YORK TOWNSHIP

Topography—The east half of this township is very rolling, while the west half is gently rolling. The township is very well settled up by many descendants of the homesteaders. Only one of the original homesteaders is now living on his land, namely, Mr. A. S. Beeney. Horseshoe lake is located in the east half of the township.

The first child born here was D. W. Esget, March 1, 1884.

The first marriage was that of W. E. Stevens and Miss Ella Potter, June 1885.

The first death was that of Mrs. Francis Woodworth in the spring of 1887.

The largest family was born to Mr. and Mrs. Martin Baron, five sons and eight daughters.

The name of township was adopted at the first election, the name being suggested by J. W. LaBaron.

Dates and settlement of homesteaders:

1881-82—John Darmody, R. W. Hanke, Tom Dawson.

1883—S. L. and D. E. Potter, A. S. Beeney, E. O. Esget, Ross E. Parks, Miss Lily Parks, L. M. Hazelton, J. B. Johnson, Joe Bell, J. W. and E. J. LaBaron, Moegling Brothers, Fritz Higland, Louis Auby, Romeo Ault, W. W. King, Chas. Anderson, Dan and James McClaren, A. Peckham.

1884—F. and Lee McCartney, E. R. and A. L. Jones, R. Stevenson, M. Corbin, M. and John Pesall, E. Cooper, A. M. Allen, Tom Leonard, Wm. Rorick, Ole Brindlson, S. D. Clark, M. K. Valsvig, M. and Ike Sanborn, S. Matthews, L. T. Depeel, H. B. Currence, W. M. Crawford, C. A. Woodworth, W. E. Stevens, Franklin and C. A. Barber.

1885-90—M. K. Berg, C. M. Eveleth, W. E. Fisk, Anton Anderson, J. F. Pitsor.

A. S. BEENEY

FARM HOME OF A. S. BEENEY
FARM HOME OF A. S. BEENEY

Mr. A. S. Beeney came from Illinois in 1883 and filed on his homestead and tree claim, to which he later added 80 acres in Troy township, used for pasture.

He was married to Miss Minna A. Corbin, December, 1893, and to this union were born two boys and two girls, all living but one.

Mr. Beeney has always been very interested in good horses, especially high grade Percheron and Belgium. He has a fine bunch on hand most all of the time.

Mr. Beeney and his married son are at present farming the home place. They practice diversified farming, milking ten to twelve cows, marketing from forty to fifty Poland China hogs, and a good bunch of poultry, Rose Comb Wyandottes, each year. Mr. Beeney first planted corn in the sod and has continued raising corn every year since, his average being fifty acres, annually.

He claims to have held his own and made some money farming up until the World War, but since that time has used up what surplus he had on hand.

Phone and R. F. D., Lily, S. D.

C. A. BARBER

FARM HOME OF C. A. BARBER
FARM HOME OF C. A. BARBER

Mr. C. A. Barber came to Day county with his parents from Illinois in 1884. When he became of age he bought a tree claim relinquishment, filing on this as a tree claim. Here he planted twelve acres of trees and built the home which is shown in the picture. His father filed a homestead just across the road.

He was married to Miss Minnie Conell, November 27, 1902, and to them were born three daughters.

He now farms eight hundred acres, which comprises his home farm, but owns two hundred and forty acres more at the north end of the township. He has always held to grain farming and has a private elevator, fully equipped, as shown above. His specialty has been full blood Percheron horses.

All the buildings are equipped with electricity from the high line, as his farm joins the corporate limits of Lily.

Mrs. Barber has for two years been leader of the M. G. R. Girls' Extension club.

Phone and R. F. D. Lily, S. D.




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©2003, Virginia A. Cisewski