REVOLUTIONARY
WAR

An account of service:
George Gall :-)


George Gall was born June 28, 1766, in Berks County, Pennsylvania. The names of 
his parents were not given. while a resident of Rockbridge County, Virginia, George 
Gall enlisted January 10, 1781 served three months as private in Captain James 
Buchanan company. Colonel John Bower's Virginia regiment. He enlisted September 
1, 781, served in Captain Charles Cambell's Virginia company, march to Yorktown, 
was there until the surrender of Cornwallis, after which, he march as a guard to 
prisoners to Winchester Barracks, under Captain William Moore and colonel Vance, 
and was discharged in Winchester, having served three months. George Gall returned 
to Rockbridge County Virginia, lived three years, then moved to Pendleton County 
Virginia, lived several years, thence to Highland County, Ohio. He was allowed 
pension on his application executed August 20, 1832, then a resident of Highland 
County, Ohio The papers on file in this claim contain no discernible date in regard to 
family. (22) 


George Gall, Jr., B. June 28, 1766, d. October 1851.

While a resident of Rockbridge County. Virginia, George Gall enlisted January 10, 
1781, served three months as a private in Captain John Buchannan's Company, 
Colonel John Boer's Virginia Regiment. He again enlisted Jan. 10, 1781, served three 
months as private in Capt. James Buchannan's Company, Col. John Boyer's VA 
regiment.

He again enlisted Sept. 1, 1781, and served in Capt. Charles Campbell's VA. Co. and 
marched to Yorktown, was there until the surrender of Cornwallis, after which he 
marched as a guard to prisoners to Winchester Barracks, under Capt. William Moore 
and Colonel Vance, and was discharged in Winchester, (VA), having served three 
months.

Ref. for above - Veterans Administration, Washington, D.C. A.D. Hiller, Ex. 
Assistant to the Administrator; and also from Official Roaster of Ohio, Vol. P. 151. 
Virginians in the Rev. Gwathmey

* Gall, George Corp. IC CL, (also listed under Gaul)

* Gall, George Sr. Ohio Pens. 

George Call Jr.

also Record, Bureau of Pension, Washington, D.C.

Application for Pension, August 28, 1832: "Battles engaged in: Yorktown". His 
claim was allowed. 

The foregoing was certified by H. Clay Evans, Com. of Pensions. (no page given.) 
"Pension Records" in the National Archives has a file (Gall, George Sr. S2 569) 
"Pertinent information in this file is summarized...Birth, on June 28, 1766,Berks Co. 
Pennsylvania. 

Children, Dates of Birth..To whom Married..

Children of the first wife, Susannah Nicholas: Jacob Ball, b. Nov. 28, 1787; 
Elizabeth Gall Clark, b. May 4, 1789: John Gall, b. Nov. 7, 1790; Sarah Gall Burris, 
b. June 22, 1792; George Gall, b. Feb 8, 1794: Susannah Gall Williams, b. Oct. 18, 
1797; Michael Gall, b. Feb 12, 1799. 

Children by second wife, Catherine Roads.

Maria Gall Countryman, b. July 5, 1801; Rebecca Gall Turner, b. Aug. 31, 1803; 
Lydia Gall Jarnigan, b. May 1, 1805; Elizabeth Gall Shoemaker, b. June 7, 1807; 
David Gall, b. March 19, 1813; Isaac Gall, b. Oct. 20, 1814, Catherine Gall 
Williasm, b. Oct. 22, 1816. Abraham Gall, b. Oct. 7, 1818; Sophia Gall Hammond, b. 
June 23, 1820; Matilda Gall Jarnigan, b. Oct 12, 1822; Julia Ann Gall Williams, b. 
June 2, 1824. 

GEORGE GALL, the father of the above named George Gall, and great, great, 
grandfather of the applicant (Fenton Gall), was also a soldier of the Revolutionary 
War. He served as a corporal in Captain John Mountjoy's Company, 10th VA. 
Regiment, commanded by Col. Edward Stevens. He enlisted Jan 10, 1777, to serve 
three years, and died Feb. 28, 1778.

See record in Pension Office, War Dept.

The foregoing was certified to by F. C. Ainsworth, Chief, Record and Pension 
Office, Washington, D.C. June 2, 2899. No page of record was given. 

"The records show that George Gall served as a private in Capt. John Jones Co. 1st. 
(McArthur's) Regiment of Ohio Militia, War of 1812." His name appears on the 
Rolls for the period from May 1, 1812 to May 7, 1813, with remarks: "Com. of 
Service, May 1, 1812." "Expire. of Service, May 7, 1813." Seal: War Loan Office of 
the Director of Publicity"> Treasury Dept. Washington, D.C., Ancestor's Service. 

"This day came into court George Gall who made a declaration under oath that he 
was a soldier of the Revolution, also appeared James Lawson, George Reed & 
William Keys who being duly sworn certified as to the truth of the declaration of the 
applicant. The courts are satisfied that the applicant was a Revolutionary soldier and 
that James Lawson, George Reed and William Keys are creditable persons and that 
this statement is entitled to credit and the court certify to that effect." (Order Book 
No. 5, 1829-1834, page 289, Aug 25, 2832 (03)

After the death of his father, although but sixteen years of age, joined the continental 
army was one of the victorious veterans that witnessed the surrender of Cornwallis at 
Yorktown. (6) 

The following interrogations were proposed to the said George Gall by the court. 

1. Question by the Court: where and in what year were you born?

Answer: I was born in Berks County, VA, June 28th, 1766

2. Question: Have you any record of your age?

Answer: I have not.

3. Question: Where were you living when called into service?

Answer: I was living in Rockingbridge County in the State of Virginia when the war 
of the American Revolution commenced - after I served out my tours in the war, I 
returned to County of Rockbridge where I continued to reside several years. and 
afterward moved to Pendletown County of Virginia. I remained several years in that 
county, after which I moved to Highland

County, Ohio, where I have been 23 years, and where I still live.

4. Question: How were you called into service, were you drafted, a volunteer or a 
substitute?

Answer: I was drafted both of my service.

5. Question: State some of the officers names of the Continental troops where you 
served. Such as

Continental and Militia assignments as you recollect, and the general circumstances 
of your

service.

Answer: I knew General Washington when I saw him, and one Major Eli Clemans, 
a Frenchman in the service. The first time I served there were no Continental troops 
or officers in company 

with us. The tour I was will most of the time before Yorktown, Virginia is with the 
whole American Army. Yet I know none of the regular officers but those names I 
have of the segments of the militia either by their officers or their numbers.

6. Question: Did you ever receive a discharge, if so where is it?

Answer: I never did receive a written discharge.

7. Question: State the names of such persons in your neighborhood as can testify to 
your character, for veracity by their belief of your services of a soldier of the 
Revolution.

Answer: John Rhoads, William Keys, James Lawson, George Reed and many others. 
I am confident they would testify in their behalf.

The said George Gall Jr. hereby relinquish every claim whatsoever to a pension or 
annuity, except the present and declares that his name is not on the pension roll of 
any agency of any state. 

Subscribed unto me

of the Court of year of 

Clerk of Highland

S/S Samuel Bell Common Pleas S/George Gall 

William Keys, James Lawson, George Read who being duly sworn certified as to the 
truth of the declaration of the applicant. The Courts are satisfied that the applicant 
was a Revolutionary Soldier and that James Lawson, George Reed and William Keys 
are creditable persons and that this statement is entitled to credit and the court certify 
to that effect. 

And said Gall further declares that there is no clergyman living in his vicinity with 
which he is acquainted and though it is possible still it is very inconvenient to obtain 
the certificate of a clergyman as is requested by the War Department in time to 
introduce it into this application before adjournment of Court. 

Subscribe..........unto me of this court day of ........

Clerk of Highland Common Pleas..........George Gall 

And the said Court do hereby declare in their opinion after the investigation of the 
matter and after putting the interrogations prescribed by the War Department that the 
above name applicant was a Revolutionary soldier and served as he states and the 
court further certifies that it appears to them that James Lawson, George Reed, 
William Keys, who signed the within certificate are residents in the County of 
Highland, Ohio, that they are creditable persons and that this statement is entitled to 
credit. 

Samuel bell, Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas in and for Highland County, Ohio, 
do hereby certify that the foregoing contains the original preceding of the said Court 
on the matter of the application of George all, for the pension. the testimony whereof 
I have here unto let my hand and seal of office this 26th day of august 1839. 

Clerk of Court of 

Samuel Bell Common Pleas Highland County, Ohio 

As to the named George Gall, being first duly sworn...............in open court before 
the American Court.........further states that he has no documentary evidence proved 
by service in the War of the American Revolution and that he knows of no person 
who can testify as to his service. 

Subscribe and sworn to in open court this day and year as sworn. 

Clerk of Highland

Samuel Bell Common Pleas George Gall

George Gall, progenitor of a large family, reared in the Gall community of 
Brushcreek Township, joined the Colonial Army when only sixteen years old. His 
father, George Gall, immigrated from Germany in time to enlist in the Revolutionary 
Army and gave his life for his adopted country. In 1782, George Gall, shoulder his 
gun and marched off from his Rockingham County home in Virginia to join the 
fighting forces. George Gall, the emigrant, left behind his wife, a son John, and a 
daughter Elizabet, besides his eldest son George. (Jr) (01) 

While a resident of Rockbridge County, Virginia, George Gall enlisted January 10, 
1781, served three months as a private in Captain James Buchannan's Company, 
Colonel John Boyer's Virginia regiment. He again enlisted September 1, 1781 and 
served in Captain Charles Campbell's Virginia Company, and marched to Yorktown, 
was there until the surrender of Cornwallis, after which he marched as a guard with 
prisoners to Winchester Barracks, under Captain William Moore and Colonel Vance, 
and was discharged in Winchester, Virginia having served three months. (04) 

George Gall Jr. married Susan Nicholas. The following eight children were born to 
them: Jacob, Sarah, Barbara, John, George Micheal Susannah and Betsey. All these 
children were born in Rockingham County, Va. His wife dying, he remarried, his 
second wife being Catharine Roads, daughter of Abrahm and Maria roads, all natives 
of Virginia. A few years after this marriage he decided to brave the dangers incident 
to the removal of his family to the Ohio Valley. He accordingly equipped himself 
with the customary camping outfit of that day, supplied himself and older sons with 
trusty rifles, placed his entire family and equipment on horseback and took the forest 
trail over the mountains for Highland county, Ohio. Only three of the children by his 
first wife accompanied him. The were Geroge, Michael and Susannah. After many 
hardships and trials of a character calculated to Completely dishearten and less 
courageous pioneer, he finally landed on the banks of the Middle Fork in Brus Creek 
township, where he decided to permanently locate. Here he built his log cabin, which 
he decided to permanently locate. ere he built his log cabin, which was one among 
the first in that section, and proceeded to develop a home and to rear his large family 
of boys and girls, for by his second wife he had thirteen children , as follows; Polly, 
David, Rebecca, Elizabeth, Lydia, Anna, Rhoads, Isaac, Catharine, Abraham, 
Sophia, Matilda and Julia A., making him the father of twenty-one children by the 
two marriages. It has been asserted that there were a total of twenty-four, but the 
writer can find no authority for more than twenty-one. (6) 


Anna, Rhoda, Isaac. 1815-June 6, 1887 (his wife, Sarah, died August 24, 1874) 
Catharine, Abraham, October 14, 1818-May 23, 1887 (his wife, Mary, born June 20, 
1818 she became the wife of Levi Williams. He was the youngest of the nine 
children born to Elias and Christian (Countryman) Williams. Julia (Gall) Williams 
was one of the last "Real Daughters" of a Revolutionary war patriot to live in 
Highland County. 

George Gall, was a soldier of the Revolution who acted as a bodyguard for General 
George Washington, Born June 28, 1766, he died in Brushcreek twp. in October 
1851. George Gall was the son of a soldier who gave his life for his country. George 
Gall, (Sr) and his wife, Marie Stultz, were natives of Germany who arrived in 
Virginia before the Revolution. When the emigrant, George Gall, (Sr) died he left a 
16 year old son, George, another son, John, and a daughter Elizabeth Gall. 

"The records show that George Gall served as a private in Captain John Jones 
Company 1st (McArthur's) Regiment of Ohio Militia, War of 1812." His name 
appears on the Rolls for the period from May 1, 1812 to May 7, 1813, with remarks: 
"Com. of Service, May 1, 1812." "Espir. of Service, May 7, 1813." Sealls: War Loan 
Office of the Director of Publicity." Treasury Department, Washington, D.C. 
Ancestor's Service. (04) 

George Gall, a Revolutionary soldier, came from Virginia and settled in the 
neighborhood of Sinking Spring during 1801. Gall was born in Berks county, 
Pennsylvania, June 28th, 17666, and was called into service from Rockbridge 
county, Virginia. He was drafted into the Militia, but was not called into service till 
the 10th of January 1781, under Colonel Boyer, and marched against the British 
through the Dismal Swamp. After this campaign, which seems not to have resulted in 
anything very definite or brilliant, he was discharged. On the 2nd day of the 
following September, he was again drafted and marched immediately to Yorktown, 
and was present at the surrender of the British army at that place. He then marched as 
a guard for the prisoners to the general military depot at Winchester, Virginia, after 
which he was discharged, the war being over. 

Claudia Thiry
Last Modified Friday, 18-Apr-2003 11:07:41 CDT

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