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in those enterprises calculated to advance the welfare of the people. He has been prominent in local affairs, and in 1878 was elected a County Commissioner for the First District, to fill a vacancy, and discharged the duties of the office with such fidelity and good judgment that at the close of the term he was re-elected for the full term of three years. He has for years been a member of the School Board of his district. While Commissioner he succeeded in having a fine iron bridge built across the Nemaha at Elk Creek, and smaller bridges in other parts of the precinct. He also caused forest trees to be set out on the County Farm, besides a good orchard, and was instrumental in having an addition built to the house, an improvement which was greatly needed.
   Our subject, while a resident of the Dominion, was united in marriage, Feb. 24, 1843, with Miss Pamelia Libby, who was born in Upper Canada. This union has been blessed by the birth of ten children, six of whom are living, namely: Eliza, Richard J., Grace, William, Jane and George. Mrs. Curry was born Feb. 4, 1827. Her parents, William and Weltha (Townsend) Libby, were of English birth and parentage, and came to America about 1819. The father spent his last years in Quebec, Canada. The mother now lives in this precinct.
   Eliza, the eldest daughter of our subject, is now the wife of P. S. Dimmock, a book-keeper of Ness City, Ness Co., Kan., who also owns a half-section of land in that State; Richard J. married Miss Orpha Craft, and is operating his own farm in Ness County, Kan.; Grace is the wife of Frank Morley, a farmer and nurseryman of Ness City; William, Jane and George are at home with their parents. These children were given a good practical education, and in their career as citizens and members of the community will reflect honor upon their home training.
   Richard Curry, the father of our subject, was born and reared in the Scottish Highlands, and there married Miss Grace Carlyle. Later they removed to County Down, Ireland, where the father followed his trade of carpenter, and became owner of two good farms. He carried on agriculture extensively, giving employment to from eight to ten men. Selling out he emigrated to Upper Canada, about 1840, and worked at his trade of carpenter until his death, which occurred about 1866, when he was seventy-eight years old. The wife and mother had preceded her husband to the silent land, her death occurring in 1864, when she was about sixty-five years old. Their family consisted of twelve children.
   When Mr. Curry first settled upon the land which he now owns and occupies his nearest neighbors were a mile and a half away. He and his family lived in true pioneer style, denying themselves necessarily many modern conveniences and comforts, but probably were fully as contented and happy as the people of to-day, who have luxuries at their command. What neighbors they had were friendly and obliging, and all were solicitous for each other, both in sickness and in health. Mr. and Mrs. Curry were among the early members of the Presbyterian Church of Tecumseh, with which they identified themselves over thirty years ago, and to the support of which they have contributed in a generous degree. Our subject votes the straight Republican ticket, and keeps himself well posted upon matters of State and National interests. A view of his fine home and its surroundings is given on another page.
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Letter/label or doodleOBERT HUSTON, a leading stock farmer of Nemaha Precinct, also carries on general agriculture, on 160 acres of fine farming land, occupying a portion of section 25. His homestead is embellished with modern improvements, the pasture seeded with tame grass, and the fields laid off with neat and substantial fencing, three miles of this being hedge. The corn and other grain which he raises is mainly devoted to the feeding of his stock, which is sheltered in good barns and other suitable buildings. His son, Paul B., has a good home on the same farm, provided with a residence and the other necessary buildings, put up by our subject.
   The Huston family is of Irish ancestry, and Paul, the father of our subject, a native of County Derry, was born about 1785. He emigrated to America in 1790, with his parents, when a little lad five

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years of age, and they settled in Pennsylvania. Paul Huston lived in Cumberland County until 1821. Thence with his family he removed to Hamilton County, Ohio, and from there in 1826 to Logan County, where he improved a good farm from a growth of heavy timber, and where, at the homestead which he had built up from the wilderness, his death occurred in 1865. He had then reached his fourscore years. He married Miss Mary Carothers, a native of Pennsylvania. Of this union there were born fourteen children, Robert, our subject, being the third, and twelve lived to mature years. The wife and mother, who was born in 1801, died at her home in Ohio in 1872. She was the daughter of Andrew Carothers, a steady-going Pennsylvania farmer, who spent his last years in Pennsylvania. Paul Huston and his wife identified themselves with the Presbyterian Church, in which the father was particularly active, being one of its Ruling Elders for many years, and Superintendent of the Sunday-school as far back as the earliest recollection of his son Robert. In fact he was a prominent man, capable, industrious and enterprising, and held many positions of trust and responsibility, besides serving as Justice of the Peace for many years.
   Robert Huston was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, Oct. 23, 1822. He was four years of age when his parents removed to Logan County, where he lived until 1872. He acquired a good practical education, fitting himself for a teacher, which profession he followed from the time he was seventeen years for a period of thirty years thereafter, with the exception of two years spent in the army. During this time he was the examiner of teachers for the county schools of Logan County ten years. and served as Justice of the Peace three years. At that period of his life he owned and occupied a farm near Bellefontaine, Ohio, and although not laboring upon it, superintended its operations.
   The second year of the Rebellion, Mr. Huston, on the 6th of August, 1862, enlisted in Company H, 96th Ohio Infantry, and was much of the time assigned to the duties of Hospital Steward. He was with his regiment during the siege of Vicksburg and the battle of Arkansas Post. After this he was discharged for disability, and after recovering his health he re-entered the service as a member of Company E, 132d Ohio Infantry, and was mustered out in October, 1864. This regiment served in Virginia, between Richmond and Petersburg, and our subject was frequently under fire. Although receiving no wounds, he suffered greatly from hardship and privation, from the effects of which he has never recovered.
   Upon retiring from the service Mr. Huston resumed teaching and made his home upon his farm until 1872. He then sold out and purchased a farm in Champaign County, Ohio, where he lived until the spring of 1880. Then selling out once more he crossed the Mississippi, and after looking around in the vicinity of Tecumseh, purchased the land which he now occupies, at $25 per acre. Since that time he has been continuously employed in its improvement and cultivation, and has four acres of forest, besides a good apple orchard and the smaller fruits. He is mostly living retired from active labor, and sitting under his own vine and fig tree is enjoying the fruits of his early industry.
   Mr. Huston, on the 28th of September, 1843, was united in marriage with Miss Jane Campbell, of Logan County, Ohio, and to them there were born nine children, only five of whom are living. The eldest son, William H., was graduated from the Ohio Medical College at Cincinnati, and entered upon a successful practice in Scipio, Ind. He married Miss Sena McKenny, of Mason, Ohio, and they became the parents of two children--Sarah P. and William P. The career of this promising citizen was cut short at the age of thirty-seven years, his death occurring in November, 1882, at his home in Scipio, Ind. Miss Nancy Huston was married to John Zeigler, a boot and shoe merchant and manufacturer, of Champaign County, Ohio, and died in 1872, leaving one child, a son, Charles H. The surviving children of our subject are John A., George S., Noah R., Mary and Paul B. These are all married, and are all in Nebraska except one son who resides in Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Huston are members in good standing of the Presbyterian Church, of which Mr. H. has been a Ruling Elder for some time, like his father before him.
   John A. Huston married Miss Susan McDonald, of Seymour, Ind., and is engaged as a photographic

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artist in Auburn, this State; George married Miss Nettie Calland, is farming in Champaign County, Ohio, and is the father of four children--Samuel Robert, Mary F. and an infant; Noah married Miss Jennie West, of Ohio, and they have two children--Grace and Charles; they are living in Johnson County, Neb. Mary is the wife of John L. Jacka, a native of Cornwall, England, and a well-to-do farmer and land-owner of Nemaha Precinct; they have two children--Clifton J. and Paul. Paul B. married Miss Lillian Ashley, of Tecumseh; they have one child, a son, Arthur, and are living on a farm in the vicinity of Tecumseh.
   It will thus be seen that our subject is the grandfather of twelve children, a fact of which he is quite proud. Mrs. Jane (Campbell) Huston, the wife of our subject, was born July 9, 1821, and is the daughter of William and Nancy (Robertson) Campbell, of Rockingham County, Va. She lived there until ten years of age, then removed with her parents to Logan County, Ohio, where she continued to reside until her marriage. Her parents were natives of Virginia and spent their last years in Ohio. Their family consisted of six children. Only two are now living.
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Letter/label or doodleLBERT H. DOLLARHIDE, a veteran of the Mexican War, who worthily represents the industrial interests of Sterling as a prosperous and well-to-do farmer and butcher, was an early settler of this city, coming here in 1872, when it was a small, insignificant place, with but few houses and scarcely any business. He may well feel proud of the fact that he has aided in its development, and is still contributing to its material prosperity.
   Mr. Dollarhide was born in Marion County, Ind., in 1825, his parents being Absalom and Lottie (Brown) Dollarhide, natives of North Carolina. His grandfather, Asel, was born in Scotland, whence he went to England, and then came to the United States, spending his last years in Marion County, Ind. When our subject was about ten years old his parents removed to Louisa County, Iowa, where they died in 1852 and 1853 respectively. They were people whose sober, industrious habits and genuine worth of character rendered them invaluable members of the community where they spent their last years, and the highest respect was accorded to them. They had seven children, of whom our subject was the fifth. He was reared in Iowa, and was there married, Sept. 17, 1849, to Miss Nancy Wornstaff, a native of Iowa, and a daughter of Henry and Elizabeth (Wilkinson) Wornstaff. Nine children were born of that marriage, of whom seven are living, all married but one, and settled in life.
   Previous to his marriage our subject served in the Mexican War for about a year, from 1847 to 1848, proving to be an able and courageous soldier. In 1872 he came to Nebraska, accompanied by his family, and purchased eighty acres of land adjoining the town of Sterling, forty acres of which is still in his possession. He paid $1,200 for the entire tract, and in 1875 sold forty acres of it for $1,000 cash, thus making 66 2/3 per cent. on the original cost. Immediately after coming here Mr. Dollarhide turned his attention to farming and butchering. In the latter he has built up an extensive trade, which he conducts with good profit. In the meantime he has not neglected his farm, but has been constantly improving it, so that it is under good culture, and has a good house, barn and other necessary buildings, besides a good orchard. His home is comfortable and cozy, and supplied with all the conveniences of modern life.
   Our subject has been twice married. The wife of his early manhood died in 1873, leaving behind her the record of a good life, and her memory is cherished by many friends. She was a devoted member of the Presbyterian Church, as are also Mr. Dollarhide and his present wife. Mr. Dollarhide's second marriage, which took place in November, 1882, was to Mary E. Hutchison, a lady well meriting the respect of her family and friends, which is called forth by her numerous good qualities.
   Mr Dollarhide is honorable in his dealings, and upright in his daily walk, and the confidence of his fellow-citizens is accorded to him freely. He is prominently identified with the Sterling Lodge No. 70, F. & A. M., having been one of the seven charter

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members when the lodge was instituted in 1875. In his politics he is a stanch Republican, and has been ever since the formation of the party, having been a Whig before that. When Mr. Dollarhide first came here he had his share of pioneer hardships and discouragements, he having been one of the few that were in this locality in 1873, when the grasshoppers took possession of the harvest fields and made way with the crops.

[The DOLLARHIDE article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Marcy Billings <mabillings@home.com>.
Thank you, Marcy.]

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Letter/label or doodleLEXANDER EATON is one of the well-known citizens and farmers of Spring Creek Precinct. He is the owner of 160 acres on section 33, township 6 north, range 12 east. He was born in County Antrim, in the North of Ireland, on the 6th of August, 1830, and is the son of James and Mary Eaton, natives of that district, but of Scottish descent. There were seven children born to his parents, he being the fifth child and second son in the family. He was educated and bought up in his native country, where he continued to reside until he attained to man's estate. After leaving school, where he received good training, he engaged in farming, in which he became quite an expert and thoroughly capable.
   Before coming to this country our subject was married. This event took place on the 6th of April, 1860, the lady who then united her life's interests with his being Margaret Beggs, the estimable daughter of Hugh and Mary (Patton) Beggs. She was born March 5, 1837, in County Antrim, and until her marriage lived with her parents. To our subject and wife there have been born eight children, and the following are their names: James, Hugh, John, Eliza, Margaret, Matilda, Sara and Mary J.
   Giving up his farm in 1879, accompanied by his family, Mr. Eaton took passage at the port of Larne, County Antrim, on the northeastern coast of Ireland, and came to the United States in the steamship "Alabama," one of the State Line boats. Fourteen days sufficed for the ocean trip, and they landed at New York in October of that year. From the port of disembarkation they proceeded at once to Henry County, Ill., where they remained a few months, after which they came on to this county, where 160 acres of land was purchased, for which he paid at the rate of $5 per acre. Practically it was an unimproved tract at the time of settlement, but is now one of the best improved farms in the County.
   Our subject has served his school district as Director for four years, and was the first to be elected to the office after its organization. He has always taken an active, untiring interest in school matters, and in fact in all matters that look to the advancement of the interests of the community. Politically, he is a stanch Republican and has been from the first. With his wife, he is accorded hearty welcome in every circle of society, and enjoys the confidence and regard of the community. They take true interest as members of the Presbyterian Church in the matters connected therewith, and are of those who endeavor to make their profession and daily conduct synonymous.

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Letter/label or doodleROF. WILLIAM H. GARDNER, Superintendent of the city schools of Tecumseh, and Principal of the High School, is a very useful factor in his community, and has in charge those interests which are second to none. The educational system of Tecumseh consists of a High School and two ward schools. The former gives employment to six teachers besides the Principal, and inasmuch as the facilities for education determine in a large measure the standing of the community, Tecumseh has reason to be proud of her achievements in this line.
   The subject of this sketch became a resident of Tecumseh in the fall of 1885, when he entered upon the duties of his present position, which he has since discharged with credit to himself and satisfaction to the people, as evinced by their annual invitation for him to continue. A native of Lee County, Ill., he was born July 19, 1855, and there continued to live until reaching his majority. After being carefully educated in the schools of Illinois he entered upon the duties of his chosen profession as a teacher of a district school in his native county, and later taught two years at Elizabeth,

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Jo Daviess Co., Ill. He was next located at Hanover, where he officiated as Principal of the High School.
   Prof. Gardner first set foot upon the soil of Nebraska in July, 1881, taking up his residence first in Pawnee City, where he was Superintendent and Principal of the schools for a period of four years. In the meantime the High School under his charge increased greatly in numbers, and he graduated its first class in June, 1885. So successful had been his management, and his prospects for the future so encouraging, he purchased town lots and put up a dwelling, establishing a pleasant and attractive home. In 1879 he invested in land in Pawnee County. He has a farm of 225 acres in Mission Creek Precinct, which he built up from a tract which had been comparatively uncultivated. For a time this was devoted to stock-raising, but there is now raised upon it quantities of grain each year.
   In the fall of 1885 Prof. Gardner changed his residence to Tecumseh to enter upon the duties of his present position. He devotes his entire time and attention to his educational work, and is a leading light in the cultured social circles of this place. Religiously, he is a member in good standing of the Methodist Episcopal Church. About 1888 he identified himself with the Masonic fraternity. He is also a K. of P., and has held various offices therein. He takes little interest in politics further than casting his vote with the Republican party, and has not the remotest desire for office.
   The lady who has presided with grace and dignity over the home of our subject for the last ten years was in her girlhood Miss Lizzie Nesbitt, and was married to Prof. Gardner in Hanover, Ill.. July 3, 1878. Mrs. Gardner was born at Hanover, June 5, 1858, and is the daughter of John and Jane (Moffatt) Nesbitt. John Nesbitt was born in County Monaghan, Ireland, was of Scotch descent, and emigrated to America when a young man twenty-one years old. He settled near the then unimportant village of Hanover, and engaged in farming, residing there for a period of forty years. In the spring of 1883 he crossed the Mississippi, and taking up his residence in Pawnee City, this State, is now living in retirement upon a competence.
   Both he and his excellent wife are members of the United Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. Nesbitt has officiated as Senior Elder and been one of its chief pillars in Illinois. To our subject and his wife there have been born two daughters and two sons, namely: Gertrude, Minnie, John and Charles.
   Joseph Gardner, the father of our subject, was born in Steuben County, N. Y., July 9, 1822, and there lived until twenty-one years of age, acquiring a good education. Thence he removed to Lee County, Ill., where he first taught school, and subsequently purchased a tract of land, which he improved into a good farm and occupied until moving to Colorado. He engaged quite extensively in stock-raising, and was a prominent man in his community, officiating as Justice of the Peace for many years. In 1878 he removed to Del Norte, where he is still living, and dealing in real estate. The mother, Mrs. Hannah M. (Shaw) Gardner, was a native of Erie County, N. Y., and the parents were married in Lee County, Ill., in 1851. Of the seven children born to them, five are still living, and residents mostly of Colorado.
   Grandfather William Shaw was one of the well-to-do farmers of Lee County, Ill. The paternal grandfather of our subject was a native of New York State, and a farmer by occupation.
   Prof. Gardner has a pleasant home in Tecumseh, and hosts of friends. He keeps himself well posted in regard to modern methods of instruction, is an extensive reader and thoroughly devoted to his work, in which he takes pride, and in which he excels.
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Letter/label or doodleALTER C. ATKINS, a citizen of Sterling, is one of the leading stockmen and agriculturists of Johnson County, and is engaged with his brother in raising and dealing in blooded horses. He is a native of Livingston County, Ill., July 23, 1852, being the date of his birth. He grew to manhood in his native county, receiving a sound education in the public schools, and from his father a practical training in agricultural pursuits.
   The parents of our subject, John and Lucy (Gillett) Atkins, had seven children, of whom he and

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his brother A. B. and two of his sisters, Mrs. Flora Bridges and Mrs. William Eames, are the only ones living in Nebraska. One sister, Mrs. A. A. Potter, lives in Kansas, and one sister, Mrs. Dr. Miller, lives in Massachusetts; his brother J. H. is in California.
   Our subject staid at home and assisted his father on the old homestead until after he was twenty-one years old. He was then united in marriage to Miss Mary Putman, their wedding occurring Dec. 25, 1873. Mrs. Atkins is a daughter of William and Mary E. (Chambers) Putman. Her father died in Vermilion County, Ill. Her mother still survives, and makes her home with her. At the time of his marriage Mr. Atkins' father gave him a team of horses and a wagon, and his wife having a farm of 160 acres, they began their wedded life with fair prospects of a successful issue, as they also brought youthful health, sound intelligence, and unlimited energy, to bear upon the problems that would confront them upon their way. Mr. Atkins continued to engage in farming in Illinois until the spring of 1883. He then disposed of his interests in his native State, having decided to invest his money in Nebraska, and on its rich soil build up a new home. He selected Johnson County as a suitable location, where he could advantageously carry out his plans, and soon purchased a farm on section 1, township 5, range 9, situated about three miles south of Sterling. Some of the land had been broken, but there were no other improvements on the place. Mr. Atkins immediately entered upon the arduous task of evolving a fine farm from the wild prairie, and the few years that he lived there witnessed a great change brought about by his steady and well-directed industry. He erected a substantial dwelling, barn and other necessary buildings; planted an orchard of choice fruit trees, fenced his land and stocked it with good grades of cattle. He now has 640 acres of land in three different tracts, all well improved, and also owns his home in Sterling.
   In the fall of 1887 Mr. Atkins moved into the city with his family in order to engage with his brother in handling blooded horses. They have three fine, thoroughbred stallions, which they imported at a cost of $4,500, and are doing an extensive business. Mr. and Mrs. Atkins have established a charming and attractive home here, and the four children who have been born of their marriage complete the pleasant household circle, viz: Willie, E. and Winnie E. (twins), Fern and Clark.
   Mr. and Mrs. Atkins and their two eldest children are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and ever since they came here they have been among the most active in promoting the cause of religion in this community, and the are fore most in every good work. Mr. Atkins is Superintendent of the Sunday-school connected with his church, and under his influence it is growing in numbers and strength. Our subject takes an intelligent interest in political affairs, and is in full sympathy with the Republican party. He was elected Justice of the Peace for this precinct last fall, and is performing the duties of this office to the satisfaction of the public. This brief record of his life will show Mr. Atkins to be a man of rare energy and stability of character, whose every act is honest and straightforward, whose relations with society, the church and the home win the highest respect of those about him.

[The ATKINS article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Beth Atkins-Gatewood <pepper1@sunset.net>. Her genealogy research includes the surnames: ATKINS, BILLING, KRAUSE, MACY and SWITZER. Thank you, Beth.]

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Letter/label or doodleACOB ALDER. The farm of the subject of this biography is pleasantly located on section 21, Helena Precinct, of which he has been a resident for the past five years. He has carried on agriculture successfully and made a specialty of stock-raising, keeping good grades of cattle, horses and swine.
   A native of Franklin County, Ohio, our subject was born March 22, 1835, and is the son of Paul and Sarah (Francis) Alder, who are supposed to have been natives of Virginia. The grandparents on both sides of the house, it is known, were natives of the Old Dominion. Grandfather Jonathan Alder at an early day was captured by Indians, supposed to have been the Wyandottes, and lived with them for a period of twenty-four years. He spent his last days in Ohio.
   To the parents of our subject there were born eight children, four of whom are living, namely: Jonathan, a resident of Fulton County, Ill.; Alma, Mrs. M. Ronan, of Fairfield, Iowa; Hester, Mrs. Thomas Ronan, of Osceola, Iowa, and Jacob, of our

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sketch. The father died at the homestead in Missouri about 1849, when middle aged. The mother survived her husband a period of thirty-five years, remaining a widow, and passing away at the home of her daughter, in Iowa, in the fall of 1884.
   Our subject was a little lad not quite five years of age when his parents, leaving his native State, crossed the Mississippi into Carroll County. Mo., where he lived until a youth of sixteen years. Then with his mother and other members of the family he returned to Fulton County, Ill., where he attained his majority and engaged in agricultural pursuits, to which he had been accustomed from his boyhood. His education was necessarily somewhat limited, having spent his boyhood in a region where the schools were conducted about three months in the year, during the winter season.
   He has always availed himself, however, of instructive books and newspapers, and kept himself well informed in regard to current events. Leaving Illinois in the spring of 1871 he came to this county, and purchased the farm which he has since owned, paying therefor $1,100. This land comprised 160 acres, and has been cultivated since the time Mr. Alder came to Nebraska, although he did not settle upon it until April, 1882, having had his home prior to this on section 17.
   There had been little attempt at improvement at the time Mr. Alder purchased this land, there having been only thirty-seven acres broken, and upon it were no buildings. It is hardly necessary to state that it has taken years of persistent labor and a considerable outlay of money to bring the farm to its present condition. It now bears fair comparison with the homesteads around it. In addition to this property associated with the Alder estate there are eighty acres on section 17, the property of Mrs. Alder. This lady was prior to her marriage with our subject Mrs. Matilda Cox, and they were married at Knoxville, Nov. 21, 1872. Henry Cox, the first husband of Mrs. Alder, was one of the earliest pioneers of this county, having come to Helena Precinct about 1867 and homesteading the land which he left to his widow. He died shortly after his settlement here in the spring of 1872. Mrs. Alder was born in Ross County, Ohio, Oct. 13, 1847, and is the daughter of Goldsbary and Phebe (Loveloss) Holloway, who were natives of Virginia. Her maternal grandfather, William Loveloss, was a soldier of the Revolutionary War under the direct command of Gen. Washington. When Mrs. Alder was seven years old her parents, leaving the Buckeye State, removed to Knox County, Ill., during its early settlement, and where the mother still lives. Mr. Holloway departed this life in October, 1885, in Illinois.
   To Mr. and Mrs. Holloway there were born eleven children, and of the eight surviving the record is as follows: John continues a resident of Knox County, Ill.; Minerva is the wife of Peter Bombarger, of Helena Precinct, this county; Armal; Mrs. Alder was the next in order of birth; Jonathan is a resident of Knox County, Ill.; David is married, and holds the position of Superintendent of the Poor Farm of this county; Nelson and Lon are living in Knox County.
   Mr. and Mrs. Alder came to Nebraska in ample time to form an acquaintance with the hardships. and difficulties of life in a new settlement, and have witnessed many changes since their arrival in this county. Our subject has signalized himself as a liberal-minded and public-spirited citizen, giving his cordial encouragement to the enterprises calculated for the good of the people. He votes the straight Democratic ticket, but cares so little for office that upon being elected Justice of the Peace in 1887 he failed to qualify, making no effort to assume the office. He has, however, served as Assessor of Helena Precinct three years. To Mr. and Mrs. Cox there were born four children, three of whom died in infancy. The survivor, a son, Walter, now nineteen years of age, lives at the homestead.
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Letter/label or doodle OBERT M. ERWIN is one of the well-to-do agriculturists and stock farmers of Lincoln Precinct, and owns 170 acres of valuable land, situated on sections 13 and 18, range 11 east, township 5, range 12 north. He was born on the 21st of November, 1847, to Peter and Mary Erwin, at their home in Northumberland County, Pa., in which State the family had been resident for three generations. The great-grand-

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