NEGenWeb Project
Resource Center
On-Line Library
 
 

Border

246

JOHNSON COUNTY.

father of our subject came from Scotland, his native country, to America in the year 1775. Subsequently he participated in the cause of liberty in the War of Independence.
   To the parents of our subject were born ten children, seven of whom are living, viz: Christopher G., now in Denver, Colo.; Sarah K., the wife of Sebastian Detsch, of Mariposa County, Colo.; Alem B., of Nuckolls County, Neb.; our subject; John E. and Charles N., of Logan County, Kan., and Daniel R., of Nuckolls County, Neb. Those deceased are: William P., who was killed in the charge at Mission Ridge; he was at the time in Orderly Sergeant in Company E, 93d Illinois Infantry; Alfred I. and Mary J.
   When about four years of age our subject removed with his parents to Jo Daviess County, Ill., where they resided a number of years, removing from there to Whiteside County, where they made their home for three years. At the end of that period, and in the year 1865, they migrated to this State, and for a short time staid in Nebraska City. In 1867 they located permanently in this county, although several years before the father had become the owner of property here. In 1866 our subject went to Denver, Colo., remaining there for two and a half years. He then went to Laramie City, Wyo., returning to Nebraska in the fall of 1871.
   On Christmas Day of the year 1873, our subject was joined in wedlock with Ada E., the estimable daughter of Elihu P. Phillips. (See sketch of that gentleman upon another page.) There have come to Mr. and Mrs. Erwin seven children, whose names are recorded as follows: Angie M., born Jan. 12, 1875; Minnie C., Aug. 16, 1877; Robert P., Feb. 8, 1880; Hattie and Jennie M. (twins), Sept. 16, 1883; George A., Aug. 4, 1885, and Arthur C., May 10, 1887.
   The farm of our subject comprises 170 acres of well-cultivated and highly productive land. In connection with his farm he is running a sorghum mill, in which he manufactures 800 gallons per season. He owns forty head of stock of grade varieties, and has had no little success in the raising and feeding of cattle.
   Mr. and Mrs. Erwin are both members of the First Baptist Church of Tecumseh, and take an active interest in religious and general society matters. Our subject has been Treasurer of the church, and is greatly respected in that connection. He has served his district as Overseer of Highways, and is now Treasurer of the School Board of District No. 19, and in the fall of 1867 he was a candidate for the Legislature of his district. In politics he is affiliated with the Union Labor party. He holds membership also in the A. O. U. W., meeting with the lodge at Tecumseh. He is in intelligent, whole-souled and honorable gentleman, and this is generally recognized throughout the community, consequently there is accorded to him and his family general unfeigned regard.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleYRUS S. PHILLIPS, the owner of a beautiful farm on section 27 in Nemaha Precinct, some 300 acres in extent, and as this property evidences, a very able and energetic agriculturist, was born in Richland, Oswego Co., N. Y., on the 18th of April, 1828. There he made his home until 1845, and in the schools of his native place received his education. In the latter year his parents removed to Waukegan, Lake Co., Ill., at that time known as Little Fort. There his father purchased a farm and lived until his death, which occurred in 1848, after which his widow and our subject continued until the year 1857, operating it as before. There were five other children in the family at that time, Mr. Phillips, however, being the eldest and of sufficient age and experience to run the farm, to him fell the task of, as far is was possible, filling his father's place in the maintenance of the farm and home. These years were by no means easy to him, but they have undoubtedly left their imprint upon his character and the struggle which at the time seemed so hard has fallen out for his good and advancement. In 1857 he sold the farm and left the district, having lost all he had saved until that time through becoming surety for a friend. He was married, on the 12th day of November of the year 1856, to Miss Abbie Childs, of LaFayette, Walworth Co., Wis. There has been given to them one beautiful daughter, who

Border

Border

JOHNSON COUNTY.

247

received the name Lottie, and still resides at home. She received the advantage of an excellent education, and her home training has been all that could be desired.
   Upon leaving Lake County Mr. Phillips removed to McLean County, where he continued to make his home for about four years, then went to Linn County, Iowa, where he continued successfully from a financial standpoint. Here he remained until 1870, and then removed to Tecumseh, where he has resided ever since. He purchased the land he now owns while still in all the wild beauty of its virgin state and immediately began to work upon it, improving it as rapidly as he was able until all was brought into a good state of cultivation, and as both his theoretical and practical knowledge of farming are beyond the average he made rapid and most gratifying progress. To-day, without a doubt, it is one of the finest and best farms in the country. He has planted a very fine grove of trees, adding much to the beauty of his property. His orchard is both extensive, valuable and fruitful. Much attention has been given to the raising of hogs, cattle and horses for a number of years past, and considerable and unusual success has attended him in this venture. About sixty acres of corn is required for feed purposes alone each year, from which it will be seen that as a cattle and general stock raiser he is among those having large interests at stake.
   Mr. Phillips is one of the prominent substantial men of Tecumseh, and was elected County Treasurer on the Granger ticket in the election of 1873. His political principles, however, have always been those of the Republican party. His first Presidential ballot was given in favor of Fremont. While County Treasurer he made his home in the town and also while serving on the Board of Aldermen, continuing in all six years, in order that in addition to the better execution of official duties his daughter might have the full advantage of the superior educational facilities. Both in this district and in his more eastern home he has filled the office of Justice of the Peace. He served on the County Board of McLean County, Ill., and for six years was a member of the School Board of Tecumseh.
   Mrs. Abbie C. Phillips was born in Saratoga County, N. Y., on the 4th of May, 1839. This was her home until the year 1846, when, with her parents, she migrated to Wisconsin, where she resided until the time of her marriage. She is the daughter of William and Susan (Dake) Childs. Her parents were natives of Saratoga County. The occupation of Mr. Childs was a farmer. The family included five children, all of whom attained their majority and entered upon successful careers. He was of retiring disposition, and although frequently urged to accept office steadfastly refused to do so, with one exception, viz: that of Justice of the Peace, which he retained for one term. He was a well educated man and a prominent member of the Baptist communion, of which he had been a member from his youth, but even in the church and though ever ready and willing to engage actively is a worker, would have nothing to do with official positions. He departed this life March 18, 1865, his wife surviving him but a few days.
   Mr. Childs was the son of the Hon. Salmon Childs, one of the heroes of Colonial and Revolutionary days. He was a member of the New York Legislature, and for some years Judge of Saratoga County. He occupied a very high place in the regard of the people, among whom he occupied a prominent position. His son William was a Whig and had drunk deeply of the spirit, ideas and political principles of his father, for whom he entertained great affection and intense admiration, sentiments and feelings which he has handed down to his daughter. He was deeply interested and actively engaged in the campaign of Gen. Harrison. To his daughter he taught the campaign song: "Tippecanoe and Tyler too" which she has recently had republished.
   Moses Phillips, the father of our subject, was born in the town of Rupert, Bennington Co., Vt., and was left fatherless when but five months old, and at a very early age was thrown entirely upon his own resources. He was thus deprived of the usual educational opportunities afforded those who have the protecting, guiding care of parents. He, however, possessed much natural ability, and as he came to realize the necessity of mental training worked hard to that end, and made himself thoroughly well informed upon all general and practical

Border

 

Border

248

JOHNSON COUNTY.

subjects, and occupied a high position in the regard of his neighbors and friends. He was a man of fine character, and had the reputation of being preeminently a peacemaker.
   While residing in his native county Moses Phillips became the husband of Charlotte Ransom, a native of the same State. They moved to Oswego County. He was the owner of a good farm in Richland, Oswego County, one and one-half miles from the village of Pulaski and six miles from Lake Ontario. Their family included eight children, six of whom grew to years of maturity. This gentleman died at Waukegan, Ill., in 1848, after a residence in that place of about three years. His wife lived upon the farm he had bought near that place for two years, supporting her family by her own exertions during that period, when she remarried, becoming Mrs. Whitman, after which she removed to her new home at Honey Creek. Being again left a widow she was once more married, her husband being Ephraim Townsend, a native of New York, but residing near Barrington, Ill. She departed this life on the 1st of September, 1863.
   Elihu Phillips, the grandfather of our subject, was a native of Connecticut, and went through the Revolutionary War. Shortly after the close thereof he was married to Miss Elizabeth Spears, and made his home in Bennington County, Vt., where his family of nine children was brought up. There he died while yet comparatively a young man. His widow survived him many years, living to quite an advanced age. She finished the task of rearing her children, in which she had fondly hoped to have her husband's continued assistance, and it was her joy to see them enter upon careers at once honorable and successful.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleARREN S. DILWORTH, foreman of the Chicago Lumber Company, at Crab Orchard, a very capable and enterprising business man, is a native of Kentucky, born Dec. 23, 1841. His father, Lindsay Dilworth, was born in Guilford County, N. C., and his mother, Sarah (Simpson) Dilworth, was a native of the same place. Their family consisted of four children, of whom two only are living, our subject and his sister, Emily J., the wife of Green T. Simpson, who is working at the harness business in Adams, Gage Co., Neb.
   The parents of our subject removed from North Carolina to Brant County, Ky., and from the Blue Grass regions to Pike County, Ill., in the spring of 1857, and there Warren S. continued with them until nearly attaining his majority. On the 31st of July, 1862, he was united in marriage with Miss Tabitha A. Walker. In September following the two families came to Nebraska, and after a sojourn of a few weeks in Table Rock located on a tract of land one-half mile west of the present site of Crab Orchard. The late Civil War being in progress, young Dilworth laid aside his personal plans and enlisted in Company G, 8th Illinois Infantry, but on account of physical disability was compelled to accept his honorable discharge in less than a year. He encountered much hardship and exposure, and now receives a pension of $10 per month from the Government.
   Mr. Dilworth after coming to Nebraska never re-crossed the Missouri River, his residence in this county dating from November, 1862. He was Postmaster at Crab Orchard from 1864 to 1867, and from the fall of 1868 to the fall of 1885. He was then removed on account of being a Republican. He takes a great interest in the temperance cause, believes in prohibition and every other measure which shall tend to insure the well-being of society. The tract of land upon which he first settled when comng to this county has been transformed into one of its finest farms, and lying adjacent to the town of Crab Orchard, is quite valuable. A fine residence and substantial out-buildings add to the general attractiveness of the home, and indicate the cultivated tastes and ample means of the proprietor. The old Otoe Indian trail, leading from the reservation in Nebraska City, passes west of this farm.
   To Mr. and Mrs. Dilworth there was born one child only, a son, James M., May 4, 1863; he is a promising young business man and proprietor of the only jewelry store in Crab Orchard. In 1886 he was married to Miss Emma V. Beatty, and they have one child, Ruby Elfa, who was born Feb. 23, 1888,

Border

Border

JOHNSON COUNTY.

249

who has now two great-grandfathers and two great-grandmothers, and also two grandfathers and one grandmother, all living in the vicinity of Crab Orchard. Mr. Dilworth has officiated as Assessor of Western Precinct two terms. Religiously, he is connected with the Methodist Episcopal Church., and labored as a local preacher in years gone by, having traveled over a circuit two years. He belongs to the G. A. R., Post No. 69, at Crab Orchard. His farm comprises 120 acres of land, and he has four town lots in Crab Orchard. He operated his farm until 1884. He entered upon the duties of his present position with the Chicago Lumber Company in June, 1883. He retains his residence on the farm, but rents the land to tenants. Included in the family circle is a young lady, Miss Ida E. Clawson, whom Mr. and Mrs. Dilworth took into their hearts and home when she was a motherless babe of ten months, and with whom she has since remained. She was born Nov. 13, 1874, in Filley, Gage Co., this State. Her mother was killed by lightning at her home in the vicinity of Filley.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleOHN DERR, of maple Grove Precinct, has for the last twenty-one years prosecuted agriculture successfully on the northwest quarter of section 2, where he owns 280 acres of choice land. He is of German descent, his father, Boston Derr, having been born in Germany. His mother, however, whose maiden name was Mary Bradbury, was born in Scotland.
   The parents of our subject emigrated to America in their youth, settling in Indiana, and the father, during the Indian troubles of 1840, served as a soldier under Gen. Harrison. Upon returning to civil life he engaged in farming. Both parents died in middle life, when their son John was but a small boy. Their family consisted of five children, three sons and two daughters, all of whom are living, and those besides our subject are residents of the different States.
   John Derr, the fourth child of his parents, was born in Parke County, Ind., Feb. 28, 1828. After the death of his parents he became a member of the family of James Strain, with whom he lived until a youth of eighteen years. In the meantime he learned the trade of tanner, which he followed until reaching his majority in Indiana. He then migrated to Cass County, Ill., and worked at his trade about six years in Tannersville and vicinity. Later he engaged in farming in connection with his trade, and lived in Illinois until the fall of 1867.
   When twenty-four years of age Mr. Derr was united in marriage with Miss Matilda Hickey, the wedding taking place at the home of the bride near Chanlersville, Ill., in February, 1852. This lady was the daughter of James and Lutitia (Wilson) Hickey, who were natives of Bunker Hill, Tenn. They were the parents of four sons and four daughters, three only of whom are living, the two besides Mrs. D. being residents of Kansas and Illinois respectively. The family, about 1830, moved to Cass County, Ill., where the death of Mrs. Hickey took place in 1862, and that of her husband a year later.
   Mrs. Derr is a native of the same place as her parents, Bunker Hill, Tenn., and was born Nov, 15, 1829. She accompanied her parents to Cass County, Ill., and lived with them there until her marriage. Mr. Derr, besides carrying on the regular cultivation of the soil, has planted ten acres of forest trees, and has in orchard of 237 fruit trees in good bearing condition. Mrs. Derr, for a period of eleven weeks after coming to this county, never saw the face of a white woman. Their neighbors were very few and far between. She was consequently not annoyed by neighborhood gossip, or made unhappy over the fashions. The country around abounded in wild game, buffalo, deer and antelope being plentiful, so whatever their larder might have lacked in other respects, they were always supplied with choice wild meat.
   Mr. Derr labored early and late in redeeming his land from its primitive condition, and was prospered. He added to his real estate, and the land for which he paid $5 per acre could now scarcely be purchased for five times that sum. He has a good residence, barns and outhouses, and a fair assortment of live stock, including horses, cattle and swine. Life's comforts and enjoyments have been meted out to him in a generous manner, as

Border

 

Border

250

JOHNSON COUNTY.

the reward of his toil and sacrifices. The home circle was completed by the birth of six sons: Calvin J. is engaged at farming in Bates County, Mo.; John H. carries on farming in Maple Grove Precinct, this county; James, Alonzo, Joseph C. and Charles are at home with their parents.
   Mr. Derr, when a lad of about thirteen years, proudly carried a musket under Gen. Harrison during the Indian troubles of 1840. He cast his first Presidential vote for Zachary Taylor, and has since that time been a stanch supporter of Republican principles. He has never been an office-holder in Johnson County, but with his excellent wife is a member in good standing of the United Brethren Church, although reared a Presbyterian. He is a strict temperance man, never indulging in card playing, whisky or tobacco. In his comfortable home, surrounded by the good things of life, and enjoying the confidence and esteem of his neighbors, he is but enjoying the regard which he has earned by an honorable and upright career.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleAMUEL BERRIE, one of the worthy and representative citizens of Lincoln Precinct, residing on section 30, township 5 north, range 12 east, and owner of 200 acres there, is a native of Bucks County, Pa., where he was born on the 30th of August, 1815. His parents, Thomas and Susan Berrie, were of English and German a ancestry. They were the parents of eleven children, of whom the four below mentioned alone survive, viz: Peter and Moses, both in Montgomery County, Ill.; Elizabeth, who was married to E. R. White, a Mexican War veteran, now deceased; and our subject. Those deceased were named as follows: George, Hannah, Susan, Thomas, William, Catharine and John. By the father's second marriage four children were born, viz: David and Margaret, both of Montgomery, Ill., and Anthony and Mary A., deceased.
   Our subject was about six years old when with his parents he removed to Hamilton County, Ohio, where he grew up until he attained to man's estate. He was brought up on the farm and educated in the district schools, but it must be remembered that those were early days, and Ohio was in the then Far West, consequently his education was limited, and practically what has been done has been the result of his own ambition and effort.
   In the year 1837, and while yet a resident of Hamilton County, our subject was united in marriage with Lydia H. Moore, who presented him with eight children. One son only, William Henry, of Montgomery County, Ill., is now living. The other members of the family were named as follows: George W., Harriet E., Abner, Emeline, Albert, Susan M., and one daughter who died in infancy unnamed. William H. was in the 6th Missouri, Company 11, and served four years in the late Civil War.
   Mr. Berrie was married a second time, the lady of his choice being Mary S. Brown, widow of Hiram Brown, of New York. This event was celebrated at Hillsboro, Ill., on the 11th of May, 1852. Mrs. Berrie is a native of Hamilton County Ohio, and was born on the 12th of September, 1823, to Jacob and Agnes Swallow. Her parents had seven children, of whom two alone survive, viz: Eliza, the wife of William Williamson, of Montgomery County, Ill., and Mrs. Berrie. The deceased members of the family were named as follows: Isaac, Ereminah, Martha, Margaret A. and John. To Mr. and Mrs. Berrie have been born six children, whose names the as appended: Camilah and Joseph, both deceased; Frank C., Laura; Ella, who is the wife of George Grim, of this county, and Samuel G.
   From his early manhood Mr. Berrie has taken a deep interest in political affairs. He was one who helped to elect William H. Harrison to the Presidency. During that campaign he helped to build a Buckeye canoe, which was lettered off with buckeyes bearing the inscription, "Tippecanoe and Tyler too." This was put on a wagon, and drawn by six horses from Springdale to Hamilton, Ohio, a distance of six miles, and was the event of the campaign in that district. Shortly after that event he left Ohio for Montgomery County, Ill., where he lived until he came to Johnson County, where he purchased 200 acres of land, and settled to agricultural life.
   Mr. and Mrs. Berrie have for many years been active members of the Presbyterian Church, in

Border

Border

JOHNSON COUNTY.

251

which communion our subject was an Elder for four years, and still continues to hold office. In politics it is hardly necessary to say he is a stanch Republican. Through the years of their wedded life Mr. and Mrs. Berrie have made it a life of mutual, affectionate confidence, and have assisted each other in the endeavor to make and sustain a home, and bring up their children amid the brightest possible influences. They are held in the highest possible regard by a large circle of relatives and friends, who recognize in them such character and personal worth as entitle them to a position among the representative citizens of the county.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodle HALL HITCHCOCK, a young lawyer of rare talent and brilliant prospects, is Judge of the Police Court of Sterling, and by his wise and able rulings in that capacity, showing a sound knowledge of the law, has already gained for himself a name and place among the leading legal luminaries of Johnson County.
   Mr. Hitchcock is a son of the well-known banker of Sterling, Col. N. F. Hitchcock, whose biography appears on another page of this volume. He is a native of the great commonwealth of Ohio, born in Perry County, April 20, 1859. He was reared in the State of his birth, and there laid the foundation of a liberal education, attending the public schools, and later the High School of New Lexington, an excellent institution of learning, then under the management of the celebrated instructor H. F. Acker. Our subject was graduated from that school with honors, and a fine record for scholarship. At the age of seventeen he began his independent career in life, as so many of our eminent public men have done, as a teacher, and for some years was engaged in that profession in the Ohio schools. This, however, was but a means to an end, as he held steadily in view a strong purpose to become a lawyer, and he subsequently entered the law school at Burlington, Iowa, from which he was graduated after pursuing a thorough course of legal studies. He also fortified himself for his encounter with the world by a good, practical business education, obtained at the business college of that city, from which he secured a diploma in the spring of 1883 he accepted the Principalship of the Sterling schools, which position he filled very satisfactorily until his resignation in the winter of 1883-84, to become cashier of his father's (the Johnson County) bank. He continued to act in that capacity until July, 1887. He then turned his attention once more to the law, and in November, 1887, was admitted to the bar, and he has since devoted his attention exclusively to his professional work. The very month that witnessed his admission to the legal fraternity of Nebraska saw also his appointment to his present responsible position of Police Judge. His manly dignity, incorruptibility, clear judgment and learning, amply qualify him for this office, whose duties he is discharging with characteristic fidelity, and in a manner to win the encomiums of his fellow-citizens.
   Mr. Hitchcock was married, March 27, 1884, to Miss Flora Reed, a daughter of A. C. Reed. Her father was one of Sterling's pioneer business men, having established himself here in the general merchandise business at an early day. He died in September, 1885, leaving hosts of friends, as his character and disposition were such that none knew him but to love and admire him. A widow and six children were left to mourn the loss of a kind husband and devoted father. One child, Pearl, has blessed the happy wedded life of our subject and his wife. Mr. and Mrs. Hitchcock are among the leading members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and that their religion is a part of their everyday life is shown in many ways, especially by their friendliness to the poor and unfortunate. Mr. Hitchcock sympathizes with the Republicans in his political views.

[The HITCHCOCK article above was typed for NEGenWeb Project by Carole Williams <williams@sunet.net>. Thank you, Carole.

Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleLIHU P. PHILLIPS. This gentleman holds a leading position among the citizens of Lincoln Precinct of this county, and is one of the representative farmers and stock-raisers, and his residence and property are situated upon section 13, range 11 east, township 5 north. He is a native of Oswego County, N. Y., and was born there at Richland, on the 20th of June, 1824, to Horace

Border

 

Border

252

JOHNSON COUNTY.

A. and Susan B. Phillips, who were natives of Vermont. His paternal ancestry were of Scotch-Irish extraction, while upon the mother's side the family is of English descent, The history of the family in this country reaches back to the Revolutionary times, and the grandfather, Elihu Phillips, was a soldier in the War of 1776.
   To the parents of our subject there was born a large family of children, of whom but ten survive, viz: Susan, Lois, Amanda, Rebecca, Elihu P., Elam D., Cynthia, Jason L., Jesse F. and James R. Susan is a resident of Oswego County, and was married to Orlando Kent, now deceased; Lois, the widow of Omar Douglas, who is living in Franklin County, this State, as is also Amanda, who was married to John C. Delano, now deceased; Rebecca is the wife of George Gurley, of Pulaski, N. Y.; Elam is a minister, and resides in Oswego County, N. Y.; Cynthia, relict of Caleb Fobes, makes her home in Tecumseh; Jason is milling in the same county, as is also James R.; Jesse is in Oswego County.
   The subject of our sketch was reared in his native county and State, and there was instructed in the common schools and grow to manhood. From his boyhood he was conversant with farm life, being reared upon the home farm, and therefore preferred to make agricultural pursuits the occupation of his life. With the exception of thorough instruction, practical and otherwise, in the engagements of farming, he is chiefly self-educated, and has always given careful attention to reading.
   On the 20th of March, 1845, Mr. Phillips was united in marriage with Angeline Douglas, a native of New York State, and the daughter of Sanford and Clarrissa (Sanford) Douglas. Of this union there have been born seven children, of whom the following survive: Frank N., who now resides at Riverton, Neb.; Horace A., now of Loup County; Ada, wife of Robert M. Erwin, of this county; George S., of Lincoln Precinct, and John, who is at home. The names of the deceased children were Omar and Onias D.
   In the year 1855, accompanied by his family, our subject turned his steps westward, emigrating to Lake County, Ill., where he remained for about three years, and then went to Iowa and farmed in Jackson County until 1862. On the 15th of August of that year he enlisted in Company K, 26th Iowa Infantry, and the regiment became part of the 1st Division of the 15th Army Corps of the Army of the Tennessee, Gen. Sherman's old corps. He was promoted to the position of Corporal, which he continued afterward to hold. During the time of his army life he fought in sixteen battles, among which were those at Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, the siege and battle of Vicksburg and Kenesaw Mountain. There he was wounded, and, being generally incapacitated, returned home to Iowa on a furlough. At the expiration of that term he returned to his duties, rejoining the forces at Nashville, Tenn., and his regiment some weeks afterward, continuing in the service until his discharge, in June, 1865.
   Leaving Iowa in 1869, Mr. Phillips came to this county and settled at his present home. His farm comprises 120 acres of well-located, fertile land in a splendid state of cultivation. He formerly owned 320 acres, but gave a portion to his children. He is in every regard a self-made man, and is deserving of every possible credit for the efforts and determination that have so favorably resulted.
   The subject of this sketch has served in the office of Justice of the Peace continuously for Lincoln Precinct, which fact eloquently voices the sentiment of his fellow-citizens entertained respecting his character and personal worth. Politically, he is a member of the Union Labor party. He has always taken the greatest interest in building up and advancing the educational and other interests of the county and State, and has done what lay in his power to that end. He is a member of Hickathorn Post No. 49, G. A. R., at Tecumseh, and is at all times well received by his comrades. In the community he and his family are much respected and esteemed.
Letter/label or doodle

Letter/label or doodleW. MOORE, a prominent citizen of Sterling, was at one time the leading physician of this vicinity, but he has now retired from active practice, although he is still often called upon for medical advice by his old friends and patients. He comes of an old and well-known Pennsylvanian family, and is a son of Dr. James Moore, of that

Border

Prior page
Names Index
Portraits index
Views index
Next page

© 2000, 2001 for the NEGenWeb Project by Pam Rietsch, Ted & Carole Miller