educated in the schools of his day and in the Black River Institute at Watertown. He was captain on the lakes for thirty-five years and is now living a retired life, December 31, 1842, he married Elmina Wheat of Sackets Harbor, and they had four children: Elizabeth H., James M., Howard M. and John R. Elizabeth H. married Dr. Everett D. Waterbury, who is a practicing dentist there, and they have three daughters, Nettie E., Jessie L., and Nellie M.; James M. married Laura Davis of the State of Kansas, and they have two sons, Clifton H. and John D.; Howard M. is not married at this date, 1897. John R. has married twice, first to Jennie Morgan, who died in 1884, and for his second wife he married Jennie Lamphear. Mrs. James M. Tracy died in August, 1885, mourned by a bereaved husband and children. Captain Tracy's father, Benjamin H. Tracy, was born at Ballston Spa, Saratoga county, N. Y., in 1787; he was educated in the public schools of that day and married Sybel Fish. They had nine children: Elsie, Julian, Herbert H., Eleanor, James M., sr. (as above), George, Gordon, Bernard and Laura. Benjamin Tracy died in 1880 and his widow in 1874.

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Hart, William E., was born in the town of Sullivan, Madison county, N. Y., December 3, 1845, was educated in the district schools and follows the honorable occupation of farming. November 20, 1866, he married Lucretia A. Vanolinda, and they have one son, Charles Grant, born June 1, 1869, was educated in the public schools and is now conducting a meat market in Brownville; he married Georgia N. Morse of Watertown, and they have one daughter, Myra Ledse. Mr. Hart enlisted in September, 1864, in Co. B, 185th Infantry, N, Y. Vois., and was honorably discharged in June, 1865. He is a member of Joe Spratt Post No. 323, of Watertown, G.A.R., department of New York. Mr. and Mrs. Hart are members of the Watertown Grange, No. 7; he is a Republican in polities. Mrs. Hart's father, Cornelius Vanolinda, was born in Albany county, N. Y., in the year 1817; he was educated in the schools of that day and was a carpenter and farmer by occupation. He helped to build the barracks of Sackets Harbor, he having located in this county when a young man. He married Elmira Royce of Pinckey, Lewis county, N. Y., and they had five children: Mary J., Lucretia A., James, Jacob, Susie and William. Mrs. Vanolinda died June 15, 1888; Mr. Vanolinda survives at this date.

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Holloway, Charles B., was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., August 16, 1830, was educated in the district schools, and early in life was a farmer. August 9, 1862, he enlisted in Co. H, H, A., N. Y. Vols., and was honorably discharged May 31,1865. February 10, 1853, he married Harriet E. Metcalf, formerly of the town of Adams, and they had two children, Charles W., who died in Wisconsin in his fourth year, and Fred M., who is a farmer and marine engineer, now on the homestead farm. He married Estella C. Love of the town of Watertown, and they have six children: Grace E., C. Grant, Blanche J., Claire L., Ada F. and Reta E. Mr. Holloway served as postmaster under Harrison's administration, and is a member of Joseph K. Barnes Post, Sackets Harbor, N. Y., No. 860, G. A. R. His grandfather, Daniel Holloway, came as a soldier with Burgoyne, was taken prisoner, exchanged and afterward joined the American force. Mr. Holloway's father. Charles Holloway, was born in Connecticut, February 14, 1795, and came to this State when a boy; he married Chloe Woodruff of the town of Watertown, and ten children were born to them: Chester (died at the age of nineteen), Lester, Elsie, Lavina, Laura, Maria, Charles B. (as above), Chloe, Horace and Chester No. 2. Mr. Holloway died February 21, 1853, and his widow April 21, 1870. Mrs. Holloway's father, William Metcalf, was born in the town of Henderson, in 1806; he married Emeline Taylor, and they had five children: Harriet E. (as above), Henry A., W. Harrison, E. Sophia and Adelaide A. Mr. Metcalf died in 1893, and his wife in 1881.

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Wilson, James A., was born on the Orkney Islands, Scotland, in August, 1844; he was educated under his grandfather's tuition, who was a government teacher. He was a sailor three years, was in the employ of the Hudson Bay Co. five years, stationed at York Factory; he returned to Europe and visited his old home a short time and then returned to the United States, locating in Oswego, N. Y., where he conducted a lumber business for a number of years. He located for his permanent home at Sackets Harbor, where he conducts a lumber trade and is a contractor and builder. He is now, in 1897, serving his second term as president of the village, has been trustee of the village several terms, and is now secretary of the board of education. He is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. & A. M., of Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68, R. A. M., has been master of the former two terms and high priest of the chapter two terms, and Watertown Commandery No. 11, K. T. He is also one of the trustees of Masonic property. In August, 1871, he married Mary Preston of Oswego, N. Y., and they had six children: Mary, Robert B., Lizzie, Jessie (who died when nine years old), James A., jr., and Fred. Robert B. is a practicing physician in Oneida county. Mr. Wilson's father, John, also his grandfather John, were whaling sailors. This family descends direct from the old Viking stock. Mr. Wilson and family are members of the Presbyterian church and he has been trustee for several years.

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Scroxton, Benjamin C., was born at Sackets Harbor, N. Y., December 25, 1851. He was educated in the public schools and learned the tinsmith trade, and has been doing business on his own account for the past ten years, dealing in stoves, hardware, pumps, plumbing, job work, etc. In 1878 he married Hattie E. Boulton, and they had four children: Grace E., Mary I., Hattie (died in her seventh year) and Lucy I. (died in her second year). Mr. Scroxton is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. & A. M., Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68, R.A.M., Watertown Commandery No. 11, K. T., is master of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, and holds the office of principal sojourner in the Chapter, His father, John Scroxton, was born in Birmingham, England, in the year 1809; he ran away from home and enlisted in the British army, was in the Patriot war in Canada in 1837, was promoted first sergeant and bought his honorable discharge. He married Eliza Dillon of Canada, and after a time came to the United States, locating in Sackets Harbor. They had nine children: John, Thomas, Mary, Lucy, Joseph, Benjamin C. (as above), Holland, George and Edward C. Mr. Scroxton died July 13, 1866, and his widow survives at this date, 1897.

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Holdridge, Mrs. Malisa.—The late Orange Holdridge was born in the town of Henderson. Jefferson county, N. Y., April 80, 1833, was educated in the district schools, and a sailor by occupation. In 1862 he enlisted in the 10th Heavy Artillery, N. Y. Vols., and was honorably discharged at the close of the war by reason of surgeon's certificate of disability. December 81, 1856, he married Malisa Haskins of the town of Lyme, and they had four children: Mary E., William H., Ina M. and Ernest D. Mary E. died at the age of twenty-five; William H. died in his second year; Ina M. married Julius Bechtel of Sackets Harbor, now of Buffalo, N. Y.; and Ernest D. died in his sixth year. Mr. Holdridge died in 1882. Mrs. Holdridge's father, Reubin Haskins, was born in Vermont in the year 1786, and came here with his parents when a boy. He was in the war of 1812, but not as a soldier. He married Emily Fuller of this county, and they had six children: Malisa (as above), Henry A., Annie, Edwin, Adeline, and Willard. Mr. Haskins died in 1861 and his widow in 1892. The ancestry of the family is of New England stock.

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Hovey, Edgar A., was born in the town of Hounsfield, March 26, 1860. He was educated in the district schools and in 1861 came to Saekets Harbor, where he engaged in the baggage and express business for himself. He next owned a stage line from Sackets Harbor to Watertown for three years, when he embarked in the livery business, in which he continued for five years; each of these he sold and returned to the first named, which he carries on together with retailing large quantities of coal, wood and ice. He is also a dealer in agricultural implements, binding twine, etc. He owns a fine farm upon which he has thirty choice cows, the product of which he disposes of on a good milk route in the village. Mr. Hovey is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 185, F. & A. M., also of the Knights of Pythias. He is a member of the Episcopal church, and in his political choice is a thorough Republican. His father, Joseph Hovey, was born in this town also in the year 1885. He was educated in the schools of his day, and married Minerva McWay of his native town, and they had five children; Edgar A. (as above), Nellie, Frank, Martha and Justus M. Mr. Hovey died in 1871, and his widow still survives. Nellie married Henry Y. Stokes, now of Nebraska, and they have three children: Sarah, Ethel and Georgie; Martha married Henry H. Reader of Houusfield, and they have one son, Edgar H. Mr. Reader died April 15, 1896. It will be seen that at the death of Mr. Hovey, Edgar A. was only eleven years old, and upon him and his mother devolved the responsibility of the family and right well has he performed his part and made a home for the family and a success of business.

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Stone, Alexander, was born in the town of Rodman, Jefferson county, N. Y., July 14, 1882. He was educated in the common schools and has always been in the hotel and restaurant business. He has been married twice, first in 1858 to Lucy D. Kent of Providence, R. L, and they had five children: Charles A., Benjamin H., George A., Lucy E. and Abby D. Benjamin H. is married; Lucy E. married Robert R. Bliss of Chicago, Ill.; and Abby D. married Eugene A. Bliss now of Boston, Mass. Mrs. Stone died in 1872 and Mr. Stone married in August, 1883, Fannie A. Thompson of the town of Hounsfield, N. Y. Mr. Stone's father, Horatio Stone, was born in 1800, very likely in the town of Rodman; his parents were from Connecticut. He was educated in the schools of that day and was a farmer by occupation. He married Sophia McKee of this county, and they had eight children: Miranda, Minerva, Mahela, Alexander (as above), Betsey, Alfred, Charles and Lewis B., who died December 19,1868; Charles died April 24,1867. Horatio Stone died June 36,1869, and his wife October 25, 1862. Mrs. Fannie A. Stone's father, Samuel E. Thompson, was born in Connecticut, January 23, 1799; all of his children by his two marriages were born on the 23d of the month. Mr. Stone is a member of Canonicus Lodge No. 9, I. O. O. P., also of Moshassuek Encampment No. 2, I. O. O. F., and Damoa Lodge No. 3, K. of P., all of Providence, R. I. In his political choice he is a thorough Republican. The ancestry of the family is English and Scotch.

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Merz, Adam, was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 31, 1851. He was educated in their schools, and is a musician by profession. In 1871 he came to the United States and remained in New York city one year. In 1872 he enlisted in the 9th Regiment Infantry, U. S. A., serving five years; he then went to Omaha, Neb., from 1877 to 1881 and re-enlisted in the same regiment, altogether serving in the army twenty-three years. In 1887 he was promoted chief musician of the regimental band. In 1877 he married Mrs. Elizabeth Martin of Omaha, and they have two daughters; Sophia Theresa and Annie Madeline. Mr. Merz is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F. & A. M.: of Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68, R. A. M.; and of Red Cloud Tribe No. 388, I. O. R. M. of Sackets Harbor. The ancestry of the family is German and Swiss.

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Young, (Gore) Levi W., was born in Franklin county, N. Y., March 22, 1861. He was educated in the common schools, and in 1887 enlisted in Co. G, llth Infantry, U. S. A,, serving three years and was honorably discharged in 1891. October 1, 1896, he took charge as engineer of the military pumping station situated on Henderson Bay. May 32, 1891, he married Clara B. Frasier of Sackets Harbor. Mr. Young is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 135, F, & A, M.; also of Sackets Harbor Chapter No. 68, R, A. M. In his political choice he is a thorough Democrat. Mr. Young's father, Levi Young, was born about the year 1835; he married Susan Royce and they had six children: Sarah, Levi W., Lovina, Phebe, Rose and Fred. They are both living at this date, 1897. Mrs. Young's father, Frederick Frasier, was born in the town of Henderson in 1855; he was educated there and by occupation is a fireman. He married Mrs. Flora Spencer of Smithville, and they had five children: Clara B., Lena M., Harry D., Roy A. and Harley C. Mr. Frasier died in April, 1887, and his widow married again.

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Wescott, Wellington G., was born in the town of Henderson, May 6, 1842. He was educated in the public schools and Adams Collegiate Institute. His early life was spent on the farm; he was a sailor on the lakes three years, was master of the sailing schooner George W. Wescott. He has had a variety of occupations and is now owner of the summer resort at Campbell's Point, which he is conducting with increasing success. May 28,1863, he married Mary Littlefield of the town of Henderson, and they have one son, Hollis W., born January 27, 1879. Mr. Wescott is a member of Sackets Harbor Lodge No. 185, F, & A. M., and ancestry of family is Welsh and Scotch, of New England origin. Mr. Wescott's father, George W., was born in the town of Hounsfield, March 11, 1813, was educated in the schools of his day, and married Catherine Bell, who was born February 17, 1812. They had five children: Florence, Wellington G., Edwin D., Byron M., and Nelson L. Florence died in 1859; Byron M. and Nelson L., were drowned in 1879. Mr. Wescott died June 23, 1863, and his widow January 20,1884.

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Wescott, Clarence M., was born in the town of Henderson, December 27, 1839, was educated in the district schools and was a sailoron the lakes, but is now a wholesale and retail market gardener. November 25,1862, he married Marian E. Leffingwell of his native town, and they have one son, Fred, who married Kate Desmore of Dexter, N. Y., and have one daughter, Mabel. The family are connected with the Presbyterian church of Sackets Harbor, and in his political choice Mr. Wescott is a gold Democrat. His father, Nelson L. Wescott, was born in the town of Hounsfield, about the year 1811; was educated in the schools of his day and was a sailor on the lakes. He married Mary B. Bell of the town of Henderson and they had four children: Louise A., Clarence M., Henry N. and Walter D. Mr. Wescott was drowned April 7, 1851, and his widow survives at this date, 1897.

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Potter, Newman H., was born in the town of Hounsfield, February 28, 1829. He was educated in the public schools and was graduated from the Watertown Institute. April 29, 1861, he enlisted in Co. K, 35th Infantry N. Y. S. Vols., was promoted sergeant and participated with his company and regiment in all its battles, and was honorably discharged June 5, 1863. February 28,1850, he married Harriet E. Goodrich of the town of Pamelia, and they have five children: Fannie E., Fred E., Charles G., Harry A. L., and Harriet M. Fannie E. married H. H. Warn and they have one son, Fred A. Fred E. married Charlotte Wooliver of Brownvule, and they have for ten years, at the end of which time he embarked in the livery business at Clayton and conducts the leading establishment in that place. Mr. Clark married Minnie Pennock, who died leaving two children: Iretta (deceased) and Harriet. He married for his second wife Marian Gurney (Mrs.) Beattie, who had one daughter by previous marriage, Mrs. W. K. Hawes.

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Grow, George F., was born in Housfield, May 23, 1858, a son of Oliver Grow. He was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. At the age of nineteen he built a creamery in Lorraine, and was engaged in that business for four years, when he engaged in the manufacture of cheese boxes for one year and then bought a farm in partnership with W. R. Grow, of 280 acres; he was also in partnership with his brother in the manufacture of cheese. He sold his interest in the cheese factory in 1887. In 1888 he sold his farm and in January, 1894, bought the old Hunt stand and engaged in the hotel business, and has since been proprietor of the Grow Hotel. In politics he is a Republican and has been assessor of the town of Boylston, Oswego county, three years, where he lived six years. June 27, 1878, he married Hattie E., daughter of Philo M. and Adora M. (Gillett) Brown of Lorraine, and they had two sons: Alonzo B., born May 12, 1879, and William L., born November 30, 1881. Mrs. Grow's father, Philo Brown, was born in the town of Lorraine, October 25, 1832, son of Morris, son of Aaron, son of Ebenezer Brown, who came to Adams in 1806 and to Lorraine soon after, where he lived and died. Philo M. was educated at Jefferson County Institute of Watertown aud Falley Seminary of Fulton, N. Y. He succeeded his father in the mercantile business at the age of twenty. He is a Democrat, was supervisor of the town four terms, justice fifteen years and notary public twenty years. He is a member of I. O. O. F. and was noble grand several years and secretary of Lorraine Rural Cemetery forty-three years. In 1856 he marrried Melissa Gillett and they had two children: Ida M. (deceased), and Hattie E., wife of George F. Grow. Mrs. Brown died Angust 18,1891.

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