SOLDIERS

IN

KING PHILIP'S WAR

Chapter 1, Part IV 

 

November 30th, 1675

Edward Barton

01

05

08

Isaac Heath

00

16

02

Henry Kirby

00

17

02

Jeremiah Wise

01

00

06

Benjamin Negus

00

17

02

John Leech

01

19

04

James White

00

17

02

John Good

00

17

02

Joseph Bateman

00

17

02

Edward Everet

00

07

02

Richard Francis

02

00

00

John Kemble

00

17

02

Experience Orris

00

17

02

Samuel Ryall

00

10

04

Joseph Gridley

01

05

06

William Bodkin

00

17

02

William Hooper

00

17

02

John Tuckerman

00

17

02

John Cann

01

00

00

William Price

00

14

06

William Davenport

00

17

02

Thomas Smith

00

17

02

Joseph Bugby

00

11

02

Samuel Gardner

00

17

02

Simon Rogers

00

17

02

Abiel Lamb

00

19

02

Richard Woods

00

17

02

Degory Sargent

00

17

02

Josiah Mann

00

17

02

John Malony

01

19

04

Francis Siddall

01

19

04

Hugh Price

00

17

02

James Harrington

00

17

02

Benjamin Gamlin

01

00

00

Isaac Morris

00

17

02

Josiah Holland

00

17

02

Joseph Wilson

00

17

02

Samuel Ruggles

00

17

02

Philip Curtis, Lieut

00

17

03

On November the 12th the Council ordered Major Willard to send forthwith twelve troopers to Capt. Henchman.

Many of the soldiers were now withdrawn and placed in garrison, and all available were pressed and mustered for the Narraganset campaign. Capt. Henchman's men were many returned home with him.

Among the soldiers impressed in Boston for the Narragansett campaign, Dec. 3d, 1675, were the following from Capt. Henchman's local company: James Whipple, Samuel Jenkins, Walter.

Cohone, James White, Thomas Jones, Thomas Stains, John Dereing, Robert Emory, Ralph Powel for Mr. James Lloyd, Francis Cooke for Mr. William Larrison. (Mass. Archives, vol. 68, 86.) Among the soldiers in the above lists were probably the twelve troopers sent out by order of the Council on November 12, 1675, and those who did not return to Boston until the later dates. It was the custom, I find, to punish the men by fines, and sometimes their pay would be withheld for several months, until on petition to the Council it would be paid, if the officer who complained of their misconduct would recommend leniency and sign their "debenture" or bill for service rendered. On the minutes of the Council, of which a few fragments are preserved in the Mass. Archives, I find several instances of this kind; one in the case of Magnus White, whose name occurs later, and one in a quaint letter from one Jonathan Adderton (Atherton), which declares that Capt. Henchman wrongfully accused him of "profanation of ye Sabbath," when his only offence was the cutting up of an old hat and putting the pieces in his shoes to relieve his galled foot, &c. Many of the above will be recognized as of Roxbury and Dorchester.

On December 12, the Commissioners of the United Colonies voted to strengthen the garrisons with such of the soldiers as were able and willing to remain for that service during the winter, and to dismiss others to their homes.

Jan. 11. "It was ordered by the Council that the Garrison Souldjers at Chelmsford, Billerica, Groaten, Lancaster, Marlborough, and Sudbury, under Major Willard, be discharged forthwith, and sent home;" and at the same time it was voted to pay them "two months' pay on their returne." This may have been done at the request of the people in the above-named towns, because we know that in many cases these garrison soldiers became very obnoxious to the citizens, as will be seen when we come to the lists at the garrisons, hereafter. I presume this service of withdrawal and settlement of soldiers was under the special charge of Capt. Henchman, who then, I think, retired from active service until the 27th of the next April.

In the latter part of May, 1676, the forces under Capt. Henchman were called together again. These had been impressed by order of the Council, April 27, and released to do their planting until such time as wanted. They were mustered at Concord, at this time, an important military post, whence he writes on June 2d, that "Tom Doublet went away soon after Mr. Clark, and with him Jona. Prescott, Daniel Champney & Josiah White, carrying the pay for Goodman Moss, and 3 gallons of Rum." They marched out towards Brookfield to join the Connecticut forces on the 27th, but on information received from this same Tom Doublet (an Indian), turned aside and had a fight with the Indians at Washakom Ponds; and this affair detained them so that they did not reach Hadley until the 14th, when they joined the Connecticut forces in the campaign on the Connecticut River.

Capt. Henchman marched down towards Boston from Hadley the last of June, and his letter, written on the way, describes the homeward march.

Capt. Henchman's Letter of June 30th, 1676

Our scouts brought intelligence that all the Indians were in a continual motion, some toward Narhaganset, others towards Watchuset, shifting gradually, and taking up each others quarters, and lay not above a night in a place. They brought in two Squaws, a Boy and a Girl, giving account of five slain. Yesterday, they brought in an old Fellow, Brother to a Sachem, six Squaws and Children, having killed five men, and wounded others, if not killed them, as they supposed by the Blood found in the Way, and a Hat shot through. These and the other inform, that Philip and the Narhagansets were gone several Days before to their own Places. Philip's purpose being to do what Mischief he could to the English. By advice I drew a commanded party under the conduct of Capt. Sill, viz. Sixteen files of English, all my Troop, and the Indians, excepting one File, being all we could make provision for; for what with the falling short of the Bread promised us, and a great deal of what we had proving mouldy, the Rest of the Forces had but one Bisket a Man, to bring them to this Place. This Party were ordered towards Watchuset, and so to Nashaway and Washakom Ponds, where we have notice Indians were and so to return to this Place. Where by your Honour's Letter that came to me Yesterday Morning, I understood that Provision was ordered for us; and which we found to our great Relief last Night, coming hither, Weary and Hungry. The commanded Party we left at Quonsigumon, where they intended to stay a while for the last Scouts we sent out: eleven prisoners we had in all; two of the oldest, by Counsel we put to Death, the other Nine the Commissary is ordered to convey to Boston, with Baggage, Horses and some of their Attendants for the Service.

DANIEL HENCHMAN

On June 24 there seems to have been a general settlement with all soldiers for service up to this summer campaign. Some were paid in cash by the treasurer, but mostly they were paid in part by the towns where they lived. The following lists probably contain most of the names of those who marched out and served in this campaign, with Capt. Henchman:

HTML by Debbie

Special thanks to Fred for his wonderful graphics.

You are the 3629th Visitor to this USGenNet Safe-Site™ Since April, 2001.

3419 Visitors before this counter was installed

[King Philip's War Index Index][NY][VT]