SOLDIERS

IN

KING PHILIP'S WAR

 Chapter 25, Part II 

Mrs. Rowlandson says that " of thirty-seven persons who were in this one house, none escaped either present death or a bitter captivity, save only one." This one was Ephraim Roper, above-mentioned.

Mrs. Rowlandson must be considered the very highest authority, as she was a part of the story, which she afterwards published, and which affords almost the only reliable information we have of the condition, plans and movements of the hostile Indians, during that dreadful winter of 1675-6. Her story is simply, yet graphically, told, and we learn many things about the habits and customs of the Indians, their ways of subsisting, treatment of captives, manners, dress, diversions, etc., which is nowhere else given.

Rev. Mr. Rowlandson sought the aid of the Council in his efforts to redeem the captives, many of whom were his own kindred. At first it was impossible to find any one of the friendly Indians, willing to venture as messengers among the hostiles, mainly because they had been so cruelly and shamefully abused by the English and were now confined at Deer Island, where they could not be accused or placed under suspicion. At last, however, one Tom Dublet, or Nepanet, consented to go, and was fitted and instructed by Major Gookin, and upon April 3d started from Cambridge, and returned with the answer of the Sachems on April 12th. The correspondence between the Council and the Sachems is still preserved, in part, though the original letters are lost. The messenger brought back word from Sam Sachem, Kutquen and Quanohit, Samuel Uskatuhgun and Gunrashit, Sagamores, and owners of the captives, that all the captives taken at Lancaster were well except the youngest of Mr. Rowlandson, who was dead. 

At last, after many negotiations by the faithful Nepanet, Mr. John Hoar, of Concord, who, more than any man in the colony, had the confidence of the Indians, accompanied by Nepanet, and another friendly Indian, "Peter Conway," and bearing the ransom, twenty pounds in money and goods, raised by several gentlemen for the redemption of Mrs. Rowlandson, met the Sachems near Wachusett Hill, and on May 2d received and conducted that lady to Lancaster, and the next day to Boston. The other captives were redeemed at various times and places afterwards.

The place where Mr. Hoar met the Sachems is well identified, being marked by a large rock called " Redemption Rock," a noble landmark near the ancient Indian trail, between Lancaster and Mount Wachusett, and in the present town of Princeton, on the easterly side of a beautiful valley, across which, in the distance, towers Mount Wachusett. The locality is known as " Everettville," from the name of an ancient family who have lived here for generations. In 1880, Hon. Geo. F. Hoar, of Worcester, a lineal descendant of the chief actor in this transaction, for the English, purchased the land containing this site, and set it apart for memorial purposes, and caused the following inscription to be placed upon the face of the rock:

UPON THIS ROCK MAY 2D 1676
WAS MADE THE AGREEMENT FOR THE RANSOM
OF MRS. MARY ROWLANDSON OF LANCASTER
BETWEEN THE INDIANS AND JOHN HOAR OF CONCORD.
KING PHILIP WAS WITH THE INDIANS BUT
REFUSED HIS CONSENT

The writer visited this rock and copied this inscription, May 13, 1896, in company with Mr. Edward G. Davis of Leominster, who secured several fine photographs of the rock and surroundings. The inhabitants of Lancaster fled from their town after its destruction, and were scattered among their friends in various towns nearer to Boston, but within a few years many had returned and begun the resettlement.

OTHERS KILLED OR TAKEN OUTSIDE THE GARRISON, IN THE SOUTH PART OF THE TOWN

John Ball

Elizabeth his wife, and their infant child

Jonas Fairbank,

and Joshua his son, aged 15

Henry Farrar, Ephraim Sawyer, aged 26, and Richard Wheeler

A man mentioned by Mrs. Rowlandson, but no name given

TAKEN CAPTIVE

Two of the family of John Ball, names unknown

CREDITED AT LANCASTER GARRISON

October 19, 1675

Peter Jennings

00

18

00

Joseph French

01

03

03

Walter Davis

00

18

00

John Nash

01

04

00

George Wiatt

01

04

00

Edward Young

01

04

00

Thomas Wenmon

01

04

00

Richard Grotis

01

04

00

Thomas Whitney

01

10

00

Henry Elliott

03

00

00

Joseph Birch

00

06

00

November 30, 1675

Michael Berstow

01

16

00

Stephen Parker

01

14

02

Palsgrave Wellington

01

16

00

Henry Salter

01

16

00

John Beare

01

16

00

Munnings Sawyer

01

16

00

George Wyatt

01

04

00

December 20, 1675

Thomas Wenmon

01

16

00

Walter Davis

01

16

00

Peter Jennings

03

07

08

Thomas Whitney

00

12

00

January 25, 1675-6

John Roberts

03

01

08

Stephen Fish

03

00

00

Nathaniel Hadlock

03

01

08

John Fitch

03

01

08

John Stanwood

03

01

08

Zacharia Eyres

03

01

08

Stephen Parker

03

01

08

Francis Nichols

01

10

00

Thomas Woods

00

18

00

Walter Davis

01

03

02

Henry Salter

01

08

02

Munning Sawen

01

15

02

Palsgrave Willington

01

15

02

Michael Bairstow

00

19

08

February 29, 1675-6

Francis Nichols

00

18

00

Thomas Marble

01

18

06

Edward Young

01

18

06

John Nash

01

18

06

April 24, 1676

William Pashle

04

16

00

June 24, 1676

Henry Sparkes

01

16

10

AT THE GARRISON AT BILLERICA

November 30, 1675

John Boyd

03

00

00

James Poply

03

00

00

Thomas Welch

02

14

00

Joseph Dowse

02

14

00

William Chapman

03

06

00

David Jones

03

00

00

December 20, 1675

John Gale

03

01

08

John Essery

03

06

00

Joseph Dowse

00

07

08

Joseph Low

03

01

08

James Poply

00

06

00

John Boyde

00

06

00

James Barnard

03

01

08

James Smith

00

07

08

Daniel Baldwin

03

00

00

John Fisk

03

06

00

Richard Satell

03

12

00

Stephen Coolidg

03

06

00

Nathaniel Livermore

02

14

00

January 25, 1675-6

Humphry Millard

03

18

00

Daniel Baldwin

01

19

04

Stephen Coolidg

02

01

00

April 24, 1676

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