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History of Lycoming County Pennsylvania
edited by John F. Meginness; ©1892

CHAPTER LI.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

BOROUGH OF MONTOURSVILLE, AND FAIRFIELD, UPPER FAIRFIELD, MUNCY, AND MILL CREEK TOWNSHIPS.


  SAMUEL MENDENHALL, hardware merchant, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, January 14, 1816, son of Abner and Lydia (Carlton) Mendenhall. Abner Mendenhall was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and married Lydia Carlton, a native of the same county, and with her he settled in Columbia county prior to 1800. He was a mechanic and cabinet-maker and manufactured pumps, by which he secured the means to purchase a small farm in that county, upon which he settled and lived until his death. Our subject received a limited education at the subscription schools, and at the age of eighteen years he was employed as a clerk in a mercantile store. This he continued for about ten years, and then purchased an interest in a mercantile establishment at Bloomsburg, where he did business for ten years, removing thence to Schuylkill county. In 1857 he removed to Black Hole valley, Lycoming county, where he engaged in farming for fifteen years. He established his present hardware business at Montoursville in 1872, and has given his personal attention to it ever since. He was first a Whig, but since the formation of the Republican party he has been identified with that great organization. He was school director of Clinton township for eight years, and filled the same office at Bloomsburg; he was burgess of Montoursville one term, and has been a member of the borough council. While residing in Bloomsburg he was his partyís candidate for prothonotary of Columbia county, but was defeated on account of his party being largely in the minority. He was married in 1845 to Miss Matilda W., daughter of Peter Mensch, and to them have been born six children: Mark; William; Arthur, who was train despatcher at Pittsburg, and is assistant trainmaster of the Pan Handle railroad; Charles; Clara, who married Sylvester F. Bubb, and Mary C., who married Griffith H. Lichtenthaler.

  WILLIAM MENDENHALL, son of Samuel Mendenhall, was born in Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, July 7, 1849. He was educated in the public schools of Lycoming county, learned the tinsmith trade, and on the 17th of January, 1872, he became a member of the firm of S. Mendenhall & Son. He was married, May 5, 1875, to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Michael Meckley, and to them have been born three children: Florence, Bessie, and Arthur. He is a Republican, was a member of the, county committee for six years, and was school director for four years; he is a member of Eureka Lodge, No. 335, A. F. & A. M., and Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., of which he was District Deputy Grand Master for three years. His wife is a mem-ber of the Episcopal church.

  JAMES W. RAKESTRAW, farmer, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, May 15, 1843, son of William and Mary (Sweigard) Rakestraw, natives of that county. His father was a shoemaker by trade, and died in 1845; his widow was again married, to Joseph Knouff, of Perry county, Pennsylvania, by whom he had one child, Joseph W. Mrs. Knouff died in 1848. James W. Rakestraw was educated in the common schools, which he attended during the winter months, and at the age of nineteen years he engaged at railroading on the Pennsylvania line, after which he took employment in a saw mill for a number of years. He came to Lycoming county in 1864; in 1873 he began farming in Old Lycoming township, and settled on his present farm in Fairfield township in 1882. He was married in 1863 to Miss Louisa Bastian, of Dauphin county. She died in 1864, and he was again married in 1866, to Hannah, daughter of John R. Hinkle, of Lycoming county, and to this union have been born eight children: Minnie, who married John Saylor; Ella May; Sarah Gertrude; Jennie Ray; John Roseberry; James Harrison; Lydia Josephine, and Sophia Bertha. Mr. Rakestraw is engaged in farming and dairying. He is a Democrat with independent proclivities, has served as school director and treasurer of Old Lycoming township, and with his family belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church of Montoursville.

  SAMUEL WEAVER, deceased, was born July 2, 1824, and received his education in the common schools. He began his business life on a farm and by running a boat, first for a Mr. Walton, of Muncy, and afterwards one of his own. He subsequently became interested in the lumber business on Loyalsock creek, and established the firm of S. Weaver & Company, which did an extensive business for many years. He was a leader among the Republicans of his township and a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He died, September 9, 1890. His marriage occurred in 1844, with Miss Sarah Dawson, who died, July 4, 1885. She was also a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was the mother of six children, two of whom are living: Albert, and Ella E., who married Charles E. Bennett.

  ALBERT WEAVER, son of Samuel Weaver, was born in Montoursville, December 11, 1844. He received his education in the public schools and Dickinson Seminary. After following the boating business for fifteen years, he assisted his father in the lumber business, becoming a member of the firm in 1883. The firm of S. Weaver & Company did business under that name until 1886, when Charles E. Bennett purchased an interest, and after the death of the senior Mr. Weaver the firm changed to the name of Weaver & Bennett. He was a member of the firm of Creswell, Weaver & Company, coal operators, in 1881, and is now a stockholder in the Standard Candy Company of Williamsport. He is a member of the Masonic Lodge of Montoursville, of the Patriotic Sons of America, and the I. O. G. T.; he is a Republican, has served as a member of the borough council and the school board, and was one of the "Emergency Men" in the time of the rebellion. He was married in 1866 to Mary E. Bubb, by whom he has four children: Cora V.; Samuel A.; Thomas B., and Clara A. Mr. Weaver and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is steward and trustee.

  CHARLES L. LYON, physician and surgeon, was born near, Hughesville, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1821, son of Edward G. and Sarah (Huckel) Lyon. He received his education at the Hughesville and Muncy schools, at a boarding school in West Chester, Pennsylvania, and at Dickinson College. He studied medicine under the tuition of his brother, Dr. Thomas Lyon, of Williamsport, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1842. He immediately began the practice of his profession with his brother, under whom he read medicine, and in 1849 he moved to his present location in Fairfield township, where he has done a lucra-tive business for over fifty years. He was one of the organizers of the Lycoming Medical Society, and has served as president of Ďthe same, and is a member of the State Medical Society. He has followed farming and lumbering in connection with his practice, is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, and a director in the Savings Institution at Williamsport. In politics he is a stanch Republican, was once the nominee of his party for the State legislature, and was defeated by only 200 votes. He was one of the organizers of the Lycoming Agricultural Society, was its president for a number of years, and was also one of the organizers and president of the Montoursville Manufacturing Company, Limited. During the war he held the commission of enrolling officer for Lycoming county. In 1847 he was married to Miss Mary B., daughter of Hon. Joseph B. Anthony, who died in 1868, and he was again married in 1870 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. Henry Shoemaker, of Muncy; she died in 1871, leaving one child, Elizabeth, and he was again married the third time, in 1878, to Emily, daughter of Dr. C. S. Boarman, of Missouri, by whom he has one child, Adelaide. Mrs. Lyon belongs to the Catholic church.

  AMOS SCOTT, son of Henry and Mary Scott, was born, April 30, 1779, and died April 4, 1843. His father was a pioneer of the Loyalsock valley and settled there before the Indian troubles of the Revolution. During the distractions of that period he was obliged to flee with his family and find refuge in the interior of the State. After the close of the war he returned; some of his property had been buried for safe keeping and this was found in a good state of preservation, but his improvements had been burned and it was necessary to replace them. On the 19th of February, 1803, Amos Scott married Rachel Blakeney, who was born January 25, 1783, and died June 18, 1841. They were the parents of eight children: Charles; Henry; Sarah; Rachel; George; Mary; Amos, and Martha. Henry settled in White Deer valley and died there; George was drowned in the mill race on his fatherís farm; Amos, the only surviving member of the family, is a physician at Seward, Illinois; Rachel married Daniel T. Thomas. Charles, Sarah, Mary, and Martha never married, but lived together upon the homestead farm, now in the possession of John Ball. In politics the family were Republicans, and in religious connection they were Methodists. Although no longer represented, this family was once one of comparative local prominence. They owned a fine farm, a merchant mill, and a blacksmith shop, and frequently built arks for the transportation of the products of the valley to points down the river.

  ISAIAH HAYES was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in February, 1796, and in 1800 came with his father and family to Lycoming county. His father died when he was quite young, leaving him to the care of his mother and brothers. When a young. man he engaged in the lumber business in partnership with his brother and John Reed. In 1819 he was married to Mary Ann Miller, and in the spring of 1820, he started with his partner for Baltimore with an ark loaded with poplar boards; at the Indian Steps, above McCallís Ferry, between Columbia and Tidewater, Maryland, they ran into the ice, destroying the ark and sustaining a loss of $800. Soon after this Mr. Hayes built a log house on the homestead and commenced to clear the farm. For some time he was employed as a laborer in the construction of a canal, and afterward took contracts to build a straight road over Laurel Hill, and in other places. He also engaged in the manufacture of arks for the grain dealers of Milton, Lewisburg, and elsewhere; observing while thus employed the need of grist mills, and being encouraged by his father-in-law, he built a substantial mill in 1831, which he operated until 1837. It was destroyed at that time by fire, causing a total loss, as he carried no insurance. His neighbors kindly came to his assistance, making up the loss of the grain, and he erected a new mill. In 1847 he started a subscription, heading it with $50, to raise money to build a bridge across Lycoming creek at Perryville. He succeeded in securing $450 of the amount necessary, and the balance was furnished by the county commissioners. The contractor failing to complete the bridge, Mr. Hayes finished it himself. About 1839 he purchased land in Cogan House township, hauled logs from the same to a saw mill at Perryville, and in 1845 he built a saw mill in Cogan valley; from time to time he purchased tracts of pine timber, and in that way accumulated thousands of acres. A few years later he built a mill on Larryís creek in partnership with Martin Meyer, erecting a steam mill near Buckhorn cabin, and still later constructing another waterpower mill on Larryís creek, making in all four saw mills and two grist mills. He sold the grist mill at Perrysville in 1863, and in 1868, in partnership with John Miller, bought a farm of 500 acres on the Rappahannock river, in Virginia; when it was subsequently divided, he retained one-fourth, the remainder going to his sons, Ambrose and William. He died, November 18, 1888, and his wife died, June 24, 1883. He was a member of the Presbyterian church, and was interested in building the new stone church at Hepburnville. He was the father of ton children: William; Ambrose; Rachel R., who married M. W. Meyer; Benjamin; Sidney; Lawrence M.; Isaiah; Mary Elizabeth; Joanna, and Josiah.

  WILLIAM HAYES, miller, was born in Lycoming township, September 20, 1820, son of Isaiah and Mary Ann (Miller) Hayes. He received his education in the township schools of that period. He learned the milling business with his father, took charge of the latterís mill at Perrysville in 1844, and did a prosperous business for fourteen years, when he bought a mill in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, and operated the same for five years. In 1862, in partnership with William Follmer, he built and took charge of the Loyalsock Mills, this partnership continuing for one year, when Mr. Hayes became the sole proprietor. In 1884 he purchased the Montoursville rolling mills, in company with Clarence Wheeland and his son, John Hayes. Mr. Wheeland sold his interest to Mr. Meyer in April, 1887, and two years later Mr. Meyer sold his interest to Mr. Pidcoe, and they have since conducted the business under the firm name of Hayes, Pidcoe & Company. Mr. Hayes is also engaged in farming in Loyalsock township and in Virginia. Mr. Hayes was president and a large stockholder of the Wayne Ferry Company while living in Clinton county. About the year 1873 he engaged in the lumber business on Little Bear creek with Warner Woolever, continuing as a firm for five years, and for twelve years longer on his own responsibility. In politics he is a Republican, and hasí served as supervisor of Upper Fairfield township. He was married in 1848 to Miss Margaret Follmer, and to this union have been born six children: Amelia Clementine, deceased, who married George Ebner; Follmer A.; May Catharine, who married William Koons; John M.; Margaret Emma, and Frank W. Mr. Hayes and family attend the Presbyterian church.

  JOSEPH WILLIAMS was born near Morristown, New Jersey, in October, 1770. His father was a native of New Jersey and an officer in the Revolutionary war. Under George Washington. He removed from Morris county, New Jersey, and settled near Danville, Pennsylvania, where he remained until his death. Joseph Williams was a surveyor and learned his profession from William Ellis, of Muncy, Pennsylvania. He came to Lycoming county when a young man, and in 1790 was married to Letitia Sutton, daughter of Amariah Sutton, who was born, August 20, 1774. Letitia and her parents were driven from their homes during the "Great Runaway." They took refuge at Forts Freeland and Augusta, and while at the latter, a captive Indian was brought before them and his hair was severely pulled by a woman whose relatives his savage tribe had doubtless wronged. Amariah Sutton took out a land warrant which is now embraced in the Walker and Rose farm, near Williamsport, which he cleared of the timber and gave a part of it to his brother-in-law and daughter, Letitia. Joseph Williams followed surveying in connection with farming. He helped to lay out the borough of Williamsport, and did much surveying in the surrounding counties. He was a member of the Masonic order, belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church, and was a Whig in politics. He died April 8, 1841, followed by his widow, June 4, 1862. They were the parents of ton children. Rachel; Amariah S.; Joseph S.; John Norris; Mary; Martin; Samuel Coleman; Rebecca Smith; Sarah Rose; Annie, and Alexander S.

  ALEXANDER S. WILLIAMS, retired, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, August 16, 1819, son of Joseph and Letitia (Sutton) Williams. He received his education in the subscription schools and remained on the farm until he was nineteen years old. After working for some time on the Williamsport and Ralston railroad, he became a clerk in mercantile stores in Williamsport, for the firms of J. L. Abrams & Company, Lindsey Mahaffey, and others. He then engaged in the mercantile business at Montoursville for a number of years; in 1850 he commenced lumbering on Loyalsock creek, and continued for over thirty years. He has also been engaged extensively in farming. He was married in 1850 to Miss Catherine, daughter of Michael Kramer, who was proprietor of the Eagle Hotel of Williamsport. To this union have been born six children, four of whom are living: Sarah, who married Huston Jackson; Emma R., who married John A. Bennett; Samuel L., and Mary Margaret. Mr. Williams cast his first presidential vote for Martin Van Buren, and was identified with the Democratic party until 1856, when he voted for John C. Fremont, and in 1860 for Abraham Lincoln, and has never since supported the Republican party. He served as postmaster at Montoursville during Franklin Pierceís administration; he has been a member of the school board, and was a justice of the peace for several years.

  JACOB WEAVER was born in York, Pennsylvania, in February, 1790, of German parentage. He was reared in that county, and for many years conducted the freight route by team from York to Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Pittsburg. He married Catherine Smith, who was born in the same county in 1790, and in 1823 they removed to Lewisburg, Union county, Pennsylvania, where he worked at dayís labor and distilling. Later they settled at McEwensville, Northumberland county, thence coming to Lycoming county, where they bought a small farm in Fairfield township. He was a Democrat and a member of the Presbyterian church, and died in 1880. His first wife died in 1846, and he was again married to a Mrs. Mull. He was the father of eleven children by his first wife: William; Susie, deceased; John, deceased; Henry, deceased; George; Margaret, who married Cornelius Wagner; Samuel, deceased; Jacob; Ellen, who married William Edler; Elmira, deceased, and Lewis M.

  WILLIAM WEAVER, of the lumber firm of William Weaver & Company, proprietors of the Union Mills, was born in York, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1811, son of Jacob and Catherine (Smith) Weaver. He received a common school education, and came to Lycoming county when he was eighteen years old, locating in Loyalsock township, and engaged in operating a grist mill and distillery for several years. He followed the. mercantile business in Montoursville for forty years; in 1851 he established the lumber firm of William Weaver & Company, and has since been at the head of their business. Mr. Weaver was a stockholder and director in the City National Bank of Williamsport, and is now a stockholder and director in the Keystone Bank of Philadelphia. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank of Williamsport, and has an interest in the J. E. Dayton Company, and is one of the large real estate owners in Montoursville. He was married in 1835 to Annie, daughter of Samuel Wheeland; she died in July, 1890, and was the mother of eight children, three of whom are living: Susan, who married Thomas Ramsey; Margaret E., who married Peter T. Marsh, and Mary E., who married W. P. Wheeland. Mr. Weaver was once a member of the I. O. O. F., and also of the Encampment. He is a Republican, has served as school director of Montoursville, is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal church and a trustee of the same, and has served as steward and treasurer for twenty-two years.

  JOHN WEAVER was born near Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, September 20, 1815, and married Catherine, daughter of Cornelius Shaffer. He located in Montoursville, where he engaged in boating on the canal, and was also proprietor of the Central Hotel. He was a Republican in politics, filled the various borough offices, and died April 27, 1888. His wife survives him. They reared a family of thirteen children, nine of whom are living: Jane; Belle, who married Charles Bubb, of Williamsport; Lindsay, postmaster of Montoursville; George, of Montoursville; Oscar B., of the Williamsport Candy Company; Byron A.; Maize, who married Dr. Ritter, of Milton, Pennsylvania; Clara, who married John E. Callahan, of Montoursville, and Harry, proprietor of the Montour House, Montoursville.

  BYRON A. WEAVER, of the firm of Weaver & Callahan, dealers in coal and agricultural implements, was born in Montoursville, December 25, 1856, son of John and Catherine (Shaffer) Weaver. He was educated in the public schools, and engaged in boating for a number of years, and in 1886 he and Mr. Callahan engaged in their present business. He was married in 1879 to Miss Alice Berry, and to them have been born four children: Raymond; Chester; Howard, and Bertha Estelle. Mr. Weaver is a Republican, and has served as councilman and treasurer of Montoursville; he is a member of Eureka Lodge, I. O. O. F., and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran church.

  JACOB WEAVER, brick manufacturer, was born in Northumberland county, Penn-sylvania, March 2, 1830, son of Jacob and Catherine (Smith) Weaver. He received his education in the common schools, learned the distilling business with his father, and followed that occupation for about nine years. He came to Lycoming county about the year 1834, and for fifteen years was engaged in boating on the canal. In 1865 he purchased the Robbins House at Montoursville, changed the name to Central Hotel, and conducted it until April, 1890, with the exception of six years, when he was proprietor of another hotel in the same borough; withdrawing from the hotel in 1890, he began the manufacture of brick, which he has continued ever since. He was a member of the Montoursville Furniture Manufacturing Company. He was married in 1855 to Miss Mary Ann, daughter of Jacob Swartz, and to this union were born eight children: Lewis Emanuel; Mary Elizabeth, who married F. R. Konkle; Agnes Kessler, who married A. G. Yoder; William Swartz; Lily May; Frank Ebner; Walter Scott, and Alice Edith. Mr. Weaver furnished a substitute in defense of his country in the late Rebellion. He is an active Democrat, and is a member of the borough council and has served as school director. His wife and family are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  JOHN S. KONKLE was born in Fairfield township in 1811, and was a son of Adam Konkle. He received a limited education, and after learning the carpenterís trade he became a contractor. He settled on Lycoming creek, and built the first bridge across that stream for the Northern Central railroad. He also erected the Eagle Hotel and woolen mills in Williamsport, and was engaged in the lumber and mercantile business. After the flood of June, 1865, he built the Lycoming Creek and Muncy aqueducts. From 1838 until his death he resided at Montoursville, where he died in 1874. He was a Whig and Republican in politics, and united with the Methodist Episcopal church at the age of eighteen years, remaining a consistent member until his death. He married, February 21, 1888, Miss Susan Lundy, who survives him and is the mother of three children: Julia Ann, who married Lewis Biehl; Ellis W., and Frank R.

  FRANK R. KONKLE, merchant, was born in Montoursville, Lycoming county, August 28, 1844, son of John S. and Susan (Lundy) Konkle. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, learned the carpenterís trade, followed the same for many years, was on an engineering gang on the Philadelphia and Reading railroad for several years, and is now inspector of ties for this company. In June, 1890, he established his present mercantile business at Montoursville. He was married, April 12, 1883, to Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Weaver, and has one child, Howard Leon. He is a Republican, has been burgess of Montoursville, a member of the borough council, and filled other offices. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and Lycoming Chapter; he was one of the organizers of the Montoursville Manufacturing Company, and is a director of the same, and is interested in the lumber business, being a member of the firm of Konkle, Criswell & Konkle. Mrs. Konkle is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM B. KONKLE, retired farmer, was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, September 26, 1818, son of Adam and Martha (Seibring) Konkle. His grandfather was a native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, was one of the pioneers, of Fairfield township, and an early member of the Montoursville Methodist Episcopal church. His father, Adam Konkle, was drafted in the war of 1812, but was not called into service. He was born, January 19, 1786, and died, January 10, 1853, and his wife, whose maiden name was Martha Seibring, was born, April 26, 1791, and died, December 30, 1871. They were prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, in which he held the office of older and class-leader for many years. They were the parents of ton children: John S.; Rachel W., who married Henry C. Reeder; Charles; William B.; George W.; Mary Ann, who married Abraham Stadden; Elizabeth, who married Henry Else; Pearson L.; Martha, who married Jacob Sheffer, and Ann Elisa. William B. Konkle was educated in the schools of his native township and worked on his fatherís farm until he was twenty-five years old. He followed lumbering on Wallis run and Loyalsock creek for several years, and also did the same business, on Mill creek for ten years. He and his brother afterwards engaged in contracting and built several of the county bridges. In 1851 he engaged in the mercantile business at Montoursville, continuing for two years, and also manufactured brick for several years. Since 1860 he has devoted his time exclusively to farming, and is the owner of two farms in and surrounding the borough of Montoursville. He was married in 1847 to Miss Amelia Bastian, and to this union have been born three children: Martha Amelia; Rachel Ann, and William B. Mr. Konkle was a Democrat until 1862, when he became a Republican. He has been burgess of Montoursville, has been supervisor, a member of the borough council, and of the school board. He was one of the organizers of the Grange lodge at Montoursville, was a member of the Lutheran church for twenty years, and afterwards he and his wife joined the Methodist Episcopal church at Montoursville, in which he has held the offices of. trustee, steward, class-leader, and superintendent of the Sunday school.

  WILLIAM B. KONKLE, physician and surgeon, was born in Montoursville, March 1, 1858, son of William B. and Amelia (Bastian) Konkle. He received his educa-tion in the schools of Montoursville, and was graduated from Dickinson Seminary in 1878. He at once entered the university at Syracuse, New York, from which he was graduated in 1881. He began the study of medicine under Dr. H. G. McCormick, of Williamsport, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1884. He began practice at Montoursville, where he has given his entire time to his profession, and has built up a lucrative business. He is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, Eureka Lodge, No. 335, A. Y. M., and Fairfield Lodge, 236, I. O. O. F.; also a member of Bald Eagle Encampment, and of the Delta Kappa Epsilon fraternity. He was married in 1884 to Miss Joan Saylor, daughter of William J. Saylor, of Schuylkill Haven, Pennsylvania, and they have no children. He is independent in politics and is a steward and trustee in the Methodist Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM WALTZ was born near Warrensville, Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in March, 1804. His father, George Waltz, was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and one of the pioneers of Eldred township. William was reared in that township. After reaching maturity he moved to Fairfield township, where he engaged in farming, erected a saw mill on Mill creek, and was extensively engaged in the lumber business for many years. He married Mary, a daughter of Jacob Hurr, of Fairfield township, and reared a family of eleven children: George, of Washington township; Catherine, wife of Christian Bidelspacher, of Hepburn township; Dorothy, wife of Jacob Entz, of Fairfield township; Mary, wife of John Entz, of the same township; Barbara, wife of Samuel Ulmer, of Anthony township; Gottlieb, of Williamsport; Caroline, wife of Frederick Foltz, of Nebraska; Abraham, of Fairfield township; Martha, wife of Daniel Bruchlacher, of Hepburn township, and William H. and Andrew H. of Williamsport. Mr. Waltz was a member of the Baptist church for many years, and was one of the organizers of Fairfield Baptist church; and a trustee in that body. He was a life long Democrat, but cast his last vote for the Republican ticket. His wife died in March, 1876; he survived her until 1885.

  GEORGE BENNET was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, December 25, 1813, and was a grandson of Thomas Bennet, and a son of Andrew Bennet, who figured so conspicuously in the Wyoming massacre, and whose names are held in veneration by the present inhabitants of that beautiful valley. He moved to this valley in 1840, purchased and cleared a farm, and remained there until his death. February 1, 1844, he married Martha Strebeigh, who was born June 26,1822, in Williamsport, and died on the 17th of April, 1891, at the old home in Fairfield township where she had lived forty-seven years. She and her husband had lived together forty-three years, he having died four years previously. Mrs. Bennet united with the Methodist Episcopal church in early life and was a faithful member of the same until she was called to the fellowship of the church triumphant. A son, Daniel S. Bennet, died suddenly in September, 1884, at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he had married and won much distinction. The father never fully recovered from the shock of this unexpected bereavement, and died on the 11th of March, 1887. It was said of him by those who knew him best that he was a great admirer of the Bible and made it almost his exclusive study during the last years of his life. Four children survive to mourn their parents loss: Mary A, Mrs. Henry S. Cole; John A.; George, and Bessie. Mr. and Mrs. Cole were married on the 15th of January, 1867, and reside at Montoursville. They are the parents of eight children: Martha B.; Sarah W.; Mary McC.; Bessie B.; Georgianna; Daniel S.; Edward, and an infant son.

  JOHN A. BENNET, farmer, was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, December 2, 1848, son of George and Martha (Strebeigh) Bennet. He was educated in the common schools and Dickinson Seminary, and has always devoted his business life to farming, settling on his present farm in 1881. He was married, February 13, 1884, to Emma Williams, by whom he has two children: Catharine W. and George. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as school director and as justice of the peace. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and attends the Methodist Episcopal church.

  GEORGE BENNET, farmer, was born on his present farm, July 18, 1864. He was educated in the township schools, Dickinson Seminary, and Williamsport Commercial College. He was married, February 1, 1888, to Jennie, daughter of Peter Belles, of Muncy township, and to this union have been born two children: Susan Arnold and Charles Peter. He is a Republican in politics, and is now serving as auditor of Fairfield township. He and his wife attend the Methodist Episcopal church.

  REUBEN W. SCHOCH was born November 15, 1814, in Berks county, Pennsylvania, was a mason and millwright by trade, and came to Lycoming county in 1840. Here he was married, April 13, 1843, to Miss Margaret Corson. He first located at Lewis Lake, but removed to Penn township four years later, and subsequently was engaged in farming two years in Muncy Creek township and on the Packer farm for twenty-two years. In 1868 he bought one of the Hall farms in Fairfield township, sold part of it, and improved the remainder, which now constitutes the residence of his son, Daniel J. Schoch; here he remained until his death, November 27, 1890. He was buried with Masonic honors. His wife was born May 16, 1821, and died in 1876. He was a Democrat in politics, was supervisor of Fairfield township for twenty-six years, and assessor for two terms. He was a member of Eureka Lodge, No. 835, A. Y. M., Fairfield Lodge, No. 236, I. O. O. F., and a charter member of the West Branch Grange, No. 136, P. of H. He was the father of nine children, all of whom died in infancy or early childhood except Abram C., who was killed by an accident, August 1, 1864, and Daniel J.

  DANIEL J. SCHOCH, farmer, was born in Wolf township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 5, 1849, son of Reuben W. and Margaret (Corson) Schoch. He was educated in the common schools and has always been engaged in farming. In 1875 he was married to Miss Lydia R., daughter of H. S. Williamson, by whom he has one child, Henry R., who is now attending Muncy Normal School. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., and also of West Branch Grange, P. of H. He is Past Master of the Masonic order, and Past Grand of the I. O. O. F.; he has also been a member of the United Order of American Mechanics, the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, and the Knights of Pythias. In politics is a Democrat; he has served as township clerk and is a member of the standing committee. With his wife he belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church.

  FRANCIS W. RAWLE was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in 1795. The Rawle family settled in Philadelphia in 1686, coming from Cornwall, England. He was reared in that city; at the age of seventeen he enlisted in the war of 1812, and held the commission of lieutenant in the Gray Reserves. When a young man he went to Clearfield county to look after some land interests, and while there he was elected and served as associate judge of that county. He was a civil engineer by profession, and engaged in locating and building the Pennsylvania and West Branch canals, afterwards engaging in the iron business near Lewistown, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he and James Hall purchased the Freedom Iron Works. He and his brother-in-law, James Hall, built the Greenwood furnace in Huntingdon county, and operated both works for many years. In 1850 he returned to his native city, where he engaged in the insurance business until 1861, when he came to Lycoming county and built the residence in Fairfield township where his son Henry now resides. Here he spent the balance of his life, dying in 1881, at the ripe old age of eighty-six years. Mr. Rawle married Louisa Hall, a daughter of Charles and Elizabeth (Coleman) Hall, the latter the daughter of Robert Coleman of Cornwall, Pennsylvania. Mr. Hall was a pioneer lawyer of Sunbury, Pennsylvania, where he practiced his profession up to his death. His wife owned the Muncy Farms estate, on which she lived from 1821 to 1858. Five children who grew to maturity were the fruits of the union of Francis W. Rawle and Louisa Hall, as follows: Charles; Henry; Emily, who married Rev. Albra Wadleigh; lames, and Francis. Mrs. Rawle died in 1884.

  HON. HENRY RAWLE was born in the Juniata valley, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August 21, 1833, son of Francis W. Rawle. He was educated at the public schools, and Lewistown Academy, and also spent four years at Bolmarís boarding school at West Chester, Pennsylvania. At the age of seventeen he was appointed to the engineer corps on the Pennsylvania railroad, with headquarters at Johnstown, Now Florence, and Summer Hill. In 1852 he was transferred to the Philadelphia and Erie railroad, where he held the position of principal assistant engineer until 1859, when he resigned and engaged in the iron business at Sharon, Mercer county, Pennsylvania, under the firm name of Boyce & Rawle. On the 20th of December, 1860, he married Harriet G., daughter of Gen. Charles M. Reed, of Erie, Pennsylvania, and in 1862 he located in that city, where he resided until 1876. In 1868 he built a furnace at Erie, and also engaged in shipping coal on the lakes until 1870. In 1874 Mr. Rawle was elected mayor of the city of Erie, and filled that office for two consecutive terms, having no opposition for the second. In 1875 he was nominated and elected by the Republican party, State treasurer, and filled that position with credit until 1878. He purchased a home in Philadelphia in 1876, and resided in that city until 1884, and then removed to Williamsport, subsequently settling on the Fairfield farm of the Muncy Farms estate, where he has since resided. He still retains his interest in Sharon and in coal works in Butler county; he organized the Shenango & Allegheny railroad, of which he was president, and is a director in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, of Williamsport. His wife died in 1869, leaving two daughters: Alice, wife of H. L. Geyelin of Delaware county, and Marion, wife of Thomas Paton of New York City. Mr. Rawle was again married, in 1890, to Mrs. Encie M. Herdic, widow of Peter Herdic, and a daughter of the late Hon. John W. Maynard. Mr. and Mrs. Rawle are members of the Protestant Episcopal church of Montoursville, in which body he holds the office of vestryman.

  LEWIS TALLMAN, farmer, was born in Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 1, 1823, son of James and Olive (Bailey) Tallman. He was reared in Eldred township, educated in the public schools, and has always been engaged in farming. Immediately after his marriage he located on a farm on the Delaware river near Philadelphia, where he lived for ton years. In 1859 he purchased his present farm of 182 acres, and is one of the progressive and prominent farmers of Fairfield township. He was married, January 7, 1849, to Miss E. P. Hall, daughter of Jacob Hall of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, who died, August 22, 1891. To their union were born seven children: Jacob; Lewis; James; Emma L.; Ellis; William, and George. Mr. Tallman is a Republican in politics, has served as school director and tax collector of Fairfield township, and was one of the organizers of Fairfield Grange.

  PETER BASTIAN was born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, and removed to Union county, the same State, and thence to Lycoming county in 1812. He purchased a farm, cleared and improved the same, and also built a hotel, which he conducted for many years. It was in Clinton township, now Armstrong, across the river from Williamsport, and is now owned by different parties. In 1838 he purchased the farm on Loyalsock creek now owned by Dr. Charles Lyon, upon which he lived. until his death in 1848. He married Esther Artly, a native of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, who died in 1852. He was a Whig in politics, and a deacon in the Lutheran church. They reared, a family of ten children, three of whom are living: Josephine, who married John Bubb; Margaret, who married John Bruner, and John S.

  JOHN S. BASTIAN, retired, was born in what is now Armstrong township, Lycoming county, November 12, 1823, son of Peter and Esther (Artly) Bastian. He received a common school education, and has devoted his life principally to farming. He and Franklin Bruner were partners in a mercantile business on Loyalsock creek for three years, and he was also engaged in operating the State flour and saw mill for eight years. He was married. in 1856 to Sarah J., daughter of David Bryan, and to this union were born seven children: Charlotte, who married Thomas Lichtenthaler; William Maffet; John Clifford; James Ausker; Albra Wadleigh; Josephine, and Harry, deceased. Mr. Bastian has always been a stanch Democrat; in 1877 he was elected sheriff of Lycoming county and served a full term. He removed to Montoursville in 1850, and has been burgess, councilman, overseer of the poor, supervisor, and a member of the school board of that borough. He is a member of Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., and with his wife and family belongs to the Episcopal church.

  MARTIN MEYER was a native of Germany and emigrated to America about the year 1828, when a young man. He was a carpenter by trade and located in Philadelphia, where he married Annie Margaret Blyler, and remained several years engaged in the manufacture of store boxes. In 1853 he moved to Lycoming county, locating in Loyalsock township, on the farm now owned by S. J. Sweely, and there resided and engaged extensively in the lumbering business with Isaiah Hayes until his death in 1863. He was a member of the Order of Red Men and of the I. O. O. F. His wife died in 1856, the mother of five children, four of whom are living: John, who was corporal of Company D, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed at the battle of Gettysburg; Martin W.; Abraham; George, and Annie M., who married Jacob Edwards.

  MARTIN W. MEYER was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, October 22, 1830, son of Martin and Annie Margaret (Blyler) Meyer. He was educated in the public schools of his native city, and in 1850 came to Lycoming county, where he joined his father and Isaiah Hayes in the lumber business. He built a store in 1851 at Perryville, and followed the general mercantile business until January, 1890, being also engaged in farming and lumbering. In February, 1889, he moved to Montoursville, and became a member of the mercantile firm of L. I. Meyer & Company. He was married in September, 1850, to Miss R. R., daughter of Isaiah Hayes, and to them have been born three children: Mary A., who married Abraham Losch; Margaret E., and L. I. Mr. Meyer is a Republican, and is an elder and trustee of the Lycoming Centre Presbyterian church.

  LEANDER I. MEYER, son of Martin W. Meyer, was born in Perryville, Lycoming county, January 10, 1856. He received his education in the township, and the Williamsport high schools, and the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1885 he became a member of the firm of Hayes, Meyer & Pidcoe, millers, at Montoursville, and in February 1889, he engaged in the mercantileí business. He was married in 1877, to Miss Annie, daughter of P. M. Trumbower, and to this union have been born three children: Della; Howard, and Perry. He is a Republican in politics, is a member of Eureka Lodge, F. and A. M., Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., and of the Encampment; he is also a member of Washington Camp, P., O. S. of A., and with his wife belongs to the Presbyterian church.

  DANIEL STREBEIGH was a native of York county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Jacob Strebeigh, a native of Prussia, who came to America with the Moravians and settled in York county. He came to Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, when a boy, was bound out to learn the blacksmith trade with George Duitch, of Williamsport, and served an apprenticeship of seven years, afterwards following that trade for twenty-three years in Williamsport. In connection with Col. Thomas W. Lloyd, he contracted to build sections seventy-two and seventy-four of the North Branch canal, after the completion of which he purchased what is now known as the Woodward farm. He followed farming in connection with merchandizing in Williamsport for a number of years, and then traded the farm property for the farm now occupied by his son, Thomas J. Strebeigh, where he resided until his death, December 4, 1857. He served as county commissioner of Lycoming county for one term, and. was in his younger days a Democrat, but subsequently became identified with the Republican party. For several years he was a trustee of the Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church of Williamsport; he was a member of Ivy Lodge, A. F. and A. M., and Lycoming Chapter. He married Mary McElrath, who died in August, 1872. To this union were born nine children: Mary, who married Hopewell Clark; Martha, who married George Bennett; Elizabeth, who married Joseph Lyndall; Robert, deceased, who was connected with the New York Tribune for many years; Elvira, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Thomas J.; Barbara, who married William Vanderbilt, and Lydia.

  THOMAS J. STREBEIGH, farmer, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1832, son of Daniel Strebeigh. He remained in Williamsport, where he received his education, until he was nineteen years old, when he moved to the farm where he now resides. He was graduated from Dickinson Seminary in 1850, and has always followed farming. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank and the West Branch National Bank, of Williamsport. He is a Republican, and was elected county commissioner in 1888; he has served as school director in Montoursville for twenty years, has been poor director of Fairfield township for fourteen years, and overseer of the poor, in Montoursville for nine years. He is one of the charter members and was the first Master of Eureka Lodge, A. F. and A. M. He was married in 1860 to Miss Julia W., daughter of John and Catherine Sheets, and to this union were born eight children, one of whom is deceased, and seven are living: Laura; Thomas; Robert; Gertrude; Agnes; Harry H., and Donald C. Mrs. Strebeigh is a member of the Presbyterian church.

  FREDERICK CLEES was born in Germany and immigrated to America when a young man, locating at Pennís Dale, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, where he worked at the tailorís trade for one year, removing thence to Upper, Fairfield township, where he followed his trade for a number of years. He is now a resident of Montoursville, Lycoming county. He married Hannah OíBourn, who died May 27, 1891, and was the mother of eight children, six of whom are living: Charles; John H.; Adam; Sarah J., who married Matthias Harris; Simon Peter, and Mary Ann, who married Henry McBride.

  JOHN H. CLEES, farmer, was born in Blooming Grove, Armstrong township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 29, 1842, son of Frederick and Hannah (OíBourn) Clees. He was reared in Fairfield township and educated in the common schools. He learned the carpenter trade, followed that occupation for several years, and on the 1st of April, 1876, he located on his present farm. He was first married, in 1864, to Miss Sarah C., daughter of Stephen Tomlinson, who died in June, 1890, leaving three children: Margaret, who married John Heverland; Ida May and Harry T. He was again married, September 9, 1891, to Jemima, daughter of Adam Varner. He is a Prohibitionist, has served as school director, was constable for two, terms, and is now serving his third term as overseer of the poor. He is a trustee of the Fairview Methodist Episcopal church and his wife is a member of the Evangelical church.

  G. H. WOOLEVER, merchant and lumberman, was born in Plunkettís Creek township, Lycoming county, September 17, 1848, son of Edwin and Esther (Wheeland) Woolever. He received his education in the public schools and at the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1873 he became a partner in the firm of William Weaver & Company, and still retains a one-fourth interest. He established his present mercantile business at Montoursville in 1884, and in 1889 he formed the lumber firm of Dubert, Woolever & Fry, which is now known as Woolever Brothers. They are also conducting a planing mill at. that place. He is a Republican, and has filled the offices of township clerk, school director, assessor, overseer of the poor, and town councilman. He was married in 1874 to Mary E., daughter of Lewis and Annie McCarty, and is treasurer of the Methodist Episcopal church at Montoursville.

  WILLIAM LEWARS was a native of Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, and came to Lycoming county about 1848. He was married in Columbia county to Mary A. Clewell, a native of that county, whence they came to Lycoming. He was a man of good education, and taught private and public schools in Montoursville for a number of years. In 1864 he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Eighty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war as sergeant of his company. After the war he returned to this county, and was employed by Canfield & Coeton, lumbermen near Montoursville, as bookkeeper and shipper, and remained with That firm and its successor until his death in February, 1885. He was a Republican, and served as justice of the peace in Montoursville for five con-secutive terms. He was a prominent member of the Lutheran church of that borough, and superintendent of the Lutheran Sunday school. His widow survives, and resides in Montoursville. They were the parents of five children, three of whom are living, as follows: James S., a hardware merchant of Williamsport; Clara M., wife of Rev. J. G. Griffith, a Lutheran minister of Omaha, Nebraska, and Annie M.

  WILLIAM GRIFFITH was born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1811. He was for a number of years engaged in the mercantile business, and served as a justice of the peace at Stewartstown for many years. He saw service in the Two Hundredth Pennsylvania Volunteers during the late war, and was a Republican in politics. He married Mary Beard, who died at the age of twenty-eight years, and was the mother of four children: Ann, who married William Arthur; Margaret, who married James Fulton, president of the Stewartstown railroad; Thomas B., and Dr. M. M., of Verona, Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. He was again married, to Elizabeth Hammond, who is also deceased and was the mother of seven children: Stewart; William; George; James; John; Mary, and Sarah, who married James Hendricks. Mr. Griffith died in 1890, a consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  THOMAS B. GRIFFITH, dentist and druggist, was born in Stewartstown, York county, Pennsylvania, February 28, 1838, son of William and Mary (Beard) Griffith. He went to Baltimore city when he was nine years old and lived with his grandmother, Mary Griffith, until sixteen. Here he had the advantage of the select and academic schools of that city. In the fall of 1862, he enlisted in, Company C, One Hundred and Thirtieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, as first lieutenant, was promoted to the captaincy of his company, and saw active service in, the battles of Fredericksburg, Antietam, Chancellorsville, and others. After a service of nine months in the war he returned to his native county, where he studied dentistry, and practiced for several years, in partnership with Hezekiah Freeston. In 1871 he came to Montoursville, and after practicing his profession for two years, in 1874 he purchased the drug business of Dr. Archer and Henry Bastian, which he has since conducted in connection with dentistry. For about eighteen months he was in partnership with Frank Wheeland, but since then has done business on his own responsibility. Dr. Griffith hold the position of overseer and gauger of the Foust distillery in York county for two and one-half years under President Andrew Johnsonís administration. He was formerly identified with the Republican party, but since the attempt to impeach Andrew Johnson he has been identified with the Democratic party. He has been a member of the school board of Montoursville for two years, and belongs to Eureka Lodge, No. 335, A. Y. M., and Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R. He was married in 1865 to Miss Margaret J. Hammond, and to this union have been born five children: Anna; Harry, deceased; Sarah; Mary, and William. Dr. Griffith is a member of the Baptist church, and his wife and family are members of the Presbyterian church.

  GEORGE C. SAEGER, physician and surgeon. was born in Clinton township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 9, 1852, son of Joseph and Elizabeth (Hartranft) Saeger. His father was born in what is now the borough of Montoursville in, 1825, and was a son of Christian Saeger, a native of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, who settled in Lycoming county about the year 1800. Mrs. Elizabeth, Saeger was, born in Delaware township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, and resides with her husband in Clinton township, Lycoming county; they are the parents of three children: George C.; Mary Ann, who married Samuel App, and Rebecca Caroline. George C., the eldest of these children, received his literary education in the Muncy and Montoursville Normal Schools. He studied medicine under Dr. Thomas Smith, of Clintonville, and Dr. George Metzger, of Hughesville, and was graduated from the University of Pennsylvania in 18761. He at once began the practice of his profession at Jersey Shore Station, where he remained for four years, removing thence to Muncy for one year, and in 1881 he located in Montoursville, where he has since enjoyed, the leading practice of the town, In 1882 he established his present drug store, which he carries on in connection with his profession. For several years he was a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1881 was elected to the office of coroner of Lycoming county, which position he filled with credit for one term. He was married in 1877 to Miss Josephine W., daughter of John Bubb, of Antes Fort, Pennsylvania. He and wife are active members of the Lutheran church.

  PETER BALL was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, and emigrated to America when a young man. He first settled at Ralston, where he remained one year, and was then successively located at Blossburg nine years, at Trout Run and year, at Hoaglandís Run two years and a half, at Blooming Grove two years, at Williamsport three years, at Loyalsock five years, in Black Hole valley two years and a half, and at Muncy creek six years, dying at the last named place, February 15, 1881. He was a blacksmith by trade, a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Catholic church. His wife, whose maiden name was Jane Brierden, survives him and is the mother of six children: Margaret Ann, who married Edward Bower; John; Sarah J., who married Seely Hetherland; Eliza Jane; Peter, and Rebecca, who married George Rentz.

  JOHN BALL, farmer, was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1852, son of Peter and Jane (Brierden) Ball. He was educated in the township schools and at a graded school at Montgomery borough; when, he was seventeen years of age he was employed by the Misses Scott to manage their farm in Fairfield township, and with them he remained nineteen years and eight months. He was married in 1886 to Mary Magdalene, daughter of John Winters, by whom he has two children: Sarah, who was born April 25, 1889, and died January 8, 1892, and Ruth C. He is a member of the Jr. O. U. A. M. is a Prohibitionist, and with his wife belongs to the Fairview Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is trustee and steward.

  WILLIAM LUCAS, proprietor of the Central Hotel, was born in Tampa Bay, Florida, December 15, 1843, Son of Luther Wesley and Mary Ann (Cassidy) Lucas. His father was born near Richmond, Virginia, and after engaging in the mercantile business for some time in Pennsylvania, he moved to Florida. He enlisted from that State in the Fifth United. States Infantry, and was killed in battle during the Mexican war. His mother and her children moved from Florida to Johnstown, Pennsylvania, in 1849, where she died, August 19, 1861. Our subject is the only surviving child, and at the age of thirteen years he left home to carve out his own way through life. He came to Montoursville in 1855 and engaged in boating on the canal until 1861. July 1, 1861, he enlisted in Company G, Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served for three years and one month, participating in all the battles of his company during that time. At the close of the war he returned to Montoursville, and resumed boating until 1884, when he became proprietor of the Central Hotel, which he purchased in 1888. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, F. and A. M., Fairfield Lodge, I. O. O. F., and the Encampment. He is also a member of the Union Veteran Legion, and of Reno Post, O. A. R., of Williamsport. He is a stanch Republican and has served as burgess and constable of Montoursville. In September, 1865, he was married to Miss Mary L. Frock, and to this union have been born two children: Jennie M. and Harry S.

  JAMES TALLMAN was born in Fairfield township, November 16, 1790, and was a son of Jeremiah Tallman. He was reared in this county, and followed the occupation of a farmer. He died, November 11, 1865, on his farm in what is now Eldred township. His wife, whose maiden name was Olive Bailey, a daughter of Daniel Bailey, was born July 13, 1800, and died August 18, 1877. Her father, Daniel Bailey, was born October 14, 1766, and her mother, Patience Bailey, was born August 21, 1772. There were born to James and Olive Tallman seven children: Sarah, who married Jacob Wise; Louis; Patience, who married Thomas Berger; Charles L.; Pierson L.; Olive, who married William Berger, and Harrison.

  PIERSON L. TALLMAN, farmer, was born in that portion of Hepburn township which is now Eldred,. November 23, 1827, son of James and Olive (Bailey) Tallman. He received a common school education and has always devoted his business life to farming. He was married in 1860 to Miss Phoebe, daughter of Jacob Konkle, and to this union have been born two children: George and Bertran. Mr. Tallman is an active Republican, and is overseer of the poor of his township. He settled on his present farm in 1872, and is recognized as one of the representative farmers of Lycoming county. His wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  STEPHEN TOMLINSON was born in Muncy township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1804, and died in 1880. His father was a native of Scotland and immigrated to America, settling in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, where he died. Stephen married Margaret Hoffman, a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and afterwards located in Montoursville, moving thence to what is now Gamble township, and then to Loyalsockville, where he kept a store. He was a wheelwright by trade and followed that all through life in connection with other occupations. He was a Democrat in politics and served as postmaster at Loyalsockville and at Upper Fairfield, and was instrumental in getting the postoffice established at the latter place. His wife died in 1874, and with him belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. She was the mother of ten children, five of whom are living: William J.; Frank; John; Margaret, who married William Buck, and Harriet, who married James Turner.

  LUDWIG F. SWEELY married Mary Magdalene Rentz; both were natives of Wurtemburg, Germany, and they migrated from that country to America in 1805, their marriage taking place after their arrival. Soon after this event they purchased a farm near Ballís Mills, in Hepburn township, which they cleared and improved; in 1834 they settled on the farm where their son, Ezra W. Sweely, now resides. He was a Whig, and afterwards a Democrat, and held some of the township offices. His death occurred in 1854, and that of his wife in 1863. They were both members of the Evangelical church; they were the parents of ten children, five of whom survive: George; Jacob; Martha, who married Jonathan D. Wald; Amelia, who married Lewis Hetler, and Ezra W.

  EZRA W. SWEELY, farmer, was born on the farm where he now resides in Upper Fairfield township, September 16, 1837, son of Ludwig F. and Magdalene (Rentz) Sweely. He was educated in the township schools and learned the carpenterís trade, which he followed for many years. In 1864 he built the Sherman House at Loyalsock and conducted the same for four years. He is one of the leading Democrats of his township; has served as auditor for two terms, jury commissioner for one term, and has been assessor of Upper Fairfield township for twenty years in succession. He has also been school director," and is serving his fourth term as justice of the peace: He was married in 1860 to Miss Catherine, daughter of Daniel Reeser, and to them have been born five children: Joseph Elmar; Lucretia Alice, who married Samuel I. Lundy; Daniel O.; Laura Bell, and Maud Myrtle. Mr. Sweely and family are members of the Evangelical, church of Loyalsock, of which he is trustee.

  SOLOMON RENTZ, farmer, was born, September 2, 1833, in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, son of Jacob and Mary (Steiger) Rentz. His father emigrated from Germany to America in 1804, and about 1818 came with his father, Jacob Rentz, to Lycoming county. Jacob Rentz died in 1865, and Mary, his wife, in 1837, they were members of the German Reformed church, and the parents of four children: John; Jacob; Solomon, and Mary. Solomon Rentz was educated in the common schools and Dickinson Seminary. He has always devoted his business life to farming. He was married, September 2, 1858, to Catharine, daughter of George Stolz, of Muncy, and to this union have been born three children: George; Melinda wife of Ezra Belles, and Harvey E.

  GEORGE MARKER, merchant, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 16, 1841, son of George and Margaret (Rutter) Marker. He was reared in his native city, where he remained until the breaking out of the war of the rebellion. He promptly enlisted in Company B, Twentieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and saw service for three months under General Patterson. He then enlisted in the United States Navy for a term of three years, and served under Capt. Stephen B. Luce on the Pontiac, which was stationed at Charleston, South Carolina, on the south Atlantic blockade. In July, 1865, he was transferred to the Shawmut, Capt. John G. Walker, and sailed from New York successively to Halifax, Nova Scotia; Southampton, England; Flushing, Holland; Antwerp, Belguim; Cherbourg, France; Fauchal, Maderia; Lisbon, Portugal; St. Vincent, Cape Verde Islands; Rio de Janeiro and St. Catharineís, Brazil; Montevideo, Uraguay, Buenos Ayres, Argentine, etc., where his ship formed part of the Brazilian squadron. In December, 1866, he returned to New York by way of the West Indies, and after serving three months in the Vermont he was transferred to the Ascutney, President Johnsonís private yacht. He was discharged from the navy at Washington, June 30, 1867, and in the same year came to Lycoming county for the purpose of securing hoop-poles for the West India trade. He was married, December 24, 1872, to Miss Mary, daughter of Daniel and Catherine Reeser, of Upper Fairfield township, and they settled where he now resides. In December, 1885, he established his present mercantile business; he was burned out, November 28, 1888, but immediately rebuilt and has since continued the business. He was appointed postmaster at Farragut by President Cleveland, and has filled that position for five years. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., of Williamsport. He is the father of three children: Cora Bell and John Franklin, deceased, and Margaret A. His wife is a member of the Evangelical church.

  DAVID SHERMAN, proprietor of the Sherman House at Loyalsock, was born in Ulster, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, December 7, 1855, son of Horace and Melinda (Campbell) Sherman, natives of Bradford county. He was educated in the public schools of Bradford and Lycoming counties, and afterwards engaged in the lumber business. He went to Michigan in 1876, where in 1881 he engaged in the hotel business at Edmore, Montcalm county, where he continued until 1887. He then returned to Williamsport, where he was engaged for two years in the wholesale and retail liquor business, became proprietor of the Ralston House, and in April, 1891, he purchased his present hotel. He is a member of the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, is a Democrat in politics, and a member of the county standing committee. He was married in 1888 to Emma L., daughter of John Pfizenmayer, of Germany. His wife is a member of the Lutheran church. Both of Mr. Shermanís paternal and maternal great grandfathers participated in the Revolutionary war.

  THE HILLS OF MUNCY FARMS. - Upon the failure of Samuel Wallis, who had been for many years the agent of the Holland Land Company, a portion of his lands in Lycoming county, known as the Muncy Farms, passed into the hands of Henry Drinker, of Philadelphia, who in 1806 sold them to Robert Coleman, of Cornwall Furnace, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Colemanís daughter, Elizabeth, had married in 1790 Charles Hall, the fifth son of Lieut. Col. Elisha Hall, of Maryland, and at this time Mr. Hall was practicing law in Sunbury, where he had built lip a large clientage, and also acquired several tracts of land in Lycoming county. the Muncy Farms, inherited by Mrs. Hall from her father, comprised 7,000 acres, and Charles Hall also owned 4,000 acres in the northern part of what is now Lycoming county and the southern part of Sullivan, north of the Muncy Farms. It was upon this historic domain that Fort Muncy was situated. It was built in 1778 by General Hartley, and had a four-pound cannon and four swivel guns. In 1778 the garrison consisted of 200 men, with Capt. Andrew Walton in command. On the 27th of April, 1779, thirteen men were killed by the Indians, and on the 15th of May General Hand came with a reinforcement of 100 men. In 1780 the garrison numbered fifty strong. In 1782 the fort was rebuilt with stone, and it has ever since been matter of tradition in this locality that Hessians were employed upon the work. The fort was finally demolished in 1847 by the tenant on the

  Farms, who said with considerable satisfaction: "have gotten rid of that old pile of stones." There are at present no outlines of the fort left, the Reading railroad having run through the site, and of the relies there remain only a few rusty implements of war and a large collection of Indian arrows. There is also on the Farms an Indian burial ground, from which some of the most interesting relies obtained in this part of the State have been taken. One of the first grist mills in this region was built upon the Farms by Wallis, and Martin Ault, the present farmer for W. Coleman Hall, is the grandson of the first miller. Five generations of Aults have lived upon the Farms in the employ of the Wallis and Hall families. The mill was abandoned in 1837.

  Mrs. Charles Hall added largely to the mansion house built by Wallis in 1769. She employed the contractor by whom the State capitol building at Harrisburg was erected, and both contracts were in progress at the same time. The materials were transported to the Farms by boat from Harrisburg. The large elm trees now standing east of the mansion were planted by Mrs. Samuel Wallis. When her husband was clearing the land to build she remonstrated against the removal of all the shade trees, to which he replied that he was paying to have the land cleared. But in the night, with the assistance of a negro boy, she planted the trees, and when Wallis saw them in the morning he said: "As they are planted, let them remain." They now shade the drive to the mansion, and constitute one of the most attractive features of the estate.

  After the death of her husband in 1821 Mrs. Charles Hall came to reside in Lycoming county, but soon after removed to Lancaster, leaving her oldest son, Robert Coleman Hall, who had married Sarah Ann Watts, daughter of Judge Watts, of Carlisle Pennsylvania, to look after the Muncy Farms; for a time he remained in charge of them, but finally returned to Carlisle, where he practiced law until his death. Upon his removal Mrs. Hall, when her children had all grown up, returned to her home in Lycoming county, and there remained until her death, in 1859. In 1848 her son James came from Greenwood Furnace, where he had been for a number of years the owner of a large iron works, and became his motherís agent for her estate. in Lycoming county; he continued to live with her until her death, and until the year 1868, when he removed to Philadelphia. There he died in 1882, leaving one son, William Coleman, who then returned to Lycoming county, and is the present occupant of the Muncy Farms.

  Of the family who have been in public life, Charles Hall was offered at the close of the Revolutionary war the position of commissioner to adjust the claims growing out of that war, with his residence in London. Of Mrs. Hallís grandchildren, Norman Hall, the son of Robert Coleman Hall, has represented the XXVIth district in Congress, and is a large and prosperous iron manufacturer in Sharon, Mercer bounty, Pennsylvania; Reginald, another grandson, removed early in life to Indianapolis, Indiana, where he became a prominent lawyer; Charles, another grandson, was among the original "forty-niners" in California, and is now the president of a railroad in the western part of Pennsylvania; another grandson of Mrs. Hall, Henry, Rawle, has filled the position of State treasurer of Pennsylvania, and at present lives on one of the Muncy Farms, which he inherited from his mother. Among the descendants of Charles Hall may also he mentioned Judge McClay Hall, of Bradford county, Pennsylvania; Lewis Hall, of Harrisburg, ex-Speaker of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives; Francis Rawle, a prominent lawyer of Philadelphia, and eight grandsons who served in the late war.

  MENDENHALL FAMILY. - John, Mary, Moses, and Benjamin Mendenhall (originally spelled DeMildenhall), immigrated in 1686 from England to America; Moses returned to his native country in a short time, but the others remained. The, Mendenhall family of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, has descended from Ben-jamin Mendenhall, who married Miss Ann Pennell, February 2, 1689, and to this, union were born nine children: Benjamin; Joseph; Moses; Hannah; Samuel Rebecca; Ann; Nathan, and Robert.

  Samuel Mendenhall, son of Benjamin and Ann (Pennell) Mendenhall, was the,. father of two children, Amos and Samuel; the name of his first wife is unknown, and his second wife was Miss Mary Miller Harlan, by whom he had two children: Abner and Beulah.

  Abner Mendenhall, son of Samuel, married Lydia Carlton, and to this union. were born ton children: Joshua; Mary; Thomas C.; Eli; Mark;. Martha; Abner Lydia; James, and Samuel.

  Thomas C. Mendenhall, son of Abner, married Anna Lundy, by whom he had. five children: William S., deceased; Narcissa, deceased; Phoebe A., deceased; Ellis Y., deceased, and Esther L. Mrs. Mendenhall died, September 9, 1862, and he was again married, to Miss Sarah Heacock, and to this union were born three children:. Lydia C.; Susan M., and Esther L., who married Nathan H. Edgerton, and was the mother of four children: Arthur; Ralph; Maude, and Edward G.

  WILLIAM S. MENDENHALL, son of, Thomas C. Mendenhall, married Mary S. Warner, daughter of John and Louisa Warner, November 29, 1848, and to this union were born the following children: Anna L.; John W.; Charles E.; Narcissa V., and George H. Anna L. married Walter A. Trap, March 4, 1874, and had two children, an infant, deceased, and Carlton; Mr. Trap died, August 0, 1876, and Mrs. Trap was, again married, to Jacob Lorah, and to this union was born one child, Mary E. Charles E. married Rachel F., daughter of Benjamin and Margaret Warner, February 10, 1879, by whom he had one child, Helen D.; Mrs. Mendenhall died, August 4, 1880. Narcissa V. was born, February 20, 1857, and died at, the age of five months. George H. married Mary Swartz, and to this union were born two children: William S., and Phoebe A.

  JOHN HAINES was a son of Richard Haines, who emigrated, from Northampton, England., in 1683, and settled in New Jersey. John purchased 600 acres of land situated in what is now Goshen, Chester county, Pennsylvania, which he divided among his two sons, and three daughters. One son was Isaac, and from him have. descended the Haines families of Chester and Lycoming counties. Isaac married Ester Barton, by whom he had thirteen children; Isaac, his third son, married Catharine Davis in 1714, and removed to Chester county upon the land descended from his grandfather, John Haines, where he lived and died. He was the father of ten children. His eldest son, also named Isaac, was born in 1718, and married in 174 Mary Cox, by whom he had seven children, as follows: Jane; Ellen; Elisha; Caleb; Isaac; Jacob, and Jesse.

  JESSE HAINES, the youngest son of Isaac Haines, came to Muncy township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1790. He was a minister of the Society of Friends, and also spent many years in teaching school. Both he and wife were remarkable for their independence, strict integrity, and earnest Christianity. He married Rachel Otley, and to them were born six children: Mary; Jacob; Jesse P.; Reuben; William E., and Thomas. He and wife lived to an old age, he lacking but six days of being one hundred years old at the time of his death.

  JACOB HAINES, oldest son of Jesse and Rachel Haines, was an influential citizen of the Muncy valley. Leaving his fatherís house to pursue his studies, he spent a few years in Philadelphia and vicinity as a student and instructor. In 1815 he was married to Rachel, daughter of William Ellis, of Muncy township. He returned to the township of Muncy in 1823, and in 1832 he purchased what is known as the Wolf Run homestead, which was a center of hospitality, and a refuge for the fugitive slaves previous to the rebellion. He was a practical surveyor and alternated that occupation with farming. He was also for a number of years actively engaged as general agent for the Lycoming County Mutual Fire Insurance Company, of which he was one of the first board of directors. He was a commissioner of dam ages on the Philadelphia and Erie railroad while it was under construction, and was for a time vice-president of the Catawissa railroad. His wife died in 1861, and he in 1866, in the seventy-eighth year of his age. Their children were as follows: William E., deceased; Mary, wife of Edward Marshall of New York; Jesse; Sarah E.; Anna M., deceased; Rebecca E., and Rachel H., wife of James Ecroyd.

  JESSE HAINES, the second son of Jacob and Rachel (Ellis) Haines, was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania. His early education was received in the common schools, and he was graduated from the Westtown Quaker College of Chester county. He was subsequently engaged in the manufacture of paper, at which he continued some fourteen years. He purchased the large part of the homestead farm where he now resides. He married Mary Ecroyd, daughter of Henry Ecroyd, and they are the parents of the following children: Anna M.; Henry E., who is in the employ of the Girard Life and Trust Company, of Philadelphia, and is married to Miss Anne Wistar; Susan L., and William E.

  JAMES ECROYD was born in England, November 1, 1767. While young he learned the tanning business, and later on immigrated to the United States, leaving Liverpool August 30, 1795, and landing at Baltimore in the latter part of October in the same year. He at once proceeded to Philadelphia, and for a short time was the guest of John Haworth. He shortly started on a tour of inspection through the northwestern part of Pennsylvania, where he invested largely in lands bordering on Loyalsock creek, then in Lycoming county, and other lands in Luzerne county. He was married, April 9, 1800, to Martha, daughter of John Haworth, and to this union were born eight children: Henry; John H.; Mary; Deborah; Sarah; Martha; Elizabeth, and Hannah. Mr. Ecroyd died in Philadelphia in 1825; his widow died, April 9, 1845.

  HENRY ECROYD, eldest son of James and Martha (Haworth) Ecroyd, was born at Muncy, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1801. He was a very popular man among his fellow citizens, and was held in high esteem for his judgment; his scrupulousness as a member of the Society of Friends kept him from entering public life, which was urged upon him by his neighbors. He was the father of six children: James; Richard H.; Susan H.; Mary W.; Martha H., and Catharine A. He resided more than fifty years upon the farm of Edgend (named after the elder English domicile of his ancestors), which lies in Muncy valley about a mile distant from the Susque-hanna river. He died there in 1888.

  JAMES ECROYD, Son of Henry and Catharine (Whitacre) Ecroyd, was born, July 31, 1830. He received his education at Westtown Boarding School, Chester county, Pennsylvania, and was married, November 29, 1854, to Rachel Haines, and to this union have been born four children: William H., deceased at the age of seven months; Henry, who was graduated in medicine at the University of Pennsylvania in 1886, and married Rebekah Ashbridge of Chester county, Pennsylvania; Charles E., who married Laura H. Taylor, of Philadelphia, and Mary H., who married John I. Kimber, of Newport, Rhode Island. Since his marriage, Mr. Ecroyd has resided on his place known as "Sunnyside," where he has successfully established a large stock farm.

  JACOB GOOD and two brothers removed from Switzerland to the United States sometime during the period immediately antecedent to the American Revolution. The three brothers were soon separated, however, and never afterward heard from each other. Jacob was a farmer by occupation, and settled near Allentown, Pennsylvania. He married a Miss Troxel and reared a family of eleven children: Peter; Daniel; John; Henry; Mary; Andrew; Salome; Jacob; Lawrence; Catherine, and Susan.

  DANIEL GOOD, second son of Jacob Good, married Catharine Helfrich, of Allentown, and they were the parents of nine children: Michael; Annie; Catherine; Daniel; Elizabeth; Mary; Sarah; Lydia, and Amelia. About three years after their marriage they removed from Allentown and purchased a farm near Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, whence they came to the vicinity of Pennís Dale, Lycoming county, in 1832, and located upon a farm of 136 acres purchased by Daniel Good in 1831. Here they passed the remainder of their lives. Daniel Good died in 1855 at the age of sixty-nine years, a consistent member of the Lutheran church, to which his family also adhered.

  MICHAEL GOOD, eldest son of Daniel and Catherine (Helfrich) Good, was born near Allentown, June 7, 1813. In 1855 he purchased the homestead farm near Pennís Dale, and improved it by the erection of entirely new buildings. He was an active supporter of the public school system, and labored earnestly to promote its efficiency in his district. In politics he was a stanch Republican. He was a member of the Lutheran church, as were also most of the members of his family. On the 28th of October, 1841, he married Sarah, eldest daughter of Valentine Beeber, of Muncy, and they reared ten children: Harriet Elizabeth, deceased; Daniel Franklin, insurance agent, Lock Haven, who served a short time in the war of the rebellion; John Irvin, deceased; George Helfrich; Michael Horace, farmer, Aurora, Nebraska; William Valentine, miller, Lackawanna county, Pennsylvania; Sarah Jane, wife of D. M. Keller, veterinary surgeon, Williamsport; Mary Emma, deceased; Charles Rollin, veterinary surgeon, Look Haven, and Margaret Alice, of Williamsport. Michael Good died on the 6th of June, 1877, at the age of sixty-four years, followed by his wife on the 15th of December following at the age of fifty-eight.

  GEORGE: HELFRICH GOOD, farmer, was born on the homestead farm, June 1, 1849, son of Michael and Sarah (Beeber) Good. On the 10th of March, 1875, he married Sarah Ann, daughter of Archibald Bonine, of Muncy. In February, 1889, he purchased his fatherís farm, whereon he now resides with his wife and two children: Edith Elizabeth, born February 20, 1876, and Archibald Beeber, born September 2, 1890.

  JOHN BUTLER was the son of James Butler, a Revolutionary soldier, who removed from Carlisle, Pennsylvania, to the Black Hole valley and thence to Lycoming county. He settled on a farm in what is now Clinton township, and was married to Miss Mary Hood, by whom he had one child, John, born January 2, 1790. John Butler came to Muncy township in 1837 and settled near Pennís Dale upon the farm whereon he died. He was the father of eleven children: Mary A., deceased; James G., who was born, July 4, 1817, married Sarah Thompson, reared a family, and died, April 21, 1859; Julia, who was born, October 10, 1818; Sarah, who was born, June 30, 1821, married William Eves, had a family of three children, and died, May 23, 1858; John B., who died, December 18, 1881; Mary A., who was born, October 26, 1825, and died, August 10, 1883; Catherine, who was born, August 4, 1827, married Joe Wells, reared a family of two children, and died, November 13, 1867; Susan, who was born, April 20, 1829, married A. S. Saul, reared one child, and died, June 17, 1858; Joseph, who died while young; Isaac P., who resides in Muncy Creek township, and Amanda, who was born June 27, 1837, married Thomas J. Ort, and resides in Williamsport. John Butler died, August 16, 1873, and his wife, August 24, 1884. The Butler family were all members of the Lutheran church. James Butler received as a reward for his service in the Revolutionary war a tract of land which is now the present site of Sunbury, but lost the deed for the same, and consequently never received any benefit from it.

  GEORGE GORTNER came to Northumberland county at a very early day. He was killed by the Indians and was the father of a family. Col. John Gortner, son of Jacob Gortner, and a grandson of George Gortner, was a farmer by occupation, and served as colonel in the State militia. He was married to Miss Elizabeth Dietrich, by whom he had three children: Jacob, deceased; Frederick, deceased, and Mandrick, deceased. His wife having died, he was again married, to Miss Christiana Beeber, and to this union were born six children: Elizabeth, deceased; Elias; John; William; Mary, and Charles, deceased. Colonel Gortner died in 1865, and his widow in 1878.

  FREDERICK GORTNER, son of John Gortner, a farmer by occupation, was the father of the following children: Elias C.; William H.; Mary; Thomas B., deceased; Elizabeth;. John H., and one deceased when young. Mr. and Mrs. Gortner were early identified with the Lutheran church. He was accidently killed at a barn, raising, June 18, 1875. William H. Gortner, farmer, was born in Lycoming county, March 14, 1850, son of Frederick and Julia (Beeber) Gortner. He received a common school education and has always been engaged in farming. He was married in December, 1877, to Gemella Sissler, and to this union has been born one child, Frank B.

  GEORGE EDKIN emigrated from England to America in order to save his two sons, Francis and George, from service in the English army. He settled on what is now known as Edkinís Hill, near Lewis Lake, Sullivan county, Pennsylvania, and was foreman of the Lewis Glass Works for a time. After he was ninety years old he walked the entire distance from Muncy, this county, to New York City, where he died at the age of one hundred and five years.

  FRANCIS EDKIN, son of George Edkin, was a miller and cooper by trade, which occupation he followed until his death; he married Joanna Palmer, of New York City, and to them were born thirteen children: Catherine; Jane; Mary; Deborah; William; Susan; Sarah; Joanna; George; Martha; Eliza; one who died in infancy, and Elias; all are now deceased except Jane, Sarah, George, and Elias. Mr. Edkin died in the fall of 1843, followed by his widow one year later.

  ELIAS H. EDKIN, farmer, was born in Stroudsburg, Monroe county, Pennsylvania, December 19, 1834, son of Francis and Joanna (Palmer) Edkin. He received a common school education and has followed farming for an occupation. He married Anna, daughter of Robert and Abigail Battin, March 19, 1861, and to this union have been born five children: Eliza S., deceased; Aaron S.; Robe A B.; Francis, deceased, and Harry, deceased. Mr. Edkin is a Republican, and he and family are, members of the Society of Friends.

  ROBERT B. WEBSTER, deceased, was born July 17, 1827, son of Joseph and Elizabeth Webster. He was a farmer by occupation, and one of the leading citizens of the community in which he resided. He married Miss Salana, Tallman, and to this union were born three children: Hannah; Daniel B., and Mary E. Mr. Webster died, August 27, 1875. Daniel Tallman, father of Mrs. Webster, was a son of Jeremiah Tallman, who migrated from New Jersey to Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, toward the close of the last century, settling on Loyalsock creek; his wife went to mill at Northumberland, Pennsylvania, in a canoe, when the Indians were very numerous and troublesome in this section of the country; she was the mother of seven children: John; Daniel; James; Joseph; Nancy; Rebecca, and Deborah. Daniel was a shoemaker by trade, which, occupation he alternated with farming. He married Hannah, daughter of Jacob Clayton, and was the father of ten children: Jeremiah; Hannah A.; Matthew; Jacob, deceased; Joseph, deceased; William; Salana; Eliza, deceased; Amos, and Amanda. Daniel Tallman died, December 29, 1864, and his widow, March 20, 1887. The Tallmans were identified with the Whig and Republican parties. Jacob Clayton was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, and removed to Jerseytown, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in 1793. Here he remained until 1805, when he removed to the present site of Hughesville, and there erected a grist mill, it being the first in that portion of the county. Some time after building the mill he traded it for a farm, now occupied by Mrs. Robert Webster, near what is known as Pennís Dale, where he remained as long, as he kept house. He was the father of seven children: Isaac; Joshua; Lydia; Hannah; Mary; Ann, and Rachel, all of whom are dead.

  JOHN MCCONNEL, with his family, consisting of a wife and four sons, removed from Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, to Williamsport, in 1810, traveling in a two horse wagon. He soon after located in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, where he engaged in the distilling business, which he continued for many years. His sons were: Thomas P.; John; James, and William. Thomas P. McConnel, son of John McConnel learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed for about forty years. He was the father of eight children: Mary; Elizabeth; Agnes; Sarah; Julia; James; Thomas P., and John. He was a member of the Lutheran church, and died in 1864; his wife died in 1838.

  JOHN MCCONNEL, retired farmer, was born in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1824; son. of Thomas P. and Rebecca (Dimm) McConnel. He learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed until 1855, since which he has devoted his time to farming. He was married in 1845 to Hannah Artley, and to them were born four children: John P., who married Abbie Hoyt; Walter E., who married Mary Pollock; Eliza C., who married Casper Laenchley, and Thomas O., who married Alice Webster. Mrs. John McConnel died, May 23, 1887, aged sixty-two years, in the faith of the Lutheran church; and her husband is a member of Immanuel Lutheran church.

  WALTER E. MCCONNEL, farmer, was born December 20, 1851, son of John and Hannah (Artley) McConnel. He was educated in the common schools and has devoted his life to farming. December 28, 1876, he was married to Miss Mary A. Pollock, and to this union have been born four children: T. Chester; Eliza E.; John L., and W. Pearl. Mrs. McConnel died, March 20, 1891, in the faith of the Lutheran church, to which organization her husband belongs.

  JOHN SWARTZ emigrated from Germany to Lycoming county, about the year 1819, settling upon a farm. He was the father of five children: Mary; Mariala, deceased; Catherine, deceased; George, deceased, and an infant, deceased while crossing the ocean. John Swartz died in 1850, and was one of the upright and honorable citizens of the county. George Swartz, son of John Swartz, devoted his entire life to farming. He was supervisor of his township for four terms, and the father of nine children: Thomas; John; Maria, deceased; Sarah, deceased; Christian; George; William; Mary, and Catherine. He was an active worker in the Democratic party, a member of the Lutheran church, and an honest, upright citizen, and died, August 14, 1890.

  THOMAS SWARTZ, farmer, was born in Lycoming county, July 23, 1846, son of George and Sarah (Reichard) Swartz. He was educated in the common schools; he is a blacksmith by trade, which occupation he has followed for twenty-one years. Sinn 1884 he has been engaged in farming. January 21, 1868, he was married to Elizabeth, daughter of the late John Gilmore, and to this union have been born, six children; Albert; Herbert, deceased; Minnie M.; an infant, deceased; Mary A., and Sarah A.

  JOHN LOCKARD came from New Jersey to Lycoming county at an early day, and settled on a farm He was the father of six children: Alexander; Thomas; Abraham; Peter; Jane, and John. John Lockard, son of John Lockard, was a farmer by occupation, and married Catherine Fague, by whom he had fourteen children: Two who died in infancy; William; Abraham; George; Matthias; Samuel; Hannah; Eliza-beth; Catherine; Ella; Alfred, deceased; John, deceased, and Margaret J., deceased.

  SAMUEL LOCKARD, farmer, was born, November 3, 1833, in Lycoming county, son of John and Catherine (Fague) Lockard. He received a common school education and has devoted his whole time to farming. February 3, 1869, he was married to Margaret M. Gortner, and to this union have been born ten children: Walter, of Montoursville; Sarah C.; Julian; George; Charles L.; Thomas; Cora; William, deceased; Isaac, deceased, and John, deceased.

  THOMAS W. ROBB, farmer, was born in the house where he now lives, in Muncy township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 31, 1854, a son of Robert and Elizabeth (McConnell) Robb, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work. He was educated in the common schools, and hag given his entire time to rural pursuits. He has served as school director, supervisor, and overseer of the poor. He was married, December 14, 1822, to Miss Anna Follmer, and to this union have been born seven children: Robert, deceased; Mary; Marion; James A.; Raymond; Bertha, and Beatrice.

  PETER NARBER, farmer, was born in 1830, in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, son of Jacob Narber, who was the father of the following children: Sallie, deceased; Catherine; Mary A., deceased; Elias; John; Leah, deceased; George; Peter; Elizabeth; Susan, deceased, and Hannah. Jacob Narber died October 9, 1846, aged fifty-seven years and eight months; Susanna, his wife, died, November 28, 1855, aged sixty-two years, four months, and twenty-five days. Our subject, Peter Narber, was married in 1853 to Sarah J. Buck, and to this union were born eight children: Emma; Ellen; Cora; Monroe; Anna; Della; Carrie, deceased, and Rachel. Mrs. Narber died, July 4, 1883, and he was again married, to Miss Margaret Cook, Mr. Narber and all of his family are members of the Lutheran church at Hughesville.

  JOHN M. FAGUE, farmer, was born in Wolf township, Lycoming county, April 10, 1830, son of Jacob and Sarah (Yeagel) Fague, and grandson of William Fague, one .of the pioneers of this county. Jacob Fague was born in Lycoming county; after his marriage he settled in Wolf township, and subsequently upon the farm where his son, John M., now resides. There he died. in 1838, and his widow died in 1881. They were both members of the Lutheran church, and their children were named as follows: Lovina, deceased; John M.; Mary, deceased; Julia Ann, wife of William Gross, and Rachel, wife of John Gortner. The subject of this sketch was reared on his fatherís farm and educated in the common schools of his neighborhood. He has always devoted his business life to farming. In 1854 he married Catherine, daughter of Samuel Artley, of Muncy township, and to this union have been born nine children: Mary, wife of Jefferson Gray; Virginia; Sarah, wife of Ellis Rynearson; Joseph, who died in 1890; Samuel; John; Charles; Susan, wife of Henry Nunn, and Julia Ann. Mr. Fague is a Democrat in politics and has filled various township offices. He is now serving his third term as justice-of the peace, and has been a member of the school board for over thirty years. He furnished a substitute who served in the late war. He and family are members of Trinity Lutheran church of Mill Creek township.

  JOHN LIPP, farmer, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1832, son of Michael M. and Jacobina Lipp, natives of Germany. His parents removed from Lancaster county to Lycoming in 1837. They settled first at Blooming Grove and afterward in that part of Muncy township which is now Mill Creek. His father died about 1840, and the widow married Barney Yost and settled on the farm where our subject now resides. She died in Williamsport in 1882, in the faith of the German Reformed church, to which her first. husband also belonged. To Michael M. Lipp and wife were born five children: John; Mary; Harriet; Catherine, and Elizabeth. By her second marriage she had three children: Christiana; Margaret, and Hannah. Our subject received but a limited education, and early in life he engaged in the lumber business. He worked on Bear creek for five years and then became a partner with John C. Bryan, and engaged in the manufacture of lumber from 1864 to 1867. During the latter year he settled upon his present farm. In September, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months as corporal of his company, and was; subsequently promoted to the position of sergeant. He participated in the battles of Fort Stedman and in front of Petersburg. Mr. Lipp was first married to Sarah, daughter of Joseph Frantz, of Upper Fairfield township. She, died in 1859, and he was again married in 1862, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Jacob Klees, of Muncy township, and to this union have been born five children: George M.; Russell N., deceased; Esther Ann, deceased; Charles K., and Harriet S. Mr. Lipp is a Republican, and has filled many of the township, offices, being at present overseer of the poor. He and family are members of Trinity Lutheran church, of which he is an elder, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school.

  DAVID GORTNER, farmer, was born on his present farm, August 20, 1836, son of Samuel and Julia (Beeber) Gortner, natives of Lycoming valley. His grandfather, Philip Gortner, was a native of Germany, and took up a tract of land in Muncy Creek township. Samuel Gortner, the father of our subject, located in Muncy township after his marriage, and in 1836 he settled upon the farm where his son David now, resides. In 1872 the parents retired from farm duties and settled in Muncy, where the father died, February 14, 1892. They were among the organizers of Trinity Lutheran church, of which the father was a deacon for many years. He was a Democrat, and filled various township offices. The mother died in 1878, and her children are as follows: Mary, wife of Joseph Rynearson; Henry, deceased; John; Barbara, deceased; Susan, deceased; Samuel; David; Margaret, wife of Samuel Lockard; Isaac; Sarah, deceased, and Sylvester, deceased. Our subject received hit education in the public schools, and has principally been engaged in farming. He was married in January, 1862, to Minerva, daughter of Isaac Shipman, and to this union have been born nine children: Mary A., who married Elmer Webster; Adolphus; Susan B., who married Everhart Moyer; Julia F.; Isaac Norman, deceased; Emma J.; Joseph Edward; Bertha A., and Clarence. Mr. Gortner is a Democrat in politics and has served as school director and supervisor. He is one of the charter members of Allegheny Alliance, of Mill Creek township, and with his family belongs to Trinity Lutheran church, in which he has filled the office of deacon for many years.

  JACOB WINTERS, farmer, was born in Upper Fairfield township, December 7, 1842, son of John and Mary (Zern) Winters, natives of Wurtemberg, Germany, who came to America in 1832 and located in Williamsport. The parents soon after removed to Upper Fairfield township, where they cleared and improved two farms. There, the father died in 1852, and the mother in 1879. They were both members of the Evangelical church, and their children were as follows: Barbara, who married Abraham Neff; Christiana, deceased; John, deceased; Mary, deceased; Martha, who married James Harrington; Martin; Harriet, deceased, who married Jonathan Neff; Jacob; Frederick, deceased, and Abraham. The subject of this sketch was reared in Upper Fairfield township, received a common school education, and has always been engaged in farming and lumbering. In 1877 he married Amanda, daughter of John and Phoebe (Welch) Burrows, and located upon his present farm, where he has since resided. To this union have been born the following children: Mabel, February 13, 1878; Clyde L. October 10, 1879; Raymond B., December 20, 1881, and Chauncey, September 12, 1890. Mr. Winters was formerly identified with the Republican party but is now a Prohibitionist. He has filled various township offices, and With his family belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church at Huntersville, in which he is a trustee, steward, and superintendent of the Sunday school.

  JOHN W. KING, farmer, was born in Shamokin township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, February 16, 1846. His father, George King, was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, January 22, 1822, of English parentage. He moved to Northumberland county with his father, John King, and was there married to Sarah Swank. With her he came to Lycoming county in 1847, and located in Muncy township. He learned the milling trade from his father, and for several years fol-lowed that occupation, being employed in the Haines mill and We Bryan mill for eleven years. He was also located at Antes Fort and at Fairfield Centre. He finally settled upon the farm where our subject now resides, where he died, June 30, 1880. Mr. King was a Republican, and filled various township offices. He was a member of Trinity Lutheran church and always took an active interest in church affairs. His widow, who survives him, resides on the homestead, and is the mother of four children, three of whom are living: John W.; Mary, and Sarah. The oldest of these, John W., was reared in Lycoming county, and received his education in the common schools and the Muncy Normal. He followed teaching school for twenty-four years. In 1865 he enlisted in Company K, Eighty-eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He is a Republican in politics and has filled the offices of assessor, auditor, and school director, being the present incumbent of the two last. He was the main organizer of the Allegheny Alliance Mill Creek township, and has served as president of the same since its organization.

  JOHN HARRIS, blacksmith, was born in Montoursville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1850, son of Marshall and Catherine, (Stryker) Harris, both of Scotch descent. His father was a carpenter by trade and died January 12, 1871. His mother died in 1870. The parents were both members of the Lutheran church and their children were as follows: Mary A., deceased, who married John A. Hunt; Hannah, who married John Rush; Peter, who married Elizabeth Lipp; Jane, who married Edward Bates, and John. The last named was reared in his native village and received his education in the public schools of that place. He learned the blacksmith trade and has always followed that occupation, locating in his present place in 1873. He was married in 1875 to Abigail A., daughter of William Gay, and to this union have been born four children: Marshall; William A.; Dean, and Lulu P. Mr. Harris is a Republican in politics and he and family are active members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Huntersville, in which he has served as superintendent of the Sunday school.


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