SOLDIERS

IN

KING PHILIP'S WAR

 Chapter 20, Part VI 

Credited under Capt. John Whipple of Ipswich

June 24th, 1676

John Dodge

03

08

06

Marke Hascall

03

08

06

William Smith

03

07

00

Richard Child

03

08

06

Thomas Leaver

03

08

06

Samuel Smith

03

08

06

Daniel Wycome, Qr. Mr.

05

02

09

Joseph Cask

03

08

06

John Rayment

03

00

00

Thadeus Berry

03

08

06

Moses Cleaveland

03

08

06

John Sawin

03

08

06

John Stone

03

08

06

Samuel Stearnes

03

08

06

John Wait

03

10

00

Samuel Cooper

02

01

00

James Tenney

02

01

00

Samuel Ladd

04

02

00

Christopher Palmer

04

02

04

Samuel Chapman

03

07

02

July 24th, 1676

Joseph Taylor

03

08

06

James Hobbs

03

10

00

Timothy Bread

03

08

06

William Dellow

03

08

06

Henry Kenny

03

08

06

James Lowden

00

10

00

Joseph Eaton

03

08

06

August 24th, 1676

Thomas Brintnall

03

08

06

Thomas Hodgman

00

17

00

John Whipple, Capt.

13

14

03

Edward Neland

03

08

06

Samuel Giddings

09

16

05

Thomas Andrews

03

06

08

Ephraim Fellows

03

19

00

September 23d, 1676

John Browne

04

02

00

CAPT. JOHN JACOB, OF HINGHAM, AND HIS MEN

Capt. John Jacob was the son of Nicholas, who came from Old Hingham, England, to Hingham, Mass., in 1633, with wife Mary and children John and Elizabeth; and there had Josiah, Joseph, born May 10, 1646, and four daughters. Nicholas was representative in 1648 and 1649, and died June 5th, 1657.

Capt. John, born in England, married Margery Eames, October 20, 1653, and had children -- John, born October 20, 1654, who, April 19, 1676, was killed by the Indians near his father's house, in what is now South Hingham; Mary, born March 21, 1656; Sarah, born Sept. 29, 1657; Benjamin, April 2, 1659. First wife died April 7, 1659, and he married, second, October 3, 1661, Mary Russell, daughter of George, and had Jael, born September 7, 1662; David, born June 20, 1664; Elizabeth, born April 11, 1666; Peter, born February 12, 1668; Hannah, born

December 26, 1669; Samuel, born November 30, 1671; Deborah, born May 15, 1674, died soon; Deborah, 2d, born August 8, 1677; John, 2d, born July 31, 1679; Lydia, born April 18, 1681; Abigail, born Nov. 13, 1683. His will, probated Dec. 31, 1693, names his twelve living children, four sons and eight daughters. He was very active and influential. His house was fortified as a garrison by order of the General Court, Feb. 25, 1676. He was in command of a foot-company of about eighty men at Medfield, when, on Feb. 21, 1676-7, the town was attacked by a large body of Indians and partially destroyed. There were, besides this company of Capt. Jacob, a detachment of twenty troopers under command of Lieut. Edward Oakes, and the "train-band" of the town, about one hundred in number. These were quartered about the town in the various houses, and there were no scouts about the town to keep watch and ward, and the enemy crept in and about the houses, and just before daylight, at a given signal, fired the detached houses, near which they had placed ambuscades, and when the people and the soldiers quartered there, rushed out, they were shot down. The main guard, stationed near the meeting-house, had a cannon which they fired several times, which alarmed the inhabitants and probably frightened the enemy, who fled across the river towards Sherburne, burning the bridge behind them, thus cutting off the slow and clumsy pursuit of the scattered troops. The fullest account of this affair is given by Major Daniel Gookin in his "History of the Christian Indians." He says the Indians burnt about forty houses, near half the town, and killed and wounded about twenty people. 

Among the killed was Lieut. Henry Adams, the military officer of the town. After the lieutenant's death, his widow Elizabeth had been taken to the house of the minister, the Rev. Mr. Wilson, near the meeting-house, and here a very sad and strange accident occurred; for Mrs. Adams, who had retired to the chamber, and was lying upon a bed just over the room below, in which Capt. Jacob and some of the officers and guards were gathered, was killed by the accidental discharge of a gun in the hand of Capt. Jacob, just as he was passing out of the house to his quarters, and having his gun "half-bent," i.e. at half-cock, the muzzle pointing upward, the bullet piercing through "the floor and mat through and through the body of the lieutenant's widow." He was with Capt. Johnson in the Narraganset campaign, and, on the Captain's death, was appointed to the command of the company.1 He was afterwards engaged during the winter, with Capt. Wadsworth, in guarding the frontiers from Milton to the Plymouth Colony bounds, Weymouth, Hingham and Hull being assigned in particular to Capt. Jacob. John, 2d, inherited his Narraganset claim. (1 It is probable that in the "Fort Fight" Lieut. Henry Bowen, if present, took the command after the Captain fell, as was proper, but Capt. Jacob was appointed to fill the place afterward, as were other senior officers, in the other companies.)

Credited under Capt. John Jacob, of Hingham.1

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