This page part of the Wallowa County AGHP Site

Imnaha

The word Imnaha was used by William Clark on a map used with the original Lewis and Clark Jorunal in 18?? in the term "Imnaha".  As far as is known Captain Bonneville was the first white man to go into the Wallowa country.  J. H. Hunner of Enterprise an authority on Wallowa county history states, that the name Imnaha was the name of a sub-chief and that he was the ------ among the Indians __________________to indicate the territory ____________ by a chief.  This Imnaha was the land rained over by Imna.

 

The Park, On the Imnaha

     Hidden in the canyon of the upper Imnaha is the fruitful district known as The Park.  Since is was settled it has suffered from lack of a direct road to the outer world.  Despite this handicap, the valley has been settled by thrifty farmers who have built good homes and put under cultivation a long strip of the bottoms and hillsides.
     In the center of the picture is the house and farm of Albert Morgan.  To the reader’s right, up the canyon, are the homes of James Esten, Lee Butler, S. C. Himelwright and Murat Blevans.  To the left down the canyon, will be found the places of Joe Shinn, Drury Davis, Ralph Barton, Lester Neil and F. K. Winston.  The old Fruita post office lies in this part of the valley.  Still farther to the left, beyond the range of the picture and below the saddle that marks the end of the Park proper, are the ranches of W. G. Beith, “Buck’ Wilson, Thomas Marks and others on the road down to the Bridge.
     In the summer and fall the Imnaha is one of the most popular places for people of the higher districts to visit.  The fishing is good in many places in the river, and grouse, deer and other game can be found and shot in season.  The soil is fertile , the winters mild and the springs early, making the valley very productive of all kinds of vegetables and fruits as well as hay and grain.  With better transportation, which will be provided before a great while, the valley will take a prominent part in the county’s program. Contributed by Orvetta Harmon