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Lawrie Township, Logan County, Oklahoma

Lawrie Township
Logan County, Oklahoma

T17N, T2W Indian Meridian



lawrie map pic

Researched, written, © and map provided by: Bob Chada


Lawrie Township takes its name from the small community of Lawrie, which was established as a railroad stop in the SE corner of Section 8. Lawrie was named for Lawrie Tatum, Quaker Indian Agent. The record shows that Lawrie was never much of a town with only a general store, post office (08-22-1890 - 10-15-1900), blacksmith shop and a few families.

The green line on the map represents the original Southern Kansas Railway Company trackage which was laid in 1887. This line was used by settlers during the run of 1889. The line is now owned and operated by the Burlington Northern and Santa Fe.

The red line represents the right of way of the Eastern Oklahoma Railroad company. Survey for the line started in 1899 with 47.9 miles of line from Guthrie to Cushing in Payne County between 1900 and 1902. The company was purchased by the Santa Fe in 1907 and the line abandoned and tracks removed in 1957.

One item of interest which survives from Lawrie was reported in the August 7, 1894 Choctaw News: "William Cardwell, a Cherokee Strip boomer, who had become hard up, some days ago, announced that he was going to sell his wife to the highest bidder. The sale was held in Lawrie last Friday. There were half a dozen bidders present, and as the woman was buxom and good looking, bidding was spirited.

John Insley, a grass widower of Guthrie secured the prize, for $100 in cash, a cow, a horse, and a lot of furniture. The woman seemed to be wholly unconcerned and departed with Insley, after he had turned over the things in his bid. The strangely mated pair have left for Texas in a covered wagon."

Camp Russell is about 6 miles north of Guthrie near the south bank of the Cimarron River where it intersects with Skeleton Creek (about 1 mile west of where Interstate 35 now crosses the Cimarron). It was opened in the fall of 1884 as a subpost of Ft. Reno and contained elements of the 9th Cavalry and 9th Infantry, which had the mission of ensuring that the "Boomers" under Capt. David L. Payne, and later under William L. Couch remained outside of the territory until it was formally opened by the run. Camp Russell remained active until June of 1885 when the troops were withdrawn to Ft. Reno, and the area remained as a community center for many years. Camp Russell was named for Capt. G. B. Russell of the 9th Infantry.

E. O. Junction, while never actually a community, was the post along the old Santa Fe Railroad where the Eastern Oklahoma (E. O.) Railroad Company track branched, north eastward to Cushing.

There were three known cemeteries located in Lawrie township. The first being Lawrie.

Another cemetery is Camp Russell.

Then we have Harding Cemetery, aka Rosenwald Cemetery aka Whitaker Cemetery.

Some references place a Lutheran Cemetery in the NW of Section 10. To date, this cemetery has not been confirmed.

A total of 8 schools, are known to have been in operation in Lawrie township. They are:

School District Closed W/B Section
Banner
53
7/16/1947
W
SE12
Camp Russell
54
07/16/1947
W
SE10
Fair Valley-Madden
59
07/16/1947
W
S35
Four B
55
07/16/1947
W
NW8
Mt. Summett
58
07/16/1947
W
SE23
North Riverside
56
07/16/1947
W
SW20
Rosenwald
56
07/16/1947
B
SW20
South Riverside
57
07/07/1950
W
SE28


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Updated: Friday, 08-Aug-2008 16:00:22 CDT

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