BioM: Runzheimer, Karen L. #2 (1961)

Contact: Stan

Email: stan@wiclarkcountyhistory.org

 

Surnames: Redmann, Runzheimer, Parsch, Okubo, Olson

 

----Source: ABBOTSFORD TRIBUNE (Abbotsford, Clark Co., Wis.) 06/22/1961

 

Runzheimer, Karen L. #2 (17 JUN 1961)

 

Miss Karen Louise Runzheimer, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Walter Runzheimer of Colby, became the bride of Ray Redmann of Janesville, son of Mrs. Ida Redmann of Edgar, Saturday afternoon at 3:30 at Christ Lutheran Church.  The Rev. F. H. Sprengler performed the double ring ceremony and the Rev. Harold Parsch of Shawano, uncle of the bride, gave the sermon.

 

Mrs. Norman Parsch of the town of Wausau played "largo" by Handel as a processional wedding march and variations of "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God" as a recessional.  The Misses Barbara and Darlene Parsch, accompanied at the organ by their mother, sang "O Perfect Love" and "Take Thou My Hand."

 

The bride, who was given in marriage by her father, wore a gown of white embroidered organza with a fitted bodice featuring a scoop neckline outlined in sequin pearls, with bracelet length sleeves.  The floor length skirt had a front and back panel of embroidered organza and a chapel train.  A crown of seed pearls held her fingertip veil of English illusion.

 

On her white prayer book, given to her by her uncle, the Rev. Parsch, was a white orchid which had been flown to the bride by a friend from Oahu, Hawaiian Islands.

 

Attending the bride as maid of honor was a roommate at Whitewater State College, Miss Ellen Okubo of the island of Maui, to the Hawaiian group.  Bridesmaids were Miss Rose Redmann of Chicago, sister of the groom, and Miss Beverly Runzheimer of Colby, another sister, was the flower girl.

 

They were dressed alike in street length dresses of pale blue chiffon over taffeta with matching headpieces of taffeta bows and chiffon.  Their dresses were designed with cap sleeves, scoop neckline with a V in the back, and wife taffeta sashes.  They all wore deep blue crystal necklaces, a gift of the bride, and carried crescent shaped bouquets of pink and white carnations.

 

Daniel Redmann of Chicago was his brother’s best man.  Ned Redmann of Chicago and Lofton Runzheimer of Colby, brothers of the bridal couple, were groomsmen.  Ushers were James Runzheimer of Colby, brother of the bride, and Richard Olson of Minneapolis.

 

The bride’s mother wore a navy blue dress and the groom’s mother chose blue print.  Both had white accessories and a shoulder corsage of white carnations.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Runzheimer of the town of Hull and Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Parsch of the town of Wausau attended the marriage of their granddaughter.  The grandmothers were presented with corsages of pink carnations.

 

Supper at 5:30 was served at the church dining rooms for the 100 guests.  A reception was held at the village hall from 7 to 10:30.  Three aunts of the bride, Mrs. Ervin Weller of Marshfield, Mrs. Manuel Richards of Milwaukee, and Mrs. Norman Zarnke of Wausau served punch.

 

Guests at the wedding came from Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, St. Paul, Northfield, Whitewater, Frederick, Durand, Wausau, Shawano, Edgar, Marshfield, Medford, Loyal, Colby, Dorchester and Abbotsford.

 

Mr. and Mrs. Redmann left on a honeymoon trip to Canada and after July 5 will be at Whitewater.  Later they will be at East Troy, where the bride will teach English and dramatics to the high school.  She is a June graduate of the Wis. State College at Whitewater.

 

Her husband is employed at General Motors Corp. in Janesville.

 

 


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