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History of Lycoming County Pennsylvania
edited by John F. Meginness; ©1892

CHAPTER XLVIII.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

CITY OF WILLIAMSPORT AND BOROUGH OF SOUTH WILLIAMSPORT.

  WILLIAM F. PACKER was born April 2, 1807, in Centre county, Pennsylvania, son of James and Charity (Bye) Packer, natives of Chester and Bucks county, respectively. At the age of thirteen years he began learning the printerís trade in the office of the Public Inquirer at Sunbury. He subsequently completed his apprenticeship in the Patriot office at Bellefonte. He was employed as a journeyman in the office of the Pennsylvania Intelligencer at Harrisburg, from 1825 to 1827, of which Hon. Simon Cameron was one of the proprietors. He studied law at Williamsport under Joseph B. Anthony, but was never admitted to the bar. In 1827 he purchased an interest in the Lycoming Gazette, and associated himself with John Brandon in its publication. In June, 1832, he was appointed superintendent of the West Branch canal. Soon after retiring from the Lycoming Gazette in 1836, Mr. Packer, in partnership with Benjamin Parke and O. Barrett, established The Keystone, at Harrisburg. In 1839 Governor Porter appointed Mr. Packer one of the three canal commissioners of the State, and in 1842 the Governor appointed him auditor general. In 1846 he was elected a member of the House of Representatives from the counties of Lycoming, Clinton, and Potter, but by a mistake in carrying out the returns of a township in Clinton county, his opponent was returned as elected, and actually served the whole session before the error was discovered. Being a candidate the following year Mr. Packer was elected by a majority of over 1,500. He was chosen Speaker of the legislative body during his first term. In 1849 he was elected to the State Senate from Lycoming, Clinton, Centre, and Sullivan counties. Mr. Packer was a delegate to the Baltimore convention in 1835 which nominated Martin Van Buren for President, and also to the Cincinnati convention of 1856 which nominated James Buchanan. In March, 1857, he was nominated at Harrisburg for Governor of Pennsylvania, and was elected. His administration was marked by sound judgment and great ability. He died in Williamsport, September 27, 1870. He was married December 24, 1829, to Mary W. Vanderbilt, and to this union were born six children.

  OLIVER WATSON was for many years a well known financier and banker of Williamsport. He was a son of William Watson, and was born November 10, 1811, on Lycoming creek, Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. His mother was a sister of Col. John McMeen, an early and prominent settler on the "Long Reach" of the West Branch, a few miles west of Williamsport. When but eight years old William McMeen took young Watson to live with him. In 1826 the family moved to the forks of Pine creek, where the village of Waterville now stands, and there the subject of this sketch remained until 1830, when he started out to make his way in the world. He entered the employ of James Stewart to learn the blacksmithís trade, served two years, and then returned to Pine creek and attended school for some time for the purpose of acquiring an education. He made such progress in his studies that he was regarded as quite a good scholar, and in 1834 he taught school for six months in a building on the farm of Henry Tomb. He was then induced by the Hon. George Crawford, John Cook, and John Gallagher to take charge of a school near the residence of Mr. Crawford, where he taught until 1836. Mr. Crawford advised him to study law, and acting upon the advice of his friend, he went to Williamsport and entered the office of the Hon. James Armstrong. He made rapid progress in his legal studies, and was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in 1837. During the time he was reading law he served as clerk in the office of the county commissioners, but resigned that position in 1838 to accept the appointment of county treasurer, which office he filled in an efficient and creditable manner for three years.

  In 1841 Mr. Watson entered into partnership with Hon. John W. Maynard, and the law firm of Maynard & Watson was continued for seven years, and obtained a wide celebrity. In 1848 Mr. Watson retired from the firm and associated with him A. J. Little. This firm lasted for two years, when Mr. Little retired, and Mr. Watson practiced alone until 1856. He was then elected president of the West Branch Bank, an office he held to the close of his life. Besides the many other positions he occupied, he served as president of the Market Street Bridge Company for nearly thirty years. He dealt extensively in wild lands, and at the time of his death owned several fine farms. Mr. Watson was a successful business man, an able lawyer, and a shrewd financier, and acquired through the passing years a handsome competence. For some years prior to his death he was almost totally blind, and his extensive business interests were attended to by his devoted wife.

  On the 16th of November, 1843, Mr. Watson was married to Marietta, daughter, of Hon. David Scott, of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, president of the first board of State canal commissioners, and president judge of Dauphin county three years, and of Luzerne county for nineteen years. Eight children were the fruits of this union, two of whom died in early childhood. The six surviving children are as follows: William S.; Jennie, of South Bethlehem, widow of Charles Rawle; Emma, of New York City, widow of Dr. Charles Jones; Oliver, of London, England; John H., of Williamsport, and Thomas, of New York City. Mr. Watson was one of the founders of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, and filled the office of vestryman in that church for more than half a century. He was a stanch Democrat, but took no active interest in political affairs. He died at big home, immediately north of Williamsport, September 1, 1882, in the seventy-first year of his age. His aged widow is a resident of Williamsport, where she removed after the death of her husband.

  TUNISON CORYELL was closely identified with the progress and development of Lycoming county for more than half a century. His ancestors were Huguenots, who immigrated from France to America in 1665, landed at Perth Amboy, and settled at Scotch Plains, New Jersey, where descendants of the family still live. Emanuel Coryell removed from Scotch Plains to Wellís Falls, sixteen miles above Trenton, where he acquired a large amount of land and established a ferry across the Delaware river, known as Coryellís ferry. Here George Coryell, father of Tunison, was born, April 28, 1761. At the age of sixteen he entered he Revolutionary army, and served until the fall of 1780. In 1790 he married Charity Van Buskirk of Mifflinburg, Pennsylvania, and Tunison Coryell, the eldest of his children, was born of this union in the old ferry house, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, June 13, 1791. In 1793 George Coryell removed with his family to East Buffalo, Northumberland county (now Union), and settled on the property of Samuel Maclay. He was a carpenter, and erected many buildings in Buffalo valley, among others the old Black Horse tavern in Lewisburg. He was a captain of the Valley Troop in 1799, and was adjutant of George Weirickís regiment at Marcus Hook in 1814. He came to Lycoming county at one time, but returned to Buffalo valley, thence removed to White Deer valley, and thence to the vicinity of Hamilton, Butler county, Ohio, where he died about 1837. His wife survived him only a short period. They left four sons: Tunison; John; Joseph R., and Abraham; also several daughters, most of whom settled in Ohio and Indiana.

  The subject of this sketch was reared in the Buffalo valley, and his advantages for an education were limited to the schools of pioneer days. In 1802, when but eleven years old, he carried the mail on horseback from Lewisburg to Bellefonte, for a, short time. He afterwards clerked in a store at Milton, and in May, 1809, he came to Jersey Shore and clerked in the store of James Collins until the fall of 1813. In 1812 he borrowed $50 of John Bailey to start in the lumber trade, which proved a profitable speculation and was the beginning of his future pecuniary success in life. In the autumn of 1813 he located in Williamsport, and clerked in the office of Gen. John Burrows, prothonotary of Lycoming county, for several years. He was appointed register and recorder, and clerk of the orphansí court, in February, 1818 and served one term. In 1821 he purchased the Lycoming Gazette, and in two years built up the paper from 400 to 1,200 subscribers, retiring in August, 1823. He served as prothonotary of the county from January, 1824, to January, 1830, a period of six years. After retiring from this office he was engaged for some time on the public works on the North and West Branch canals, and took an active part in pushing those improvements to completion. He was one of the leading spirits in trying to got the government to build a national road through Williamsport, and also encouraged Peter A. Karthaus to construct two steamboats to ply on the Susquehanna and its branches. It was largely through his efforts that the Philadelphia and Erie railroad was built to Williamsport. In 1856 he was instrumental in organizing the Williamsport Gas Company, and for seventeen years he served as secretary, superintendent, and treasurer of the company. He was a director of the Northumberland Bank for a short time, and took an active part in founding the West Branch Bank, of which he served as cashier.

  Mr. Coryell was married, February 13, 1816, to Sarah, daughter of Gen. John Burrows of Montoursville, which union was blessed with three sons and three daughters, as follows: Jane, widow of John Gibson; John B.; George; Mary V,; Sarah, and Charles. Mrs. Gibson and John B., both of whom are residents of Williamsport, are the only survivors of the family. Mrs. Coryell died, March 24, 1869, after a married life of over fifty-three years. Her husband survived her more than twelve years, and died, August 8, 1881, in the ninety-first year of his age. Mr. Coryell possessed an active and remarkably retentive memory, and a strong taste for The collection and preservation of local history, on which he was a recognized authority until the close of his life. His mind was a storehouse of information, and he wrote much for the local press. Through his efforts a great deal of valuable data relating to pioneer days and trials have been preserved. In the later years of his life he published a volume of over 100 pages, filled with incidents and sketches of old settlers whom he had known personally. He enjoyed a wide acquaintance with public men, and was hold in high esteem by all who knew him. He presented a commanding personal appearance, was dignified in his manners, and sociable and kind to all. Owing to his splendid constitution and correct habits, Mr. Coryell lived to a greater age than is usually allotted to man, and few men of his time possessed to a greater degree the confidence of the community in which he resided for nearly three-quarters of a century.

  JOHN B. CORYELL is the only surviving son of Tunison Coryell, and was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1822. He grew to manhood in his native city, and there received a public school education. On reaching his majority he embarked in merchandising at Montoursville, was afterwards engaged in mercantile pursuits at Williamsport, has carried on the same business at St. Maryís, Elk county, for many years, and is recognized as one of the prominent and successful business men of the West Branch valley, Mr. Coryell has taken an active interest in promoting the welfare of his home. He is one of the original stockholders in the Savings Institution, and has been one of its directors many years. He was also a stockholder in the Lycoming Savings Bank, and has been a director in its successor, the Lycoming National Bank, since its organization. In connection with his father he assisted in establishing the Williamsport Gas Company, and is a stockholder and director in the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. The Coryell Flint Paper Company, now managed by his sons, John G. and Bingham, owes its existence to his enterprise and public spirit. He was one of the organizers of the Hermance Chemical Company and the Otto Chemical Company, the plants of which are located in McKean county. Mr. Coryell has always extended his aid and encouragement to every worthy project, and has given liberally of his means to the cause of religion and charity. He was married November 28, 1855, to Margaret, daughter of James Bingham of Williamsport, who has borne him three sons and one daughter, as follows: James B., attorney at law; Sarah, wife of John K. Hays; John G., and Bingham, all of whom are residents of Williamsport. Mr. Coryell has been a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport since early manhood, and has been one of the most liberal supporters of that organization. He has always been an unswerving, adherent of the Republican party, and is a stalwart in upholding its measures and principles.

  MAHLON FISHER was born, February 8, 1810, in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and died at his borne in Williamsport, December 28, 1874. Before he was sixteen years old his time was spent on a farm and in attendance at the schools of his neighborhood. 1t this period of life he began to learn the carpenterís trade, with no capital but unfolded talents and his unflinching integrity. With the broad world and its busy throng before him he marched without fear or favor into the contest and commanded the respect and confidence of all who knew him. In 1834 he married Mary A. Stires, who shared with him the trials and struggles of his early life, as well as the luxury and opulence of declining years, until 1873 when she died. In 1848 he abandoned his trade and removed to Stockton, New Jersey, where he engaged in an extensive grain and lumber trade with his brother, Johnson Fisher, until 1855, when he came to Williamsport. Having learned while living in New Jersey of some extensive coal and timber lands in western Pennsylvania which others had failed in an attempt to develop, he determined to risk his all, and became a third owner of the vast territory which he proposed to develop. His life thus far had been stamped with the seal of honor, and among the friends of his boyhood he had no trouble to find those who, with unstinted confidence in his ability, were ready to contribute and risk the means required to bring forth the hidden treasures of the forests which placed him, as well as those connected with him, in positions of ease and opulence. At the time of his death he was connected with many business inter-ests of Williamsport, being president of the Susquehanna Boom Company and the Valentine Iron Works. He was largely interested in the lumber firms of Reading, Fisher & Company, Teneyke, Emery & Company, and the planing mills of Reading, Fisher & Reading. He was one of the organizers and a director of the old Lum-bermanís National Bank, and was one of the original members of the Williamsport Land Company. He cast his first Republican vote for Abraham Lincoln, and served one term as county treasurer while living in New Jersey. He also held other offices of minor importance. Mahlon Fisher was the artificer of his own life, and was one of the few men who became rich and yet maintained a reputation spotless and unsullied. Truth, honor, and fidelity was the platform on which he stood firm and unmovable. His generosity was without stint. According to the sixth item of his will he provided that his executor shall invest $30,000 in Pennsylvania State bonds, and turn the same over to the trustees of the First Baptist church in trust, the larger part of the interest on said bonds to be paid to the widows and orphans of Williamsport who have been made such while residing in that city, regardless of race, color, or religious denomination. The interest has amounted to about $1,000 per year, and is distributed semi-annually by the treasurer of the Baptist church. Shortly after his death, the Lumbermanís Exchange called a special meeting and passed resolutions, expressing their sorrow, and their personal knowledge of his purity of life, his love of truth and justice, and the strict integrity which character-ized his business relations. He reared a family of seven children: John S., deceased; Annie J., wife of John E. Jones, Elizabeth, wife of W. H. Taylor; Will-iam S., deceased; Alfred E.; Mary H., wife of Dr. W. M. Du Four, and Charles B.

  JOHN S. FISHER, deceased, was born in Flemington, New Jersey, January 1, 1835, and died October 23, 1876. He was the son of Mahlon Fisher and a Democrat in politics. He received his education in the public schools of his native town, and early in life was employed as a clerk in a mercantile store. After removing to Williamsport in 1855, he occupied a position in the office of the firm of Reading, Fisher & Company for a number of years, previous to forming a partnership with John E. Jones, and engaging in the lumber business, under the firm name of Fisher & Jones. Mr. Fisher afterwards entered into a partnership with Lewis Jamison, with whom he was largely identified with the lumber interests of Lycoming county. In 1862 he was married to Miss Mary E., daughter of Alexander Jamison, who, accompanied by her uncle, Lewis Jamison, and an aunt, removed from Delaware City, Delaware, to Williamsport, in 4853. Mr. and Mrs. Fisher became the parents of four children: Edward J.; Lewis J.; May A., and Mahlon L. Mr. Fisher was a Democrat, and was prominently connected with the Masonic order as a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  ANDREW D. HEPBURN, son of James and Mary (Hopewell) Hepburn, was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, in 1786. His maternal grandmother was a De Normandie, and fled from France during the troubles between the French government and the Huguenots, and with one brother and sister, took refuge in England. She married an Englishman named Hopewell, and afterwards they emigrated to the United States. Here her daughter, Mary, married James Hepburn, and to them were born the following children: Samuel, who was one of the first lawyers in the State; James, a lawyer, and president of the Northumberland Bank, and also president of the Tidewater Canal Company; Hopewell, a lawyer at Easton, and afterwards judge of the Western district of Pennsylvania; Jane, who married F. C. Campbell, of the Williamsport bar; Mary, who married James Merrill, a lawyer and once a member of Congress; Sarah, who married James Armstrong, of Williamsport, a lawyer and afterwards judge of the Supreme court of Pennsylvania, and Andrew D. The last mentioned came to Williamsport when about eighteen years of age. At that time it was a mere hamlet, and a large part of the site of tile future city was covered by a forest. Shortly after locating here he commenced building, and the logs of which his dwelling was constructed were hewn from trees felled on the back part of the lot. The house was afterward weather boarded, and was quite a landmark until destroyed by lire some years since. This house contained the first ingrain carpet, and the first sofa brought to Williamsport. Mr. Hepburn engaged in mercantile pursuits, and was very successful, but after a time he gave himself to the care of his valuable and increasing property. He purchased and inherited large tracts of land, a portion of which, at the present time, includes a part of Williamsport. He was familiar with both law and medicine, and people were in the habit, as long as he lived, of coming to him for advice oil legal questions, which he never refused to give. Being a descendant on his fatherís side of the Scotch Covenanters, he was a Presbyterian, early attached himself to this church, and was an elder in the same for many years. He donated the site for the erection of the first Presbyterian church on Market street, and left a bequest of a building to be used as a parsonage. He was quiet and retiring in his manners, studious and literary in his tastes, of fine talent, and marked ability. There were few men in the community more widely known, or whose influence was more generally felt, and his pen was ably used in promoting the construction of the West Branch canal. He was firm and decided in his views when a question of right was concerned, and would have gone to the stake rather than sacrifice his principles, and when an object of want or distress was presented, he was ever ready to render assistance. He married at a very early age, Martha, a daughter of Thomas Huston, who served as a captain in the Revolutionary army. She was a sister of the Hon. Charles Huston, an eminent lawyer and judge of the Supreme court of Pennsylvania. Mr. Hepburn reared a large family, and died in 1862. Among his children were Judge Samuel Hepburn, of Carlisle; James H. Hepburn, of Jersey Shore; and Dr. William Hepburn and Andrew Hepburn, of Williamsport, all of whom are dead.

  ABRAHAM UPDEGRAFF was born in Williamsport, June 17, 1808. In September, 1799, his father, Thomas Updegraff, with his wife and two children, moved up the Susquehanna river in two canoes and located at Williamsport, where he established a tannery and followed that occupation the greater part of his life. At the age of eleven years Abraham was put to work in his fatherís tannery, where he remained for sixteen years. In the spring of 1934 he entered into partnership in the mercantile business with Jacob Graflus. In April, 1837, he bought the interest of his partner and continued alone for twenty-four years. When the West Branch Bank was organized in 1836, Mr. Updegraff was chosen a director, and served for ten years. In June, 1848, he became president and served in that capacity until 1856, when he resigned. In December, 1863, he was the prime mover in the organization of the First National Bank, and was its first president. He was manager in the first organization of the Williamsport Bridge Company, and remained such until his death. He was one of two persons who laid out the Williamsport cemetery in 1850, and was a prime mover in establishing Wildwood cemetery, of which he was presi-dent at the time of his death. He was for years identified with the lumber inter-ests, and was connected with the Williamsport Water Works. For over twenty years he served as president of the board of trustees of Dickinson Seminary. He was also for about ten years a member of the city council. In 1840 he and his wife became members of the Second Presbyterian church, and for a time he was superintendent of the Lycoming County Sunday School Association. Like his father, Mr. Updegraff was very liberal in his contributions to meritorious objects. His sound judgment, fine business abilities, correct dealings, and accommodating spirit entitled him to a prominent place among the people, and he was always greatly respected and highly honored. He took great care in preserving the memory of his father, and before his death he published a neat little memoriam, and placed therein a- portrait of him as a token of his filial affection. February 12, 1835, Mr. Upde-graff was married to Elizabeth Peterman, and to this union are living two daughters: Lizzie, the wife of J. M. Black, and Lucy L., the wife of James J. Gibson. Mr. Updegraff was quite successful in business, and died, April 17, 1884, leaving his family property worth many thousand dollars, the result of his upright and frugal dealings.

  HON. JOHN SMITH was for many years one of the best and most favorably known citizens of Lycoming county, and was a descendant of one of its pioneer families. He was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, January 27, 1794, on the tract of land originally known as the Rose farm, now Vallamont, a portion of which is now within the limits of this city. He received the rudiments of ail English edu-cation in the pioneer schools of his native township, and his early life was spent upon a farm. When about seventeen years of age he came to Williamsport, then a small village, and was indentured with Jeremiah Tallman to the shoemakerís trade. After acquiring a knowledge of the business he worked as a journeyman for several years. About 1821 he opened a shop of his own on Fourth street, and carried on the manufacture of boots and shoes for many years. In 1833, in partnership with Rev. Jasper Bennett and Joseph Williams, he engaged in the mercantile business on Third street, whence they removed in 1835 to a new store building on Pine street, the site of which Mr. Smith bad previously purchased. Here he conducted a very successful business for many years, or until retiring from mercantile pursuits. In the meantime he had purchased the Judge Cummings farm, and was extensively engaged in agriculture for several years. In 1848 he married Rachel, daughter of Joseph Williams, one of the pioneers of Williamsport. She was born, January 11, 1794, and for nearly sixty years she proved a devoted wife and mother. Three children were born of this union: Letitia W., who was twice married, her first husband being the Rev. I. T. Stratton, and her second, William Murray of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, who survived her; Thomas, deceased, and Susan T., wife of Daniel B. Knapp. Mrs. Smith died, December 12, 1876, her husband surviving her nearly eight years, and dying November 10, 1884, at the ripe old age of ninety years, nine months, and fourteen days. When twenty-one years of age Judge Smith united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and was one of the original members of the Pine Street organization. He remained steadfast in his church affiliations up to his death, and was recognized as a useful and honored official. In early life he identified himself with the Whig party, but upon the organization of the Republican party he supported Fremont, and subsequently Lincoln for the presidency. A few years later, however, he became dissatisfied with the policy and actions of the Republicans, and identified himself with the Democratic party, by whom he was elected, in 1866, one of the associate judges of Lycoming county. He remained a Democrat up to his death. Schooled in early life to know the real value of money, he accumulated through the passing years considerable real estate, which afterward became valuable. He was one of the corporators of the West Branch National Bank, and a director in that institution for several years. He gave liberally of his means toward the support of Dickinson Seminary, and throughout history and useful career he was held in high esteem by the best citizens of his native county.

  JAMES CUMMINGS was born in Tyrone, County Antrim, Ireland, July 24, 1774, and emigrated to this country when quite a young man. He had several brothers, among who was John, who became the second sheriff of Lycoming county, and served in that office several terms. James Cummings was twice married. His first wife was a native of Ireland. His second wife was Mary Culbertson, daughter of Andrew Culbertson, who settled quite early near the present site of the borough of DuBoistown, and was also one of the most enterprising men of that time. Mr. Cummings, after his second marriage, lived a short time in Newberry. He subsequently opened a hotel in Williamsport, which stood on the present site of the First National Bank. He established the first mail route in this section, and carried the mails in the first stage coaches leaving Williamsport and running up the river as far as Dunnsburg, and down as far as Sunbury. He died, January 22, 1820, while on his way from Washington, where he had been to look after some of his mail contracts. His wife survived him over twelve years, and died, August 18, 1832. They left three sons and one daughter. Thomas, the eldest, was born in Newberry, March 11, 1802, and died in Philadelphia, April 25, 1885. He married Lucy Ann Babb of Jersey Shore, and reared four children, one of whom, Lieut. Commander A. Boyd Cummings of the United States Navy, was killed at the battle of Port Hudson. Alexander Cummings, son of James Cummings, was born in Williamsport, Novem-ber 17, 1810, and attained high distinction as a journalist, politician, and legislator. He was a man of marked character, and enjoyed a wide reputation in newspaper and political circles. He served as Governor of the Territory of Colorado, and died, July 16, 1879, while United States consul at Ottawa, Canada. Andrew Boyd Cummings, the last surviving son of James Cummings, was born in Williamsport, but resided in Philadelphia for many years preceding his death. To him the city of Williamsport is indebted for the magnificent gift of Brandon park, named in memory of his only sister, Jane C., who married John Brandon, and died at Browns-ville, New York, September 13, 1840. This park will forever remain as a memorial of its generous donor, who cherished such an affectionate regard for his sisterís memory and the place of his birth.

  JAMES VANDUZEE BROWN, president of the Williamsport Water Company, and the Citizensí Gas and Water Company, was born in Hartford, Washington county, New York, March 2, 1826. His paternal grandfather, Amasy Brown, was a native of Rhode Island, and a descendant of the family that founded Brown University. He was a Baptist minister, a prominent political friend and supporter of Clinton, and a man of high standing and much influence. David Brown, father of James V., was a native of Washington county, New York, and a farmer by occupation, but later in life he engaged in the lumber business in Allegany county, in the same State. He was first a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and filled several prominent, offices in his native county. He died in 1866. He was twice married, and reared a family of fifteen children, ten of whom are living, as follows: Henry and James V., of Williamsport; Richard N., Daniel C., and Alfred S., of New York State; Stephen S., of Williamsport; Allen L., of Allegany county, New York; Orange S., manager of the Gazette and Bulletin, Williamsport; Sarah A., wife of Harvey H. Grotz, of Bloomsburg, Pennsylvania, and Charles F., of South Bethlehem, Pennsylvania.

  The subject of this sketch was the fourth son of David Brown, and was reared in Allegany county, New York. He was educated in the common schools of that county, after which he learned the printerís trade, at which he was employed from the age of seventeen until reaching his majority. He then, in connection with his father, purchased a flour mill at Angelica, New York, and in 1851 he went to Wellsville and engaged in the milling and mercantile business. He remained there until 1859, and then came to Williamsport and purchased the Updegraff and Herdic flour mill, which he operated until 1866. During this time the mill was burned, but he immediately rebuilt it. In 1866 he sold the property and devoted his whole time to the lumber business, in which he had previously embarked as a member of the firm of Thomas and James Thompson, which was merged into the firm of James Thompson & Company. He sold out his interest in that firm in the autumn of 1866, and became a member of Brown, Early & Company, and erected mills on Park street. He was connected with this firm until 1881, when he severed his connection with it, and has since been engaged in the lumber business in the West. Mr. Brown was one of the organizers of the First National Bank, and has been a director of that institution since it commenced business. In 1866 he became president of the Williamsport Water Company, and has since taken an active interest in its success. He is also president of the Citizensí Gas and Water Company, was one of the original stockholders in the Market Street Bridge Company, prior to the erection of the wire bridge, and is a stockholder in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company. He takes an active interest in the Young Menís Christian Association, and has contributed liberally to the support of that institution. He is an earnest and uncompromising Republican, and has served as a member of the State executive committee, but has never desired political preferment. Mr. Brown was married in 1860 to Carile C., daughter of Edmund C. Higgins, of New York State, but a native of Connecticut. He and wife are members of Christ Protestant Episcopal church, in which he holds the offices of vestryman and warden.

  MATTHIAS EDER, deceased, was born in Williamsport, December 15, 1801 son of Levi and Mercy Eder, natives of Germany and Scotland, respectively. His parents were among the pioneer families of Williamsport, and located on the present site of the new government building. Only one of their children is living, George, a cattle raiser, living in Texas. Our subject was early in life appointed a mail carrier from Williamsport to Muncy, and subsequently was engaged in operating a stage route, doing business under the firm name of Eder & Bailey, and having their stables located on the present site of the Market House. They did an extensive business and became the owners of a line of packet boats which were run on the canal for many years. Mr. Eder was also a stockholder in the Catawissa railroad, and was a contractor in the construction of a canal in West Virginia. He was one of the original stockholders of the Williamsport Water Company, was a charter member and director of the same, and was one of the original stockholders of the West Branch National Bank. Mr. Eder was one of the pioneer lumbermen of Williamsport, having been a member of the firm of Eder, Lentz & White, Eder, Ruggles & Company, and Eder, Housel & Deemer. He erected what is known as the Guy W. Maynard mills, the Reeder and Benedict mills, and several others on the river. He was a Democrat in politics, and died in 1885. Mr. Eder was married in 1859 to Mary T., daughter of John Foresman of Williamsport, who survives him. To this union were born three children: John F., Martha G., and Mary C., all of whom are living.

  JOHN F. EDER, bookkeeper and collector for the Williamsport Water Company, was born in Williamsport, June 23, 1861, only son of Matthias and Mary T. Eder. He was educated in the Williamsport high school, and was graduated at Lawrenceville, New Jersey, in the class of 1881; he assisted his father in business until the death of the latter. He is a stockholder and director of the Williamsport Water Company, and in 1887 was elected to his present position. He was married in 1890, to Lizzie, daughter of Charles B. Metzger, of Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, and to this union has been born one child, Marjory. Mr. Eder is a Democrat in politics, and has served as secretary of the city standing committee. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum.

  CAPT. JEREMIAH JEFFREY AYRES was born in Ulysses, Tompkins county, New York, in December, 1811. He received a fair education. When scarcely nineteen years of age he shipped on a whaler at New Bedford and spent a year and a half in the Pacific. In 1842 he settled at Williamsport and opened the first bookstore of the city, continuing in the business, with slight interruptions, for a period of about thirty-six years. In 1845 he was appointed postmaster of Williamsport, which office he held until 1849. In 1846 he wag appointed by the Lycoming Mutual Insurance Company as the first local agent of that corporation in Williamsport, and served in that capacity until 1869. He was again commissioned as postmaster in 1867, and served until 1869. About 1836, while a resident of Ithaca, New York, he was appointed captain of Company A, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth New York Militia; this gave him the military title he so honorably bore to the close of his life. In 1839 Captain Ayres married Miss Cordelia Derby of Williamsport. He died on the 24th of August, 1880, in the sixty-ninth year of his age. A wife, two sons, and four daughters survived him. Few men of his time were better known in Williamsport, or died more sincerely regretted. He was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian church.

  CHARLES STEWART, son of Alexander Stewart, was born in Nippenose township,. February 15, 1816. He received his education at the Kirkpatrick school at Milton, Pennsylvania, and became a civil engineer. In 1836 he was employed by the Williamsport and Elmira railroad, and finished twenty-five miles of the same to Ralston. In 1838 he was employed as rodman on the Pennsylvania canal during its construction, and in 1839 was appointed assistant engineer of said canal, which office he filled until it was abandoned by the State. He made the first estimate of work on the Sinnemahoning division, and was assistant engineer under Thomas Bennett in the construction of the dam near Lock Haven until 1842, when he was transferred to the position of canal repairer until 1846. He then went to Canada, where he built two lock foundations for the Buhorway canal of ton feet of water. In 1847 he was a contractor on the Hudson river, continuing two years, and on February 15, 1849, he and his brother, William, sailed for California, remaining until 1851 and building three reservoirs for San Francisco. In 1854 he took charge of the building of two locks and dams on the Monongahela river and the repairing of four old locks. In 1859 he made a survey for slackwater on the Big Sandy river, from its mouth to Peach Orchard, for the Peach Orchard Coal Company. In 1861 he surveyed the Little Pine, a branch of the Cumberland river, for a slackwater navigation company. In 1862 he built a railroad for Phelps & Dodge from. their mills on Pine creek to the canal. In 1863-64 he was engaged in the Dodge mills. He also built a dam on the Kanawha river, near Charleston, West Virginia. He married Susan, daughter of William Harris, who was once sheriff of Lycoming county. Mr. Stewart died, December 26, 1889, a prominent member of the Second Presbyterian church. He was a Republican in politics, served as city engineer of Williamsport for twenty years, was secretary and treasurer of the Williamsport Bridge Company for many years, was treasurer of Wildwood cemetery for some years, and was a director in the First National Bank of Williamsport. His only child, Joseph G. Stewart, of Williamsport, was born in Woodward township, May 28, 1854. He was educated in the public schools, Dickinson Seminary, and the Williamsport Commercial College. He is a civil engineer by profession, has followed that occupation for many years, and after the death of his father he was secretary and treasurer of the Williamsport Bridge Company until it was sold to the county. He has also been assistant city engineer of Williamsport, is a stockholder in the First National Bank, and is a Republican in politics. He was married in 1886 to Anna, daughter of Robert Gibson, and to this union have been born two children: Sarah and Charles.

  JOHN GIBSON was a son of John Gibson, a native of Ireland, who after serving in the British army in the American Revolution, returned to his native country. He was born, July 1, 1774, and emigrated to America in 1801. He married, December 17, 1802, Elizabeth Ramsey, born May 24, 1775, and soon after removed with her from Peach Bottom, Maryland, to Lycoming county, settling in Susquehanna township, He died, September 17, 1847, and she died, July 5, 1846. Their children were as follows: Mary, who was born December 11, 1803, and died December 22, 1885; Elizabeth, who was born March 2, 1805, and married Robert Smith; James, who was born March 30, 1807, and died April 30, 1808; Letitia J., who was born March 17, 1810, married Charles Borrows, and died December 8, 1832; John, who was born October 28, 1811, and died October 29, 1831; Nancy N., who was born April 26, 1814, became the second wife of Charles Borrows, and died January 7, 1891; William H., born July 13, 1816; Robert R., who was born July 20, 1818, married Sarah Hyndwan, January 16, 1851, and was the father of seven children: John R.; Alexander; Mary E.; William A.; Robert, deceased; Annie H., and Robert H.

  SAMUEL GIBSON was the eldest son of John, Sr., and Mary (Henderson) Gibson, who were the parents of seven children: Samuel; William; John; James; Robert; Elizabeth, and Mary. He brought his parents to America and they died at the home of their son, John Gibson, and were buried in the family graveyard on the farm now owned by Robert Gibson, Samuel married a Miss Vandyke and to them were born four children: John; Mary; Elizabeth, and Jane. He and his son John settled in St. Joseph county, Michigan, where many descendants are yet living.

  WILLIAM GIBSON, son of John and Mary (Henderson) Gibson, was born in Ireland, February 14, 1769, emigrated to America about 1802, married Mary Ramsey in 1803, and removed with her from Peach Bottom, Maryland, to Lycoming county, locating for a while along, the banks of Larryís creek, and finally settling in Armstrong township, where Mrs. Gibson died, March 13, 1836. Mr. Gibson was again married, to Mancy Jamison. By his first wife there were three children: Elizabeth, who was born in 1804, married James Warren, and died in 1841; Mary, who was born September 1, 1805, and married Ralph Elliot, and John, born July 15, 1807.

  JOHN GIBSON, Son Of William Gibson, was married, February 24, 1842, to Jane B., daughter of Tunison Coryell, and to them were born eight children: Sarah C., who married George W. Parsons and became the mother of four children; Jean G. : Marcia; Florence C., and John G.; William, born September 15, 1844, who married June 11, 1872, Alice Otto, and has seven children: Otto C., deceased; James E.; Clara M.; Fred W.; Ralph; William, and Alice; James J., born in 1846, who was married, October 30, 1876, to Lucy, daughter of Abraham Updegraff, and has two children: Abraham and Elizabeth; Mary C., who was born January 11, 1849, and died December 11, 1860; John C., who was born September 9, 18,50, was a farmer for years, is a member of the firm of Thompson, Gibson & Company, and is married to Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel Jones, and has three children: John; Samuel, and Charles; Elizabeth, who was born August 15, 1853, and died September 8, 1855 Robert W., born September 28, 1855, married March 5, 1879, Isabella Baker, and has two children: Charles B. and Elizabeth B.; Charles C., who was born May 27, 1858, was clerk in the First National Bank of Williamsport for some time, and is now treasurer of the Lycoming Suspender Company. John Gibson was a farmer during his lifetime, and filled many township offices. He was one of the moving spirits in erecting the first bridge across the Susquehanna river; was an original director of Loyalsock Gap Turnpike Company, and president of the same at the time of his death, March 8, 1885; was a stockholder and director in the First National and West Branch Banks, and was a stockholder and director of the Williamsport Gas Company. He was a Whig and Republican, took a deep interest in schools, and with his wife belonged to the First Presbyterian church.

  JAMES GIBSON, son of John and Mary (Henderson) Gibson, was born in Ireland. He married Susan Coffin, and they were the parents of nine children: Samuel; James; Ira C.; Andrew; William; Mary; Susan; Henrietta, and Margaret. Mr. Gibson died in 1864, and his wife died about 1845. He was a Democrat in politics, and belonged to the Presbyterian church. His son, Ira, a coal dealer, was born, March 4, 1825, in Susquehanna township. He married Rachel Bennett in 1852 and to this union were born four children: Charles; James; Ida, and Carrie.

  WILLIAM AND JAMES J. GIBSON, sons of John and Jane B. (Coryell) Gibson, were educated at Dickinson Seminary, and Hudson River Institute at Claverack, New York, the former taking also a course in the American Business College at Springfield, Massachusetts. Returning home, William was employed for two years by Edward Lippincott, a lumberman operating in Rose valley. He then became financially interested in saw mills, with Mr. Lippincott for two years. He and James made their first venture in business by investing $35 each in Williamsport gas stock, and soon after William sold his interest in the saw mills. They became members of the firm of Harrison, Gibson & Company, wholesale stationery, wallpaper, and oils. They subsequently sold, and purchased W. R. Vanderbeltís interest in D. S. Andrus & Companyís music store, of which James J. is manager at the present time. Soon afterward they started the Williamsport Carriage Works, and now employ about twenty-five men. In 1882 they bought D. 13. Hubbardís interest in the Williamsport Furniture Company, of which William is secretary and James is president. William is a director and one of the organizers of the Williamsport Braid Company, begun in 1892 he was a director of the Williamsport Gas Company; is a director and an auditor of St. Maryís Coal Company; is a director of the Otto Chemical Company, succeeded his father as director of the Loyalsock Gap Turnpike Company, was a director of the Williamsport Bridge Company, is a director of the Lycoming National Bank, and is a director and president of the Keystone Plaster Company, at Chester, Pennsylvania, in which his brothers, James J., Charles, and John are interested, the last named being treasurer. William is also a director in the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, is one of the executors of the John A. Otto estate, and he and James J. are the executors of their fatherís estate. They are both Republicans and members of the Ross Club. William and his wife belong to the First Presbyterian church, and James J. and his wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church.

  ROBERT W. GIBSON was born in Armstrong township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 28, 1855, son of John and Jane B. (Coryell) Gibson. He received his education in the common schools and took a two yearsí course at Pennsylvania State College. In 1873 he embarked in the dry goods business in Pennsfield and St. Maryís, Elk county, Pennsylvania, with his uncles, John B., and Charles H. Coryell. In 1877 he became a member of the firm of R. W. Gibson SL Company, of Williamsport, and remained with the same through its change in 1888 to the firm name of Thompson, Gibson & Company, until he resigned, October 3, 1891. In January, 1892, he organized The Royal Braid Company for the purpose of manufacturing silk and cotton suspender and other braids. He was elected to the offices of secretary and treasurer, March 5, 1892. He was married March 4, 1879, to Miss Isabel L. Baker, of Farmington, Maine, and to this union have been born two children: Charles Blanchard, and Bessie Blanchard. Mr. Gibson is an active Republican, and with his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church.

  JOHN AND JANE HAYS emigrated from West Donegal, Ireland, in 1732 and settled in Northampton county, Pennsylvania, where the former died, November 16, 1789; the latter died in 1806 in Northumberland county. They were the parents of nine children; John; William; Robert; James; Francis; Jane; Isabella; Mary, and Elizabeth. All of the sons except William, who died young, were Revolutionary soldiers, and it is said that two of them were detailed to keep up the camp fires while Washington surprised the British at Princeton. John was the only one who remained at the original Irish settlement in Northampton county. He raised a company and marched with it to Philadelphia in 1776, and was afterwards known as Capt. John Hays. He was born in Ireland and came to America with his parents when two years old. He was married, October 16, 1760, to Barbara King, who died, August 11, 1770, leaving five children: Mary; John; James; Jane, and Elizabeth. Captain Hays was again married, August 13, 1771, to Jane Walker, who died, December 15, 1825, leaving ten children: Ann; William, Isabella; Robert; Thomas; Richard; Samuel; Mary; Joseph, and Rebecca. Of these, William served four years in the State Senate, was associate judge of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, and died in 1846, leaving seven children: John; Robert; Richard, Henry; Charles; William, and Jane. Robert, the second son of Captain Hays; died in Bellefonte, February 15, 1843, where he followed tanning for many years. He was the father of three children: William; Alfred, and Ellen. Thomas, the third on of Captain Hays, engaged in the manufacture of hats in Williamsport, and served as sheriff, prothonotary, treasurer, and register and recorder of Lycoming county. He married a sister of the late Judge Huston, and died in 1846, leaving eight children: Thomas; William; Charles; Jane; Mary; Sarah; Martha, and Isabella. Richard, the fourth son of Captain Hays, was for years engaged with his brother Thomas in the manufacture of hats in Williamsport, and finally purchased and settled on a farm in Lycoming township, where he served as a justice of the peace for twenty years. He married Christiana Ralston, and died, October 8, 1856, leaving four children: J. Ralston; Jane; Marian, and Isabella. Samuel, the fifth son of Captain Hays, settled in Erie, where he followed tanning and died, May 27, 1850, leaving five children: William; John W.; Jane; Catherine, and Maria. Joseph, the sixth son of Captain Hays, died in Northampton county, March 30, 1795. Captain Hays died at Meadville, Pennsylvania, November 3, 1796.

  John Hays, son of Captain John and Barbara (King) Hays, married Jane Horner, May 21, 1795, and soon after purchased land of his father in Lycoming county. They came to their future home in a wagon, and erected a cabin where their son, John K., was born. John Hays served as sheriff of Lycoming county in 1807, and died, October 9, 1821, followed by his widow, September 23, 1824. Their only child, John K. Hays, received such educational advantages as the times afforded. March 1, 1827, he married Jane Hays, who died, November 6, leaving two children: Jane and John Walker. May 31, 1832, Mr. Hays was again married, to Martha Grier, who died, April 8, 1867, leaving three children: James G. Martha Ann, and Henrietta. Mr. Hays was married a third time, September 24, 1868, to Mrs. Jane H. Teas, who died, November 25, 4875, followed by Mr. Hays, March 11, 1878.

  John Walker Hays was educated in the country schools and Williamsport Academy. He learned the tinnerís trade and was engaged in the tin, stove, and heating business from 1850 to 1880. His father was one of the original stockholders of the Williamsport Savings Institution, and since his death John Walker has taken his place on the board of directors. He is a member of the A. F. and A. AT., No. 106, and served as Master of the same in 1857. He is also a member and Past High Priest of Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, and Past Eminent Commander of Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22, K. T., and belongs to Adoniram Council, No. 26. He was reared a Whig, voted for Fillmore for President in 1856, and for Bell and Everett in 1860. He became a Democrat soon after this, and has since given his support to that organization. He was a member of the borough council, 1860-63, of the common council of the city, 1867-68 and 1877, and was a member of the Board of Health about ten years. He is an active member of the First Presbyterian church, and was a trustee for many years. Mr. Hays was married, May 17, 1855, to Rachel Allen, and to this union were born four children, two of whom survive: John K. and Jane. The first named was born, August 18, 1856. He was educated in Williamsport and graduated from Lafayette College in 1876. He read law with Hon. Robert P. Allen, and was admitted to the bar in 1879. He is an active member and trustee of the Y. M. C. A. He was married, June 25, 1885, to Sarah B., daughter of John B. Coryell, and to this union have been born three children: John C.; Walker A., deceased, and James B. Jane, daughter of John Walker Hays, married Charles R. Stearns.

  WILLIAM HARRIS was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, son of John and Susan (Scott) Harris. He was educated in the country schools. He married Sarah, a daughter of Jacob Grafius; they were the parents of four children: Catherine, who married Dr. A. S. Rhoads; Sarah S., who married Charles Stewart; Jacob G., who married Phoebe Shultz, and John, who married Mary White. Mr. Harris was a shoemaker by trade. He was employed for many years as a clerk in Mr. Grafiusís store in Williamsport. He served one term as commissioner of Lycoming county, and was elected sheriff of the county. He died, July 31, 1835, while serving, in the latter office. Mrs. Harris died, December 16, 1881. Both were highly respected by the community in which they resided So many years.

  COL. JACOB SALLADE was born in Nippenose valley, Adams township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania (now Crawford township, Clinton county), February 26, 1817. He is the fourth child and second son of Jacob Philip and Catherine (Showers) Sallade, a sketch of whom will be found in another chapter. His boyhood days were passed on the homestead farm, and he still vividly remembers a trip he made in the winter of 1822 with his father in a sleigh to Antesís mill, which stood near the mouth of Antes creek, and was the pioneer grist mill of the Nipponese valley. His birth place was the first farm improved in the valley, having been settled by John Clark in 1776 In the "Big Runaway" Clark was driven off by the Indians, but returned in 1784. Michael Showers, the maternal grandfather of Colonel Sallade, purchased this farm, and in 1817 it became the property of his son-in-law, Jacob Philip Sallade. In early boyhood our subject began assisting on the farm and in operating the, grist mill built by his father at Salladeís Gap, and during the construction of the Pennsylvania canal he worked for his father on that improvement. He was afterwards employed in boat building, and in erecting flour and saw mills at different points in the West Branch valley for several years. On the 10th of August 1837, he married Nancy Thomas, and the following year he settled on the old homestead, and successfully operated for a short time the saw mill erected by his father at that point. He purchased timber lands near Salladasburg, and followed lumbering and manufacturing, also erected houses, mills, etc., and engaged in merchandising and shoemaking quite extensively. He operated two saw mills on Larryís creek, and was one of the most active business men of that period and locality. In the autumn of 1844 he removed to Williamsport, but still carried on lumbering, merchandising, and farming on Larryís creek and at Salladasburg up to 1853. During this period he also continued contracting and building, and served four years as foreman on the Pennsylvania canal. He erected bridges, locks, mills, churches, etc., and in partnership with Levi Hartman built the middle portion of Dickinson Seminary. After coming to Williamsport his interests were many and varied. He was interested in a drug and bookstore, had charge of the telegraph office, was a partner of J. W. Mussina in the jewelry business, and operated a saw and planing mill for several years. In 1850, in company with Robert Baker, he bought the Jersey Shore Republican, and in 1860 removed the plant to Williamsport, and changed the name to the West Branch Democrat. When Sumter was fired upon he sold or leased his several properties, and went to Washington, where he served as agent in the quartermasterís department. In February, 1863, he was appointed a paymaster in the United States Army, with the rank of major, and was afterwards promoted to colonel, and held that position, with headquarters at New Orleans and Washington, until February, 1866, when he resigned and returned to Williamsport. On leaving the service Colonel Sallade received the highest testimonials from his superiors and comrades of his department. The originals are still in his possession, and a perusal of them will convince any candid mind of his efficient and faithful service and high standard as an officer. In 1866 he was appointed postmaster in Williamsport, and filled that position two years.

  Colonel Sallade was one of the original stockholders and directors of the First National Bank; was a director of the Savings Institution, and in 1869 helped to establish tire bank of Holden, Lentz & Sallade, which carried on a large business about six years. He was one of the projectors and builders of Larryís Creek plank road, and a director of that company for many years. Since the war he has been interested in several newspaper plants of Williamsport. In 1879 he purchased stock in the Gazette and Bulletin, which he sold and then purchased the Sun and Democrat. In 1880 he bought the Daily and Weekly Banner, amalgamated the two papers, and in company with his son, H. T. Sallade, under the firm name of Sallade & Son, founded the Sun and Banner, and published it for several years. He then sold the office, and has since devoted his attention to his large real estate interests in this city and county, and his farms in the West and in Virginia. He has been quite an extensive traveler, and has visited most of the States and Territories, besides Cuba, the British Isles, and the Continent of Europe.

  Colonel Sallade has always been a Democrat, and a prominent advocate of temperance. He has served two terms in the select council of Williamsport, and ten years as justice of the peace of Loyalsock township. He is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and takes a deep interest in all that relates to the defenders of the Union. In August, 1842, he united with the Methodist Episcopal church, and for the past fifty years he has been one of the most liberal supporters of that denomination, and has given generously toward the erection of churches, and educational and charitable institutions. He is a trustee in Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, and fills the same office in the High Street organization. He has been officially connected with Dickinson Seminary since 1856, and is one of the founders of the Preachersí Aid Society. He is also one of the organizers of the Y. M. C. A. of Williamsport, and a life member of the Association. Mrs. Sallade died in 1881, and the following year he married Mrs. Agnes Oliver. She was a member of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, and died December 30, 1891. No children were born of either marriage, but Colonel Sallade reared an adopted son, H. Torrence, since deceased. He has been a continuous resident of Lycoming county for more than seventy-five years, and is one of the best known citizens in the West Branch valley. His life has been a busy, useful one, and he has accumulated through the passing years a large and valuable estate.

  ADAM FOLLMER is the eldest son of William and Catharine Follmer, and was born on the homestead in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, May 19, 1820. He was reared under the parental roof, and received only a meager education in the log school houses of his boyhood days. He followed farming until 1843, and then removed to Williamsport, where he engaged in the mercantile business, which he continued four years. Since then he has been engaged in dealing in real estate, and has accumulated through the passing years a handsome competence. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming National Bank, also in the First National Bank, and was formerly a director in the first mentioned institution. He is a stockholder in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company, and the Lycoming Electric Company. He has always been a stanch Democrat, but has never taken any active part in political affairs. He was married November 10, 1842, to Catharine, daughter of Jacob Strieby, a pioneer of Loyalsock township. They have no children, and are spending the declining years of their lives at their home in Williamsport. They reared a niece, Clementine Strieby, wife of William E. Sprague, lumber dealer, of this city. They also reared Charles Oliver Patier, a relative of Mrs. Follmer, who went west before the breaking out of the Rebellion. At St. Louis, Missouri, he and William Wolf raised a company of which Mr. Patier was provost-marshal and subsequently captain. At the close of the war he located in Cairo, Illinois, and is a prosperous merchant. Mr. Follmer and wife are members of the Lutheran church, to which faith they have adhered all their lives.

  O. H. RANDALL was born in Oxford, Chenango county, New York, November 4, 1829, son of Orrin and Esther (Stafford) Randall, the former a native of Connecticut, and the latter of Vermont; both families were among the pioneers of Chenango, county. Orrin Randall was a soldier in the war of 1812, and drew a pension from the government. He married Esther Stafford and engaged in farming in Chenango county, whence they removed to Bradford county, Pennsylvania. They afterwards went to Missouri, where he took up a soldierís grant and settled upon it. At the breaking out of the rebellion he came to Williamsport, and died at his daughterís home in Canton, Pennsylvania, in 1863. His wife died in Missouri in 1860. Both were members of the Baptist church. They reared twelve children: Mrs. Caroline Smith, of Bradford county; Louisa, widow of Benjamin Minor, of Chenango county, New York; Mrs. Hannah Jones, of Norwich, New York; O. H.; Samuel, deceased, who served in Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers; Clorinda, wife of John Paulhamus of Hepburn township; W. J., deceased, who was a physician of Sullivan county; Howard, who resides in Texas, and served in the Confederate army during the war; Polly, a resident of Texas; Luther, who was a member of Company I, Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and died in Salisbury prison, South Carolina; Jabez, of Missouri, and Zinab, who was killed at Vicksburg, while serving in the Union army.

  The subject of this sketch was reared principally in Bradford county, Pennsylvania. In early manhood he worked at shingle making, and afterwards became connected with the lumber business. He worked for Peter Herdic, and rafted the boom with him for six years, and was connected with the firm of White, Lentz & White for thirty years. In 1854 he settled in Williamsport, where he has since resided, and is one of the few surviving lumbermen of the West Branch valley. In 1863 he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Fort Fisher and Petersburg, and the closing scones around Richmond. He is a member of Reno Post, O. A. R., is a Republican in politics, and has served as constable of Williamsport for one term. Mr. Randall was married in 1852, to Abigail, daughter of Abraham Case, of Troy, Pennsylvania, and has five children: Dr. William H.; Fannie, wife of Gottlieb Waltz; Josephine, wife of William Waltz; Mary, and George, all of whom are residents of Williamsport. He and wife are members of the First Baptist church, in which he holds the office of trustee. Mr. Randall is the owner of a farm of 200 acres in Clinton county and one of 300 acres in Lycoming county, to the management of which he devotes a share of his time.

  REV. THOMPSON MITCHELL was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1817, and is a son of George and Jeanette (Baird) Mitchell, natives of that county. His paternal grandfather, George Mitchell, was a native of Ireland, and immigrated to America about the time of the Revolution. He married a Miss Thompson of Centre county, Pennsylvania, and settled in Mifflin county, where the remaining years of his life were passed. George Mitchell was born near McVeytown, in the latter county, in 1784. He learned the blacksmithís trade, at which he worked for many years, and afterwards purchased a farm and became one of the substantial agriculturists of his native county. He married Jeanette, a daughter of John and Margaret (Wilson nee Boyd) Baird, the former a native of Ireland, and the latter of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. She died in 1842; her husband was again married, and Survived until 1860. The subject of this sketch was the third in a family of ten children born to George and Jeanette Mitchell. He was reared in Mifflin county, and obtained a fair education in the common schools of that locality. He remained on the homestead farm until 1839, when he entered the Baltimore Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church, and continued in the ministry up to the spring of 1884, a period of forty-five years. His first circuit was that of Carlisle in the Cumberland valley, whence he was transferred to the Shrewsberry circuit, and he was on the Shrewsberry and Kadorus circuits in 1842. In 1843 he was transferred to the Lewistown circuit. In 1844 he was located at Birmingham, Pennsylvania, in 1845-46 he had charge at Hollidaysburg, in 1847-48 of Bellefonte, in 1849-50 of Danville, in 1851-52 of Williamsport, in 1853 of Staunton, Virginia, in 1854-55 of the church at Columbia street station, Baltimore, and from 1856 to 1859 he was in the Northumland district. In 1860 he was elected president of Williamsport Dickinson Seminary, and filled that position up to 1869. He made many improvements in the curriculum of the seminary, and did much towards placing that institution on a sound financial basis. In 1870 he was appointed presiding elder of the Carlisle district, which position he occupied until 1874, and then returned to Williamsport, and was presiding elder of this district from 1874 to 1877. In 1877 he was appointed presiding older of Juniata district; in 1881 he was appointed pastor of the First Methodist Episcopal church of Altoona, and one year later he sought to retire from the active ministry. He was, however, assigned to DuBoistown, and served the church in that village without pay, until his final retirement from active work in 1884; he also contributed and helped the church entirely out of debt. Rev. Mitchell was a delegate to the general conferences held at Buffalo, Chicago, Brooklyn, and Baltimore, and was a member of the book committee of his church from 1876 to 1880. During his ministry he assisted in the erection of many church buildings in different parts of the State, and contributed liberally towards the Mulberry Street and the High Street churches. Mr. Mitchell was married in 1842 to Temperance, daughter of Samuel Turner, a native of New Jersey. Her mother was a Miss Kauffman. Five children are the fruits of this union, as follows: Jennie M., wife of Joshua Horner, of Baltimore, Maryland; Maurice Janes, of the same city; John H., an attorney of Pueblo, Colorado; Maud; and Max L., an attorney of Williamsport.

  MAX L. MITCHELL was born at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 23, 1866, while his father was president of that institution. He was educated at the high schools of Huntington county, and graduated at the head of his class from Williamsport Dickinson Seminary in 1885 and from Dickinson College in 1887, with high honors. He read law with Judge Samuel Linn, and was admitted to the bar in January, 1889. In July, 1890, he was appointed clerk of the United States court, which position he still holds. He is a stanch Republican; he is the present chairman of the Republican county committee, and was elected solicitor by the Williamsport school board in 1891.

  ALEXANDER SMITH was one of the prominent early settlers of Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, whither he came from Maryland at an early date in the history of this county. He was born in 1761, and served in the Revolutionary war. He married Rebecca Ackman, who was born in 1770, and coming to Lycoming county settled and cleared the farm now known as the Updegraff property. He died, June 25, 1836; his widow survived him until 1861, and died at the ripe old acre of ninety-one years. They were the parents of ten children, as, follows: Jane; Alexander; Letitia, who married James Knox; Joseph W.; Rachel, who married William Updegraff; Valentine; Elizabeth, who married John Eldridge; Rebecca, who parried David Showers; Maria, who married William Riddel, and Jane, born in 1814, who married William Stoltz. Jane is residing in Newberry, and is the only survivor of the family. Mr. Smith was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. For his patriotic services during the Revolution, he drew a pension from the government up to his death.

  JOSEPH W. SMITH, fourth child of Alexander Smith, was born on the homestead in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, July 29, 1797. He received a common school education, and afterwards attended the Williamsport Academy. He then engaged in teaching, and followed that vocation a number of years, finally settling on a farm. He was married in 1823 to Susan, daughter of Daniel Updegraff, one of the pioneers of Lycoming county, who came here from York county at an early day. Soon after his marriage Mr. Smith settled on a farm on the "Long Reach," which he cleared and improved. He died June 17, 1869; his widow lives on the old homestead. They were the parents of two children: Rachel, deceased wife of Samuel Jones of Williamsport, and Daniel, deceased. Mr. Smith was a Democrat, and served as register and recorder of Lycoming county one term. He was a prominent member of the Masonic order, and took an active interest in the workings of that fraternity.

  DANIEL SMITH was born in Newberry in 1827, and was the only son of Joseph W. and Susan Smith. He received a public school education, and afterwards engaged in farming, which he followed up to his death. He was married in December, 1868, to Jennie, daughter of George Good, of Old Lycoming township, and immediately settled upon the farm now occupied by his widow. He died there in February, 1881. He was prominent in the local councils of the Democratic party, and was also actively identified with the Grange movement. He was the father of two children: Margaret E. and Josephine M., who reside with their mother on the old homestead.

  MOSES MAHAFFEY was a native of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Thomas Mahaffey, a native of Ireland, who entered 600 acres of land in Lycoming township, this county, and was one of its earliest settlers. Moses grew to manhood in Lycoming township and engaged in the distilling business, which he followed several years. He married Mary Reynolds, whose father, David Reynolds, came from Orange county, New York, at an early date, and was the first settler on Trout run. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are living: Lindsey, of Williamsport; David R., deceased; Hannah, who resides upon the old homestead, and Elizabeth, wife of John Carothers, of Woodward township. Mr. Mahaffey was originally a Whig, and afterwards a Republican, and filled various township offices. He died in March, 1851; his widow survived until 1879, dying at the ripe old age of ninety-two years.

  LINDSEY MAHAFFEY was born in Lycoming township, Lycoming county, August 13, 1814, and is the eldest son of Moses and Mary Mahaffey. He was educated in New York State and at the Williamsport Academy. Locating in Newberry in 1836, he engaged in the mercantile business, at which he continued about twenty-four years; since then he has followed farming. He is one of the original stockholders of the West Branch Bank, and is now the oldest director in that institution, having served continuously for forty-five years. In 1858 he was elected to the legislature, and served one term, being a member of several important committees. He served in the common council several years, and since 1883 he has been president of the select council. He is a member of the school board of Lycoming township, and is a member of the Brandon Park Commission. He has always voted the Whig and Republican tickets. Mr. Mahaffey was married in 1849 to Sarah Jane, daughter of Ezra Riley, of Clinton county. She died in 1867, leaving four children: D. T. ; Ella, wife of Dr. Luther Otto; Boyd C., deceased in 1871, and Delos S. Mr. Mahaffey was again married, in August, 1886, to Mrs. Sarah Jane Straight, of Elmira, New York. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Newberry, in which organization he has served as trustee for many years. He was a delegate to the Republican National Convention which nominated Abraham Lincoln for President and is proud of having cast his vote for him. He was also the first revenue collector for his district, then composing Centre, Clinton, Lycoming, and Tioga counties, which position he finally resigned on account of the sickness of his wife, and recommended the appointment of George Bubb in his place.

  MAJ. JAMES H. PERKINS was born in South New Market, Rockingham county, New Hampshire, March 13, 1803, son of Robert and Deborah (Hill) Perkins, natives of the same county, and grandson of John. Perkins, of New Market, who was captain of a merchant vessel during the Revolution. His maternal grandfather, Gen. James Hill, was a native of Maine, born December 31, 1734. He was a boat builder, and served in the French and Indian war. He subsequently held the position of inspector and purchaser of timber for the navy department, and died in August, 1811. Robert and Deborah Perkins had a family of eight children, and died in 1814 and 1815, respectively. The subject of this sketch grew to manhood in his native county, his school and farm life ending at the age of seventeen, when he began to learn the millwrightís and machinistís trades in his native place. After mastering the details of the business, he followed it for several years in New Hampshire, a part of the time on his own account. In 1830 he removed to Philadelphia, where he was engaged in the erection of a calico print works. After the completion of the plant he worked in the factory as a journeyman for three years, and then became a member of the firm, under the name of Raugh, Perkins & Company, who bought the plant on time for $42,000, which they paid in four years. The firm then became Perkins & Wendell. In 1841 Mr. Perkins sold his interest to his partner and retired from business, with what was then considered a snug fortune. Finally tiring, of his inactivity, he came to Williamsport in December, 1845, and early in 1846 he purchased what was then known as "The Big Water Mill,"located opposite the island above the town. This mill had not been a success under its previous management, but Major Perkins went vigorously to work and soon built up a paying trade. He inaugurated a system of cash payments for labor, not in vogue in this locality at that day, and his immediate, ruin was predicted by many who looked askance at such an innovation. But with sturdy determination he followed it Lip by raising the wages of his employees, and though it was everywhere asserted that his speedy failure would soon follow, his experience and sound business judgement backed by with substantial capital, finally convinced his neighbors that his course was the wisest one, and that he knew what he was doing. He operated the water mill for several years, then sold it, and erected a steam saw mill at DuBoistown, which he carried on about fourteen years.

  Perceiving the necessity for a log boom in the river, Major Perkins urged its construction, but the project was not considered feasible by his contemporaries, and met with considerable opposition. With characteristic enterprise, and unflagging own confidence in the scheme he advocated, he finally offered to build a boom at his own expense, if the residents of this locality would petition the legislature for a charter. This very liberal proposition was accepted, and he went to work and constructed the first boom on the Susquehanna river, opposite Jaysburg, above Goose island, at his own expense, completing it in March, 1849. It embraced a system of sunken cribs, which proved a success and secured the entire confidence of the people. In November, 1849, a stock company was organized under the charter obtained through the persistent efforts of Major Perkins, in March, 1846, and the Susquehanna Boom Company then came into existence, and a new boom was completed in 1850-51. He was the leading spirit of the company for many years, and can justly be termed the founder of that institution, to which Williamsport largely owes its growth and prosperity. He continued in active business until 1870, and then retired to enjoy the competence which his many years of successful industry bad won. He is one of the few surviving pioneer lumbermen of the West Branch valley.

  Major Perkins was one of the charter members of the Savings Institution of Williamsport, and served as its vice-president for two years, then became president, and has filled that position tip to the present, a period of twenty-four years. He also has served as a member of the board of directors in the West Branch Bank since 1858. He was one of the founders of the Williamsport Hospital, and is president of the board. He assisted in organizing the Wildwood Cemetery Company, and has been one of its trustees from the beginning. His title was derived from his connection with the Twenty-fourth Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, of which he was elected major in 1842, while a resident of Philadelphia. Politically he was a Whig until the demise of that party and has since been a stanch Democrat, and served as mayor of Williamsport in 1871 and 1872. He was a member of the select council for several terms, and served as president of that body. Major Perkins was married, July 30, 1844, to Mary J., daughter of Joshua Smythe. of New Hampshire. She died, May 1, 1884, leaving no children. The Major is a member of Christ Protestant Episcopal church, and has been senior warden of that organization since 1853. He is one of the oldest and most highly respected citizens of Williamsport, where he has lived for nearly half a century.

  GARRET TINSMAN was for thirty-six years one of the prominent and successful lumbermen of the Susquehanna valley, and throughout his business career he was always recognized as a gentleman of modest, dignified character and sterling integrity. He was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, November 28, 1808, and was a son of Peter and Mary (Pursel) Tinsman, natives of New Jersey. His father was a successful lumber manufacturer of Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and at an early age Garret began assisting him, and thus acquired a thorough knowledge of the business. He afterwards engaged in lumbering and milling on the Delaware river, and at Milford, New Jersey, until 1843, when he removed his business to Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, and in partnership with Runyon Woolverton continued operations on the Lehigh river until the spring of 1852. He then came to Williamsport, which at that period was a small village, and contained only three or four saw mills, one of them being then in course of construction by his brother Peter. Here he found plenty of opportunity for the display of his untiring energy in the development of tile lumber industry, then in its infancy, and in the prosecution of this work he devoted the best years of his life. As a member of the firm of Woolverton & Tinsman he erected a mill on the site of the present plant of that firm, arid began a career in this city that continued up to his death with unabated success. In 1855 he purchased his brotherís interest in tl]e mill built by tile latter and George W. Quinn in 1852, and for a number of years the firm of Quinn & Tinsman conducted a very successful lumber trade. Many years later he was the senior member of Tinsman & Ryan, and was connected with that firm, also with Woolverton & Tinsman, Lip to his death, December 25, 1888.

  Mr. Tinsman was married, April 12, 1838, to Margaret S., daughter of Andrew and Annie (Sinclair) Saylor, natives of New Jersey. She was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and reared a family of four children: Peter I. and Andrew S., both deceased; Lina, wife of John R. T. Ryan, and Garret D. Mrs. Tinsman was a loving helpmate for over fifty years, and was consulted by her husband in all his business ventures, and his success was largely due to her wise foresight and willing assistance. Especially was this the case during the earlier years of their married life, and after his coming to Williamsport, when he laid the foundation of his subsequent success. She is spending the remaining years of her life in the old homestead, on East Third street, surrounded by the comforts which her husbandís industry provided. Mr. Tinsman was eminently successful, and accumulated through the passing years a large arid valuable estate. He gave liberally of his means to charitable, religious, and educational interests, and never refused his assistance to any worthy public enterprise. He was a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and contributed generously towards the erection of the present church building. Politically he was a stanch adherent of the Democratic party, and always manifested a deep interest in public affairs. Mr. Tinsman was a director in the Savings Institution, the Williamsport National Bank, and the Wildwood Cemetery Company, and was one of the organizers of the last mentioned corporation. He was one of the organizers of the Loyalsock Boom Company, and president of that company in 1857. For several years he was a large stockholder in the Susquehanna Boom Company, and can safely be classed as one of the pioneer industrial architects of Williamsportís prosperity, in which city he was a leading spirit in business, social, arid public circles for nearly forty years.

  PETER TINSMAN is one of the few living pioneers of the lumber interests in the, West Branch valley, and erected The first steam saw mill within the present limits of Williamsport. He was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, on the Delaware river, August 18, 1818, and is a brother of Garret Tinsman. He obtained in early manhood a thorough knowledge of the lumber business from his father, a successful lumber manufacturer of Hunterdon county, New Jersey. When comparatively a young man he left home and purchased timber lands in the vicinity of White Haven, Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, on which he erected a small saw mill. He carried on a successful business at that point until 1849, when he sold his plant to his brother Garret. In the summer of 1850 he visited the West Branch valley, and after several trips up Pine and Sinnemahoning creeks, exploring the valuable lands lying along those streams, he concluded to embark in the lumber business in Williamsport. On the 1st of January, 1852, he purchased from Thomas Updegraff a piece of land bordering oil the river, east of the Philadelphia and Erie railroad, and now owned by Mills T. Weed, and the following spring and summer Mr. Tinsman, in company with George W. Quinn, whom he had taken into partnership, erected the first steam saw mill in the town, which they bad in operation in the fall of 1852. The importance of the manufacture of lumber had about this period begun to create excitement in the little village, and every man either wanted a mill or an interest in one. Several mills were being built, and negotiations for mill sites were actively prosecuted. The years 1852 and 1853 destined Williamsport to be what it is to-day-the greatest lumber market of the East. Mr. Tinsman continued in the lumber business until 1855, when he sold his interest in his mill to Woolverton & Tinsman and wont to Reading, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the retail lumber trade. He was quite successful, and remained there until 1867, when he sold his business and returned to Lycoming county. In 1873 he purchased the steam saw mill of Alexander Davidson, across the river from Williamsport, but met with the misfortunes of the panic of that period, which wrought destruction throughout the country. He never engaged in active business thereafter. Mr. Tinsman was married in 1855, to Elizabeth H. Allen of Trout Run, Pennsylvania, and with his wife and family he still resides in Williamsport.

  PETER HERDIC was born December 14, 1824, at Fort Plain, New York. His father, Henry Herdic, died when Peter was eighteen months old, the youngest of seven sons. In 1826 his mother with her family removed to Ithaca, where Peter attended school for a short time. In 1830 his mother married a second time and removed to a farm, about five miles from Ithaca. From a small boy he displayed great energy and pluck. When but ton years of age he could cut his cord of wood a day, and, in addition, would frequently walk to Ithaca, to dispose of small game in the market. At an early age he acquired the habit of never spending his wages, except for what was necessary to his existence. At the age of thirteen his stepfather died. This second bereavement seemed to necessitate a change in their family affairs, for soon after his mother sold her interest in the farm and moved to the head waters of Pipe creek, New York, where she bought fifty acres of wild land for $200 making a payment on it of $50. A log house was temporarily rented and immediate efforts were made for clearing a patch of ground, on which a small house was erected for their own use. Here young Peter worked, clearing laud, cultivating their crops, and in every way aiding his mother until he was twenty years old. Soon after he hired out to Ransom Light, Ďwho was the agent of William Ransom, the owner of a saw mill at the head of Pipe creek. He worked six weeks, and made a demand for his money, which was finally paid after threats of suit were made. He continued to add to his capital by working for various parties. In 1846, when less than twenty-three, Mr. Herdic came with William Andress to Cogan House township, Lycoming county. Here they purchased a shingle mill and cleared about $740 each during the first year. In about three years Mr. Herdic had accumulated about $2,500. He then purchased a farm of 154 acres on Lycoming creek, erected thereon a modest little house, and, December 25, 1849, he married Amanda Taylor. In 1850 he erected a steam saw mill in company with Henry Hughes, whose interest he purchased soon after, and later sold to James Woods. He realized from his lumber operations and the sale of his mill upwards of $10,000.

  In 1853 he settled in Williamsport, then a town of less than 1,700 inhabitants, and from the hour of his advent down to the close of his wonderful career, his busy brain and restless body worked and toiled both for his own and also for othersí pleasure and profit. What he did, the vast operations in which he was concerned, and the turmoilís through which he passed, are too well known to the people to be repeated here. During the following ten years he had purchased hundreds of acres, built houses, saw mills and other manufactories, and given the town an impetus that sent it upwards with a boom that was the wonder and the talk of everybody. His first wife died, December 6, 1856, and January 12, 1860, he married Encie E. Maynard, daughter of Judge J. W. Maynard, to whom were born two sons : Peter and Henry, both of whom are living. He induced the Philadelphia and Erie Rail- road Company to move their passenger station to a plot of ground he gave them nearly a mile west of the old one. He built several fine houses on Fourth street, and close to the station, the Herdic House, now the Park Hotel. Blocks of buildings sprung up like magic, street railways, waving jobs, political jobs, manufactures, newspapers, gas companies, water works, banks, and stores grew up at once. Everywhere he was the busy, the mysterious, the energetic, the wonderful Peter Herdic. He was instrumental in getting a charter for the city of Williamsport. In the fall of 1869 he was elected mayor of Williamsport and he pushed many of his speculative operations with great vigor and sagacity. He acquired over 54,000 acres in Lycoming, Potter, Tioga, and Cameron counties, of which 21,000 acres are still supposed to contain valuable coal deposits. He built at his own expense Trinity Protestant Episcopal church and donated it to the society.

  Mr. Herdic continued in the successful tide of his operations until the panic of 1878. When the crisis set in he throw all his energy into his business, but not with standing his real strength and fertility of resource he finally went into voluntary bankruptcy in the spring of 1878. After passing through bankruptcy the spirit of the man began to revive, and in course of time he engaged in several enterprises which gave him active employment, and in later years he was largely interested in erecting water works at Selinsgrove, Huntingdon, Cairo, Illinois, Florida, and a few other places. Peter Herdic was a benevolent man, and there were many who sorrowfully mourned his death, which occurred February 2, 1888. His death was the result of an accident. While superintending the construction of water works at Huntingdon, he slipped on the ice and fell down an embankment, receiving a severe concussion of the head. His widow subsequently married Henry Rawle. Whatever maybe, said of the character of Mr. Herdic, and the methods he sometimes employed ill business, it must be admitted by all that he started Williamsport on the highway of prosperity.

  JOHN WHITE was for thirty-five years one of the prominent and successful lumber manufacturers in the West Branch valley, and throughout his long and active business career he was recognized as a gentleman of the strictest integrity. He was born in Lycoming county (now Clinton), Pennsylvania, November 4, 1818, and was the second son of Col. Hugh White, a pioneer of Pine Creek township, by his marriage to Mrs. Charlotte White nee Weitzel. His youth was spent amid the scones of the homestead farm, and he was educated in schools taught by John Austin and Rev. John H. Grier, two excellent teachers of pioneer days. He studied mathematics and theoretical surveying under Mr. Austin, and at the age of seventeen he left school and became a member of the State engineer corps, then in charge of James D. Harris, chief engineer, and thus acquired a practical knowledge of that profession. He assisted in the survey of the Tangascootac and Sinnemahoning extensions of the Pennsylvania canal, also in the construction of the Williamsport and Elmira railroad, now the Northern Central, and later was engaged in locating the eastern and western reservoirs of the canal, and was afterwards engineer in charge of the canal for several years.

  While occupying this responsible position, Mr. White was married, September 19, 1843, to Emily, daughter of the late Henry S. Weaver, of Freeport, Armstrong county, Pennsylvania. He at once gave up civil engineering, and engaged in the mercantile and grain business at Freeport, which he continued for ten years. He was then employed to locate the dams on the Monongahela river for the Monongahela Navigation Company, which occupied his time until April, 1854, when he came to Williamsport and embarked in the lumber trade in Cogan valley, where he carried on that business five years. In October, 1859, he became a member of the well known lumber firm of Herdic, Lentz & Whites, which in 1867 was changed to White, Lentz & Whiter by the withdrawal of Peter Herdic, and for the succeeding thirty years he continued in the active duties of the lumber business up to his death, June 3, 1800. The success of Mr. White was attained through long years of industry, and the closest attention to the details of his business affairs. A man of sound judgment and broad intelligence, his investments were always conservative and safe. Hence he accumulated through the passing years an estate estimated among the most valuable in his native county.

  Three sons and five daughters were the fruits of his marriage to Emily Weaver, as follows: Hear W., who succeeded his father in the management of the lumber business; Charlotte. widow of Hon. Hugh H. Cummin; Mary L., wife of George L. Sanderson of Philadelphia- Hugh L. ; Gula B.; Emily, wife of E. P. Almy of Williamsport; Jennie P., wife of Henry N. Almy of Philadelphia, and John A. Mrs. White is a member of Christ Protestant Episcopal church, to which organization her husband belonged, and in which he filled the office of vestryman for many years preceding his death. Politically Mr. White was a life-long Democrat, but took no active part in public affairs. At the time of his death he was a director in the Williamsport National Bank, and a trustee in the Savings Institution; he was also president of the Citizensí and Williamsport Water Companies, and a stockholder and director in the Lycoming Electric Company and the Williamsport Steam Company. Mr. White always manifested a deep interest in the social and material development of Williamsport, and gave liberally of his means to the charitable, religious, and educational institutions of the city.

  HENRY WHITE was one of the well known citizens of Williamsport throughout his long residence in that city. He was born on the homestead, west of the mouth of Pine creek, Lycoming (now Clinton) county, Pennsylvania, August 7, 1820, and was the third son of Col. Hugh White by his marriage to Mrs. Charlotte White nee Weitzel. He grew up under the parental roof, and received a good common school education, afterwards attending Allegheny College, Meadville, Pennsylvania. He read law in Williamsport and was admitted to the bar, but never engaged in the practice of his profession. For several years he was associated with Robert S. Bailey and Matthias Eder in operating mail and stage lines, which he continued to follow until the advent of railroads superseded the old modes of traffic and he sub-sequently embarked in the lumber trade. In October, 1859, he became a member of the lumber firm of Herdic, Lentz & Whites, composed of Peter Herdic, George W. Lentz, and John and Henry White. In 1867 Mr. Herdic withdrew from the firm and it then became White, Lentz & White, and has ever since been known and recognized as one of the most prominent and successful lumber firms in the Susquehanna valley. Mr. White devoted his principal attention to his private business, and accumulated a large and valuable estate. He took quite an active interest in public affairs, and served in the common council of Williamsport many years, and at one time was president of that body. He was a stanch Democrat all his life, and in 1877 was the Democratic candidate for Congress in this district. His party was largely in the minority, and consequently he was defeated, but he received more, than the average Democratic vote in tile district. Mr. White married Catherine G., daughter of Hon. Joseph B. Anthony of Williamsport, member of Congress, presi-dent judge, and for many years a distinguished advocate of the Lycoming county bar. Mrs. White was born, March 5, 1830, and died, March 10,1803, leaving three, daughters: Isabella, wife of John C. Brenner; Mary L., who first married James. M. Gamble, and is now the wife of William Emery, and Josephine, deceased wife of C. La Rue Munson. Mr. White was again married, June 16, 1866, to Martha Covell of Elmira, New York, who Survives him. He died at his home in Williams- port, March 7, 1880.

  GEORGE WINTER LENTZ, a prominent deceased lumber manufacturer of Williams-port, was born at East Hanover, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania, November 5, 1818. His paternal grandfather, Jacob Lentz, was a soldier in the Revolution, and after the war ended in the triumph of the American cause, he settled in Londonderry township, Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. George Lentz, father of our sub-ject, was there born and reared. He married Mary Winter of East Hanover, Lebanon county, two of whose brothers served in the war of 1812. She was a descendant of John Harper, whose father built and carried on the celebrated tavern at the confluence of the Swatara and Indiantown creeks, about the middle of the last century, and which still is known as Harperís Hotel. She bore him four children, two of whom died in infancy. Her husband died a short time before the birth of the subject of this sketch, and he lived with his maternal grandparents until his sixteenth year, receiving a good common school education. He then found employment in East Hanover for a year or two, when he concluded to seek his fortune in the West, and traveled to Peoria, Illinois, by packet, this being before the advent of railroads. He soon afterwards went to Logansport, Indiana, 300 miles distant, making the entire journey on foot. On his arrival his sole possessions consisted of three Spanish quarter- dollars, but he had good health and indomitable pluck. He found employment in a saw mill at Logansport for about two years, and in 1838 he returned to his old home in East Hanover, Pennsylvania, making the entire trip in a spring wagon, and spending three months in the journey. He took a course in civil engineering at East Hanover, and then came to Newberry, Lycoming county, where he had an aunt living, and taught school a few months. He subsequently spent two terms at Annville Academy, in Lebanon county. Upon coming of age he inherited a small property from his fatherís estate, and returning to Newberry he attended a select school for some time, and became quite a skillful mathematician. After another brief period of school teaching at Newberry, he accepted a clerkship in the register and recorderís office, under Joseph W. Smith, and three years later he was elected on the Whig ticket treasurer of Lycoming county.

  During this period he became interested in wild lands, and familiar with their location and value, and at the close of his term he made large purchases of these lands, in partnership with Oliver Watson. He subsequently became associated with Peter Herdic in the same business, and they were afterwards joined by John and Henry White. The co-partnership of Herdic, Lentz & Whites was then organized, and became one of the best known lumber firms of the West Branch valley. They purchased and laid out in lots the Campbell and Armstrong farms, which now comprise one of the most thickly settled parts of the city. They also erected extensive saw mills, and engaged in the manufacture of lumber on a large scale. In 1861 Mr. Herdic withdrew from the firm, and the name then became White, Lentz & White, and still bears that title, though all of its founders are sleeping in Wildwood cemetery. Mr. Lentz afterwards made large purchases of timber lands in Wisconsin and Florida, where he was financially interested up to his death. He was the principal owner of the water works plants at Selinsgrove and Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, Cairo, Illinois, and Orlando, Florida. He also was a stockholder and director in the Williamsport Water Company, and was similarly interested in the West Branch National Bank and the Savings Institution.

  From an early period in the history of Williamsport Mr. Lentz was interested in its prosperity, and was one of the prominent actors in its later growth and development. By sagacious enterprise and shrewd investment, he accumulated an ample fortune, but his success never affected the simplicity of his tastes or the sympathy which he always felt for the poor and unfortunate. All his transactions were characterized by a sturdy integrity, and his kind and genial nature marked him as one of the most unselfish of the pioneer fathers who laid the foundation and built the structure of Williamsportís prosperity. Mr. Lentz was married in 1859, to Jane C., daughter of Dr. Jesse Wood of Williamsport, who bore him three children, as follows: George F., who died at the age of sixteen; Mary Ann, wife of Delos S. Mahaffey of Williamsport, and Harry W., who resides in the old homestead on East Third street. Mrs. Lentz died, October 28, 1873, and her husband survived her until May 17, 1891. They were attendants of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and gave liberally of their means towards its support.

  THE OTTO FAMILY. - The ancestor of the American branch of the Otto family was Dr. Bodo Otto, who was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany. He was a graduate of the University of Gottingen, and a learned and able physician, and immigrated with his family to Philadelphia in 1755, where he soon acquired a high reputation for his literary and medical ability. After residing in Philadelphia for eighteen years, he, in 1773, followed the tide of German emigration up the Schuylkill valley, and located in Reading, where he continued the practice of his profession. About this time the Revolutionary sentiment in the Colonies was gathering force, and Dr. Ottoís influence among his countrymen in opposing British oppression was widely felt. He was chosen a delegate to represent Berks, county in the Provincial Conference which met at Carpenterís Hall, in Philadelphia, June 18, 1776, and early in the progress of the Revolution he joined the patriot army as surgeon, and served in that capacity until the close of the war-brought liberty to the struggling Colonies. During the dark days of Valley Forge, Dr. Otto, assisted by his sons Drs. Bodo, Jr., and John A. Otto, was surgeon in charge of the camp hospital, and while devoting himself to the care of the sick and wounded, he endured all the privations incident to that critical period in the history of Washingtonís army. At the close of the Revolution Dr. Otto returned to Reading and resumed his practice, which he continued up to his death, June 13, 1787. He also took a prominent part in the administration of local affairs, and was active in promoting the best interests of the community. He was thrice married, and was the father of one daughter by his first marriage, and three sons and one daughter by his second.

  His sons, Bodo, Jr., and John A. Otto, took up their fatherís profession, and both served as surgeons in the Continental Army. They were born in Hanover, Germany, and came to Philadelphia with their parents, and thence to Reading. Bodo died in 1782, during his service in the Revolution, leaving, three children, one of whom, John C. Otto, was a prominent physician of Philadelphia for many years. John A. returned to Reading, after the war closed, where he continued in active practice as one of the leading physicians of his time and locality up to his death, in December, 1834. He was one of the court of justices under the State Constitution of 1776, and was appointed prothonotary of Berks county in 1790. He married Catharine Hitner of Marble Hall, Montgomery county, and reared two sons and five daughters.

  His youngest son, Dr. John B. Otto, was a native of Reading, and a graduate of Princeton College and the Medical University of Pennsylvania. At the time of his death, August 2, 1858, he was the oldest physician in Reading, where for half a century he enjoyed a large and varied professional experience. He served for a short time in the war of 1812, and was with the army at York when General Ross was marching on Baltimore. Dr. Otto was married in 1810 to Esther G., daughter of Judge William Whitman. Three sons and three daughters were the fruits of this union. Mrs. Otto survived her husband twenty-two years, and died July 10, 1880. Both were life-long residents of Reading, and prominent in the social and material development of that city.

  HON. JOHN AUGUSTUS OTTO was for thirty years one of the well known and most highly respected and successful business men of Williamsport. He was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, August 13, 1814, and was the oldest son of Dr. John B. and Esther G. Otto. He was educated in his native town, and remained at home with his father assisting him in his office and in attending to his large real -estate interests. He took a practical course of surveying through Berks and Schuylkill counties, and subsequently spent three years learning the iron business, as clerk with the leading iron manufacturers of Berks and Dauphin counties. He next engaged in exploring his fatherís unseated lands in the counties of Schuylkill, Carbon, and Clearfield. He opened the coal veins and made some improvements on what are called the Otto mines in Schuylkill county. In 1835 his father purchased the Mahanoy Iron Works in the latter county, and the following year our subject commenced operations. He was married, November 23, 1840, to Caroline F. Mohr, of Mohrs-ville, Berks county. In connection with the iron business he was occupied with farming, lumbering, milling, merchandising, etc. He also filled the office of justice of the peace, and in 1849 he was, elected to the legislature and served on the committee of domestic manufactures. In 1859 he removed to Williamsport and embarked in the lumber business, which he prosecuted very successfully for many years. In 1870 he purchased the property known as the Blue Mill," on Third and Grier streets, and carried on a planing mill, to which he added a sash, door, and blind department, and furnished employment to a large number of workmen. At this time he associated with him his two oldest sons, Dr. Luther M. and H. How-ard Otto, and the firm became John A. Otto & Sons. John M. and Frank 11. Were subsequently taken into the business. The mill was struck by lightning and burned, September 1, 1881, but they immediately commenced rebuilding a more substantial brick structure, which now forms a part of the extensive furniture plant of John A. Ottoís Sons. On its completion Mr. Otto retired from active business, though-still looking after the welfare of his children. He died, October 1, 1889; his widow occupies the old homestead. on Fourth street. They were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are living and residents of Williamsport, as follows: Mrs. William F. Thompson; Mrs. William Gibson; Luther M.; H. Howard; Mrs. J. H. B. Reese; John M., and Frank R. The deceased are: Anna, Emma, and Augusta, all of whom died in infancy. The following just tribute to Mr. Ottoís character appeared in one of the city papers at the time of his death: "Mr. Otto was a thorough gentleman, of easy and unassuming manners, and no citizen of Williamsport is more respected than was be, while there are comparatively few em-ployers held in the esteem which has always been accorded him by his men. As a citizen he was broad-minded and highly regarded in the business and social world. He was a member of St. Paulís Lutheran church, and to his liberality that prosper-ous congregation is probably more indebted than to any other man."

  DR. LUTHER M. OTTO was born in Taylorsville, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, September 22, 1846, and is, the eldest son of John A. Otto. He received his education in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He served with the Emergency Men during Leeís invasion of Pennsylvania, although under age. After completing his education he studied medicine with Dr. Thomas Lyon of Williamsport, and graduated from the Medical University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Otto followed his profession in this city for several years, until he became a member of the firm of John A. Otto & Sons, when he gave up his practice and has since devoted his attention to the varied interests of his business. He was the leading spirit in the organization of the Otto Chemical Company, and has been president of that institution, and he also originated the American Furniture Exposition of New York City, an enterprise which has proven highly beneficial to the furniture manufacturers of the United States. Dr. Otto married Eleanor, daughter of Lindsey Mahaffey, and is the father of five children: Howard H., deceased; Florence; Luther; Delos, and Alice E.

  H. HOWARD OTTO was born in Taylorsville, Schuylkill county. Pennsylvania, February 2, 1848, and is the second son of John A. Otto. He received a public school education, and learned the printerís trade. When Lee invaded the State he went out as a drummer boy with Colonel Troutís Emergency Men, and was the youngest boy to enlist from Lycoming county. In 1864 he graduated from Eastmanís National Business College. Poughkeepsie, New York. At the age of seventeen he entered the lumber business, and subsequently became a member of the firm of John A. Otto & Sons, with which he has since been connected. Mr. Otto was one of the founders of the Y. M. C. A. of Williamsport, and has since been closely identified with that organization, and for a number of years its president. For the past seventeen years he has been a member of the State executive committee, and has been prominent in Y. M. C. A. work in this section of Pennsylvania. He also organized the Womanís Christian Association, and was instrumental in obtaining the aid of John Wanamaker to the erection of the Home of the Friendless in this city. Mr. Otto is one of the organizers of St. Paulís Lutheran church and Sunday school, and in 1874 he organized a Sunday school in the lumber office of the Otto factory, which is known as St. Johnís Lutheran Sunday school. He was also one of the founders of the City Mission. He married Mary E., only daughter of the late Col. Phaon Jarrett of Lock Haven, and has two children: Eugene Jarrett, and Caroline M.

  JOHN M. AND FRANK R. OTTO are the junior members of John A. Ottoís Sons. The former was born in Taylorsville, Schuylkill county, December 14, 1858, and the latter in Williamsport, February 2, 1861. John M. was educated in the public schools of Williamsport and at Dickinson Seminary, and afterwards attended school at Kingston, Pennsylvania, and Cheshire and Waterbury, Connecticut. He is a member of the firm of John A. Ottoís Sons. Frank R. received his education in the Williamsport public schools, and at Norristown, Pennsylvania, and Williston Seminary, East Hampton, Massachusetts. He read law with William H. Armstrong of Williamsport, and was admitted to the Lycoming county bar. He became a member of the firm of John A. Ottoís Sons in 1882 and has since devoted his attention to that business.

  NEHEMIAH SHAW is the oldest lumberman in Williamsport, and was born in Warren county, New York, July 7, 1814, son of Nathaniel and Clarissa (Wheeler) Shaw, natives of that county, and farmers by occupation. Mr. Shaw was reared in his native county, and obtained his education in the schools of that period. He learned the carpenterís and millwrightís trades, at which he worked for some years, and afterwards engaged in the lumber business at Fort Edward, New York. In 1852 he came to Williamsport, and began operations on the West Branch. He brought with him the first flat gang saw mill, which was erected on the river, and he is thus recognized as the pioneer in the business. He built a saw mill at Lock Haven, known as Blanchard, Gregg & Companyís mill, which was the first one built in that town, and he operated it for twenty years. He next built his present saw mill in Williamsport, and associated with him Paul B. and George B. Merrill, under the firm name of Shaw & Merrill, which was changed to M. Shaw & Company. In 1890 Paul B. Merrill died and his brother, J. C. Merrill, was admitted to a partnership. This firm operates extensively in Lycoming, Clinton, Potter, Elk, and Clearfield counties, and is one of the largest and most prominent, lumber firms in. the West Branch valley, manufacturing about 15,000,000 feet of lumber annually. Mr. Shaw is a stockholder in the Williamsport and Binghamton railroad, and is one of the charter members of the company. He is also a stockholder in the Demorest Publishing and Sewing Machine Company, and is one of the solid and substantial business men of Williamsport. Mr. Shaw was married in 1837 to Rachel, daughter of Ira Cole, of Warren county, New York. She died in February, 1888, and was the mother of one daughter, Dow deceased, who married Paul B. Merrill. He is an active Republican, and during his residence in Lock Haven he was a member of the council nine years. November 10, 1891, Mr. Shaw was again married to Nellie Shannon.

  EBENEZER B. CAMPBELL was born in Johnstown, Renfrewshire, Scotland, March 4, 1820, and was a son of D. W. and Jeanette (Black) Campbell. He left his native land at the age of fifteen, and emigrated to New York City, where he found employment in a drug store. Soon afterwards he came to Tioga, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and began clerking in a general store, thence removed to Manchester, on Pine creek, and took charge, of the lumber mills of Phelps, Dodge & Company. He remained there several years, and in 1840 went to Phelps Mills, and had charge of the companyís business at that place up to 1871, when he came to Williamsport to assume control of the Dodge lumber mills in Newberry. He filled this position up to his death, July 17, 1890. During a period of forty-six years he was prominently connected with the lumber interests of Dodge, James & Stokes, and its successor, the Pennsylvania Joint Lumber and Land Company, and was the principal business man of that institution throughout its different administrations. The success of the business was principally due to his wonderful energy and keen foresight, and the best years of his life were devoted to the interests of that company. Mr. Campbell was married in 1847, to Encie, daughter of Elijah Deputy of Tioga county, Pennsylvania. She died in June, 1854, leaving two sons and two daughters: William E. D.; Elijah, deceased; Jennie, and Jeruslia, wife of T. A. Updegraff. Mr. Campbell was again married, to Mary A. Imms, of Brooklyn, New York, who survives him. Seven children were born of this union: Eben B., Jr.; Elijah; Henry; Charles, and Catherine, both deceased; Frank, and Mary; the five living children are residents of Williamsport. Mr. Campbell was a member and trustee of the First Baptist church, and in politics he was a Republican. For a number of years he was a trustee and director in Bucknell University, and was a liberal contributor to every worthy object. He was a kind hearted and generous man, and enjoyed the respect and confidence of the best citizens of his adopted home.

  EDGAR MUNSON, president Of the Williamsport National Bank, and manufacturer of and dealer in lumber, was born, April 21, 1820, in Saratoga county, New York, son of Jesse and Sophia (Tallmadge) Munson. His father was a tanner, currier, shoemaker, and farmer. Our subject was educated in the common schools of his neighborhood, and at academies at Manchester and Bennington, Vermont. At the age of fifteen years he began clerking in a store at Saratoga Springs, where he remained until nineteen. His fatherís family having removed to Steuben county, New York, he followed them, and secured employment in a store at Bradford, that county. At the age of twenty-seven he became a partner in the mercantile store of Merriman, Munson & Company; at the death of his brother in 1866 he assumed the entire proprietorship, and continued to do business there until 1870. In 1854 he became financially interested in saw mills and timber lands along Kettle creek, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, and in 1864, in company with Col. S. W. Starkweather, he purchased mills in Williamsport. He removed to this city in 1870 and has since devoted his time to his various enterprises. In 1883 his sons, C. L. and Robert H., were admitted to a partnership in the lumber and planing mill business, and the firm at once added to their enterprise the manufacture of sash, door-blinds, and box-shooks. Mr. Munson was a director and president of the Syracuse, Geneva, and Corning railroad during its construction; it is now a part of the Fall Brook system. He is president of the West Branch Lumber Company and is largely interested in the Kettle Creek Coal Mining Company, being one of the owners of 14,000 acres of coal lands in that region. He is also a member of the Lycoming Rubber Company, and having succeeded George L. Sanderson to the presidency of the Williamsport National Bank, he continues to be its efficient chief executive officer. He is a Democrat in his political proclivities, and while living in Bradford, Steuben county, New York, he served that town as supervisor and superintendent of schools. Mr. Munson was married, June 15, 1852, to Lucy Maria, daughter of Amos and Louisa (Johnson) Curtis, of Connecticut, and to this union have been born three children: C. L.; Robert H., and Edwin C., deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Munson are members of the Episcopal church, of which he is vestryman. Having begun the manufacture of lumber in 1854, Mr. Munson is consequently one of the oldest lumber merchants in Lycoming county, as well as one of the most successful, and is a gentleman highly respected.

  JOHN NORRIS WILLIAMS was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 30, 1801, and died in this city, May 10, 1862. He was a son of Joseph Williams, a native of Morris county, New Jersey, born October 31, 1770, who after reaching manhood, located in Williamsport, where he married Letitia, daughter of Amariah Sutton, one of the first settlers of the West Branch valley. Joseph Williams was a civil engineer by profession, and followed that vocation during the earlier years of the countyís history. Many of the old unseated land warrants in middle and western Pennsylvania were plotted by him, and are still used in legal proceedings. John Norris Williams married Ann Clark, who was born in England, August 28, 1799, and died in Williamsport, December 17, 1889. Their children were as follows: Letitia Ann, wife of Henry A. Bumgardner of Williamsport; Joseph J., of Philadelphia; Mary Elizabeth, who married Aaron Gandy, both of whom are dead; Rachel Smith, wife of Benjamin Bennett of Williamsport; Martha M., wife of Adam C. Brown of the same city, and Samuel Norris. Mrs. Williams was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  SAMUEL NORRIS WILLIAMS was born in the house now standing on Fourth street, facing Cemetery street, in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1841, and is the youngest son of John Norris Williams. He received his education in the public schools of his boyhood and later attended a private school and Dickinson Seminary, closing his school days by a business course at Bryant, Stratton and Bannisterís College, Philadelphia. On his return from school he kept books for two years, and then became interested in the lumber business with Charles Runstead, which he continued for six years. He next became identified with the Star mill, and at the same time a member of the firm of Finney, Williams, & Company. This firm continued in business for three years, when Mr. Finney retired, and the firm of Williams & Foresman was organized and is still in active business. Mr. Williams is one of the original stockholders of the Lycoming Rubber Company, which was organized in August, 1882, and since the organization he has filled the positions of secretary, treasurer, and general manager of the company. He is a director in the First National Bank of Williamsport, and is one of the representative business men of the city, as well as a gentleman of commendable enterprise and public spirit. He is an ardent Republican, and represents the Sixth ward in the city council. Mr. Williams served with the Emergency Men during Leeís invasion of Pennsylvania, and his deepest sympathies were with the cause of the Union. He was married, November 21, 1866, to Mary Alice, daughter of D. Watson and Margaret (McCormick) Foresman, who is a descendant of two of the pioneer families of White Deer valley.

  BENJAMIN C. BOWMAN was born in Chenango township, Broome county, New York, April 7, 1818, and is a son of Ebenezer and Sylvia P. (Barnaby) Bowman. His mother died when he was thirteen years of age, and his father, who was a native of Vermont, returned to that State. Our subject was reared near Binghamton, New York, and attended the public schools of that city. After his motherís death he removed to Great Bond, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, where he was employed in working on a farm, until reaching his majority. He was married, January 8, 1840, to Eliza Ann Buck, of Susquehanna county, who has been a faithful helpmate for over fifty-two years. He rented a farm in that county, upon which he remained two years, and then removed to Centre county and engaged in the lumber business. He commenced by purchasing an old saw mill and a tract of timber land, which he cleared and manufactured into lumber, rafting the product down the Moshannon. He subsequently erected a steam mill near Phillipsburg, Centre county, and hauled his lumber on wagons to Clearfield creek, upon which he rafted it down to the river and thence to market, and he was one of the first men to float logs via the Susquehanna to Williamsport. From a small beginning Mr. Bowman became one of the most. extensive lumber operators in Centre and Clearfield counties. In June, 1864, he located in Williamsport and purchased the Star Mills, under the firm name of Barrows, Bowman & Company, which they operated for many years, the name of the firm having been changed in the meantime to Bowman, Foresman & Company. Mr. Bowman is a member of the firm of B. C. Bowman & Company, and Bowman, Foresman & Company, and is president of the Bowman Lumber Company of West Virginia. He is recognized as one of the most prominent lumber operators in the Susquehanna valley, and owes his success to his indomitable pluck, wonderful perseverance, and close attention to the details of his business. He has been connected with the Susquehanna Boom Company for many years, and is now president of the company. He has been president of the Lycoming Rubber Company since its, organization, was vice-president of the Lumbermanís National Bank, and is now vice-president of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He is a director in the Williamsport Gas Company, and is financially interested in other institutions. Mr. Bowman has always been a supporter of the Democratic party, and manifests an active interest in public affairs. He has two surviving children: Francis C., of the Lycoming Rubber Company, and James Walton, employed in his fatherís office. He is president of the board of trustees of Grace Methodist Episcopal church, and is the steward of that organization. He is a trustee of Dickinson Seminary, also of the Young Menís Christian Association, and gives liberally of his means to the support of religious, charitable, and educational institutions.

  GEORGE S. BANGER is the third son of William and Mary Banger, and was born at the United States Arsenal, on the Schuylkill river, in the City of Philadelphia, August 16, 1828. His mother was a Matlack, and came from Revolutionary stock. Her grandfather, Seth Matlack, was captain of a military company, and with four other brothers. served in the Continental Army, one of them being, colonel of his regiment. The company in which her father served belonged to this regiment.

  Mr. Bangerís grandfather, Timothy Banger, came from England to Philadelphia in 1795, and had a letter of introduction from Rev. Elhannan Winchester ,of London, England, to Dr. Benjamin Rush of Philadelphia. At that time the seat of government was in the latter city, with Washington as president of the United States. Dr. Rush presented this young Englishman to President Washington, who gave him a position in what was then known as the war department. On the completion of the Schuylkill Arsenal at Philadelphia, in 1800,he was transferred to that office. He remained there for a number of years until the commissary generalís office was established in Philadelphia, where he was appointed chief clerk, and filled that position until President Van Burenís administration, thus serving the government through eight administrations, and covering a period of about forty years.

  William Banger, the son of Timothy, and father of George S. Bangor, was born in Philadelphia, in 1800. On attaining his majority he was appointed to a clerkship in the Schulykill Arsenal. He was advanced to the position of chief clerk, and, for some years, filled the position of military store keeper. He remained there, with A short interval, until the war broke out in 1861, when he was transferred to New York City, as chief clerk in the department of contracts and purchases, under General Stanton, where he remained until the war closed, when the office was abolished. Thus, father and son, served under the government continuously, from Washingtonís administration, until Grantís administration-almost the lifetime of the Republic.

  The subject of this sketch attended the public schools of Philadelphia, and graduated from the high school, when he was about sixteen years of age. In 1846 he entered the office of Samuel L. Clement, a prominent conveyancer of that city, .and after four yearsí study of the conveyancing and real estate business, he opened an office for himself, and followed that vocation until May, 1855, when he removed to Williamsport, Pennsylvania. In that year he, with William A. McCann of Philadelphia, and Hiram Craft of Elmira, built the first planing mill erected in Williamsport, subsequently known as the Weed and Allen mill. He entered the office of the Susquehanna Boom Company in May, 1862, as secretary of the company. In addition to the office of secretary, he was the acting treasurer of the company for a period of fifteen years. Since September, 1868, he has been the stated clerk of the Northumberland Baptist Association, and for twenty-four years he has been tile clerk of the first Baptist church of Williamsport, with which he has been connected since 1855. In 1867 he was elected a school director from the Fifth ward and was re-elected in 1870. He was president of the board in 1871. He has frequently been urged to represent his ward in the city council, but persistently declined to allow his name to be used for that or any other office. On the 19th of June, 1850, Mr. Bangor was married to Miss Sally E. Hollingshead of Philadelphia. Four children were born to them: Frank Judson, deceased; M. Helen; Lizzie H., deceased, and Ida M., wife of Charles A. Bowman of Williamsport. His second marriage was with Mrs. Emma K. Mulford, daughter of the late Rev. Joseph H. Kennard, D. D., of Philadelphia, which occurred May 7, 1870. Mrs. Banger died, December 1, 1882. He subsequently married Miss Adele M., daughter of Levi Peabody Dodge, late of Newburgh, New York. Mr. Banger is still the secretary of the Susquehanna Boom Company, having filled that office for a period of thirty years.

  D. WATSON FORESMAN was the youngest son of Robert Foresman, and was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 9, 1812. He was reared on the homestead farm, and in 1833 married Margaret S., daughter of Seth McCormick, a native of the same township. She bore him the following children: D. Hammond and Robert M., both deceased; Seth T.; Mary Alice, wife of S. N. Williams; James S.; Eliza S., wife of J. E. Baker; Hannah, wife of A. J. Updegraff; Sarah P., wife of C. P. Tiers; Alvina, deceased, and Henry M. Mr. Foresman was a farmer all his life, and removed from White Door valley to Montour county in 1844, and afterward to Northumberland county. In 1854 he rented tile Judge Robert Grier farm, which is now within the limits of Williamsport, upon, which he lived many years. Here his wife died, February 9, 1874 he survived her nearly six years, was again married, and died, October 16, 1879. He was a ruling elder in the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and was a life long, adherent of the Democratic party. Mr. Foresman was a plain, unassuming, and worthy citizen, and reared a large and respected family. Though unable to leave his children wealth, he left to them the rich legacy of an honest name.

  DAVID HAMMOND FORESMAN was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, February 15, 1834, and was the eldest son of D. Watson Foresman. He was reared a farmer, and his tastes always ran to agricultural pursuits. He was educated at the McEwensville Academy, and taught school in Northumberland and Lycoming counties for several years. In 1854 he came to Williamsport with his parents, and was a resident of this city without interruption, except five years, when he lived at McEwensville. He was a stanch Democrat, and took a deep interest in political affairs. He served several terms in the city council from tile Sixth ward, was one of the most vigilant members of that body, and was chairman of the hallway committee until elected president of the council in 1871. For two years he was president of the Lycoming County Agricultural Society, and was a member of the State Board of Agriculture. He served as agent for the Grier estate in this city for many years. He also became largely identified with the Lycoming Rubber Company a few years before his death, and took an active interest in the business of that flourishing enterprise. Mr. Foresman married Rebecca, daughter of John Reighard, of the "Long Reach," to whom were born three sons and one daughter: Robert; Chester; Anna, wife of William I. Selser of Philadelphia, and Grier, all of whom are living, as is also his widow. He died, April 21, 1881, in the fifty-fourth year of his age. Mr. Foresman was a genial and affable gentleman, and had many friends in the community. He was a director in the Lycoming National Bank at the time of his death, and was recognized as a man who never faltered in the discharge of his duty.

  SETH T. FORESMAN, lumber dealer and manufacturer, was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1838, and is the oldest, surviving son of D. Watson and Margaret S. Foresman, and a grandson of Robert Foresman, one of the pioneers of White Deer valley. He was reared under the parental roof, and remained with his parents until he was twenty-six years of age, assisting his father to support the family. He received a common school education, and taught school two winter terms, and with the money thus acquired he took a course of two years at Dickinson Seminary. In April, 1861, he enlisted in Company D, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, served four months, and then returned home to assist in tilling the farm. He afterward went out with the Emergency Men during Leeís invasion of Pennsylvania. In 1864 he engaged in contracting, and built the two large basins at the foot of Rose street, also the lumber branch of the Philadelphia and Erie railroad, from the Star Mills to He burn street. He followed contracting four years, and then organized the firm of Frow, Foresman & Company. They erected a planing mill on the site of the Otto furniture plant, and conducted a mill and lumber yard. In 1872 Mr. Foresman became a member of the lumber firm of S. N. Williams & Company, but their plant was burned in April, 1873. He then found employment in the Star Mills, and in 1874 he and Mr. Williams purchased a one-third interest in the business. In 1876 they became sole proprietors, and the firm of Williams & Foresman was then established. From that time up to the present they have carried on business very successfully, and are recognized as one of the prominent lumber firms of Williamsport. Mr. Foresman is also a member of Bowman, Foresman & Company, and of the Bowman Lumber Company of West Virginia. He is a large stockholder in the Lycoming Rubber Company, is a director in the Binghamton Railroad Company, is an active supporter of the Board of Trade, and a charter member of the Ross Club.

  Mr. Foresman was married, December 9, 1862, to Sallie E., daughter of Samuel Updegraff, of the "Long Reach," and has a family of two sons and two daughters, as follows: John; George; Laura, wife of Frank Robb, and Ruth Mae. The family are adherents of the Third Presbyterian church, and Mr. Foresman has been a K. T. in the Masonic order for twenty five years. He has always been a stanch Democrat, and an unswerving advocate of Democratic principles. In 1882 he was a candidate for legislative honors, and came within two votes of receiving the nomination. He is a member of the select council, and takes a very active interest in public affairs. Mr. Foresman gives his earnest support to every project that tends to the general welfare and prosperity of Williamsport.

  ROBERT M. FORSMAN was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, February 29, 1836, and died in Williamsport, March 6, 1889. He was the second son of D. Watson Forsman, and removed with his parents to Montour county, in 1844, and subsequently to Northumberland county, and thence to Williamsport in 1854, which he made his home up to his death. He received a common school education, and in early manhood engaged in the lumber business. He continued to prosecute that line of trade very successfully throughout his business career. In 1877 he gave up the lumber business in Williamsport for a more lucrative field of operations in Wisconsin, where he was interested until the close of his life. Mr. Forsman was married, August 13, 1859, to Anna Nichols of Williamsport, who bore him the following children: Florence, wife of Rev. Francis T. Madge; Frank; Harry H.; Stanton, and Stanley, all of whom are living. In his political affiliations Mr. Forsman was a Republican, and was a member of Reno Post, G. A. R. During the latter part of the war he served as a lieutenant in a cavalry company. He was a member of the common council several terms, and was twice president of that body. Mr. Forsman was an open-hearted, genial, and hospitable man, was noted for his love of home and family, and was a progressive, liberal, and public spirited citizen. He took an active part in establishing the Williamsport Steam Company, and was secretary and treasurer of that institution until a short time before his death.

  FRANK FORSMAN, lumber dealer, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1863, and is the eldest son of Robert Forsman. He was educated in the public schools and at Cheltanham Academy, and after leaving school he engaged in the lumber business with his father, and afterward was a member of the firm of Luppert & Forsman. In July, 1890, he became a member of H. W. Jenkins & Company, and in August, 1891, he purchased his partnerís interest. Mr. Forsman was married, June 3, 1800, to Esther, daughter of David Wilson of Harrisburg. He is a Republican, and both he and wife are members of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM HOWARD, of the firm of Howard & Perley, lumber manufacturers, was born in Yorkshire, England, August 13, 1831, son of John and Hannah (Lockwood) Howard, who lived and died in their native land. He received his education in England, and learned the stonemasonís trade. In 1851 he came to the United States, located at Reading, Pennsylvania, and worked a short time for the Lebanon Valley Railroad Company in building a bridge near the city of Reading. He came to Williamsport in August, 1854, and worked on the dam on the Susquehanna, near that city. He next found employment with the Water Mill Company for a few years, and in 1857 he went into the lumber woods and engaged in that business. Some time later he organized the firm of C. B. & W. Howard, and engaged in the lumber business as log stockers. In 1863 he purchased land in Cameron county, and operated there until 1887. In 1866 Mr. Howard went into partnership with John R. Cooke & Company, purchased the saw mill now operated by Howard & Perley, and engaged in the manufacture of lumber. He was later a member of the firm of Slonaker, Howard & Company, which was merged into that of Howard, Perley & Howard, and finally became Howard & Perley. Mr. Howard is one of the pioneer lumbermen of Williamsport, and has been prominent in the lumber interests in this section of the State for many years, dividing his time between Williamsport and Cameron county. He is a stanch Democrat, and while living, in Emporium was burgess of that borough for two terms, and served two comity commissioner of Cameron county. He was also a member of the borough council of Emporium for several years, and has served two years in the common council of Williamsport. Mr. Howard was one of the organizers and is a stockholder and director in the First National Bank of Emporium, and was one of the organizers of the Emporium Water Company, and is a director in that institution. He is a stockholder and director in the Lycoming Rubber Company, of which he was one of the organizers; he was active in securing the removal of the Demorest Sewing Machine Works to Williamsport, and gave liberally of his means in furtherance of that project; he is a stockholder in the West Branch National Bank, and a member of the Board of Trade and of the Ross Club. Mr. Howard was married December 28, 1853, to Mary Woodhead, a native of England, and has one son, Samuel T., who is employed with the firm of Howard & Perley. He and wife are members of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, and he is a vestryman in that organization. He is a prominent Mason, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, commandery, and consistory.

  ALLEN P. PERLEY, manufacturer of lumber, was born in Oldtown, Penobscott county, Maine, March 8, 1815, son of Dr. Daniel J. and Mary (Lovejoy) Perley. His father was a native of Ipswich, Massachusetts, and practiced his profession for sixty years in the State of Maine. His mother was born in Kennebec county,í Maine, and both died in Penobscott county, in that State. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county, and began his business life as a clerk in a mercantile house, which he followed several years. In 1865 he came to Williamsport, and accepted the position of bookkeeper at George Zimmer & Companyís planing mills; in 1869 he purchased an interest in the firm which he retained until 1873. He next engaged in bookkeeping for Daniel W. Smith, and in July, 1874, he became bookkeeper for Slonaker, Howard & Company. In 1879 he purchased Mr. Slonakerís interest, and engaged in the lumber business under the firm name of Howard, Perley & Howard. In January, 1887, C. B. Howard retired from the firm, and Mr. Perley and William Howard have since continued the business under the name of Howard & Perley. This firm ranks high among the lumber dealers of Williamsport; they have large interests in Clinton and Potter counties, and are the owners of twelve miles of railroad in the lumber field. Mr. Perley is a director in the West Branch National Bank, and is one of the substantial business men of the city. He is a Republican, and has served one term in the city council. He is a member of Lodge No. 106, F. & A. M. Mr. Perley has been twice married. His first marriage, to Clara, daughter of Albert Lovejoy, of Gardner, Maine, occurred September 1, 1869. She died in January, 1886, leaving five children: Margaret Lovejoy; Harriet Scott; Fred A; Martha C., and A. P., Jr. He was again married in 1888, to Ann Stowell, a native of New York State. He and wife are members of Christ Episcopal church, in which he holds the office of vestryman.

  GUY W. MAYNARD was born, November 28, 1828, in Hamilton, New York, son of Luke and Philena (Staples) Maynard, who were the parents of six children. The family migrated to Tioga county, Pennsylvania, when Guy W. was about two years old, he attended the public schools in that county until his nineteenth year, when he came to Williamsport and completed his education at Dickinson Seminary. He was afterwards employed by the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in Philadelphia, and also did surveying for that corporation. After severing his connection with it he sold machinery on commission in various parts of the United States for two or three years. He was married, August 11, 1850, to Mary A. Crosby, a native of New York City. In 1860 they removed to Williamsport, where for about two years Mr. Maynard was employed by John White in the lumber business. In 1862 he formed a partnership with Peter Herdic in the lumber business which existed for several years. He was also in partnership with J. W. Maynard in the manufacture and sale of lumber for some time. In 1887 he retired from active business, leaving the cares of his enterprises to his sons. On the 15th of February 1892, he died, leaving a widow and four children: Louisa, who married E. M. Baldwin; Ransom C.; John W., and Eneie E. Mr. Maynard was a member of Trinity Episcopal church, of which he was vestryman from the organization of the parish to his death. He was a man highly respected by all who knew him, and one who always gave assistance to everything which tended to build up the community in which he resided. His son, Ransom C. Maynard, was born and educated in Williamsport. He began his business life with his father and has succeeded to the business, now comprising lumber and coal. He was married, June 15, 1887, to Kate I. Barlow, who died in March, 1889, leaving one child, Helen Louise. He is a member of Trinity Episcopal church, and is a Democrat in politics

  JOHN R. T. RYAN was born in Trenton, New Jersey, September 4, 1889, and grow to manhood in his Dative town. He received his education at the Trenton Academy, after which he engaged in a wholesale and retail drug business in Trenton, as a member of the firm of C. B. Vansyckel & Company, for a number of years. At the breaking out of the rebellion he recruited Company G, Tenth Regiment, New Jersey Volunteers, and was commissioned lieutenant of the same in the spring of 1862. He was detached from his regiment, and served on the staff of Brigadier General Wadsworth, and Brigadier General Martindale as an acting aide, but was afterwards reassigned to duty with his regiment, which was then in Peckís division, Seventh Corps, arid served with his command in the Army of the Potomac. Mr. Ryan was married, October 16, 1866, to Lina, only daughter of Garret Tinsman, of Williamsport, and has a family of three children: Garret T.; Florence T., and Mary C. In 1867 he connected himself with the lumber firm of Wooherton & Tinsman, and was afterwards a member of the firms of Tinsman & Ryan, Ryan, Cochran & Company, and Ryan, Thompson & Company, all extensive lumber operators. He is interested in numerous institutions connected with the social and material interests of Williamsport, He is president of the Lycoming Electric Light Company, of the Susquehanna and Buffalo Railroad Company, and of the Eaglesmere Land Company; he is a director in the West Branch National Bank, the Kettle Creek Coal Mining Company, the Williamsport Steam Company, the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company, the Williamsport Water Company, and the, Williamsport Brick Company. He is president of the J. E. Dayton Company, manufacturers of boots and shoes, also of the firm of Lewars & Company, hardware dealers, and is largely interested in the Fisher & Hinkle Company and a director in the Williamsport National Bank. Mr. Ryan was one of the prime movers in the purchase of Eaglesmere, and it was largely through his untiring efforts that it became a successful summer resort. A soldier in the rebellion, he has always taken an active interest in military societies, and is a member of the G. A. R. and of the Loyal Legion. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served as a member of the common council for three, years. The family are members of the First Presbyterian church, with which organization he has been prominently identified several years. He was one of the promoters in the erection of the present church building, and served on the building committee. Every worthy cause finds in Mr. Ryan a warm friend and generous supporter, and he is recognized as one of the most enterprising citizens of his adopted home.

  WILLIAM E. SPRAGUE, manufacturer and dealer in lumber, was born April 5, 1849, in Sullivan county, New York, son of David and Eliza J. (Adams) Sprague. His parents removed to Pennsylvania, about 1855, and located in Monroe county where his father engaged in the lumber business. Our subject was reared in Monroe and Luzerne counties, Pennsylvania, and attended the public schools until he was twelve years old. He then entered the employ of the Lehigh Coal and Navigation Company, and remained with them until 1863, when he ran away and enlisted in Company A, Twenty-Eighth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was seriously wounded at Peach Tree Creek, near Atlanta, Georgia, July 20, 1864, and was confined in the hospital until the fall of that year. He was then detailed on the recruiting service, and during this period he mustered his father into the army. He served until the close of the war, and then returned to Luzerne county, and entered the employ of the Lehigh Valley Railway Company as civil engineer. He remained with that company until 1868, and then removed to the West and engaged in business. In March, 1870, he located in Williamsport, where he found employment as shipper and manager of the Williamsport Iron and Lumber Company, and one year afterwards entered the employ of John A. Ottoís Sons, with whom he remained nine years. In July, 1880, he formed a partnership with J. F. Strieby, under the firm name of W. E. Sprague & Company, and engaged in manufacturing and dealing in lumber. The firm has since been successfully engaged in the lumber business. Mr. Sprague is also a member of the firm of Strieby, Sprague & Company, organized in 1888, and of M. T. Barry & Company, organized in 1891. They have large mills in Jefferson and Clarion counties, Pennsylvania, and carry on an extensive trade. Mr. Sprague is one of the original stockholders of the Lycoming National Bank, and has been a director in that institution for many years. He was one of the organizers of the Pennsylvania Hoop Manufacturing Company, and chairman of the company, and was also chairman of the Lycoming Fertilizer Company. He is a stockholder in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company, was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade of Williamsport, and is largely interested in real estate in the city. Politically he is a Republican, and in 1883 he was elected sheriff of Lycoming county, by 1,000 majority, which was a tribute to his popularity in a Democratic county. In 1887 he was chairman of the Republican county committee, and in 1890 he declined the senatorial nomination for this district. While absent from the city, however, his friends placed him in nomination for the mayoralty, in 1890, but he was defeated by F. H. Keller. He has always taken interest in the public schools of Williamsport, and in 1874 was elected a member of the board, and served as president of the same. Mr. Sprague is a charter member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and was Commander of the post in 1879, 1880, and 1881, and has been a member of the board of managers since its organization. He is also connected with the Soldiersí and Sailorsí Monumental Association, and is a member of the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Sprague was married, February. 20, 1872, to Margaret Clementine, daughter of William Strieby, of Loyalsock township, who is the mother of two children: Adam Follmer, and Blanche Reno. Mrs. Sprague is a member of St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  THOMAS LUNDY, manufacturer of lumber, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1844, son of Cornelius W. and Amelia (Bucher) Lundy. Thomas Lundy, grandfather of our subject, was a native of New Jersey, and settled in Eldred township, Lycoming county, about 1801, where he cleared and improved a farm upon which he resided up to his death. Cornelius W. was born and reared on the homestead in Eldred township, and died there in 1886. His widow still survives. He was a member of the Christian church, held the office of deacon for many years, and was superintendent of the Sunday school for a quarter of a century. In early life he was a Whig, and afterwards a Republican. His family consisted of eleven children, all of whom are living. The subject of this sketch is the third in the family, and was reared and educated in his native township. He learned the carpenterís and millwrightís trades, and followed that business for fifteen years. In 1876 he purchased the Lippincott mill, in Gamble township, and engaged in the manufacture of lumber, removing to Williamsport in 1882. Mr. Lundy is now one of the representative lumbermen of the city, and has mills at Renovo, Clinton county, and at Ralston, Lycoming county, and lumber interests in Somerset county. He is a stockholder and director in the Merchantsí National Bank, was a stockholder in the Packer Land and Improvement Company, and served as president of the latter institution. Mr. Lundy is an active Republican. He was auditor of Armstrong township for a number of years, and a school director in his district. He is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery. Mr. Lundy was married in 1868 to Margaret Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Southard, of Gamble township. Thirteen children are the fruits of this union: Henry C. deceased; Thomas Franklin; Charles E.; William W.; Laura M.; Bruce P.; Theodore A.; George; Clyde; Raymond; Florence A.; Harrison, and Marion Elizabeth.

  HENRY M. OTTO was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, January 4, 1826, son of Dr. John B. and Esther G. Otto. He was educated in the schools of Reading, and removed to Barry, Schuylkill county, in 1845, and March 16, 1848, he was appointed the first postmaster of the town. He was married to Susan B., daughter of Jacob and Mary B. Goodhart of Reading, June 3, 1850; she became the in other of two children: John B., of Williamsport, and Mary Irene, deceased wife of Dr. John W. Lowe of Baltimore, Maryland. Mr. Otto opened a dry goods store in Reading in April, 1851, and continued in that business until April, 1863. When the State was threatened with invasion in 1862, he enlisted in Company G, Second Regiment, Pennsylvania Militia, which marched to Williamsport on the Potomac, and was engaged in the battle of South Mountain and in the pursuit of Stonewall Jacksonís corps. He moved to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, November 1, 1863, and joined the lumber firm of John A. Otto & Company in 1868. He was a member of the firm of Filbert, Otto & Miller until 1876, when he became senior partner of the firm of H. M. & J. B. Otto, lumber manufacturers and dealers, now operating at Otto Glen, Elk county. In 1876 Mr. Otto was elected to the first select council of the city, and served one term. He moved to Baltimore, Maryland, in Feb then to Reading, Pennsylvania, in April, 1891, where he now resides. He became a member of Trinity Lutheran church of Reading in 1844; in 1864 he united with the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport; in 1888 he joined Grace Methodist Episcopal church of Baltimore, and in January, 1892, he was elected an elder of Calvary Reformed church of Reading, Pennsylvania. He was a stanch supporter of the temperance cause all his life, and was a member of the Sons of Temperance many years.

  JOHN B. OTTO, son of Henry M. and Susan B. Otto, was born in Reading, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1851, and removed with his parents to Williamsport in November, 1863. He was a student at Dickinson Seminary, and afterwards attended Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, and graduated with the degree of civil engineer, June 28, 1871. In the fall of that year he assisted in the construction of the Reynoldsville division of Bennettís branch extension of the Allegheny Valley railroad. In the spring of 1872, while serving upon the engineer corps of Reading, he accepted a position of assistant engineer upon the location corps of the Philadelphia and Reading railroad, and helped to survey the Perkiomen branch to Emmaus, also the Catawissa branch from Tamanend Junction to Williamsport. He left the Philadelphia and Reading Company in the spring of 1873 to accept a position on the engineer corps of a proposed railroad from Williamsport to Arnot, Tioga county, but after running the experimental line the project was abandoned on account of the panic of that year. He then opened a civil engineerís office in Williamsport. In 1875 he formed a partnership with his father, under the firm name of H. M. & J. B. Otto, manufacturers of hemlock and hard wood lumber, and dealers in hemlock bark. In 1876 he superintended the construction of J. K. Mossor & Companyís tannery at Newberry, and May 1, 1876, he was elected to the office of city engineer, in which he served four years. During his term he made a topographical survey of the city, and designed a complete system of sewerage for the business portion, which received the approval of all who examined it. He was twice re-elected to the office of city engineer, and resigned the position, April 12, 1880. He accepted the superintendency of the South Williamsport Land Company, January 21, 1881, a position which he still holds. He was appointed trustee for the Mahlon Fisher estate, January 27, 4882, and in September of the same year he was elected secretary and treasurer of the Williamsport Gas Company, which he resigned, January 20,. 1885. Mr. Otto superintended the rebuilding of Maynard street bridge, and had charge of the same from 1886 until February, 1891, when it was sold to the county commissioners. He was married, March 11, 1873, to Lillie M., a daughter, of Sam-uel and Amanda S. Ladd of Reading, Pennsylvania. She died, March 6, 1891, leaving six children: Henry L.; Josie AT.; Lillie L.; Nettie I.; Mary L., and John B. He was again married, May 24, 1892, to Ida F., daughter of Marcello A. and Mary T. Pray of Williamsport, Pennsylvania. Mr. Otto has been an elder in the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport sin. April N85, a and superintendent of the Sunday school since December, 1887. He is an ardent Prohibitionist, and a firm advocate of the cause of temperance.

  SAMUEL WEYMOUTH, superintendent of the Edgar Munson mill, was born in Carroll county, New Hampshire, November 29, 1826, son of Andrew W. and Mary (Lary) Weymouth, natives of that State. He moved with his parents to the State of Maine at the age of four years. He received a common school education, and learned the blacksmith trade with his father. In 1858 he located in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in lumbering, and in 1864 came to Williamsport, and was employed as foreman for E. B. England for two years. In 1866 he was employed by Edgar Munson as superintendent of his mills, which position he has held ever since. He is a Republican in politics, and in 1878 was elected a member of the common council of Williamsport, served ten years, and was chairman of the gas and water, fireman and supply, and the highway committees. In February, 1890, he was elected a member of the select council, and chosen chairman of the highway committee of that body. He was married in 1852 to Miss Emily J., daughter of Henry Houscom, and to this union have been born four children: William C.; Mary E., who married P. E. Bishop; Ida J., who married Robert Thorne, and Clara, who married R. P. Blackburn.

  JAMES MANSEL, lumber dealer, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1847, son of William B. and Rebecca (Southard) Mansel, the former a native of Chester county, and the latter of Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. William B. Mansel came to this county in 1840. He was a poor man, and worked is a laborer, finally purchasing a farm in Eldred township, where he has since resided. His family consists of three children: George, of South Williamsport; James, and Hannah, wife of Hiram Mosteller, of Eldred township. The subject of this sketch received a common school education in the township schools and at Lewisburg, and afterwards attended Dickinson Seminary. Prior to his attendance at the last mentioned institution he was engaged in teaching school, and after leaving Dickinson he began clerking in a grocery store in Williamsport. He. followed that business three years, and then became connected with the Standard Nail and Iron Company, with which he remained two years. He next took charge of the lumber business of Corcoran, Richards & Company, with whom he remained six years, and was afterwards associated with Thomas Lundy under the firm name of Lundy & Company for three years. He then engaged in business for himself, has been quite successful, and handles nothing but hardwood lumber. Mr. Mansel is a member of the Cross Planer Knife Company, and one of the originators of the same; he is also a stockholder and director in the Royal Braid Works. He is a Republican with Prohibition tendencies, but takes no interest in public affairs. He was married in 1874, to Maggie, daughter of John Hartswick, of Centre county, Pennsylvania, and two children: Bernard H. and Harry S.

  THOMAS DUFFY, lumber manufacturer, was born in County Meath, Ireland, in 1845, son of Michael and Elizabeth (Clarke) Duffy, natives of the "sea-girt isle." He came to the United States with his brothers and sisters, when he was ten years old, and located in Corning, New York. He received a limited education in the common schools, and grow to manhood in New York State. In 1869 he came to Williamsport, and engaged with a Mr. Parker in the manufacture of shingles for two years, and was employed by various other parties until 1873. He then became connected with his present shingle mill, where he has since carried on quite an extensive business in the manufacture of white pine shingles. In 1891 he purchased an interest in the West End mill, and has since been manager of the business. Mr. Duffy is a stockholder and director in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, is a stockholder in the Lycoming Rubber Company, and is interested in real estate in the city. He was married in 1872 to Ellen, daughter of George Mahar, of Williamsport. She is the mother of six children, as follows: Ann; Harry; John; Joseph; Mary, and Elizabeth. The family are members of the Annunciation Catholic church, and Mr. Duffy is one of the liberal supporters of that organization. He is a Democrat in politics, and one of the active, enterprising businessmen of Williamsport.

  MAURICE H. LUNDY, lumber dealer, was born in County Sligo, Ireland, March 16, 1833, son of Patrick and Winifred (Henry) Lundy. The family came to America in 1845, and after remaining in New York for about six months they migrated to Canada and thence to Corning, New York, where the parents died. Our subject was principally reared in Steuben county, New York, and was educated in the common schools. He came to Williamsport in 1850, where he was employed by Samson & Ballard as lumber counter for a number of years and remained with their successors until joining Fletcher Coleman in the same business. Mr. Lundy has therefore been in the lumber business in the city of Williamsport for over forty years. He built the second house on Third street west of what is known as West street. He is a member of the Lycoming Real Estate Association, is a Democrat in politics, has served as United States marshal for this district under President Clevelandís administration, has also been a member of the common council six years, and is now serving his second year in the select council. He was married in 1854 to Mary, daughter of John Merren, and to this union have been born nine children: Thomas; Mary, who married Thomas Mulligan; Maurice; Eliza, who married James Burrows; Henry; Frank; Kate, who married John Coleman; Agnes, and George. Mr. Lundy and family are members of the Catholic church.

  JOHN WESLEY MAYNARD was born, May 18, 1806, at Springfield, Massachusetts, second son and third child of Lemuel Maynard, a native of Sunbury, in the same State. In 1823 his fatherís family moved to Hamilton, New York, where young Maynard spent one year in attendance at the Hamilton Academy. In 1827 he began the study of law in the office of William G. Angell and George C. Clyde, in Otsego county, New York. Here he spent three years, after which the family located in Lawrenceville, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, where he was admitted to the bar in 1831. Until 4840 he was engaged in practice in Tioga, Bradford, Potter, and McKean counties. In the summer of that year he located in Williamsport. In 1859 he was appointed assistant law judge for the Fifth judicial district of Pennsylvania, then consisting of the county of Allegheny, including the city of Pittsburg. In 1862 he was elected president judge of the Third judicial district, composed of the counties of Northampton and Lehigh. This position he filled with eminent ability for nearly six years. In the autumn of 1867, owing to the death of his son-in-law and former partner, W. W. Willard, and also on account of his own ill health, Judge Maynard resigned and returned to Williamsport. He was nominated for Congress by his Democratic friends from Lycoming county, but declined to run. Judge Maynard had a legal experience of half a century, during which time he was called upon to conduct many of the most important cases in Pennsylvania and New York. March 18, 1830, Mr. Maynard was married to Sarah Ann, daughter of Thomas and Nabby Mather, of Burlington, New York; they were the parents of one daughter, Sarah Ann, who became the wife of W. W. Willard. Mrs. Maynard died, December 25, 1832, and Judge Maynard was again married, December 29, 1834, to Alvira C., daughter of Elijah De Pui. The offspring of this union were four sons and three daughters, of whom three sons and one daughter died young. The survivors are: Encie Eliza, who married Peter Herdic, and is now the wife of Henry Rawle; James W., and Clara. Mrs. Maynard died, April 1, 1881, and in November, 1883, he married Cordelia Bellows, who survives him. Judge Maynard was educated in the Methodist faith, but subsequently united with the Protestant Episcopal church, and when Christ church was organized in Williamsport, in 1841, he was chosen a vestryman. He died, May 8, 1885, at his summer cottage at Minnequa Springs, Bradford county, Pennsylvania.

  HON. HENRY JOHNSON was born, June 12, 1819, at Newton, Sussex county, New Jersey. He received in the schools of that place his primary education and in 1837 was graduated at Princeton College. He read law for three years with Hon. Whitfield S. Johnson, afterwards Secretary of State of New Jersey, and was admitted to the bar in 1841, after an examination before the Supreme Court judges of New Jersey, as required by the rules of that State. His father, Samuel Johnson, died in 1820, and his only brother, John Brodhead Johnson, while temporarily in New Orleans, died of yellow fever in 1825. His mother, with her five surviving children, moved to Muncy in 1841, she having acquired as one of the divisees of her grandfather, Gen. Daniel Brodhead, considerable real estate in Pennsylvania which required attention. June 19, 1841, Henry Johnsonís law office was opened in Muncy, Pennsylvania, which he occupied for over fifty years, enjoying a successful and lucrative practice. In 1856 he married Margaret, youngest daughter of Enoch Green, and sister of Hon. Henry Green, now a justice of the Pennsylvania Supreme Court. In November, 1890, he removed to Williamsport, and now occupies the mansion on the corner of West Fourth and Maynard streets, which he had erected for his subsequent home. He continues in the practice of law, of which he was always devotedly fond. From the time of his settlement in Lycoming county he has been prominent in political and public affairs, first as a Whig and afterwards a Republican. In 1848 he was among the earliest supporters of Gen. Zachary Taylor; as such he was elected one of the Presidential Electors of Pennsylvania, and voted directly for Taylor and Fillmore. In 1861 he was elected to the State Senate for the counties of Lycoming, Union, Clinton and Centre, and served during the war times of 1862-63-64. He served on various committees during, his term. In 1864 he was chairman of the Judiciary committee, and thus became political leader of the Senate. He was also for a considerable period Speaker pro tem. of the Senate. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania having decided that the Act of 1812, which authorized and regulated elections by soldiers in the field, was unconstitutional, thereby depriving a very large number of citizens of the right of suffrage, and endangering the re-election of Abraham Lincoln and the permanence of the Union. the legislative recorded 1863, page 60, records on June 22d that Mr. Johnson read in place, "a joint resolution proposing an amendment to the Constitution, extending the right of suffrage to citizens in actual military service." Subsequent proceedings show that it was adopted by both Houses. At the next session he again introduced the amendment, it being necessary by the Constitution to be passed unchanged by two successive legislatures, and it was again adopted by both Houses. He also prepared, and on June 6, 1864, introduced another bill, submitting this amendment to a vote by the people, providing for a special election in July of that year. An adjourned session to receive the returns and announce the vote was provided for to be held in, August, 1864. The election was duly held and the people by a very large majority adopted the amendment. The following, brief extract from his speech on "The soldiersí amendment bill," furnishes full explanation of its object and necessity, in these words: "It simply contemplates incorporating into the Constitution of the State a great measure of remedial justice, to our patriotic and brave soldiers in the field." February 29, 1864, in order to. render the amendment effectual, he introduced "An Act to regulate the election by soldiers in active military service." This was passed at the special, session in August, 1864, and the amendment thus made effective secured the re-election of Lincoln and the final triumph of the Union cause. His official acts constitute a record of patriotism, ability, and zeal in the public service, which will endure as long as the Constitution itself; for, in the new and present Constitution, the soldiersí voting provision is retained, as originally proposed by him, and the law regulating the mode of voting thereunder, as framed by him, remains on the statute book, and neither is likely to be materially changed. Mr. Johnson was a member of Company K, Fourteenth Regi-ment, Pennsylvania Volunteer Militia, refusing any higher position than a private; this was during his senatorial term, and he was under command of. General Reynolds, at and around Hagerstown, Williamsport on the Potomac, and other Southern places, in response to Governor Clintonís call at the Antietam campaign. He is a member of Muncy Lodge, No. 299, F. and A. M., and of Post No. 66, G. A. R.

  The family records show on his paternal side an ancestry extending from 1505, when one Gasper Johnson, a colonel of infantry and a Huguenot in religion, was compelled to flee from France on account of religious persecution; he subsequently emigrated to America. Several of the Johnson family served in the Revolution and the War of 1812. His mother, as before stated, was a granddaughter of Daniel Brodhead, who was a deputy from Berks county to a Provincial Assembly convened in Philadelphia, July 15, 1774, and as a member of the appointed committee, recommended a Continental Congress and acts of non-importation, which were among the first steps toward the Revolution which followed. He was selected by General Washington to command the Western department at Fort Pitt and performed valuable services during the war, and at its close was active in forming the "Society of the Cincinnati." Among the invaluable relies in the possession of the family which they delight to exhibit is a miniature portrait set in gold of General Brodhead, which in 1809 was bequeathed to his granddaughter, Mrs. Rebecca J. Johnson. This painting, although now much over a century old, is as perfect as when it was painted for his family, previous to the then Colonelís entry into the Revolutionary. War

  The oldest sister of Henry Johnson married Col. H. L. Cummings, and their oldest son, Henry, was colonel in the war of the rebellion and afterwards a member of Congress from Iowa. His sister, Laura, married the late Dr. Thomas Wood, of Muncy. His oldest daughter, Rebecca, is the wife of County Superintendent Charles Lose; another daughter is the wife of Emerson Collins, attorney at law, and another daughter recently married Herman L. Collins, now on the editorial staff of the Philadelphia Record; his youngest daughter died recently, and his four other daughters remain at home.

  GEORGE W. YOUNGMAN, lawyer, was born at Youngmanstown, now Mifflinburg, Union county, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1819, and is the eldest son in a family of thirteen children. His ancestors on both sides came from the same place in Holland, and settled for a time in Philadelphia. Later, at the instance of the Penns, they settled on what is known as the Falkner claim of the Penn lands in Montgomery county. Here Henry Antes erected a grist mill on Swamp creek; he dedicated the proceeds from the same, together with the income from his farm, to the support of the Moravian school, which he employed John G. Youngman and Anna, his wife, to teach. This school was one of the first if not the first Moravian school in Pennsylvania. It soon became so large that Mr. Antes purchased land on which the school of Bethlehem was established. The descendants of Antes removed to Nippenose township, Lycoming county, and the Youngmans to Union county, and George W. Youngman is the first offspring from a union of these two families. The parents Of George W. were Elias P. and Amelia (Antes) Youngman. The father died at his residence in Nippenose township, August 30, 1864. The mother was a daughter of John Henry Antes, a son of Col. John Henry Antes, who erected Antes Fort, near the mouth of Nipponese creek, and served in the Revolution. In April, .1831, his parents moved to Nippenose township, took charge of the farm and grist mill of Colonel Antes, and our subject was put to work on the farm and in the mill. In 1835 his parents removed to the farm and fulling mill on Antes creek, now the site of the Nippenose woolen mills. In 1838 Elias P. Youngman was appointed by Governor Porter register and recorder of Lycoming county, and after the adoption of the Constitution he was the first man elected to that office. He appointed our subject deputy recorder, and while serving in that capacity he attended the Latin school kept by Rev. J. P. Hudson and read law with Hon. Anson V. Parsons. He was admitted to the bar in August. 1842, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. After his admission he was appointed county attorney, and served three years in that office. Mr. Youngmanís experience in the orphans court, and in recording and investigating land titles, together with his knowledge of the German language rapidly brought him a lucrative business. On the 26th of March, 1844, he was married to Ann E., daughter of Samuel Ludwig, of White Deer valley, Lycoming county. This year (1844) he purchased the property now known as Youngmanís Block on Pine street, and in 1857 he erected the present brick building, which has since borne his name. In the latter year he bought a farm of 200 acres, situated west of Lycoming creek, and laid out about forty acres in town lots, known as Youngmanís addition to the Seventh ward. After the death of his father in 1864 he purchased the shares of the balance of the family in the homestead property on Autos creek. He built a saw mill thereon, and organized a company which erected the Nippenose woolen mills at an expense of about $125,000. He was the principal stockholder and president of the company, which was dissolved after the panic of 1873. He then purchased the entire property, retired from its active management, and has since leased the mill. He resided for twenty-five years on his Pine street property, in Williamsport, when, to meet the demands for business locations, he erected his present residence on his farm west of Lycoming creek. Mr. Youngman served as school director for six years, and has filled various other minor offices. He is one of the original stockholders of the Williamsport Bridge Company and of the Williamsport Water Company, and was one of the leading spirits in the organization of the Wildwood Cemetery Association and in the purchase of the land and laying out of the cemetery. He organized the society of the Independent Order of Good Templars, and passed through the several grades of that society.

  Mr. Youngman has always been bold and fearless in his political opinions. Reared a Democrat, he left that party to espouse the cause of the abolition of Slavery and protection to American industry. He is at present nominally a Republican, but expects to vote hereafter independent of party affiliations. He has been a stanch supporter of the Greenback currency and interconvertible bond monetary system, and, believing these to be the most vital issues before the people, will support the party upholding them regardless of name. He never was a candidate before the people for any political office, and never had any ambition for political preferment. Honest, active, energetic, and far sighted in business, and frugal in his habits, he has justly earned the competence he has acquired, as well as the respect and esteem of his fellow citizens. To George W. and Ann E. Youngman were born nine children, seven of whom are living, as follows: Alonzo, a farmer of Newberry; Samuel L., a lawyer of Williamsport; George W., a manufacturer of Newberry; William, a merchant of New York City; James, an attorney of Williamsport; Mary, widow of James Mahaffey, and Dr. Charles W., of Williamsport.

  SAMUEL L. YOUNGMAN, attorney at law, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, August 24,1846, and is a son of George W. Youngman. He received his education in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He read law with his father, and was admitted to the bar, April 22, 1868. He began practice the same year, and has ever since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. He served as one of the Emergency Men during the rebellion. A Republican in politics, he was for some years an active member of the party, but latterly has taken very little interest in political affairs. Besides attending to the calls of his profession, he is also engaged in the real estate business. Mr. Youngman was married, February 22, 1871, to Margaret Louisa, daughter of Henry Russell, of Lycoming county, and has a family of five children: William Sterling; Mary V.; Julia Ross; Amanda Louise, and Samuel Antes. He and wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church.

  JAMES M. YOUNGMAN, attorney at law, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 2, 1852, and is a son of George W. Youngman. He was educated at the public schools, and in Dickinson Seminary and Williamsport Commercial College. He read law with his father and his brother, Samuel L. Youngman, and was admitted to practice in 1876. He was married in 1884 to Ella M., daughter of John R. Hinkle, of Williamsport, and has two children: Florence and Adaline. He and wife are members of Grace Methodist Episcopal church, and he is secretary of the board of trustees of that organization. He was one of the organizers of the Nippono Park Association, and is secretary thereof. In politics he is a Democrat.

  ANSON V. PARSONS was born in Granville, Massachusetts, in 1798. After a thorough course in the schools of that day, he entered the law school at Litchfield, Connecticut, from which he was graduated with high honors. He spent some time in the law office of Andrew Porter at Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and in 1824 he located at Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, where he opened the first law office in that place. By close attention to his profession, Mr. Parsons soon acquired a good practice and built up a fine reputation as a lawyer. No one at the Williamsport bar could gain the attention of the jury more quickly, or retain it more successfully, than Mr. Parsons. He studied the evidence in his cases thoroughly before they came to trial, and he was prepared to make masterly arguments to secure the admission of his own evidence and the rejection of much that was offered by his opponents. January 22, 1843, he was appointed Secretary of the Commonwealth by Governor Porter, and served until February 16, 1844. Subsequently he was elected State Senator, but before the expiration of his term he was appointed president judge of the judicial district composed of Dauphin, Lebanon, and Schuylkill counties. He was afterwards appointed associate judge of the court of common pleas in Philadelphia, and at the close of this term he resumed his practice in that city. During his residence there he collected and published two volumes of very valuable equity decisions entitled "Parsonsís Equity Cases." Judge Parsons was married to Mary, daughter of James Hepburn, of Northumberland county. Mrs. Parsons died in 1853, and Mr. Parsons, never married again; he continued to reside in Philadelphia, where he died in September, 1882.

  HENRY C. PARSONS, lawyer, and president of the West Branch National Bank, was born, February 10, 1834, at Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, son of Anson V. Parsons. He comes from a highly respected New England family, dating back to the early settlement of the country, of which many members have attained to distinguished prominence in the State that gave them birth, and many more to eminence in other States to which, obeying the colonizing instinct of their race, they removed in quest of opportunity and fortune. He removed with his parents to Williamsport when a few months old, and was subsequently prepared for college in the high school of that city. In 1851 he entered the Sophomore class of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island, from which he was graduated in 1854. His tastes and opportunities led him to embrace the profession of law, and after a thorough course of study in the office of his father, then practicing in Philadelphia, he was admitted to the bar in 1857. Returning to his native county in the fall of that year he opened a law office in Williamsport, and has since practiced, and has attained prominence among the ablest lawyers of Pennsylvania. He enlisted in 1861 and served as sergeant of Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and in 1864 he made a second campaign as captain of Company B, One Hundred and Fifteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He was elected in 1873-74, a member of the Constitutional Convention of Pennsylvania, an honor he shared with the most distinguished talent of the State. He was elected mayor of Williamsport in 1881, and his administration, covering the years 1882 and 1883, was marked by business like conduct of the cityís affairs and its perfect cleanness. When he left the chief magistracy of the city, he carried with him the thanks and best wishes of his fellow citizens irrespective of party. Since 1882 he has been president of the West Branch Bank of Williamsport, and is vice-president of the Savings Institution of the same city. Mr. Parsons is a Republican, and belongs to Reno Post, G. A. R. He was married, October 15, 1865, to Martha, daughter of Dr. William Hepburn, an esteemed and deceased physician, and to this union have been born five children.

  HON. JAMES GAMBLE enjoyed a long, varied, and honorable professional and official career, and when he retired from the office of president judge of the Twenty-ninth judicial district, he bore with him the respect and confidence of the people whom he had served. He was born on the homestead farm, a short distance east of Jersey Shore, January 28, 1809, and was a son of James Gamble, who came, from Centre county to Lycoming in 1803. He was educated at the Jersey Shore Academy, under the tuition of Rev. John H. Grier and Dr. Hugh Montgomery. The death of his father prevented him from receiving a collegiate education, as was contemplated, and he then concluded to learn a trade. He carried out his intentions by serving throe and a half years at the tannincy business. At the expiration of his apprenticeship, through the advice and assistance of his brother John, he resumed his books, and finally studied law with Hon. Anson V. Parsons, who was then a resident of Jersey Shore. He was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county at the December term, 4833, but did not at once enter upon the practice of his profession. In January, 1834, he was appointed county treasurer, and served in that office for two years. In 1836 he began the practice of the law at Jersey Shore, and soon built lip a lucrative, business. In 1841 he was elected on the Democratic ticket to the legislature, and was re-elected in 1842. He devoted close attention to the work of legislation and retired with credit at the end of his second term. In 1850 he was nominated by his party for Congress in the old Eleventh district, composed of the counties of Lycoming, Clinton, Sullivan, Union, and Northumberland, and redeemed the district from the Whigs, which party had carried it the three preceding elections. He was re-elected in 1852, and during his four years in Congress he became intimately acquainted with the eminent men of the nation. On retiring from Congress in 1855, Mr. Gamble, resumed the practice of his profession at Jersey Shore, and followed it without interruption for fourteen years.

  In 1868 he was nominated for president judge of the Lycoming judicial district, and was elected by a handsome majority. He removed to Williamsport, and resided in that city the balance of his life. Judge Gamble served his full term of ten years, and during this long period he was fortunate in securing and maintaining the respect of the bar. When he retired from the bench, the bar hold a meeting at which complimentary addresses were delivered, and a record of the proceedings duly made. The testimonials and resolutions were. a fine tribute to the retiring judge, and were not only gratifying to him but to his many friends outside of the profession. The judicial experience of Judge Gamble embraced every phase and variety of the administration of equity and law, civil and criminal. Eight persons were tried for homicide during his term, and four were convicted of murder in the first degree, and sentenced to suffer the penalty of death. So far as these trials were reviewed by the Supreme court, they were all approved.

  Judge Gamble married Miss Elizabeth Breneman, of Columbia, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and two sons and two daughters were the fruits of this union, as follows: John A., of Williamsport; James M., deceased; Barbara, who married William H. Trump of Philadelphia, and died many years ago, and Elizabeth, wife of Hon. O. H. Reighard of Williamsport. From early life Judge Gamble was a member of the Presbyterian church, and took an active interest in everything, pertaining to church affairs. He filled a number of offices in the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and was noted for his strict devotion to the cause of religion. When he closed his judicial term in 1878, he lived a retired life, surrounded by his family and friends, until his death, February 22, 1883. His aged widow resides in the old homestead on Fourth street, in the enjoyment of the comforts which his wisdom and foresight provided.

  HON. HUGH HART CUMMIN, late president judge of the Twenty-ninth judicial district, was born at Liverpool, Perry county, Pennsylvania, May 25, 1841, and was a son of Dr. William and Mary (Hart) Cummin. His father was born in Ireland in 1804, and commenced the study of medicine at the Belfast Medical College, in the City of Belfast, Ireland. In early manhood he came to the United States, and continued his studies in Philadelphia at Jefferson Medical College, where he was graduated. He died at Liverpool, Pennsylvania, in 1846, where he had practiced his profession many years. His mother was a daughter of Hugh Hart, a farmer of Tuscarora valley, Juniata county, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Henry W. Watson of Williamsport, in May, 1890. The subject of this sketch was thrown upon his own resources in boyhood, by the early death of his father, but, glowing with enthusiasm, indomitable pluck, and courage, which are marked characteristics of the Celtic race, he applied himself so assiduously during his school days that he began teaching ere reaching his majority. He subsequently attended York Commercial College, and acquired a thorough knowledge of bookkeeping. In 1862 he removed from Liverpool to Williamsport, and entered the law office of the late George White, Esq., then one of the active members of the bar. His legal studies occupied two years, during which time he supported himself by doing clerical work in the several county offices. He was finally admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in August, 1864, and at once began the practice of his profession in Williamsport, where he continued in the active duties thereof up to his death. In 1869 he married Charlotte, eldest daughter of John White of Williamsport, and of the two children born to this union, one, John White Cummin, a graduate of Harvard University, survives, to solace and comfort his widowed mother.

  Mr. Cummin was a painstaking, methodical, and energetic lawyer, and every case intrusted to his care was conscientiously prosecuted. He gradually built up a large and lucrative practice, and won his way to the front rank of his profession. In 1878 a formal letter containing over 2,000 names, and embracing the majority of the bar and advocates of every shade of political opinion, was presented, to Mr. Cummin, requesting him to allow the use of his name for judicial preferment. The tone of this letter was highly complimentary, and he consented to be a candidate for the bench. He was accordingly nominated for president judge of the Twenty-ninth judicial district, and was elected to that responsible position by a plurality of 305 votes, November 5, 1878. Judge Cummin distinguished himself by the prompt manner in which he discharged all judicial business, and the same exactness of method and scrupulous regard for duty which had marked his career at the bar were conspicuous throughout his term of ton years on the bench. With a view to preventing needless expenditure or waste of the public money, Judge Cummin kept accurate statistics of all trials and the expenses of trial and was thus enabled to institute many needed reforms. While on the bench he disposed of 5,878 cases, which bad been regularly set down for trial. Many of these cases were of great importance. One of them, which excited deep interest throughout the country, particularly in Catholic circles, was that between Father Stack and Bishop OíHara, concerning the ownership of the old Annunciation church property. Judge Cummin irrespective of. his predecessorís decision, decided the case against Father Stackís, claim to the church property, and this decision was affirmed by the higher courts. Judge Cumminís judicial career was characterized by high moral courage, a keen sense of justice, and a calm, firm, and dignified deportment, and he discharged his duties without fear or favor, faithfully redeeming his pledges.

  After leaving the bench he devoted himself to professional labors, and was in the enjoyment of a very lucrative practice, when he responded to the call of Governor Beaver and went to Johnstown on an errand of mercy to assist in mitigating the sufferings of his fellow man in, that flood swept city. While engaged in this work of philanthropy and self-sacrifice, he was stricken with the disease which ended in his death at Cresson, Pennsylvania, on Sunday, August 11, 1889. Judge Cummin was a member of Christ Protestant Episcopal church, a comrade of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and a stanch supporter of the Democratic party. His courtly manners, his ready mother wit, his generous nature, his unbounded charity, and his inflexible honesty could not fail to make him hosts of friends in both church and society, as well as in every part of the West Branch valley.

  HON. ROBERT P. ALLEN was the youngest son of Charles and Rachel Allen, and was born on the Allen homestead in Armstrong township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1835. His boyhood days were spent on his fatherís farm, and he obtained a good education in the public schools of Williamsport. He afterwards attended Dickinson Seminary, from which institution he graduated in 1852, and then entered Lafayette College and was there graduated in 1855. Upon his return from college he commenced the study of law in the office of Gen. Robert Fleming, with whom he spent a year and a half, and completed his legal Studies at the Harvard Law School, Cambridge, Massachusetts. Returning to Williamsport he was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in January, 1858, and at once began the active practice of his profession. He applied himself to his duties with characteristic energy, and soon won an enviable reputation among his professional brethren. He first associated himself with James M. Gamble, and the firm of Allen & Gamble enjoyed a lucrative practice for several years. Mr. Gamble then retired, because of failing health, and Mr. Allen practiced alone for a short time, and them took into partnership John G. Reading, Jr. Allen & Reading was one of the best known and most successful law firms of Williamsport up to the death of Mr. Allen, December 6, 1890. He won a high reputation in his profession, and accumulated through the passing years a handsome competence. As a lawyer he possessed great legal learning and strength, was a man of unswerving integrity, and was always faithful to the interests of his client. He conscientiously discharged the duties devolving upon him as attorney and counselor, in a way that met the approbation and won the confidence of his fellow citizens, and stamped him as a man of the highest honor.

  For many years Mr. Allen was one of the most prominent Democrats in this section of the State, and wielded a great influence in the councils of his party. In 1874 he was elected to the State Senate from the Twenty-fourth senatorial district for the short term under the new Constitution, and was then re-elected as his own successor for the full term of four years. During his two terms in the Senate he commanded the admiration of his contemporaries, and was recognized as one of the ablest and most, fearless members of that body. Though subsequently urged to accept the nomination of his party for Congress, and prominently mentioned on several occasions as a Democratic candidate for Governor, he always refused his friends to present his name. In 1883 he was a member of the State Executive Committee, and in 1884 he represented the Sixteenth district in the national convention at Chicago, which nominated Grover Cleveland for the presidency. In 1885 he was temporary chairman of the Democratic State convention, and was ever foremost in supporting and defending the measures and principles of his party.

  Outside of his profession Mr. Allen was prominently identified with many of the leading business institutions of Williamsport, and loyal to the best interests of the whole community. He served as a director of the Lumbermanís National Bank, and was president of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, the Williamsport Water Company, the Brandon Park Commission, and the Williamsport Cemetery Company; was ex-president of the Williamsport Street Passenger Railway Company, and a director of the Market Street Bridge Company, the Williamsport Hospital, the Williamsport Gas Company, and the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company. He was also a member of the Board of Trade, and solicitor of the Philadelphia and Reading and Fall Brook Railroad Companies, and several other corporations.

  On the 5th of January, 1864, Mr. Allen married Ellen E., daughter of Gen. Robert Fleming, his first law preceptor, who survives him. Three sons and four daughters were the fruits of their union, as follows: Clara A., wife of John G. Reading, Jr.; Rachel P.; Robert Fleming; Charles; Nellie; Esther E., deceased, and Porter. Mr. Allen was a member of the First Presbyterian church, and an officer in that organization. He was a trustee of Lafayette College from 1881 up to his death, and took a deep interest in the growth and progress of educational and religious institutions. His uniform good nature, genial manner, cheerful disposition, strong friendship, and strict fidelity to every cause which he espoused, made him universally respected and fearlessly trusted.

  SETH T. McCORMICK was one of the best known members of the Lycoming county bar throughout his long residence in Williamsport, and his prominent association with the municipal affairs of that city made his name a household word in every part of the West Branch valley. The family is of Irish origin, and came from the North of Ireland to the Cumberland valley, whence Seth McCormick, grandfather of our subject, removed to White Deer valley prior to the Revolution. In 1778, when the settlers along the West Branch fled before the scalping knife of the ruthless savage, at what is familiarly known as the "Big Runaway," the McCormick family took refuge for a time at Fort Augusta, which stood on the site of Sunbury, whence they returned to White Doer valley after the danger had passed. His father, Seth McCormick, was born, lived, and (lied within the limits of Lycoming county, and the name is closely interwoven with the growth and progress of this section of the State throughout his history.

  Mr. McCormick was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, oil the 17th of January, 1814, received a common school education, and spent his early life in the work of a farmer and lumberman, which pursuits he followed in White Deer valley until he was forty-four years of age. He was married in March, 1837, to Ellen, daughter of William Miller, of Washington township, who bore him a family of seven children, five sons and two daughters, as follows: Sarah E., who married William D. Oakes of Ogle county, Illinois; Henry Clay, of Williamsport; William M., of Philadelphia; Horace G., a physician of Williamsport; Hannah, wife of Thomas L. Painter of Allentown, Pennsylvania; Frank H., and Seth T., both of whom reside in this city. In 1861 Mr. McCormick determined to study law, and with that intention in view, he removed Williamsport. He entered the office of W. W. Willard, and applied himself to the study of the law with such diligence and assiduity that he was admitted to practice in 1862. By his indomitable perseverance and energy, backed by a close application to business, he soon built up a large and lucrative practice, and in February, 1867, he took his son, Henry Clay, into partnership with him, and thus formed the well known law firm of S. T. & .H. C. McCormick, which stood in the foremost rank of the legal profession.

  Mr. McCormick was an excellent business man, and acquired a comfortable estate. He took an active interest in the development of every legitimate enterprise tending to promote the interests of his chosen home. He did a great deal of work in the effort to secure the location of the Middle district penitentiary in Williamsport. He was the compiler of the book of the charter, laws, and ordinances of the city, published by the council, and the very full indexes of the work bear testimony to the thoroughness of his labors.

  In early manhood Mr. McCormick was a Whig, with strong Abolition tendencies, and in 1856 he joined the Republican party, and supported Fremont for the presidency, and also voted for Lincoln in 1860. But he was strongly opposed, to the course of that party at the breaking out of the civil war, solely on constitutional grounds, and in 1861 he became a Democrat, and he remained a stanch advocate of Democratic principles up to his death. His prominent connection with the fight for honest municipal government is still vividly remembered in every part of the county. In 1869 he was elected to the common council, to represent the Second and Eighth wards, and he took such a bold and decided stand against the Nicholson pavement swindle, and was such a thorn in the side of its abettors, that he was legislated out of office by an act of the legislature, passed hurriedly in 1870, with that intention, abolishing the common council. In 1871 he was the Democratic nominee for city recorder, and made a good race, but the city was heavily Republican, and he was defeated by a small majority. In 1872 he was elected to the common council from the Eighth ward, and was continuously re-elected to a seat in that body tip to the day of his death. Most of the time he was chairman of the finance committee, and his carefulness saved the city thousands of dollars. In the council he was the recognized leader of the party that fought corruption and extravagance, and no man wielded more influence or commanded more respect from his associates. The following tribute to his memory is all editorial from the Gazette and Bulletin of December 2, 1878:

  In the death of S. T. McCormick, Esq., Williamsport has lost one of her most valuable and truly representative citizens. As a member of the common council for years, he had familiarized himself throughout with the laws, and no member of that body ever took a deeper interest in municipal legislation, nor worked harder to promote the welfare of the city. Having been honored with repeated elections to council, he appreciated the confidence reposed in him by his constituents, and looked after their interests with sleepless vigilance. It is safe to say that for nearly ten years past three-fourths of the ordinances were drawn by his own hand, and as chairman of the finance committee he labored incessantly to guard the city treasury. He was a positive as well as representative man, and always ready to give, as well as to take blows, in the advocacy of what he deemed to be right. In the course of a long public career, and in the many heated discussions which arose over matters of public policy, it would be strange if he did not make some enemies; but we venture to say that those who may have fought him with the most energy in life will be among the first to forgive and forget, now that he sleeps the last sleep. As a local legislator he was a recognized leader the "great commoner of Williamsport and his absence from the council will be severely felt, for where is the mail in that body who can fill his place" We say this in all sincerity, because we believe it to be true, and we doubt if there will be a dissenting voice, in or out of council, to the declaration.

  The common council passed the following resolutions on his death:

Resolved, That in the death of S. T. McCormick his constituency have lost the services of an able and upright representative, the city a faithful servant and this council a diligent member, his associates a friend and a wise counselor, who was, by his integrity and unswerving. fidelity, rendered especially dear.

Resolved, That by the constant care and watchfulness of deceased, the city of Williamsport rested safely from corruption, and that while others fell before temptation, he stood firm. Sustained by his high sense of honor and duty to the public, he was never once charged with even a compromise with wrong or the peopleís rights. Fearless in the discharge of his duty, he stood in front guarding the public good.

  The bar of Lycoming county also passed appropriate resolutions, two of which we here give:

Resolved, That we have learned with profound sorrow of the death of Seth T. McCormick Esq., who for many years has been a member of the bar, and was entitled to and enjoyed the highest measure of respect for his ability and esteem for his virtues.

Resolved, That in his death we fully realize that our bar has lost one of its best and most faithful members, that this community has lost a man whose indomitable energy, inflexible honesty and integrity, and spotless moral character, commanded the entire confidence of all who knew him, and his family has lost a kind and devoted husband and father.

  Mr. McCormick died in the prime of mature manhood, on the 1st of December, 1878, and his remains were followed to their last resting place in Wildwood cemetery, by many of the best and most representative citizens of his native county.

  HON. HENRY CLAY MCCORMICK, attorney at law, and ex-member of Congress from the Sixteenth district, composed of the counties of Lycoming, Clinton, Tioga, and Potter, comes from a long line of worthy ancestry. He was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1844, and is the eldest son of Seth T. and Ellen McCormick. He worked on his fatherís farm during his boyhood years, and received in the district schools of his native township the rudiments of an English education. In 1861 his parents removed to Williamsport, and for the next year he was one of the most industrious students in Dickinson Seminary. In 1863 he attended Eastmanís Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, and graduated with high honors. After his return home he engaged in keeping books for a local firm, and subsequently taught school. In October, 1864, he began to study law, and also taught school at the same time until his admission to the bar, August 28, 1866. He then went to Iowa with the intention of locating in that State, but after a few months stay he returned to Williamsport and entered into partnership with his father, under the firm name of S. T. and H. C. McCormick.

  From February, 1867, until the death of his father, December 1, 1878, the business was so continued and conducted, and since January 1, 1882, his younger brother, Seth T. McCormick, has been associated with him in the practice of the law, the firm being H. C. & S. T. McCormick. During the past twenty-five years Mr. McCormick has practiced his profession with marked success. In 1869, when barely twenty-five years of age, he was elected solicitor of the City of Williamsport, and in 1879 he was re-elected for his second term. In the latter year he was strongly urged for the appointment of United States district attorney for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and was endorsed generally by the bench and bar for the position. Mr. McCormick was one of the originators of the Lycoming Law Association, and its secretary for many years. His abilities as an attorney have become so fully recognized that no lawyer at the bar enjoys a more lucrative practice, including cases of the most important character that come before the courts for adjudication. The industry, research, method, and skill with which he prepares his cases for court have not only been favorably commented upon for years, but they have afforded the explanation of the uniform success which he has enjoyed. As a speaker, both in court and on the platform, he has shown himself well equipped, forcible, logical, and effective.

  Although Mr. McCormick had never been a candidate for any public office, in the congressional contest of 1882 he was asked by nine of the eighteen conferees of the Sixteenth district, then composed of the counties of Lycoming, Tioga, Sullivan, Potter, Cameron, and McKean, to stand as a candidate. For three weeks he steadily received these votes, and finally his supporters, at his request, voted for W. W. Brown of McKean county, and nominated him. On the 18th of August, 1886, after a protracted dead-lock of many weeks duration, Mr. McCormick was nominated for Congress by the Republican conferees on the 253d ballot, to represent the Sixteenth district. That was only ton days prior to the election, but no previous candidate in the district ever received so handsome a majority, which was 4,826. He carried the Democratic county of Lycoming, which but recently had given over 2,500 majority for the Democratic district attorney-elect, by a majority of 847, the only time in the history of the county that it ever gave a majority for a Republican candidate for Congress. Mr. McCormick took his seat in the Lth Congress, December 5, 1887, and was placed on the Committees of Railroads and Canals, and Militia. He delivered his maiden speech in Congress, May 5, 1888, in opposition to the free importation of lumber. After the House had voted to put lumber on the free list by passing the Mills bill, he appeared before the sub-committee on finance in the Senate, and it was largely through his instrumentality that the committee reported in favor of retaining the duty, thus protecting the lumbermen against Canadian competition. In the Lth Congress the Republican party was in the minority, and much of the work done by Mr. McCormick did not appear on the surf ace. But he proved a decided acquisition to the Republicans of the Pennsylvania delegation, and gained prestige second to no other first-term member of the House. At the subsequent meeting of the Republican congressional conference of his district, his course was strongly endorsed, and he received the thanks of those engaged in the lumber industry for his efforts in opposition to the Mills bill.

  Mr. McCormick has always been an earnest advocate of liberal pensions, believing that the government should care for its defenders, and those dependent upon them. In a letter to the Commander of Post No. 141, G. A. R., of Bradford, Pennsylvania, under date of October 23, 1886, in answer to a query as to his position on pensions, he wrote as follows: "Permit me to say that in my belief the time has arrived when every honorably discharged soldier and sailor should receive substantial recognition by the government, without being obliged to prove that he was physically or mentally disabled in the service. The granting of pensions to all soldiers of the late war is, in my judgment, only a question of time, and I think the time should not be delayed. These are my views, and they have not been acquired simply since I have been a candidate for Congress, but have been expressed publicly, and privately many times." On the 5th of January, 1888, he introduced in Congress a bill which he had prepared, to give every soldier who served four months or over a pension of $8 per month, but the bill was smothered in committee and never saw the light. In 1888 Mr. McCormick was re-nominated as the Republican candidate, and was re-elected by the handsome majority of 4,664, leading the presidential ticket 254 votes, which was a substantial recognition of his worth and popularity, and a marked approval of his course during his first term. In the LIst Congress he was made chairman of the Committee on Railways and Canals, and a member of the Judiciary Committee, and the Committee on Education, and was recognized as one of the ablest members from Pennsylvania. His second term expired, March 4, 1891, and since that time he has given his principal attention to the practice of his profession.

  As a business man Mr. McCormick possesses the same successful traits and qualifications that have made him one of the leading lawyers of the State. For the past decade and more he has been closely allied with the material advancement and prosperity of Williamsport. In 1873 he helped organize the Lycoming National Bank, of which he was a director for fourteen years. In April, 1887, he severed his connection with that bank to help found the banking house of Cochran, Payne & McCormick, a concern of great financial strength and popularity. Mr. McCormick has been for years a member and director of the Board of Trade. He also was the prime mover in organizing the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, was president of the company the first two years of its existence, and since then has been a director. In February, 1892, he was elected president of the Williamsport and North Branch Railroad Company, and has taken an active part in the promotion of many other public enterprises.

  Mr. McCormick was married, October 21, 1875, to Ida, daughter of John W. Hays of Erie, Pennsylvania, and has two children, Ellen and John. The family, like the ancestry for several generations, is Presbyterian in religion family, McCormick and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  SETH T. McCORMICK, attorney at law, was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, August 28, 1860, and is the youngest son of Seth T. and Ellen McCormick. He was reared in Williamsport, and received a good public school education. In January, 1878, he began reading law with S. T. & H. C. McCormick, and was admitted to the bar, September 1, 1881, and has since been admitted to the State Supreme, and United States circuit and district courts. He formed a partnership with his brother, January 1, 1882, and the firm of H. C. & S. T. McCormick has existed up to the present. He has devoted his whole attention to the practice of his profession, and as junior member of this widely known law firm, is recognized as an able and successful young lawyer. Politically he is a Democrat, but has never been a candidate for any office, and has no ambition for official preferment. He has always taken an active interest in the success of his party, and gives a hearty support to its measures and principles. Mr. McCormick is a director in the Williamsport Land and Lumber Company, and is secretary of the Williamsport and North Branch Railroad Company. He is a charter member of the Ross Club, and one of the organizers of that institution. He was married, October 21, 1886, to Belle, daughter of Frank L. Herdic of Williamsport, and has one daughter, Myra.

  JAMES M. GAMBLE, second son of Judge Gamble, was born at Jersey Shore in 1844. He received a good public school education, and graduated at Yale College in 1867. Soon after graduating he commenced studying law with his father, was admitted to the bar in 1870, and immediately entered into partnership with Robert P. Allen. The firm of Allen & Gamble existed about top years, when Mr. Gamble retired on account of poor health. In October, 1875, he married Mary L., daughter of Henry White, of which union two daughters and a son were born to him. He was elected superintendent of the Finley Sunday school in January, 1875, which under his management grew to be one of the largest Sunday schools in the city. At the end of ton years he retired. ĎMr. Gamble was also an elder in the First Presbyterian church for five years, and took an active interest in the erection of the present church edifice. He took a deep interest in whatever was calculated to improve and benefit the city, and represented the Second ward for one term as a member of the select council. He filled the office of president of the Williamsport Water Company, and was a director of the Williamsport Passenger Street Railway Company, the Bald Eagle Valley Railroad Company, and the Lycoming National Bank. He was one, of the executors of his fatherís estate, and executor of the wills of his uncles, John A. and Mathew Gamble. Some five years before his death he became interested in Eaglesmere with several other gentlemen, and was prominent in laying out and beautifying that summer resort. Among his last acts was his assistance and supervision of the erection of a chapel for religious worship at that place, which he lived to see completed and dedicated. He died, July 16, 1888, at the age of forty-four. He was a man of fine natural ability, and his early demise was mourned by a large circle of friends.

  JOHN ARTLEY BEEBER, lawyer, and president of the First National Bank of Williamsport, was born in Muncy, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 6, 1845, and is the eldest son of Teter D, and Mary (Artley) Beeber. He is a descendant of one of the pioneers of the West Branch valley, and the family has lived in what is now Lycoming county since 1783. His great-grandfather, John Beeber, was a native of Germany, who immigrated to Bucks county, Pennsylvania, prior to the Revolution, and served through the war of Independence. At its close he took up a soldierís claim on Muncy creek, built a cabin in the unbroken forest, and commenced pioneer life in his new home. He married soon after coming to this county, reared a large family, and died upon the old homestead. Jacob Beeber, grandfather of our subject, was one of John Beeberís sons. After reaching maturity he married Mary Dimm, who bore him a family of six children. After his wifeís death, he married her sister Elizabeth, of which union three children were born. He located on a farm in Muncy Creek township, in the vicinity of the original settlement, and spent his life in agricultural pursuits. His oldest son, Teter D. Beeber, was born and reared in that part of the county. He married Mary J., daughter of John and Christiana Artley, of Muncy township, and was the father of three sons, as follows: John Artley, of Williamsport; Thomas R., pastor of the First Presbyterian church of Norristown, and Dimner, a lawyer of Philadelphia. T. D. Beeber was a farmer and blacksmith, and lived in the borough of Muncy, where both he and wife died. They were members of the Lutheran church, to which faith the ancestry adhered.

  The subject of this sketch was reared in his native town, and there received a public school education. He afterwards spent four years at Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, where he graduated in 1866. He then commenced reading law in the office of Hon. William H. Armstrong, of Williamsport, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1868. Since his admission he has been engaged in the active duties of his profession, and his practice extends into the several courts of the State. He is one of the best known members of the Lycoming county bar, and is recognized as a safe, careful, and judicious lawyer. Mr. Beeber is a stanch Republican, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs, as well as in the social and material development of Lycoming county. During Leeís invasion he served in the Twenty-sixth Regiment, Pennsylvania militia. He was city solicitor in 1875 and 1876, which is the only public office he has ever hold. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, is a member of the Brandon Park Commis-sion, is one of the managers of the Williamsport Hospital, and is president of the Ross Club. For several years prior to 1884 he was a stockholder and director in the First National Bank, and May 1st of that year, he was elected president, succeeding Abraham Updegraff, the first president of that institution, which is the oldest national bank in this part of the State. He has held the presidency for the past eight years, and has filled the position with credit and ability. Mr. Beeber was married, June 21, 1870, to Alice, daughter of Daniel and Catherine Clapp of Muncy, Pennsylvania. Two children, Mary J. and William P., are the fruits of this union. The family are adherents of the First Presbyterian church. Though quiet and unassuming in his character, Mr. Beeber is one of the most progressive and representative citizens of his native county.

  JOHN J. METZGER, president judge, was born June 20, 1838, in Clinton township son of George and Susan (Dietrick) Metzger. He was educated in the public schools and Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport. After teaching school for five terms he began the study of law in 1858, under the tuition of A. J. Dietrick, of Williamsport, and completed the same under C. D. Emery. He was admitted to the Lycoming county bar in April, 1860. In 1862 he was elected district attorney for a term of three years. In 1860 he was a member of the city council. In 1871 he formed a partnership with Guy C. Hinman, which lasted for some time. From 1869 to 1872 he was connected with the Williamsport board of education. In 1872 he was elected a delegate to the Constitutional Convention. He was elected president judge of Lycoming county in 1888. He was married in 1858 to Hannah Margaret Hess, and to their union were born five children: Verus H., deceased attorney and ex-State Senator; Ella J.; George B. M. McClellan, an attorney; Floy May, and Hannah Margaret. Mrs. Metzger died in March, 1870. Judge Metzger went out twice with the Emergency Men during the late war, and is a member of the G. A. R. He is a Democrat in politics and belongs to the Lutheran church. As a lawyer Judge Metzger attained distinction at The bar, and since he has been on the bench he has given satisfaction on account of the ability he has shown and the fairness of his decisions.

  VERUS H. METZGER was one of the prominent young members of the Lycoming county bar, and was engaged in active practice up to his death, May 28, 1891. He was born in Clinton township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1859, and was a son of Hon. J. J. Metzger. He was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and graduated from Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg, in 1878. He read law with his father, and was admitted to the bar in April, 1881. Mr. Metzger was active in local politics, and in 1883 he was elected district attorney of Lycoming county, serving three years. In 1886 he was elected on the Democratic ticket to the State Senate, and served with credit in that body during his term of four years. He was a member of Company G, Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania, and served five years. Mr. Metzger was married in 1884, to Lulu, daughter of A. Conradi, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, who bore him two children: John J. and Clementine.

  GEORGE B. M. METZGER, attorney at law, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, August 3, 1864, son of Hon. J. J. and Hannah M. (Hess) Metzger. He was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and subsequently attended Pennsylvania College, at Gettysburg; he completed his course at Lafayette College, Easton, graduating from the latter institution in 18S4. He read law with his father, and was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in April, 1887. He commenced practice in partnership with his father and brother, and has since been engaged in the duties of his calling. Mr. Metzger was married in 1883, to Mary, daughter of Philip Wagner, of Easton, Pennsylvania, and has four children; Ella Zaidee; Clarice Geraldine; Hannah Margaret, and Mary W. The family belongs to St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport.

  CHARLES KING GEDDES is of Scotch-Irish descent. His fatherís great-grandfather, James Geddes, with his wife and three sons, Paul, William, and Samuel. emigrated from County Antrim, Ireland, to Pennsylvania, in 1752. William afterwards settled in Cumberland county, and was the father of seven children. John, his second son, born in 1766, studied medicine, and practiced in Newville, Cumberland county, until his death, in 1840. He married Elizabeth Peebles, daughter of Capt. William Peebles of the American army, who was killed in the battle of Long Island in 1776. They had nine children. John Peebles Geddes, their third child, born in 1799, studied medicine, and practiced with his father until his death, in 1837. In 1825 he married Catharine Irwin Maclay, daughter of Hon. William Maclay of Fannettsburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania. William Maclayís father, John Maclay, was born in County Antrim, Ireland, May 10, 1734, just fourteen days before his father, Charles Maclay, with his wife and infant son, sailed for Pennsylvania. They settled first in Chester county, removing in 1741 to what is now Lurgan township, Franklin county. John Maclay was an ardent patriot during the Revolution, and was a delegate to the Provincial Conference which met June 18, 1776, in Carpenterís Hall, Philadelphia. He afterwards served three terms in tile Pennsylvania legislature. His brothers, William and Samuel, were identified with the history of the West Branch valley during its early settlement, and both were afterwards United States Senators from this State. John Maclay had nine children. William, the fifth child, born in 1765, settled in Fannettsburg. He served two terms in the House, and one term in tile Senate of Pennsylvania, also two terms in Congress, and was appointed associate judge of Franklin county. He had twelve children. Catharine, his fifth child, born in 1799, married Dr. John Peebles Geddes in 1825. She died in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, December 22, 1873. They had six children. Charles King Geddes, their fifth child, was born in Newville, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, October 2, 1834. His father dying in 1837, left him with his sister and brothers, to the care of his widowed mother. But she was of the sturdy Scotch-Irish stock, and, though with slender means, determined to give her children a good education. In 1844 she removed to Chambersburg, where Charles attended the academy. In September, 1840, he entered the Sophomore class of Jefferson College, at Canonsburg, Pennsylvania, where he graduated, August 4, 1852. He then engaged in teaching. He taught near Pittsburg; was principal of Milnwood Academy, at Shade Gap, Pennsylvania; also of the public schools of New London, Missouri, and Kittanning, Pennsylvania, and of the Preparatory Department of Jefferson College, where he received the degree of M. A. In 1857 he studied law with James H. Hopkins of Pittsburg, and was admitted to the bar of Allegheny county, September 4, 1858. His health failing he resumed teaching. He taught in Virginia one year; was principal of Mount Lebanon Academy near Pittsburg; at McNairís Academy, Summitt, Mississippi, and New Orleans, Louisiana; and in St. Thomas Hail Military Institute, Holly Springs, Mississippi, While here the civil war began, and two months later he succeeded in getting North. In October, 1861, he took charge of the academy at Williamsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania, and in April, 1862, he became principal of the Savannah Male and Female Academy, at Savannah, Ashland county, Ohio. On the 28th of June, 1864, he resigned this position, and September 26, 1864, he located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. November 22, 1861, he was admitted to the Lycoming county bar, and since that time he has continued to reside and practice his profession in Williamsport. Mr. Geddes was married, January 28, 1874, to Sarah, eldest daughter of Henry Sproul of Williamsport, formerly of Pittsburg. She died, February 9, 1891, leaving two children, Margaret Sproul, born in 1876, and John Maclay, born in 1881. In religion Mr. Geddes, like all of his ancestors for the last 200 years, is a Presbyterian of the Old School. In politics, he is a Democrat. He has never held any public office.

  O. H. REIGHARD, lawyer, was born in what is now the Seventh ward, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, July 12, 1840, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Henry) Reighard, natives of Dauphin and Lehigh counties, Pennsylvania, respectively. Daniel Reighard was born in 1802, and came with his father, John Reighard, to Newberry, Lycoming county, in 1811, where he was one of the first settlers. John Reighard died in 1813, leaving a large family. Daniel engaged in farming, and served as justice of the peace for several years; he also erected and operated a tannery for a number of years in the Seventh ward. In 1851 he moved to Jersey Shore and engaged in the hotel business, and died there in 1862. His wife was a life-long member of the Presbyterian church. The subject of this sketch removed with his parents to Jersey Shore, and received his education in the Jersey Shore Academy. He worked at the printerís trade for nine months, when failing health compelled him to discontinue that business. He then entered the law office of Judge James Gamble, of Jersey Shore, and after a thorough course of study he was admitted to the bar in the spring of 1863. He sold his fatherís hotel property the same year, and moved to Williamsport. Soon afterwards he went to the oil fields of Pennsylvania, and was quite successful as a producer and refiner, but the money he made in these operations was lost by the failure of the banks in which it was deposited. In 1865 he returned to Williamsport, and devoted himself assiduously to the practice of the law. In 1868 he was elected on the Democratic ticket district attorney of Lycoming county, and filled the office for one term with credit and ability. In 1872 he was a candidate for mayor of Williamsport, but was defeated, as there were four candidates in the field, and as his party was largely in the minority. In 1874 Mr. Reighard was elected to the legislature, and during his term of two years he was chairman of the committee on appropriations, was a member of the judiciary committee, and also of the general committee on constitutional reform. He was also chairman of the special committee to investigate the State treasury. In 1876 he was prominently named as a Democratic candidate for Congress, and could have had the nomination, but refused to accept it. Since at time Mr. Reighard has not been actively engaged in politics. He was married, January 1, 1885, to Lizzie, daughter of Judge James Gamble, and has one son, James Gamble. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church, of Williamsport, and he was an active member of the building committee in the erection of the now church building. Mr. Reighard was largely interested in lumber and manufacturing industries of the city several years. He has valuable real estate interests, and in 1884 he erected the Reighard Block, on West Fourth street. Since 1886 his failing health has prevented him from attending to his legal practice, which he has gradually given up. He is a director in the Lycoming National Bank, the Savings Institution, and the Williamsport Water Company, and is president of the Brandon Park Commission. He is a director of Bald Eagle Valley Railroad Company, also of the Valentine Iron Company, and his many and varied interests during the years of his residence in Williamsport have made him one of the busiest as well as one of the most prominent citizens of his native county.

  J. CLINTON HILL, attorney at law, was born, June 11, 1841, at Hughesville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and is the eldest son of Dr. George Hill of Hughesville. He graduated at Pennsylvania College, Gettysburg, in 1864, Ins college course having been somewhat interrupted by service in the army. For one year he taught as professor of mathematics in Missionary Institute, at Selinsgrove, and then commenced reading law with J. & W. H. Armstrong. He was admitted to the bar, and began the practice of the law in Williamsport, in February, 1864. On the 8th of September, 1870, he was married to Catharine C., daughter of Henry Weise, of Hagerstown, Maryland, and has four children. Mr. Hill was the Republican candidate for district attorney in 1868, and was solicitor of Williamsport from 1871 until 1874. He served as a member of the common council, and was president of that body during the years 1887 and 1888. He has been a member of the school board at different times, and attorney for his school district and for the overseers of the poor of the city of Williamsport. He is a member of the common council at the present time, and president of that body. Mr. Hill was one of the organizers of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, of Williamsport, and since its organization he has served on its board of directors and as its attorney. He is also a director in the Renovo Electric Light, Heat, and Power Company, the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, of Sunbury, the West Branch Building and Loan Association, the Williamsport Board of Trade, and other organizations. He is a member of St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport, and has been one of its trustees since its organization. For the past six years he has been treasurer of the Susquehanna Synod of the Lutheran church. Mr. Hill has devoted his attention principally to the practice of his profession, and is one of the well known members of the Lycoming county bar.

  CHARLES BARTLES, JR., attorney at law, was born in Flemington, New Jersey, in October, 1843, and is a son of Charles and Eliza (Hart) Bartles of that place. His ancestors on the paternal side were of German origin, and settled in New Jersey during the war of Frederick the Great. The Harts came from Scotland prior to the Revolution, with John Witherspoon, the first president of Princeton College. The subject of this sketch was reared in Flemington, and was educated at Lawrenceville, New Jersey. He graduated at the Harvard Law School in the class of 1867, with the degree of LL. B., and was immediately afterwards admitted to practice in the courts of Boston, Massachusetts. In the summer of 1867 he came to Williamsport, and in September was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county, and subsequently to the Supreme court of Pennsylvania, and the Federal courts of the United States. For the past twenty-five years he has been engaged in the active practice of the law in Williamsport, and has built up a large and successful business. Mr. Bartles has taken an active interest in the manufacturing growth of the city, and was instrumental in starting the Solar Oil Company. He has also been interested in lumber operations, and is a director in the Caledonia Coal Company, Dents Run Coal Com-pany, and the Deer Creek Coal Company, and is counsel for the same, and is also interested in private enterprises of coal and coke. Politically he has always been an ardent Republican, and has taken an active part in promoting the interests of that party. Mr. Bartles married Mary E. Bell of Pittsburg, and has four children: Charles; Charlotte; Frederick, and Mario. He is a member of the Masonic order, and the family are attendants of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church.

  HERBERT T. AMES, attorney at law, was born in Sullivan township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, June 7, 1844, son of Thomas W. and Mary A. (Card) Ames. He was reared in his native county, received his education in the public schools, and graduated from Mansfield Normal School in June, 1867. He subsequently entered the law department of Michigan University, at Ann Arbor, Michigan, and was admitted to the bar of Washtenaw county, Michigan, March 18, 1869, by examination in the circuit court. In June following he was admitted to the bar of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and came to Williamsport, July 20, 1869. He entered the law office of Maynard, Eutermarks & Parker, and remained with them until June 1, 1870, when he opened an office for himself. He practiced alone until 1886, and then formed a partnership with Thomas H. Hammond, and the firm of Ames & Hammond has since been one of the well known legal firms of Williamsport. In 1888 Mr. Ames was requested on petition of 1,000 citizens of the county to be a candidate for president judge, but declined to ran. He is a stanch Prohibitionist, is an active worker for the principles of that party, and was the Prohibition candidate for Congress in this district in 1890. Mr. Ames has served in the city council, and was unanimously elected president of the select council, and by virtue of his office as president h was chairman of the committee that funded the city debt. He is a stockholder the Merchantsí National Bank, and is treasurer of the Keystone Paint Company of Muncy. Mr. Ames was married, December 21, 1886, to Lizzie W., daughter of Jacob Wise, of Lycoming county, and has two children: Mary C. and Thomas W. He is a member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church, is a trustee and steward of that body, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school for nine years. In 1884 he was a lay delegate to the Central Pennsylvania Conference of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Ames started in life poor, and has attained his present rank in the legal profession by hard work, an flagging energy, and in domitable perseverance.

  JAMES L. MEREDITH, attorney at law, was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, November 12, 1838, son of Isaac and Thomazine (Pennock) Meredith. His parents were natives of Chester county, and were Quakers. His mother still survives, but his father died in that county, in 1874. Mr. Meredith is the eldest of four children, and grew to manhood in his native county. After pursuing the required preparatory studies he entered Union College, New York, where he graduated in 1865. He read law under the late Hon. Daniel M. Smyser, of Norristown, Pennsylvania, and was admitted to the bar in 1867. In the spring of 1868 he came to Williamsport, where he has since continued in the active duties of his profession, and practices in all the courts of the State. Mr. Meredith is an adherent of the Republican party, and in 1871 he was elected to the office of city recorder, which position he filled four years. He was chairman of the Republican county committee in 1878. He has been a member of the school board from the Sixth ward of Williamsport, and president of the board one year and its solicitor for two years. Mr. Meredith was married in October, 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of Dr. C. C. Joslin, of Johnstown, New York. Their only child, a son, died in 1889 at the ago of twenty years. Mr. Meredith follows in the footsteps of his ancestors, by adhering to the Quaker faith, while his wife is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM W. HART, attorney at law, was born in Clinton township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 23, 1843, son of Adam Hart, a farmer during his life time, and Eleanor (Pollock) Hart. He attended the public schools of his neighborhood and completed his studies at the Tuscarora Academy and Dickinson Seminary. He then began the study of law under J. J. Metzger, was admitted to, the bar of Lycoming county in 1869, and has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. In 1874 he was elected district attorney of the county; he was re-elected in 1877, serving in that office six consecutive years. In 1882 he was elected to the State Senate, to represent the district embracing the counties of Lycoming, Columbia, Sullivan, and Montour, and served his full term of four years. Mr. Hart was a member of the judiciary committee, and also of the committee on municipal affairs and education, and that on canals and inland navigation. He has always been a stanch supporter of the Democratic party, and an ardent advocate of Democratic measures and principles. In 1884 he was an alternate delegate to the Democratic national convention held at Chicago; four years latter he represented the Sixteenth congressional district at the Democratic national convention in St. Louis, and cast his vote for Grover Cleveland. He was one of the organizers of the Merchantsí National Bank, of Williamsport, and is a director in, and solicitor for that institution. Mr. Hart was married in December, 1877, to Frances L., daughter of Dr. Hugh Montgomery, of Muncy, Pennsylvania. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, to which society his wife also belongs. Mr. Hart is now serving as solicitor for the board of commissioners, and is recognized as one of the successful members of the bar.

  JOHN J. REARDON, attorney at law, was both in Chester county, Pennsylvania, December 12, 1852. He was reared upon his fatherís farm, attended the public schools of his district, and completed his education at Maplewood Institute, Delaware county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Reardon came to Williamsport in the spring of 1872, followed the vocation of teaching, and during this time commenced reading law in the office of Hon. H. C. McCormick. He prosecuted his studies diligently, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1875. He commenced practice in May, 1876, and continued in the active duties thereof up to 1880, when he was elected district attorney of Lycoming county and served in that position three years. He has since devoted his attention to his professional duties, and has won and retained a good practice in all the courts. He is an active and influential Democrat, and has done good service for his party in both county and State politics. He served as chairman of the Democratic county committee in 1879, 1880, and 1881. Though not seeking it, he received the nomination of his party for Congress in 1890. Mr. Reardon is a member of the Ross Club, and stands high both as a lawyer and a gentleman. He was married in 1884, to Mary P. Grafius, of Lycoming county, a daughter of John S. and Sarah (Pollock) Grafius. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JAMES B. KRAUSE, attorney at law, was born in Aaronsburg, Centre county, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1854. He is a son of Rev. A. Krause, a retired itinerant evangelical minister, and Louisa (Barber) Krause, a daughter of the Rev. James Barber, of Union county, Pennsylvania. He received his education in the common schools of Baltimore, Maryland, and at Glen Rock Academy, York county, Pennsylvania, and the Union Seminary, Union county, Pennsylvania. He afterwards engaged in teaching in Lycoming county, and had charge 4 a school in Warrensville, and subsequently of schools in Anthony and Loyalsock townships. Mr. Krause read law with Hon. O. H. Reighard of Williamsport, and was admitted to the bar in January, 1878. He soon won a good practice, and is recognized as one of the industrious and able attorneys of the Lycoming county bar. He was the attorney for the school board of Williamsport for a number of years, and also for the poor district of the city. He is the projector and organizer of Vallamont, a beautiful suburb of Williamsport, and has been active in the development of that enterprise. Mr. Krause has always been a stanch republican, was chairman of the Young Menís Republican Club, of Williamsport, in the Garfield campaign, and has been chairman and secretary of the Republican county committee. He has twice refused the nomination for district attorney, when an election was possible. Mr. Krause was married, May 11, 1882, to Maggie, daughter of Mark A. Champion, of Williamsport, and has one son, Mark C. He is a member of the Masonic fraternities, and is one of the enterprising citizens of his adopted home.

  HENRY G. TROXELL, attorney at law, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1853, son of David H. and Lavina (Weiss) Troxell, natives of Chillisquaque township, Northumberland county. His father was for many years a butcher in the city market, but is now retired from active business. He served as overseer of the poor in the city, and is a prominent member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. His wife died, November 22, 1890, having borne him a family of six children. The subject of this sketch was the third child, and has always resided in his native city. He received his education in the public schools of Williamsport and at Dickinson Seminary. After completing his education he first worked on the Nicholson pavement, then in the shingle mills of L. C. Kinyon for three seasons, and next at Pennell & Zimmerís planing mill one season. He subsequently learned the bricklayerís trade, at which he worked for some time. In 1874 he entered the law office of Charles Bartles, Jr., and read law for three years. He was admitted to the bar in 1878, and has since practiced his profession in the courts of Lycoming county. He was elected to the common council in 1889, and is still a member of that body. He is a member of the Democratic State committee, and has been connected with the county committee for several years, having always taken an active interest in the success of his party. Mr. Troxell was married in 1880 to Lena Williams, of New York State, and has one child, Harry La Rue. His wife is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, while he adheres to the Methodist Episcopal.

  COL. JAMES B. CORYELL, lawyer, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1856, son of John B. and Margaret (Bingham) Coryell, and grandson of Tunison Coryell. He received his education in the Protestant Episcopal Academy, of Cheshire county, Connecticut, where he graduated in 1876. He read law in the office of Armstrong & Linn, and completed his legal studies with the Hon. Henry C. Parsons, of Williamsport. Colonel Coryell was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in 1881, commenced practice in Williamsport, and has since made a good record in the courts of his adopted home. In 1891 he formed a partnership with Emerson Collins, and the firm of Coryell & Collins are enjoying a fair share of the best legal practice at this bar. In 1886 Colonel Coryell was elected district attorney of Lycoming county, and served from January 1, 1887, until January 1, 1890. His administration of that office was highly creditable, and was characterized at all times by a strict devotion to right and justice. He is an adherent of the Republican party, and is ever ready to uphold and defend the measures and principles of that organization. Colonel Coryell is commander of the Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania, and won his promotion by hard and faithful work. He is a model military officer, and under his rigid discipline the Twelfth Regiment has attained a high degree of efficiency. Colonel Coryellís regiment was at Homestead during the great lockout at the Carnegie Steel Works in July 1892. The command won high praise for its soldierly conduct and discipline, and rendered valuable service in assisting to Uphold the laws of the Commonwealth. He is prominently interested in the social and material development of this portion of the State; is a director of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and one of the board of directors of that institution, and is actively identified with a number of the lead-ing enterprises of Williamsport. For several years he has been secretary of the Clearfield Coal Company, and has a large financial interest in the Cambria Coal Mining Company. Every worthy enterprise finds in Colonel Coryell a warm friend and a generous supporter. He was married in 1887 to Mary, daughter of Hon. C. A. Mayer, of Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, and has one son, Charles Mayer. Mr. and Mrs. Coryell are members of the Third Presbyterian church, of Williamsport.

  EMERSON COLLINS, attorney at law, was born in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 30, 1860, and is a son of John and Catharine (Hyde) Collins, natives of this county. His great grandfather, Isaac Collins, settled in Lycoming county about 1790. He entered a tract of land in what is now Loyalsock township, and was one of the very earliest settlers of that locality. Jeremiah Collins, the grandfather of Emerson, was born in this county, and is now living in Upper Fairfield township. John Collins, the father of our subject, was born in 1830, and has always been engaged in farming. His first wife was a daughter of George Hyde, and died in 1882. He has since married a Mrs. Koch, and resides in Hepburn township. By his first wife he was the father of seven children, the subject of this sketch being the third in order of birth. Emerson was reared in his native township, and received his primary education in the district schools and at Montoursville. He afterwards attended the Muncy Normal School, and took a four yearsí course at Lafayette College, graduating from the latter institution in 1884. He engaged in teaching, and was principal of the Muncy Normal School one year. He read law with the Hon. H. C. Parsons, was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in 1887, and has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. In 1890 he formed a partnership with Col. J. B. Coryell, and the law firm of Coryell & Collins stands high among the legal fraternity of Lycoming county. Mr. Collins is an active Republican, and has filled the offices of secretary and chairman of the county committee. He was a delegate to the State convention in 1890, and received the endorsement of his party in this county for Congress that year. During the last, presidential campaign, he stumped the counties of Allegheny, Lancaster, Chester, Schuylkill, and Tioga for his party. Mr. Collins was married in 1888 to Annie, daughter of Hon. Henry Johnson, of Williamsport. She is a member of the Episcopal church.

  JONATHAN F. STRIEBY, attorney at law, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming, county, Pennsylvania. December 8, 1849. His father, Joseph Strieby, was a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Jacob Strieby, one of the pioneers of Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, where the family settled prior to 1830. Joseph Strieby was born, November 25, 1817, and married Margaret Follmer, March 19, 1844. He died, April 23, 1881, and his wife, January 24,1882, both dying on the old homestead in Loyalsock township. They reared a family of six children, and were respected members of the Lutheran church of Montoursville. Our subject was reared on the homestead farm, and was educated at select schools in Montoursville and Williamsport, and completed his education at Dickinson Seminary, Gettysburg College, and Bucknell University, graduating from. the last mentioned institution in 1875. He read law with Hon. John J. Metzger, now president judge of Lycoming county, and was admitted to the bar in May, 1878. In 1882 he was the Democratic candidate for district attorney, but was defeated. From 1879 to 1882 Mr. Strieby was chairman of the Democratic county committee. In 1880 he formed a partnership with William E. Sprague, under the firm name of W. E. Sprague & Company, lumber manufacturers and dealers, and in 1888 the firm of Strieby, Sprague & Company was organized and carries on an extensive lumber business. In 1878 Mr. Strieby was married to Willie M., daughter of William. Bastian, of Butler county, Pennsylvania, and has three children: Ilai, Guy B., and Wilford J. Mr. Strieby and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JAMES B. DENWORTH, attorney at law, is the eldest son of Peter J. Denworth, a sketch of whom appears in another chapter. He was born at Easton, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1844, and came to this county with his parents in the spring of 1850. He was reared on the homestead in Nippenose valley, and there received a common school education. When Fort Sumter was fired upon, and President Lincoln called for volunteers, James B. and Hugh Denworth were among, the first to respond to the call of duty. The latter was rejected on account his extreme youth, but James B. continued on duty until the disbandment of the company in June, 1861. He re-enlisted, September 7, 1861, in Company K, Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and followed the fortunes of that regiment from the first advance of General McClellanís army on Manassas until the last campaign of the Army of the Potomac, which resulted in the surrender of Lee at Appomattox. He was thrice wounded, first at Vienna, Virginia, December 31, 1861, again in Keenanís charge at Chancellorsville, May 2, 1863, and the last time at Sailorís Creek, Virginia, April 6, 1865, three days before Leeís surrender, while in command of his company leading a charge. This last wound virtually ended his military career, as he was confined to the hospital when his regiment was mustered out in the summer of 1865. He was finally mustered out of the service, August 23, 1865, although still on crutches, which he was not able to discard for six months afterwards. Since the close of the war he has taken an active part in all that pertains to the best interests of the old soldier, and has been a member of the executive committee and officer of his regimental association ever since its organization. Under his administration as president of the association, the survivors of the Eighth Cavalry erected and dedicated at Gettysburg, September 1, 1890, a life-size granite equestrian statue, commemorative of the 135 battles and skirmishes that his regiment participated in. He has been actively identified with Post No. 2 and Post No. 64, G. A. R., of Philadelphia and Williamsport, respectively. He was Commander of the latter in 1882, and secretary of its board of managers since its incorporation, and is now president of the Soldiersí and Sailorsí Monumental Association of Lycoming county. Nine years after the close of the war, he read law with Gen. C. H. T. Collis, of Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1876, and has since practiced his profession in Williamsport. He has served over four years as city recorder of this city, and was the last person to hold that office in Pennsylvania. Mr. Denworth was married, May 26, 1885, to Mary E., daughter of Frederick Friedel, of Mifflin township, and has three children: Raymond K.; Mary C., and Hugh F. He is a stanch Republican in politics, and is a member of the Masonic order, in which he is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  JOHN G. READING, JR., attorney at law, was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, March 1, 1859. His parents were Philip G. and Evelina (Evans) Reading, the former a native of Hunterdon county, and the latter of Trenton, New Jersey. Our subject was reared in his native county, up to the age of fifteen years, and then went to Lawrenceville. He was educated at the John C. Green Preparatory School to Princeton College, and was admitted to Princeton in 1876 in September of tile same year he entered Lafayette College, and graduated from that institution in June 1880. The following November he came to Williamsport, entered the law office of Bentley & Parker, and was admitted to the bar in November, 1882. In 1885 he formed a partnership with tile Hon. Robert P. Allen, which continued up to the death of Mr. Allen, December 6, 1890. Upon the death of Mr. Allen, he took charge of the estate as executor, to which position he was named in the will. Mr. Reading is attorney for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, the Tide Water Pipe Line Company, the Pine Creek Railway Company, the Fall Brook Coal Company, the Beech Creek Railway Company, and the Wilkesbarre and Western Railway Company. He is a stockholder in the Williamsport Gas Company, and also a director and attorney for that corporation. He is chairman of the National Furniture Company, Limited, and is a director in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company and in the Lycoming National Bank; he is also secretary and treasurer of the Brandon Park Commission. Mr. Reading was married in November, 1886, to Clara F., daughter of Hon. Robert P. Allen, of Williamsport, and has one daughter, Ellen E. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church, and he is superintendent of the Sunday school in that organization. He is a Republican, and gives a hearty support to the measures and principles of that party.

  OTHO N. MILLER, lawyer, was born in Williamsport, March 11, 1861, son of Dr. William H. H., and E. Virginia (Hammett) Miller. He received his education in the public schools of Williamsport and under private instructors until the age of fifteen, when he took the Freshman course at Muhlenberg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania; the following year he entered as a Sophomore at Lafayette College, Easton, Pennsylvania, the youngest of a class of 110, and from which he was graduated in 1880. He then read law with the late Hein. Robert P. Allen, of Williamsport, and was admitted to the Lycoming county bar in July, 1883. A few months later Lafayette College conferred upon him the honorary title of A. M. While studying law he was connected with the Williamsport Sun and Banner, and also taught as a substitute in the public schools of Williamsport in all the grades from the junior floors up through the high school. Mr. Miller is a Democrat in politics, always taking an active interest in the welfare of his party, and stumped his native county of Lycoming during the presidential campaigns of 1884 and 1888. He is a communicant of St. Markís Lutheran church of Williamsport, also an active member of the Williamsport Board of Trade.

  FRANK P. CUMMINGS, attorney at law, was born in Lewis township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 31, 1854. He was educated in the public schools and at the Muncy Normal School, and began teaching in the winter of 1876-77. He continued teaching school until May, 1881, when he began the study of law in the office of J. F. Strieby. He was admitted to the bar, April 3, 1884, and has since been engaged in active practice. Mr. Cummings was one of the two examiners appointed by the respondent, in the judicial contest of 1889-90 in the Twenty-ninth judicial district, which resulted in favor of the Hon. John J. Metzger. In April, AS81, he enlisted in Company D, Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania, for five years, was promoted to corporal, May 9, 18S2, and to adjutant of his regiment, August 10th following, re-appointed January 29, 1885, and served for five years, until the expiration of his commission through the resignation of. Col. Alfred H. Stead. Mr. Cummings has for years been active in total abstinence work. In 1882 he was elected vice-president of the Catholic Total Abstinence Union of Pennsylvania; in 1888, he was elected its president, which position he held for two years. He is at present secretary of the Father Mathew Memorial Committee, appointed by the Catholic Total Abstinence Union of America, to raise a fund $50,000 for the endowment of a "Father Mathew Chair," in the Catholic University at Washington, D. C.

  CHARLES J. REILLY, district attorney of Lycoming county, is a son of John and Elizabeth Reilly, natives of Ireland, who reside in Loyalsock township, near the northern extremity of Williamsport. He was born in Philadelphia, September 23, I and is the eldest in. a family of eleven children, eight of whom are living. He received his education in the public schools of Philadelphia, which he attended eight years, afterwards taking a private course in the higher branches and as a member of the Chautauqua College, class of 1890, has read the four yearsí course. In 1874 he took charge of the shipping department of J. Bartles & Company, manufacturers, of Williamsport, and subsequently attended the Williamsport Commercial College, from which institution he graduated in 1875. Shortly afterward he took charge of the books of J. Bartles & Company, and while thus employed conceived the idea of studying medicine, but after a yearís application to the study of the science he changed his mind and determined to study law. In May, 1882, he passed his preliminary examination, and was registered as a law student with Candor & Munson, with whom he remained six months, when the necessities of his family required him to earn means for their support. He became bookkeeper for George Bubb & Sons, and while filling this position he devoted every spare moment to his lecyal studies. Having saved sufficient to permit him to resign his position, he entered the law office of J. J. & V. H. Metzger, where he completed his studies June 4, 1884, and was admitted to practice at the bar of Lycoming county. He has since been admitted to practice in the district and circuit courts of the United States, and the Supreme court of Pennsylvania. In 1885 he was elected chairman of the Democratic county committee, to which party he has always given an unwavering support, and demonstrated his ability as an organizer. He was re-elected chairman in 1886, I887, and 1888, and therefore served four years. In November, 1889, he was elected district attorney of Lycoming count by a majority of 2,868 votes, the largest majority ever received in the county for any county office. In the discharge of its duties he has shown an unflinching determination in the calls of justice, and a commendable fearlessness in the prosecution of law-breakers. He is a good, impressive speaker, and has won an enviable reputation among the members of the bar. Mr. Reilly was married in 1879 to Elizabeth, daughter of Christian Harseh, of Williamsport, and has had two children: Howard F., living, and Charles J., lately deceased. The family are members of the Catholic church, in which faith Mr. Reilly was born and reared.

  FRANK DIETMEIER, attorney at law, was born in Sasbach, Baden, Germany, November 16, 1863, son of Jacob and Catharine (Graf) Dietmeier, natives of Germany. His father was a merchant of Sasbach, and a well-to-do citizen of that town. Franz was educated in the Latin schools of his Dative land, and at the age of sixteen years he came to America. located at Freehold, New Jersey, where he continued his studies until September, 1880, and then accepted a position as tutor in the family of Peter McKeogh, of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He remarried there until the spring of 1881 and then returned to Freehold, where he taught in a private family until the following September, when he went to Norwich, Connecticut. He continued to teach languages in that city until 1883, and in June of that year visited his native land. In the meantime he had commenced the study of law, January 1, 1882, under the preceptorship of Ripley & Coolie, of Norwich, and on his return from Europe continued his studies. He was admitted to the bar at Norwich in March, 1885, and began practice at Waterbury, Connecticut. During the time that he was engaged in his legal studies he occasionally taught for the purpose of acquiring means to prosecute them. He continued practice at Waterbury, where he was also editor of the New England Wachenblatt, until February, 1888, when he came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. Mr. Dietmeier was married in 1890 to Minnie, daughter of Emanuel and Margaret Lininger, of Williamsport. He is a member of the Catholic church, and one of the prosperous young lawyers of the county.

  WILLIAM MELVIRNE STEPHENS, lawyer, was born at Lenoxville, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1856, son of William and Jemima (Hallstead) Stephens, natives of Susquehanna county. His father was an architect and contractor and removed to Scranton, Pennsylvania, when our subject was ten years old, where he soon afterwards died. A noble motherís teachings have been his guide in life, together with a sincere belief in the fatherhood of God, and Christ as his Savior and elder brother. He lived on a small farm near Lenoxville, Pennsylvania, until his sixteenth year, when with his mother he removed to Nordmont, Pennsylvania, and soon after began to teach school, which was continued for three terms. He devoted his evenings, often until midnight, as well as all his spare moments through the day while teaching and working on the farm, in pursuing his studies, until, through the material assistance of Prof. Charles H. Verrill, he was enabled to attend the Mansfield State Normal School, from which institution he graduated with the class of 1876. He at once engaged in a general commission business in Canada and Australia for the following three years, and by hard work and indomitable perseverance was successful. After visiting the East Indies, Arabia, Egypt, and Europe, while completing a trip around the world, he entered the literary and law departments of the University of Michigan at Anti Arbor, from which institution he graduated in 1882. He pursued his law studies under the instructions of Hon. Thomas M. Cooley, and was admitted to the bar of Washtenaw county, Michigan, and soon after to the Supreme court of the State, and the same year to the United States district court at Detroit. The intervals to 1885 Mr. Stephens passed in travel, lecturing and as a newspaper correspondent, visiting during the winter months all the West India islands from the Bermudas to Trinidad, and from the Bahamas to St. Thomas, as well as several of the South American countries, including the great divide between the Amazon and Orinoco valleys; during the summer months he visited many of the States of the Union, Canada, and the Maritime Provinces. Mr. Stephens came to Williamsport in the summer of 1885, and the following autumn was admitted to practice in the several courts of Lycoming county. He has been twice married, first in 1880 to May Evelyn Rood of Lenoxville, Pennsylvania, who died the following winter while at the University. In 1889 he was married to Sue M., only daughter of John E. Dayton of Williamsport, by whom he has had one child, William Dayton Stephens, deceased. He is an elder in the Second Presbyterian church, and a director in the Young Menís Christian Association; is a stockholder in the West Branch National Bank, and has large real estate interests in Williamsport and Sullivan county. He is a Republican, but takes little active part in political matters aside from presidential years when he makes an occasional stump speech, and at all times casts his vote as judgment dictates. Mr. Stephens believes in honesty, industry, and perseverance, and his motto has always been: Luck is a fool, but pluck is a hero."

  CLARENCE E. SPROUT, attorney at law, was born in Muncy, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1861, son of S. E. and Mary (Sutton) Sprout, natives of Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, and residents of Muncy, where his father is engaged in manufacturing. Our subject was reared in his native town, where he received a public school education and subsequently entered Bucknell University, Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated in 1883, and later received the degree of LL. B. from the University of Pennsylvania. He read law with Crawford & Dallas, a well known firm of Philadelphia, and was admitted to the bar in June, 1885. He commenced practice in Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the duties of his profession. Mr. Sprout is a Democrat, and has won a local reputation as an organizer and campaign speaker. He is a stockholder in various institutions in the city, and is an active supporter of every laudable enterprise. He was married in November, 1886, to Annie, daughter of Daniel Clapp, deceased, who was a prominent lumberman of Lycoming county for many years. Mr. Sprout and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  HON. WALTER E. RITTER, attorney at law, was born in Muncy Crook township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 29, 1860, and is a son of Jacob and Julia Van Buskirk Ritter. His great-grandfather, Martin Ritter, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. He had emigrated from Germany some years prior to that time, and bad settled in Berks county, Pennsylvania. His son Jacob, grandfather of our subject, subsequently came to Lycoming county, and settled in Muncy Creek township. Walter E. attended the common schools of his native township until he was seventeen years of age, and then spent five terms at the Muncy Normal School, and graduated from the State Normal, at Look Haven, in 1881. At the age of seventeen he began teaching, at a salary of $20 per month, and taught in the schools of Moreland and Fairfield townships during the winter season, from 1877 until 1880. After graduating from the State Normal he was elected principal of the Hughesville public schools, and in 1882 was chosen principal of the schools of South Williamsport, which position he filled for a period of three years. Mr. Ritter registered as a law student with Cummings & Reilly, June 19, 1884, and passed his examination and was admitted to the bar in June, 1886. He at once began practice, and has been engaged in the active duties of his profession up to the present. He has always been identified with the Democratic party, and has invariably given it his hearty support. In 1883 he was a candidate for the office of county superintendent of schools, but was defeated. In 1888 Mr. Ritter was elected to the State legislature, and was re-elected in 1890 by an increased majority, During his term in the legislature he served on the judiciary committee, the committee on corporations, and on other important committees, and took an active part in the business of the House. During his second term he was elected chairman of the Democratic caucus, which position carried with it the practical leadership of the minority side. He has served as school director and has held several other local positions of minor importance. Mr. Ritter was married in 1883, to Margaret Wallace, of Hughesville, and has two children: Florence E. and Allan G.

  NICHOLAS M. EDWARDS, attorney at law, was born in Christian county, Kentucky, December 18, 1859, son of Stephen and Mary Virginia (Carter) Edwards. He was reared in his native county, and was educated at Lafayette Academy, in that State. In the spring of 1881. he came to Williamsport, and entered the Williamsport Com-mercial College, from which institution he graduated in March, 1882. He soon afterwards began the study of law in the office of Charles K. Geddes, and was admitted to the bar, June 25, 1886. Since his admission he has been engaged in active practice in the courts of Lycoming county, and holds a high rank among the younger members of his profession. He is the present city solicitor of tile city of Williamsport. He is a Democrat in politics, and is an ardent supporter of his party.

  WALTER C. GILMORE, attorney at law, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, November 26, 1859, son of John and Rachel (Willits) Gilmore, the former a native of Northumberland county, and the latter of Lycoming county. Our subject was reared in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, where he received a common school education, subsequently attending the Muncy Normal School and Lafayette College, graduating from the latter institution in 1884. He was valedictorian of his class. After completing his education he taught in the Lenox Academy, Lenox, Massachusetts, and was principal of the high school of Williamsport two years. Mr. Gilmore read law in the office of the Hon. Robert P. Allen, and was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in July, 1887. He has since been actively engaged in the practice of his profession in the courts of the district and State, and has made a specialty of practice in the orphans court. Politically he is a Democrat; he has been chairman of the Democratic county com-mittee for the past two years, and has filled that office with credit to himself and his party. He has been a member of the school board in the Eighth ward for three years, and is the present solicitor of the board. Mr. Gilmore is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, and takes a deep interest in the growth and improvement of his adopted home. He was married in 1884 to Jennie, daughter of Charles A. Rentz, of Clinton township, Lycoming county, and hits a family of three children: Charles Edmund; Anna, and Helen. The family are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church, in which society he is a deacon. His wife is president of the Ladiesí Aid Society of that organization. Mr. Gilmore is a member of the Masonic order, and belongs to the chapter and commandery.

  HARVEY W. WHITEHEAD, attorney at law, was born in Armstrong township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 7, 1854, son of Charles and Elizabeth (Gable) Whitehead. His father is a native of Steuben county, New York, and came to Williamsport in 1846; he moved to DuBoistown in 1855 and has resided there ever since. Our subject received a common school education, subsequently attended the Muncy Normal School, and took private instruction for two years; he also took a course at Professor Davisís Commercial College. He taught school in DuBoistown five terms; in 1882 he was elected clerk of the board of county commissioners, and filled that position three years. In 1884 he was elected on the Democratic ticket to the office of county treasurer by. a majority of 970, which was the largest majority given for any candidate that year. He filled that office for three years, 1885-87, and then commenced reading law with J. F. Strieby. He was admitted to the bar, January 16, 1889, and has since been engaged in the practice of his profession. Mr. Whitehead has always taken an active interest in the public schools. He has served as school director four years, and in 1881 he was a candidate for county superintendent, but was defeated by Charles D. Riddell. He was married in September, 1883, to Laura, daughter of Henry Aurand of DuBoistown, and has four children: Charles G.; Edith C.; Harriet, and Ralph. Mr. Whitehead is a stock holder in the Athletic Park Association and the Lycoming Opera House Company. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., the Encampment, the Canton, and the Royal Arcanum.

  OTTO G. KAUPP, attorney at law, was born in Shrewsbury township, Lycoming county, June 2, 1866, son of Matthias Kaupp, a native of Germany, who came to Lycoming county in 1853 at the age of eighteen years. Here he married Catherine Hepperlin, also a native of Germany, who came to Lycoming county with her parents. They resided on a farm in Shrewsbury township until 1891, when they removed to Hughesville, to pass their declining years in the enjoyment of a comfortable competency. They are consistent members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Kaupp served in the late war as a member of the One Hundred and Ninety-second Pennsylvania Volunteers. He is a Democrat in politics, has filled various township offices, and served one term as county commissioner. Otto G. Kaupp was reared upon his fatherís farm and attended the public schools of his native township. He graduated from the Lycoming County Normal School in 1885 and from the Williamsport Commercial College in 1886, After teaching several terms in the district schools he became principal of the public schools of Hughesville, but resigned to accept a similar position at Montoursville, and in 1880 he was assistant principal of the Lycoming County Normal School. He read law with W. E. Crawford, Esq., of Hughesville, and was admitted to the Lycoming county bar in April, 1890, since when he has practiced his profession in Williamsport. While a resident of Hughesville he served as auditor of that borough, and in 1891 he was appointed solicitor to the board of county auditors. In 1891 he was chosen chairman of the Democratic county committee, after having served as secretary two years. In February, 1891, he married Katharine M., daughter of John Heller, of Fairfield township, and they are the parents of one child, Katharine. Mr. and Mrs. Kaupp are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport, of which he was treasurer in 1891. He is also a member of Brandon Lodge, No. 1007, I. O. O. F., and is one of the rising young attorneys of his native county.

  WILLIAM C. KING, attorney at law, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, February 6, 1860, and is a son of James T. and Mary R. King of that township. His grandfather, Joseph King, and great grandfather, William King, were pioneers of that part of Lycoming county. He was reared on the homestead farm, and was educated in the public schools and at the Muncy Normal School, and subsequently attended the Williamsport Commercial College. He then taught school at Ralston one year and two years in Fairfield township. He served as deputy prothonotary of Lycoming county for ton years, under William Follmer, Daniel Steck, and John L. Guinter. In 1887 he was elected to the office of register and recorder, and served until January 1, 1891. Mr. King had previously studied law, was admitted to the bar in January, 1891, and has since practiced his profession and also is at present general secretary of the Grit Publishing Company. He is an active adherent of the Democratic party; he has served as a member of the school board from the Eighth ward for six years, was secretary of the board two years, and auditor for three years. He is prominently connected with many secret organizations in Williamsport, and is an active member of the F. & A. M., the I. O. O. F., the Royal Arcanum, B. P. & O. Elks, and the Pennsylvania Society of the Sons of the Revolution. Mr. King has served three years as a private in the National Guard of Pennsylvania, was made second lieutenant of Company D, Twelfth regi-ment. in 1889, and is the present adjutant of the regiment. He is a director in the Lycoming, Opera House Company, and a stockholder in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and is largely interested in Williamsport real estate. Mr. King was married, September 15, 1881, to Elvira F., daughter of Isaac Campbell, of Lycoming county, and great-granddaughter of John Philip De Haas, a brigadier general in the Revolutionary war. One daughter, Beryl May, is the fruit of this union. He and wife are members of St. Paulís Evangelical Lutheran church, in which organization he has served as deacon for six years.

  THOMAS LYON, physician and surgeon, was born at Pennsville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1812, son of Edward G. and Sarah (Huckle) Lyon, both natives of England, born April 25, 1783 and 1777 respectively. He was the third of six sons, and after having acquired an academic education in the schools of Pennsville, Hughesville, and Muncy, he was placed under the instruction of Rev. David Kirkpatrick, an eminent teacher of his day. He studied medicine under Dr. James S. Dougal, of Milton, Pennsylvania, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1838. He at once commenced practice at Williamsport, where he has continued to the present time. When he located in Williamsport the total population did not exceed 1,000 persons and he found but one professional rival. Dr. Lyon rapidly grew in favor and in a few years acquired a practice which extended over a large territory. He is an honored member of & Lycoming Medical Society, of the Pennsylvania Medical Society, and the American Medical Association. He is a Republican in politics, but has never hold any public office except the purely professional one of examining surgeon, to which he was appointed by Governor Curtin in the early part of the civil war. The duties of the position were the examination of applicants for the positions of surgeons in the army. Dr. Lyon was married in May, 1842, to Elizabeth, daughter of Joseph R. Priestly, once cashier of the Northumberland County Bank, and great-grand daughter of the noted chemist, Dr. Joseph Priestly, To this union were born six children, four of whom are living: Fannie, who married Thomas Hays, of Philadelphia; Dr. Edward, who was graduated from Pennsylvania University in 1868, married Mary J. Lescure, and is practicing medicine in Williamsport; Sarah, who married Augustus Stearns, of Williamsport, and Jennie, who married Dr. E. B. Campbell.

  DR. SAMUEL POLLOCK was born at Milton, Pennsylvania, October 23, 1808, son of William and Sarah (Wilson) Pollock. The former was a native of Lykens valley, Dauphin county, and located at Milton in the mercantile business at an early period in the history of that borough. His children were Sarah, who married Dr. James S. Dougal; Fleming W.; Thomas; Margaret, who became the wife of Dr. William McCleery; James, who was successively Congressman, Judge, Governor of Pennsylvania, and director of the United States mint at Philadelphia, and died at Lock Haven on the 19th of April, 1890, and Samuel, the subject of this sketch. His early instructors were Judge Anthony and Rev. David Kirkpatrick. Graduating from Dickinson College in 1828, he began the study of medicine with Dr. James S. Dougal; in 1830 he entered the University of Pennsylvania, graduating in 1832. In April, 1833, he began practice at Milton, moving thence to Williamsport in June, 1838, and there he resided in the enjoyment of an extensive and lucrative practice until his death, April 28, 1887. In 1832 he married Elizabeth S. Sterling. He was a tine clinical scholar; he was also proficient as a microscopist, and took considerable interest in astronomical research.

  DR. JOHN S. CRAWFORD was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1808. He was reared in Luzerne county, and though he received a fair common school education, he afterwards obtained his principal education through his own efforts. While engaged in school teaching he read medicine; after graduating from Jefferson Medical College he began his practice in Luzerne county, but soon afterwards moved to Williamsport, where he formed a partnership with Bishop Bowman and Dr. Huntoon, and engaged in the practice of his profession. For many years he continued in active practice, and was one of the oldest physicians in the city. He organized the Lycoming County Medical Society, and was president of it for several years. He was also president of the State Medical Society at one time. Dr. Crawford was thrice married. Four children survive of the first marriage: Sarah M., widow of A. N. Harvey of Luzerne county; Lavina P., wife of J. C. Ayres of Dixon, Illinois; Charles P., of Luzerne county, and Joseph, of Jersey City, who is superintendent of the New York division of the Pennsylvania railroad. His second wife was Frances Covert, of Milton, Northumberland county, who died, leaving one soil, Wilbur F., a druggist of Williamsport. He subsequently married Mary Cushman, who survives him. He was a Republican, and quite active in local affairs. He was a member of Pine. Street Methodist Episcopal church, and later of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he held the office of trustee. Dr. Crawford was instantly killed in December, 1879, while crossing a railroad on one of his professional visits.

  WILBUR F. CRAWFORD, druggist, Newberry, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, June 16, 1851, and is the only son of Dr. John S. and Frances (Covert) Crawford. He was reared in this city, and was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He served an apprenticeship with Dr. Logan in the drug business, and graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in the spring of 1875. He soon afterwards located in Newberry, where he has since been engaged in business. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade and a director of that institution. Mr. Crawford was married in 1880 to Susan, daughter of Adam Baker of Milton, Pennsylvania, and is the father of five children: C. Ruth; Joseph W.; John S.; George Ayres, and Florence M. He and wife are members of the Lycoming Presbyterian church, in which he holds the office of trustee. He is a Republican, but takes no active interest in political affairs.

  AUGUST RICHTER, physician and surgeon, is one of the oldest and best known medical practitioners of Williamsport, where he has been engaged in the active duties of his profession over forty-one years. He was born in Coswig, Duchy of Anhalt, Bernburg, Germany, December 16, 1822, and received a good public school education in his native land. When nineteen years of age, being exempted from military duty by drawing a free ticket in the annual draft of 1842, he concluded to see some of the world, and spent several years in travel. He visited a few points of interest in his native land, and then embarked on a German steamer for St. Petersburg, the capital of the Russian empire. He spent sometime in St. Petersburg and vicinity, and thence proceeded to the medical university at Torpat, and afterwards to Lenzenhof, Finland. Here he was stricken with a severe illness from which he did not recover until early in the following summer, when he resumed his journey, and visited Riga, Frankfort, Berlin, and Schleswig-Holstein. He thence crossed to the city of Copenhagen, Denmark, and proceeded to Gotheburg, Sweden, and Christiania, Norway, where he remained one season. He then returned to Gotheburg, sailed for the United States, and, after a voyage of forty-nine days, arrived safely at Boston. He made a short visit to New Orleans, once he returned to Philadelphia, where he entered the Pennsylvania Medical College, and graduated in March, 1851. In the spring of that year he came to Williamsport, where for nearly forty two years he has been in continuous practice, and is recognized as one of the pioneer members of the profession. While serving on the Board of Health, in 1871 and 1872, Dr. Richter earnestly advocated the founding of a hospital in Williamsport, and he was instrumental in having the project carried out. He is one of the trustees of that institution, and takes a deep interest in its success and prosperity. The Doctor has filled the position of health officer in Williamsport since 1887, and to his untiring zeal and strict devotion to the duties of that office the city is largely indebted for its freedom from epidemics after the great flood of June, 1889. To the performance of his duties Dr. Richter brought an extensive medical experience, a wide knowledge of the laws of hygiene, and a determination to root out and destroy the local sources of disease. Consequently all his work has been prosecuted and carried out in an intelligent manner, and in the best interests of the whole community. He is one of the oldest members of the Lycoming County Medical Society, and is also a member of the State Medical Society, and one of the founders of the Natural Science Association. Dr. Richter was married, April 10, 1883, to Cecelia, daughter of Bernhardt Steuber, a native of Thuringen, Germany, and a merchant of Williamsport. Mrs. Richter was born in this city, and is the mother of five children, as follows: Rex, who was born October 24, 1885, and died in February, 1888; Vera Adelaid, born August 25, 1889; Ruby Augusta, born June 7, 1892, and two who died in infancy. The family are adherents of the Lutheran church, and the Doctor is a stanch supporter of the Republican party. He has served in the select council of Williamsport, and is one of the well known citizens of Lycoming county.

  BENJAMIN H. DETWILER, M. D., was born in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, October 6, 1831, and is a son of Abraham and Mary (Horning) Detwiler. His grandfather, John Detwiler, was born in Germany in 1747, and after his marriage immigrated to America in company with his brother Joseph. They separated in Phila-delphia, and it is supposed that Joseph located in the interior of the State, and that the Detwilers of York and Lancaster counties are his descendants. John Detwiler settled in Montgomery county, twenty-five miles from Philadelphia, where he purchased a tract of land and resided until his death, in 1826. He was a member of the Mennonite church. After the death of his first wife he married Mrs. Elizabeth Horning nee Hall, who survived him two years, and died in 1828. Their son, Abraham, was born in Montgomery county in 1790, and grew to manhood on his fatherís homestead. On the l1th of December, 1810, he married Mary Horning. She was born in 1790 and died in 1879, surviving her husband forty-seven years. Mr. Detwiler was a liberal supporter of education, and was the first man in Montgomery county to send his children to a boarding school. He was a strong temperance man, and was one of the first men in his locality to prohibit the use of whiskey in harvest time. He was a Whig in politics, and a Mennonite in his religious views. He died in 1832. Four children survive: Mrs. Catharine Price, of State College, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Hannah D. Price, of Ridley Park, Philadelphia; Abraham, a real estate dealer of Toledo, Ohio, and Benjamin H., of Williamsport.

  Dr. Detwiler was educated in the common schools of his native county, and at Trappe Boarding School and Union College. He attended medical lectures at the University of Pennsylvania, from which he graduated in 1855. He began practice at Cogan Station, Lycoming county, whence he removed to Linden, and in 1866 located in Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession. He is recognized as one of the leading physicians in this section of the State, and has built up a very large and lucrative practice. Dr. Detwiler was one of the organizers of the Lycoming County Medical Society, and has served as president of the same. He is also a member of the State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He was one of a committee of three physicians selected by the Lycoming Medical Society to consider the advisability of establishing a hospital at Williamsport, and was president of the pension examining board of Lycoming county for some time. He has been a trustee of the Danville Insane Asylum since its organization, and has always taken the deepest interest in the growth and progress of worthy medical institutions. Politically he is a Republican, but aside from casting his vote he finds very little time to spend on political affairs. Dr. Detwiler has been twice married. In 1857 he married Louisa, daughter of Jacob Grafflus, of Williamsport. She died in 1885, leaving three children: Thomas C., a physician of Lancaster, Pennsylvania; Elizabeth, and Mary. In 1887 he married Mary Stowe Stewart, of Beaver county, Pennsylvania. Both he and wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church, of Williamsport, and take an active interest in the social and material development of that organization.

  WILLIAM R. HULL, M. D., was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania,. February 17, 1838, son of David and Emily J. (Rittenhouse) Hull, natives of that county. When our subject was eight weeks old he removed with his parents to New Jersey, where he lived for eight years, and then returned to Northumberland county. He was educated in the common schools, and at Tuscarora Academy, in Juniata county, Pennsylvania. He read medicine with Dr. Samuel Pollock of Williamsport, and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania,. Philadelphia, in 1858. Dr. Hull commenced practice at Hepburnville, Lycoming county, and continued there up to 1862, when he was appointed surgeon of the One Hundred and Seventy-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until his regiment was mustered out in October, 1863. Previous to this he was in the surgeon generalís office at Harrisburg. At the close of the Rebellion he resumed his practice at Hepburnville, whence he removed two years afterwards to Newberry. About 1868 he located in Williamsport, where he has since practiced his profession. Dr. Hull was one of the organizers of Lycoming County Medical Society, and has filled the offices of president, secretary, and treasurer in that society, and also served as a member of the board of censors. He is a member of the State Medical Society and of the American Medical Association. He was prominent in establishing the Williamsport Hospital, was one of the charter members, and is now a member of the board of directors. He is a Republican, but takes no active part in political matters. Dr. Hull was married in 1860, to Miss J. M. Willard, a native of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and has three children: David Frampton, manager of the Mahaffey kindling wood factory; Waldo W., a practicing physician, in partnership with his, father, and Clara J. The family are attendants of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM H. MILLER, physician and surgeon, was born near Springtown, Pennsylvania, August 23, 1825, son of Rev. Henry S. Miller, and Camilla (Clemens) Miller. His father was educated in Easton and was a Lutheran minister, holding charges in Bucks and Montgomery counties for fifteen years, and thereafter in Lebanon, Reading, Norristown, and Phoenixville, dying at the latter place in August, 1887, at the age of eighty-six years. Dr. Miller passed his youth principally in Montgomery county, where he received his education and read medicine under Dr. Hahn. He was graduated from the Pennsylvania Medical College in 1849, and first began practice in Hancock, Maryland, where he soon built up a lucrative business, which, on account of failing health, he was compelled to abandon, and afterwards located in Baltimore City. He removed to Williamsport in 1858, where he has been in active practice ever since. He has taken an active interest in the Lycoming Medical Society, and has served as its president. He was married in 1851 to Elizabeth Virginia Haminott, and to this union there survive three children. W. H. Haydn, Otho N., and Norman. The Doctor and his wife are prominent members of St. Markís Lutheran church.

  HENRY H. FESSLER, M. D., was born in Old Lycoming township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 20, 1834, son of John and Mary (Myers) Fessler, natives of York county, Pennsylvania. John Fessler was one of the pioneers on the "Long Reach," Lycoming county, where he purchased a tract of land, and cleared a farm upon which he and wife resided until death. They reared a family of thirteen children, and were Lutherans in their religious views. Henry H. is the twelfth child, and was reared on the homestead farm, receiving a common school education. He afterwards attended Dickinson Seminary, where he completed his studies. He read medicine under Dr. E. H. Horner, of Newberry, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1858. Dr. Fessler commenced practice in Clinton county, moved from there to Cameron county, and in June, 1865, he came to Newberry, Lycoming county, where he has since been actively engaged in the duties of his profession. He is considered one of the leading physicians of the county, and has a large practice in the country surrounding Williamsport. He keeps well abreast with the improvements in medical science, Ďand in 1882 he took a special course of studies. The Doctor is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and has served as a censor of the same. He is a member of the Board of Health, and in politics he is a stanch Democrat. Dr. Fessler was married, September 20, 1858, to Wilhelmina, daughter of James Funston, of Newberry, who is the mother of four children, all of whom are dead except Rachael Gertrude, wife of Walter Good, of Newberry.

  GEORGE D. NUTT, M. D., was born in Burlington county, New Jersey, April 17, 1845, son of Noah and Beulah (Budd) Nutt. He was reared in his native county, and was educated at Heightstown Institute, of that State. He read medicine under Dr. Jacob Grigg, of Pemberton, New Jersey, attended lectures at the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania, and was graduated in 1869. Dr. Nutt came direct to Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession, and has won and retains a large and lucrative practice. He is recognized as one of the leading medical practitioners of Williamsport, and devotes his whole attention to the varied duties of his calling, paying special attention to surgery. He is a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society, the State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association, and has served as president of the county society for two years and held the office of corresponding secretary for a long period. Dr. Nutt has taken an active interest in the social and material development of Williamsport. He is a member of the First Baptist church and is a trustee in that organization. The Doctor is one of the original stockholders of the Williamsport Electric Light Company. He is an ardent supporter of the Democratic party, and though not devoting much time to political affairs, he always manifests an interest in the success of the candidates and measures of that organi-zation. Dr. Nutt was married in 1876 to Kate E. Tubbs, of Lawrenceville, Tioga county, Pennsylvania. She is the daughter of James Tubbs of that county, and has two children: John B., and Abbie Louisa.

  EUGENE B. CAMPBELL, M. D., was born in Tiffin, Seneca county, Ohio, May 28, 1850, and was reared in his native county. He was educated in the public schools of Tiffin, and completed his studies at the St. Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri. He came to Williamsport in 1869, read medicine with Dr. George W. Rittenhouse, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in the spring of 1873. Dr. Campbell immediately began practice in this city, in the office with his preceptor, and on the death of Dr. Rittenhouse the large practice of that gentleman fell to his care. He not only retained that practice, but extended it into a wider field, and is one of the busiest and most efficient practitioners in this section of the State. Dr. Campbell is recognized as an able, conscientious, and skillful physician, and is untiring, in his devotion to the many duties of his profession. He is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and always manifests the deepest interest in the growth and improvements of medical science. He was physician to the Williamsport Hospital for several years, but resigned that position in the spring of 1892 to accept a trusteeship, and has had a wide and varied experience in nearly every branch of medical practice. He served eight years as pension examiner, four years as president and four years as secretary of the board. Politically he is a Republican, and has taken considerable interest in public affairs; his large practice, however, gives him little time to devote to political matters. Dr. Campbell was married November 24, 1881, to Jennie P., daughter of Dr. Thomas Lyon, one of the oldest physicians in Williamsport. One child, Elizabeth P., has blessed this union.

  HORACE G. MCCORMICK, M D., was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 16, 1850, son of Seth T. and Ellen (Miller) McCormick. His parents removed to Williamsport when our subject was a child, and he was educated in the public schools of that city, and at Dickinson Seminary. He taught school in this county two years, and read medicine under Drs. Pollock & McVicker. He attended lectures at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, from which he graduated, March 11, 1874. In April of that year he commenced the practice of his profession at Montoursville, and remained there until December, 1886, when he went to Philadelphia and took a special course. In April, 1887, he located in Williamsport, where he has since built up and now enjoys a lucrative practice. He is regarded as one of the leading physicians of the city, is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, of which he was president in 1890-91, and 1891-92, and is connected with Lycoming County Anatomical Society. He is also a member of the State Medical Society, and is at present chairman of the committee on State medical legislation. He served as coroner of Lycoming county from January, 1876, until January, 1879, and during President Clevelandís administration he held the position of examining surgeon of pensions in this district. Dr. McCormick has always taken an active interest in the progress of education, and served as school director in Montoursville three years, and is now filling the same position in the Sixth ward of Williamsport. December 15, 1875, Dr. McCormick married Margaretta, daughter of George Hill, of Williamsport, and has three children: Martha; Seth T., and Dorothy. The family are attendant at the Third Presbyterian church, of which society Mrs. McCormick is a member.

  HOWARD CHEYNEY, M. D., was born in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 29, 1854, son of George B. and Annie (Bailey) Cheyney. He was reared in his native city, where he attended the public schools, and graduated from the West Chester Normal School. He read medicine under Dr. Wood, of West Chester, and attended lectures at Hahnemann College, Philadelphia, where he graduated in 1874. He came to Williamsport the same year, and engaged in the practice of his profession, and is now the oldest Homoeopathic physician in the city. Dr. Cheyney has won and retained a large and lucrative practice, and enjoys the respect and confidence of the families with whom he has been professionally connected. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, also of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and is medical examiner of the latter society. The Doctor is a Democrat, but finds little time to spend in public affairs, and though offered the office of coroner, his large practice prevented him from accepting it. Dr. Cheyney was married in November, 1880, to Anna, daughter of the late Judge Samuel Linn, and has one child, Jean. The Doctor and his wife are members of the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JEAN SAYLOR-BROWN, M. D., was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, in December, 1843. She is a daughter of Daniel and Catharine (Crouse) Saylor, natives of that county. At the age of nine years she removed with her parents to Cleveland, Ohio, and in 1854 they came to Williamsport. She took the degree of A. B. at Dickinson Seminary in 1862. She subsequently read medicine, and in 1874 she graduated from the Womenís Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, and at once engaged in the practice of medicine in Williamsport. She has built up one of the most extensive practices of any physician in the city, and enjoys the respect and confidence of the leading members of her profession. She was one of the first physicians to take an active part in the establishment of the city hospital, and one of the first to contribute financial support to that institution. Dr. Saylor Brown is one of the trustees of the hospital, also a member of the executive com-mittee, and much of its success is largely due to her efforts. She is a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society and of the State Medical Society. She is the wife of William D. Brown of Williamsport, and is one of the best known practitioners of the city.

  JAMES L. A. BURRELL, M. D., who died in Williamsport, October 24, 1891, was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, June 30, 1847,. son of Samuel and Lydia (Ilgen) Burrell. He remained in his native county until he was eighteen years of age, and received a good English education in the public schools. He afterwards attended school at Selinsgrove and Gettysburg, and taught one year in the latter place. In the meantime he had taken tip the study of medicine, and after teaching one year at Gettysburg, he attended lectures at the University of Pennsylvania. He read medicine with Dr. Charles Horner of Gettysburg for One year, and with Dr. Frank Hinkle of Columbia two years, and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1877. He at once commenced practice at Salona, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, but in 1879 he removed to Williamsport. From that date up to his death Dr. Burrell was recognized as a careful and conscientious practitioner, and with the passing years he built up a large and lucrative practice. He was a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society, the State Medical Society, and the American Medical Association, in all of which he manifested the deepest interest. He was a Democrat in his political views, and served as a member of the city council. Dr. Burrell was married in 1878 to Margaret S. Swope of Gettysburg, and at his death left a family of three children: James; Blanche, and John Swope. The unexpected death of Dr. Burrell was one of the saddest events in the history of the medical fraternity of Williamsport, and his memory will long be cherished by his contemporaries.

  EDWARD D. LUMLEY, M. D., was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, March 2.1, 1837, son of Patrick T. and Margaret (Dowling) Lumley, who cattle to the United States in 1850 and located in Baltimore, Maryland. Edward D. was then twelve years old, and he grew to manhood in Baltimore, receiving his education in the public and private schools of that city. He studied for a civil engineer, and followed his profession nine years, a part of the time in the construction of the Northern Central railroad from Harrisburg to Sunbury. He then concluded to turn his atten-tion to medicine, entered the office of Dr. J. W. Peale, of Sunbury, and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania at the session of 1870-71. Dr. Lumley commenced practice in Sunbury, Pennsylvania, in partnership with Dr. Peale, prior to graduating, and practiced alone at Northumberland three years, coming to Lycoming County in 1869. He located at Rocktown, south of the river, where he remained for fifteen years. He then removed to Williamsport, and enjoys a large and lucrative practice. Dr. Lumley is a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society, and has been surgeon of the Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania, for the past six years. Politically he is a Democrat, but takes no active part in political affairs. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum. He was married in 1859 to Martha Jane, daughter of his preceptor, Dr. J. W. Peale, of Sunbury. Four children have blessed this union: Joseph; Jennie; Annie, and Maggie.

  WILLIAM M. DU FOUR, M. D., was born in New York City, March 22, 1840, son of Dominick and Amanda (Morgan) Du Four. He was reared in that city and edu-cated in its public schools, and served as assistant librarian in the Astor library for six years under Dr. Joseph G. Cogswell. In January, 1861, he went to South America for the benefit of his health, and remained in that country six months. In December, 1862, he came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, but left in 1866) and returned in 1876; bore he has since resided. He studied medicine, and attended lectures at Hahnemann Medical College, Philadelphia, from which he graduated in 1880. He at once commenced practice in this city, and has since been engaged in the active duties of his profession, making a specialty of the diseases of women. Dr. Du Four is a member of the Homeopathic Medical Society of Pennsylvania, and is one of the representative practitioners of that school in this part of the State. In 1862 he enlisted in the Thirty-Seventh New York Volunteers, and served three months as corporal of his company. In 1864 he again joined the army, enlisting in the Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was quartermaster sergeant of his regiment. He is prominent in G. A. R. circles, and is Past Commander of Reno Post, No. 64. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery. He is also a member of the K. of P. and the R. A. Politically the Doctor is a Republican. In February, 1888, he was elected to the school board, and re-elected in 1891, and is now president of the board. He is a director in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. February 1, 1892, he become a member of the firm of Harry K. Smith & Company, gentsí furnishers. Dr. Du Four was married, January 3, 1866, to Mary, daughter of Mahlon Fisher, of Williamsport, who is the mother of three sons: William, who died in 1889; Joseph A., and Charles F. He and wife were formerly members of the Third Presbyterian church, in which body he served as trustee, but they now belong to the First Presbyterian church.

  S. S. KOSER, M. D., was born in Shippensburg, Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, April 9, 1852, son of Samuel and Mary (Deardorf) Koser. He was reared in his native county and the city of Philadelphia, and was educated at Pennsylvania ,College and the University of Pennsylvania. He read medicine under Drs. Alexander Stewart and William Popper, and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1873. He commenced practice in Schuylkill county, where he prosecuted his profession four years, and then spent three years in Europe perfecting himself in the knowledge of medical science. In 1882 he located in Williamsport, where he built up and now enjoys an extensive practice in that city and surrounding country. Dr. Koser is a specialist of the eye, ear, and throat, and devotes most of his attention to that practice. He is a member of the State Medical Society, also of the International Congress of Oculists and Ear Surgeons. He is a member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, A. F. & A. M., and in politics is a Republican. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and a liberal supporter of churches and schools. Dr. Koser is a stockholder in the Dom6rest Machine Company, a director in the Royal Braid Works, and has large real estate interests in Williamsport.

  WILLIAM H. RANDALL, M. D., eldest son of 0. H. Randall, was born in Cogan House township, Lycoming county, December 18, 1855. He was reared in Williamsport, and after receiving a public school education he attended the academy in Oxford, New York. He read medicine with Dr. Thomas Lyon, of Williamsport, and graduated from Jefferson Medical College in 1878. He commenced practice at Trout Run, and practiced at various points in Lycoming and Sullivan counties lip to 1884, when he located in Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the duties of his profession. Dr. Randall was married in 1879 to Miss R. C. Updegraff of Williamsport. She is a member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  LOUIS SCHNEIDER, M. D., was born in Huntington, Pennsylvania, June 22,1844, oldest son of Louis and Mary H. (Losch) Schneider, natives of Germany. Dr. Schneider came to Williamsport with his parents when ten years of age, and was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He then commenced the study of medicine in the University of Pennsylvania, and graduated from the Kentucky School of Medicine, at Louisville, Kentucky, in 1865. In the meantime he had seen nearly two years service as medical cadet, United States Army, and served from 1863 until the close of the war in the hospitals of the Union army. After the war had ended he located in Charlton, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, and there practiced his profession until his removal to Williamsport in, 1884, where he has since continued in the active duties thereof. Dr. Schneider is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and was president of the same in 1888. He is also a member of the State Medical Society and the American Medical Association. He served as an United States pension examining surgeon during President Clevelandís administration, and was a member of the Board of Health of Williamsport for one year. The Doctor is a stanch Democrat, and is now serving his. third term as a member of the board of education from the Eighth ward, of which, he was president in 1889. He is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and is, popular among the old soldiers of Williamsport. Dr. Schneider was married in 1875, to Jennie E., daughter of John H. Chatham, of Clinton county, Pennsylvania. One son, George Chatham, is the fruit of this union.

  J. P. CONNELLY, physician and surgeon, was born June 20, 1859, in Cogan, House township, Lycoming county, son of James and Mary (Clark) Connelly. His, parents were natives of Ireland, and emigrated to America in 1852. They settled on a farm in Cogan House township, where they died, the mother in 1874, and the father in 1889. Both were members of the Catholic church. They were the parents of four children: Mary, who married David McEvilla; Thomas; Anna, who married Delaney Smith, and J. P. Dr. Connelly was educated in the common schools and the Muncy Normal. He taught school for seven years, and in 1883 began the study of medicine with Dr. Nutt. He was graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons at Baltimore in 1886, taking second honor in a class of 150. He at once associated himself with Dr. Nutt, and has built up a lucrative practice. Dr. Connelly is a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society, and has been its secretary for the past three years. He also belongs to the Pennsylvania State Medical Society, is assistant secretary of the same, and is a permanent member of the American Medical Association. He is secretary of the Lycoming Anatomical, Association, and is a surgeon of the Williamsport Hospital. Dr. Connelly was married in 1888 to Catharine Burrows; they have three children: Irene; James, and Joseph. He is a Republican in politics, and with his family belongs to the Catholic church.

  G. FRANKLIN BELL, M. D., was born in Salladasburg, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 27, 1860, son of Stephen and Amelia (Litzelman) Bell, the former a native of Frankfort, Germany, and the latter of Cherry township, Sullivan county,. Pennsylvania. His father is one of the pioneer millwrights of Lycoming county, and has erected many of its oldest mills. He is a stanch Democrat, and has filled various offices in Mifflin township, where he now resides. The subject of this. sketch was the fifth child in the family of Stephen Bell, and was reared in his Dative township. He attended the public schools, and afterward spent one year at Dickinson Seminary and two years at the Muncy Normal School. He subse-quently taught for three years in Mifflin township. He read medicine with Dr. Thomas W. Meckley, of Jersey Shore, and graduated from the College of Physicians and Surgeons, Baltimore, Maryland, in 1885. Dr. Bell commenced practice in Cogan House township, coming to Williamsport in the fall of 1886, and opened an office in Newberry. He enjoys quite an extensive practice; in 1887 he was elected on the Democratic ticket coroner of Lycoming county, and re-elected in 1890. He 19 now serving his second term in that office. Dr. Bell is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and has been a member of the board of censors for the past two years. He is also a member of the State Medical Society, and of the American Medical Association, and was a delegate to the medical convention held at Reading, Pennsylvania in 1800. He served as a member of the Williamsport Board of Health for three years. Dr. Bell was married in July, 1885, to Minnie J., daughter of the late John M. Thomas, of Millville, Pennsylvania, and has two children: Stephen Roscoe and Warren Dalton.

  THOMAS CARROLL RICH, M. D., was born in Indianapolis, Indiana, December 23, 1843, son of George and Louisa (Andrus) Rich, natives of Connecticut; he lived in his native city until eight years of age, and then removed to Rochester, Indiana, near Chicago, where he grew to manhood. In August, 1862, he enlisted in the Union army, and his regiment was assigned to the Fourteenth Army Corps, under General Thomas. He participated in the various campaigns of the Army of the Cumberland, and was with Sherman in his march to the sea. He was wounded in front of Atlanta, Georgia, and near Warrenton Junction, Virginia, and was mustered out at Washington, D. C., after the great review in June, 1865. He afterward studied medicine, and graduated from the medical department of Georgetown College and tile National Medical College, both of Washington, and subsequently from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. He located in the latter city, and practiced his profession there until August, 1887, when he came to Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the active duties of his calling. Dr. Rich was a United States examining surgeon for pensions in Philadelphia twelve years, and fills that position in Williamsport at the present time. He was appointed a surgeon on the Philadelphia and Erie and Northern Central railroads at Williamsport, January 1, 1888 and has since filled that position. During his residence in Philadelphia he was on the staff of the Howard Hospital for many years. He is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and is also a member of the State Medical Society. Dr. Rich was married in 1874 to Sallie J. Howard, of Philadelphia, and has four children: Charles OíNeil; Mary A.; Susie, and Louise. The family are members of the Second Presbyterian church, and the Doctor is connected with the Masonic fraternity.

  JOHN A. KLUMP, M. D., was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, June 15, 1856, son of Charles F. and Annie Elizabeth (Sebastian) Klump, natives of Germany, who settled in Tioga county. His mother died in 1876, and his father is a retired farmer living in Delaware. Dr. Klump is the youngest of seven children, and remained in his native county until nine years of age, when he went to Dover, Delaware. He was educated at the Dover high school, and afterwards took a special course of studies at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport. He commenced the study of dentistry with his brother, Dr. G. W. Klump, in 1877, and at the same time was engaged in reading medicine. He attended the University of Pennsylvania, where he graduated in 1880 from the dental department and the following year he graduated from the medical department of that institution. Dr. Klump commenced practice in Harrington, Delaware, and remained there six years, when he returned to the University of Pennsylvania, and took a course in its post graduate department, afterwards coming to Williamsport in the spring of 1887. In the past five or six years he has built up a good practice, and enjoys the confidence of the families to whom he ministers the healing art. He is a member of the Lycoming County Medical Society, and served as its treasurer for two years; he is also a member of the State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, and the West Branch Valley Medical Association. He is a Republican in politics, but takes no active part in public affairs. Dr. Klump was married in 1800 to Amanda L. Wolcott, of Harrington, Delaware. He and wife are members of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  CHARLES W. YOUNGMAN, physician and surgeon, is a native of Lycoming county, and a son of George W. Youngman. He was educated in the Williamsport high school and Dickinson Seminary. He read medicine with Dr. William Hull, and was graduated from Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, in 1883. After serving one year as resident physician in the Jefferson Medical Hospital he came to Williamsport, where he has since followed his profession. He is a member of Lycoming County Medical Society, and is one of the surgeons of the Williamsport Hospital. Dr. Youngman is married to Margaret, daughter of John Porter, proprietor of the Eagle Hotel; they are the parents of one child, Rachel P.

  CHARLES D. HUNT, M. D., was born in Milford, New Jersey, March 23, 1863, son of John H. and Elizabeth (Johnson) Hunt, now residents of Williamsport. When our subject was five years old his parents removed to Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood. He received a public school education, and was then engaged in business for four years, after which he learned the machinistís trade. In 1880 he came with his parents to Williamsport, which he has since made his home. His father is a member of the lumber firm of Strong, Deemer & Company. Dr. Hunt read medicine with Dr. Doane, and graduated from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania in 1887. He immediately began practice in this city, and has since built up quite a lucrative professional business. He is a specialist of the eye, ear, and throat, and keeps fully abreast with the latest discoveries in medical science. He is a member of the State Medical Society. Dr. Hunt was married in 1889 to Marie, daughter of August Schumann, of Williamsport, and has one daughter, Helen. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and an active adherent of the Republican party.

  DAVID WALTER SPENCE, M. D., was born in Moncton, New Brunswick, March 22, 1864, son of David and Margaret (McLaren) Spence, who are now residents of Williamsport. At the age of twelve years he left his native place and went to Boston, Massachusetts, and graduated from the Boston high school at the age of fourteen. He then entered the drug store of J. T. Brown & Company, with whom he remained four years, and graduated from the College of Pharmacy in Boston. He subsequently entered the McLean Insane Asylumí as apothecary and medical student and remained there two years; he next entered Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, where he took a two yearsí course. He engaged in the practice of medicine at Hazleton, Pennsylvania, and after practicing two years returned to Jefferson Medical College and was graduated in 1888. He located at Valatie, New York, and practiced there until November 1, 1889, when he came to Williamsport, where he has since continued in the duties of his profession. He enjoys a good practice, making a specialty of womenís diseases. He is the surgeon of the Demorest Sewing Machine Company and has recently opened the Williamsport Private Sanitarium, in connection with Dr. P. W. Von Scheliba. Dr. Spence was married in 1889 to Gertrude, daughter of M. Burr Casselberry of Pottstown, Pennsylvania. His wife is a member of the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport. The Doctor is a Republican, and is a member of the K. of G. E., I. O. O. F., and the Knights of Maccabees.

  JOHN P. HAAG, physician and surgeon, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania; September 20, 1864, son of Philip and Sarah (Lehman) Haag. He received his education in the Binghamton Institute, Binghamton, New York. He read medicine under Dr. Max J. Reinhold of Williamsport, and was graduated from the Hahnemann Medical College in 1888, having been previously graduated in surgery in 4886. He began his practice in Williamsport, and has built up a good business. He is a member of the State Medical Society, is a Republican in politics, and belongs to the Knights of the Maccabees. He was married 11 1889 to Eva, daughter of James Derr, of Williamsport. Dr. Haag and wife are members of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  MRS. M. G. COLEMAN, M. D., is the eldest daughter of John and Mary (Anderson) Young, of Glasgow, Scotland, where the subject of this sketch was born. She came with her parents to the United States in 1827, and first settled in New York, whence her father removed to Rhode Island, where he was engaged upon the public works. The family subsequently lived in Pottsville and Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, and at several other points whither his business called him. He finally settled in Lycoming County, where he was manager of the Astonville Iron Works. He was also con-nected with the Morris Run Coal Company in a similar capacity for many years, and, being a practical geologist, he was for some time mineral agent for the Mount Savage Iron Works in Maryland. He subsequently purchased a farm in Tioga county, and died in 1875 at the residence of his eldest son in Troy, Pennsylvania. The death of his wife occurred in 1861. He was the eldest son of Robert Young, the highest worthy Grand Master in the Masonic fraternity at Glasgow, Scotland, at the time of his death. The subject of this sketch received an academic education at Elmira and Canandaigua, New York. She subsequently taught school at Ralston, Jackson, and Block House, Lycoming county, and at Blossburg and Tioga, Tioga county, and was governess two years on a plantation at the South. After the death of two brothers and a sister from typhoid fever within a period of eight days, because of improper treatment, as she fully believed, she resolved to study medicine. She read medicine two years, and attended lectures three years at the Pennsylvania Medical University, graduating in 1858. She opened an office at Williamsport, where she has been engaged in the active duties of her profession for the past thirty-four years. She is a close student, and keeps fully abreast of contemporary progress in medical science. She is the first lady physician to locate in the West Branch valley, or in fact, in northern Pennsylvania. She makes a specialty of womenís diseases, and has fitted up her home for the care and comfort of patients from a distance. Her office contains the Hoffman electro-o-therapeutic bath cabinet, where she gives Russian, Turkish, electro-vapor, and electro-medicated baths. She was married in 1864, and has one son, Albert C., of Washington, D. She is a member of the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  ANDREW S. RHOADS, D. D. S., was born in Moreland township, Montgomery county, Pennsylvania, March 14, 1831. son of William and Elizabeth (Scott) Rhoads, natives of Montgomery and Bucks counties, respectively. His father was a cabinet maker and undertaker; he worked in Philadelphia for a number of years, and also kept a store in Montgomery county. He came to Williamsport in 1859, where he engaged in cabinet making and undertaking, and died in 1863. His widow survived him until 1884 and was a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. Andrew S. was the third son in a family of seven children, and was reared in Montgomery county; he was educated in the public schools, and graduated from the Loller Academy, in that county. He afterwards studied dental surgery in Philadelphia and practiced there until 1858, when he came to Williamsport. He at once opened an office in that city, and is now its second oldest dentist, and enjoys a large and lucrative practice. Dr. Rhoads is a member of the Susquehanna Dental Association, and is recognized as a leading member of his profession. He was one of the original stockholders of the First National Bank of Williamsport, also of the Williamsport Bridge Company, and was a director in the latter institution for many years. He is a member of the firm of Jenks, Rhoads & Company, Limited, shirt manufacturers and laundrymen, which business was established in 1886. He is a Republican, has served as a member of the school board, and is at present representing the Second ward in the common council. Dr. Rhoads was married in 1861 to Catharine G. Harris, whose father, William Harris, was at one time sheriff of Lycoming county. One son, Joseph G., has been born of this union, and is a member of the firm of Jenks, Rhoads & Company. The Doctor is a member of the Second Presbyterian church, in which he holds the offices of deacon and trustee. He was one of the organizers of the Young Menís Christian Association of Williamsport, and is a member of that society.

  G. W. KLUMP, of the firm of Klump & Hertz, dentists, was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, May 20, 1841, son of Charles and Annie Elizabeth (Bastian) Klump. His father is a native of Germany, and came to Pennsylvania in boyhood, was educated in the schools of Tioga County, and engaged in farming. He after-wards removed to Delaware, where he now resides. His mother was a native of Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, and her grandfather, George Bastian, owned the land on which Newberry now stands. The subject of this sketch was reared and principally educated in his native county. In 1863 he entered the United States Signal Corps, and served as an acting signal officer until the close of the war. He studied dentistry, graduated from the Pennsylvania Dental College, and in 1867 he located in Williamsport, where he has since practiced his profession. Dr. Klump is recognized as one of the leading and successful dentists of the city. He is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank and the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He is a member of the State Dental Society, and is at present its treasurer, and a member of the State examining board. He is also a member of the American Dental Association, and is one of the clinical instructors of the dental department of the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Klump was married, September 10, 1872, to Annie M., daughter of John I. Berry, and has one child, George W. B. He and wife are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church, in which he is an older. He is a Republican, and a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  N. ROBERT HUBBARD, dentist, was born in Russell, Massachusetts, July 12, 1859, son of William Henry and Sarah (Perkins) Hubbard, natives of the same place. His father was a member of the Thirty-fourth Massachusetts Regiment during the late rebellion, and died of sickness in the hospital at Alexandria, Virginia. Our subject was reared in Springfield, Massachusetts, where he received a common school education. He studied dentistry under two preceptors, took one course at the Philadelphia Dental College in 1881, and was graduated from the University of Maryland in 1889. He began practice in Springfield, Massachusetts, and in the fall of 1882 he removed to Williamsport, where he was associated with Dr. Mundy until 1885, at which time he established his present office and has since enjoyed a lucrative practice. He was married in June, 1888, to Miss Lizzie, daughter of John J. Everett, of Lock Haven. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, and is a Republican in politics.

  CHARLES W. HUNTINGTON, of the firm of Rhoads & Huntington, dentists, was born in Orwell, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, December 11, 1852, son of the Rev. Charles and Eliza Ellen (Ridgway) Huntington. His father was a native of New York State, and a minister in the Presbyterian church; his mother is a native of Pike county, Pennsylvania, youngest daughter of Charles Ridgway. Charles W. was reared in Port Jervis, New York, and was educated in the public schools of that town. He studied dentistry, and graduated from the Philadelphia Dental College in February, 1886. He came to Williamsport, April 1, 1886, formed a partnership with Dr. Rhoads, and has since practiced his profession as a member of the firm of Rhoads & Huntington. Dr. Huntington was married in 1882 to Alice, daughter of David B. Kinne, of White Lake, Sullivan county, New York, and has two children: Amy Hortense and Barton Kinne. He is an older in the Second Presbyterian church, is clerk of the session, and is assistant superintendent of the Sunday school. He is connected with the I. O. O. F., is a member of the Young Menís Christian Association, and politically is a stanch Prohibitionist. He cast his first vote for Smith and Stewart, Prohibition candidates, in 1876. Dr. Huntington is descended in the ninth generation from the emigrant ancestor of his family on American soil. The family history is traced to 1632. Samuel Huntington, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, was a member of this family.

  JOHN B. HALL was born in Geneva, New York, June 1, 1804, son of Moses and Phoebe (Burrows) Hall. He received a fair education and learned the blacksmith trade. Ill health compelled him to give up this vocation for some time, during which he cared for his aged grandfather, John Hall, after which he began work for his father, who promised to give him his shop and tools upon reaching his majority. His health again failing, he traveled for a season, afterwards clerking in a store for a few years. About 1825 he formed a partnership with his father and did a prosperous business in a foundry at Geneva until 1832. Their beginning was the manufacture of ploughshares by hand power and subsequently by engine. Mr. Hall was married in 1826 to Eugene, daughter of Peter Millspaugh, of Orange county, New York. She was a milliner by trade, and at the time was engaged in business with Mr. Hallís sister, Harriet Hall. Soon after marriage her husband purchased his sisterís interest and Mrs. Hall continued the millinery trade until 1830 when they sold. In 1830 Mr. Hall came to Williamsport on a visit, and being encouraged by his friend, Dr. James Hepburn, he located here in 1832. A business arrangement was effected between him, Dr. Hepburn, and Tunison Coryell, and the engine which Mr. Hall had built while in Geneva was transported to Williamsport on wagons, and located in a building erected for a foundry by Messrs. Hepburn and Coryell, where the Williamsport Savings Institution is now located. Here these gentlemen, Cornell, Hepburn and Hall, conducted the first foundry in this part of the state, under the firm name of John B. Hall & Company. Among the important articles manufactured by them were the turn-out castings for the railroad from Columbia to Philadelphia, and the wicket castings for the Pennsylvania canal. In 1840 they constructed a building on ground which they had previously purchased, the present site of the Williamsport Machine Company. After the firm of John B. Hall & Company located in their new quarters, they increased their machinery by putting in several new lathes, planers, etc. In 1842 the firm dissolved and Mr. Hall did a large business for a number of years. During this time John A. Montgomery was a clerk for Mr. Hall for several years and afterwards his partner. Mr. Hall sold the foundry to Bowman, Vanderbilt & Murray, and in one year bought it back again and continued the business until 1865, when he sold to A. T. Nichols, and it was finally merged into the Williamsport Machine Company. He has since been retired from active business cares, although largely interested in real estate. He was one of the first directors of the First National Bank of Williamsport, serving many years, and is also one of the original stockholders of the West Branch Bank. He was one of the organizers and is a director of Wildwood cemetery. He was formerly identified with the Whig party, is now a Republican, and has served in the city council. His wife died, December 30, 1883, leaving no issue, but they reared and educated ten children, nine of whom were relatives. Mr. Hall was one of the organizers and original elders of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport in 1833, and is the only one living of the original official members of that organization. He was also one of the organizers of the Second Presbyterian church in 1840. He gave $2,000 to, assist in the erection of the first church edifice for this latter organization, and $7,000 for the construction of the present building. He has been an elder for that congregation ever since its organization, and he and the widow of his brother, Stephen W. Hall, are the only two living of the original members of that church.

  PHILIP AUGUSTUS MOLTZ, deceased, was born in Germany, February 22, 1825. His parents, John and Catherine Moltz, came to Baltimore, Maryland, when Philip was one year old, and he there grew to manhood, receiving but a limited education. He learned the machinistís trade in the Baltimore and Ohio railroad shops, of Baltimore, and worked there until 1854, when he came to Williamsport. He continued working at his trade in this city for two years, and then purchased the shop of Mayby & Bowman, now Rowley & Hermance, and carried on business until 1868, when he sold the shops, but had to take them back again in 1871. During that time he engaged in the planing mill business, in partnership with William G. Elliot. In 1877 he sold his machinery plant to Rowley & Hermance, and retired from active business, but did not live to enjoy the fruits of his industry, as he died, April 1, 1878. Mr. Moltz married Maria Harvey, of Baltimore, who survives him. Eight children were born of this union: William R., deceased; Jacob J.; Augustus I ; Jennie; Jerome; Annie, wife of F. J. Arend; Margaret M., wife of George Maxwell, and one who died in infancy. Mr. Moltz was a Democrat, and served in the com-mon council of Williamsport. He was a stockholder in the Lycoming National Bank, and in the First National Bank. He was connected with the Masonic order, and was a member of the Episcopal church.

  JACOB J. MOLTZ, proprietor of machine shop and foundry, was born in Baltimore, Maryland, July 5, 1851, and is the oldest surviving son of Philip A. Moltz. He was educated in the public schools of this city, and at Dickinson Seminary. He started as a check boy for William L. Purdy & Company, and afterward clerked for W. G. Elliot in the dry goods business, and subsequently for Elliot, Dietrick & Kline, remaining in that business for about five years. In 1870 he began to learn the machinistís trade with his father, and after completing his trade he worked for his father and afterward for Rowley & Hermance, until going into business. In 1878 he formed a partnership with his brother Jerome, and the firm of Moltz Brothers carried on business up to June 30, 1885, when the firm was dissolved, and our subject has since continued alone. Mr. Moltz is a Democrat, and has been a member of the council one term. He has been treasurer of the Academy of Music since 1870. He is a prominent Mason, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery. Mr. Moltz was married March 30, 1875, to Annie M., daughter of George Keller of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and has had four children: Ralph Elliot, May Keller, and two who died in infancy. The family are attendants of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, of which organization his wife is a member.

  JEROME MOLTZ, proprietor of the Variety Iron Works, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, October 27, 1860, and is the youngest son of Philip Augustus Moltz. He was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and learned the machinistís trade in his fatherís shop. In 1878 he engaged in business with his brother Jacob J., under the firm name of Moltz Brothers, which partnership existed until June 30, 1885. He established his present business, March 2, 1886, and manufactures all kinds of machinery. Mr. Moltz was married, August 15), 1885, to Elizabeth May, daughter of Elijah Gould, of Williamsport, and has had four children: Clyde, deceased; Harold; Gould, and Merrill. He is liberal in his religious views, and independent in politics.

  E. A. ROWLEY, of the firm of Rowley & Hermance, manufacturers of woodworking machinery, has been prominently identified with the growth and prosperity of Williamsport for many years. He was born in Lewis county, New York, May 16, 1836, and is a son of Isaac and Laura (Hunt) Rowley, natives of the same county, and farmers by occupation. The family is of English descent. Four brothers of that name immigrated to America soon after the coming of the Mayflower, and settled near New London, Connecticut, and from them it is believed all of the Rowleys in the United States are descended. Our subject was reared in Rome, New York, and at the age of sixteen he went West, and is virtually the architect of his own fortune. He located in Michigan, and spent a portion of his time in learning the machinistís trade, and also conducted a large farm some four years. He thus earned money with which to prosecute his education, and attended Michigan Union College, at Leona, Michigan, a branch of Oberlin University. Mr. Rowley remained in the West fourteen years, and in the spring of 1868 he located in Williamsport, and engaged in a general machine business. In January, 1875, he formed a partnership with A. D. Hermance for the purpose of manufacturing machinery, and the firm of Rowley & Hermance became in a few years one of the most prominent and successful institutions of the kind in this part of the State, and it has won and retained an enviable reputation in the several markets of the country.

  Mr. Rowley was chairman of the National Furniture Company from its organization up to 1892, when he sold his interest in that concern. He also was one of the organizers, and is now president of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company of Williamsport; was among the organizers of the Kettle Creek Coal Mining Company, and has been one of its directors since the beginning. He was a director of the Lumbermanís National Bank until it went into voluntary liquidation, arid was succeeded by the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, an organization with a capital of $500,000, and having many of the leading business men of the city backing it. Mr. Rowley served as vice-president of the latter institution from its organization up to the death of Robert P. Allen,. December 6, 1890. In January, 1891, he was elected president, and has since filled that position in a creditable and satisfactory manner. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank and the Merchantsí National Bank, and was a director in the latter until his election to the presidency of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He was one of the organizers of the Self-Locking Buckle Suspender Company, and is president of the same. He is also president of the Culler and Hawley Furniture Company, and vice-president of the Backus Manufacturing Company, two of the later additions to the manufactories of Williamsport. Besides his handsome home on West Fourth street, he owns a fine stock farm near the city, also valuable real estate in the West and in Washington, D. C.

  The constant demands of his many and varied interests make Mr. Rowley a very busy man, but he always finds the time to lend a willing and generous support to every worthy object. As president of the board of trustees he has taken a commendable interest in the Young Menís Christian Association of Williamsport, and he was the first man to subscribe towards the erection of the new Association building, on Fourth street. He was among the first to recognize the bright future of Eaglesmere as a summer resort, and proved his faith in its ultimate success in being the first citizen of Williamsport to erect a cottage at that place. Though a stanch Republican, he has taken no active part in political matters, but always performs well the duties of an American citizen. He is a member of the First Baptist church, and has been a trustee in that society for many years. He is a liberal supporter of the religious, charitable, and educational institutions of his adopted home, and is recognized as a progressive and public spirited citizen. Mr. Rowley was married, November 10, 1866, to Emma P., daughter of Judson Olmstead of Hudson, New York, and has two children: Robert E., a Junior of Yale College, and Georgia Etta, a pupil at the Misses Masters School, Dobbs Ferry, New York.

  ALBERT D. HERMANCE, Of the firm of Rowley & Hermance, manufacturers, was born in Saratoga county, New York, August 8, 1847, and is a son of Richard and Emeline (Dubois) Hermance, natives of New York State. His father was a farmer, but after settling in Saratoga county he erected a large foundry and machine shop, and engaged in the manufacture of stoves. He is the inventor of the low-down reservoir attachment for ranges and cooking stoves, now in general use throughout the country, and is also the patentee of many other stove attachments, and is well known among the stove manufacturers in that part of the country. Albert D. is the third in a family of five children; he was educated in the common schools and at Stillwater Seminary, and spent a short time at Fairfield Seminary. He remained in his native county up to 1860, and at the breaking out of the rebellion he went to Troy, New York, and engaged in a sash, door, and blind factory, to learn that business. In August, 1864, at the age of seventeen, he enlisted in Company C, Twenty-first New York Cavalry, and was immediately sent upon detached service. He served on detached duty until the close of the war, and was then mustered. out. In the autumn of 1865 he came to Williamsport, and found employment with Culver, Barber & Company, remaining with them until 1868. He then went to Green Island, New York, and took charge of Crampton & Beldenís blind factory, which was the largest institution of the sort in the United States at that time, and remained with them four years. In 1872 he returned to Williamsport, and took charge of the planing mill of Culver, Barber & Company, which position he occupied one year. He also had charge of the American Match Stick Company for a short time. In the meantime he had originated a woodworking machine, which he patented in the spring of 1873, and then commenced manufacturing his patent. He traveled through the State introducing and selling his machine, and had a gratifying success. In January, 1,875, he entered into partnership with E. A. Rowley, and the present firm of Rowley & Hermance was organized. Mr. Hermanceís extensive practical experience has had much to do with the success of this firm. He is the originator of the Hermance Chemical Company, and is a stockholder in the Otto Chemical Company, the plants of which are located in McKean county. He is a large stockholder in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company, and a director in that institution. He is also a director in the First National Bank of Williamsport, and a stockholder in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, and the Williamsport Water Company, and is a member of the Kettle Creek Coal Mining Company, and president of the Backus Manufacturing Company, which has a capital of $250,000. Mr. Hermance has large real estate interests in Williamsport, also in Dakota and New York States. He was one of the organizers of the Ross Club, in which he is a director. He has always taken an active interest in political affairs, and has served as a member of the common council of the city. He is a stanch Republican, a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R. and is connected with the Masonic fraternity. Mr. Hermance was married in 1870 to Agnes, daughter of E. M. D. Levan, of Williamsport. There are few business men of this city who have taken a deeper interest in its later growth and prosperity than Mr. Hermance, and few who have shown greater enterprise in the development of its manufacturing resources.

  THOMAS MILLSPAUGH, manufacturer, was born in Sullivan county, New York, October 14, 1839, son of Marcus and Polly (Mills) Millspaugh. He resided in his native county until he was nearly seventeen years of age, and received a common school education. He came to Williamsport, March 25, 1855, and became apprenticed to John B. Hall, to learn the machinistís trade. After completing his trade he worked as a journeyman in different parts of the country. In 1870 he formed a partnership with his brother, John H., under the firm name of Millspaugh Brothers, and opened a machine shop on Third street, Williamsport. They were soon afterwards joined by E. A. Rowley, and the firm of Millspaugh, Rowley & Millspaugh began the manufacture of woodworking machinery. The plant was burned in 1875, and the Millspaughs bought Mr. Rowleyís interest and rebuilt the works on the former site. They continued there for three or four years, then purchased their present site, and began the manufacture of engines, etc. In 1882 the Williamsport Machine Company was organized, and the manufacture of woodworking machinery resumed, and since 1888 the whole plant has been devoted to that line of business. Upon the organization of the company our subject became secretary and treasurer, which position he has since held. Mr. Millspaugh is prominent in the Masonic order, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, commandery, council, and consistory. He is an active Republican, and was elected to the city council from the Fourth ward in 1890, and is chairman of the finance committee. Mr. Millspaugh was one of the organizers of the Williamsport Suspender Company, and is secretary and treasurer of the company. He was married, July 6, 1866, to Margaret A., daughter of Thomas and Catharine Mackey, of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania. Three children. have been born of this union: Laura C.; Marcus, and Henry W. The family are members of the Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is steward,. and he is also president of the board of trustees of Park Avenue chapel.

  JOHN H. MILLSPAUGH, manufacturer, was born in Sullivan county, New York, April 30, 1846, son of Marcus and Polly (Mills) Millspaugh, natives of Orange. county, New York, and farmers of Sullivan county. Our subject was reared and educated in his native county. He came to Williamsport in 1863, and learned the machinistís trade under John B. Hall, afterwards spending one year in Binghamton, New York. He next had charge of the Buckeye Machine Works of Toledo, Ohio, for one year. In 1870 he formed a partnership with his brother Thomas, under the firm name of Millspaugh Brothers, and opened a machine shop on Third street, Williamsport, and did "a general repairing business. They were soon afterwards. joined by E. A. Rowley, when the firm was changed to Millspaugh, Rowley & Millspaugh, and they began the manufacture of woodworking machinery. Their shops were burned in 1875, and the Millspaughs purchased Mr. Rowleyís interest and rebuilt the works on the former site. They continued the business up to 1878 or 1879, when they purchased their present site, enlarged the business, and began the manufacture of engines and circular and gang saw mills. In 1882 F. H. Sweet was admitted to partnership, and they resumed the manufacture of woodworking machinery, and since 1888 the whole plant b as been devoted to that line of business. Their trade in this branch had so rapidly increased, that they were obliged to his continue the manufacture of engines and saw mills. After the admission of Mr. Sweet the name of the firm was changed to the Williamsport Machine Company, and still goes under that title. Mr. Millspaugh is a director in the Merchantsí National Bank, and is one of the most active business men in the city. He is a Republican in politics, and served as a member of the common council one term. He was married in 1870 to Alice, daughter of Edward Kramm, of Williamsport, and has three children: Mabel B.; Ella K., and Alice Elsie. Mr. Millspaugh is a member of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is steward, and a teacher in the Sabbath school. He is vice-president of the Young Menís Christian Association, and is a director in that body.

  FRED H. SWEET, general manager of the Williamsport Machine Company, was born in Athens, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1844. His parents, John S. and Mary (Carmon) Sweet, came to Williamsport in 1854, where the former became a prominent contractor and builder. He erected many of the prominent buildings of the city, but has now retired from active business. He is a member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which faith his wife died in 1871. They reared a family of one son and three daughters, Fred H. being the youngest of the family. He was educated in the city schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He learned the carpenterís trade with his father, followed it for four years, and then engaged in contracting and building. He subsequently followed pattern making for one year and then became foreman of the pattern shop of A. T. Nichols, with whom he continued until the failure of that gentleman. For the succeeding six years he, bad charge of the pattern department in the machine works of Rowley & Hermance, and in 1883 he associated himself with the Millspaugh Brothers, and organized the Williamsport Machine Company, of which he has since been the general manager. Mr. Sweet is one of the organizers of the Williamsport Suspender Company, is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, and is one of the directors and a member of the building committee in the erection of the new opera house. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, commandery, and council. He is a Republican in politics, and an active supporter of that party. Mr. Sweet was married in 1869 to Mary Jane, daughter of William Sharar, of Williamsport, and has two children: Harry, and Alice.

  WILLIAM P. RILEY, proprietor of the Valley Iron Works, was born in 1828 in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, where his father, Patrick Riley, was at that time engaged as a contractor on the Lehigh canal. His parents were natives of Ireland; his father was a member of the Catholic church, and his mother was brought up in the Church of England. In 1830 his father secured a contract on the West Branch division of the Pennsylvania canal commencing a short distance below Williamsport, and extending to Loyalsock creek, at which time his family removed to Lycoming county. Upon the. completion of this contract Mr. Riley relinquished the business, which he had followed for several years, and purchased a farm in Hepburn township, where the subject of this sketch, a child of two years when his father located in this county and the second in a family of six children, was reared and obtained his education at the local schools. In 1839 the family removed to Williamsport, where William, who was still quite young, was variously employed in summer and attended school in winter. In 1845 he engaged with John B. Hall to learn the trade of iron molder, which occupation he followed with but little interruption until after the outbreak of the rebellion. He enlisted in the One Hundred and Ninety-second Regiment, and was discharged from the service in August, 1865. Very soon after his return he took measures for the establishment of the business in which he had been educated, resulting in the formation of the firm of Sechler, Riley & Company, composed of Michael Sechler, W. P. Riley, and his brother Daniel. The works were adapted to the manufacture of stoves, plows, and light castings. During the first year the firm was changed to Heathcote, Riley & Company, and subsequently to Riley & Maitland, who continued until 1878. Upon the retirement of Mr. Maitland in that year Mr. Riley assumed sole control, since which time the establishment has been known as the Valley Iron Works. The character of the product has also changed, stoves and plows having long since been superseded by machinery of various kinds. The leading specialty is the Valley Automatic Engine, patented and placed on the market in 1886. The favorable reputation of this engine is attested by orders from every State and Territory of the Union, as well as Canada, Mexico, South America, India, and Japan. Mr. Riley was married in 1852 to Mary A., daughter of Harman Yost, of Lewisburg, Union county, and to this union four children have been born: Francis H., who died in 1856; Edward H. and William C., both of whom are employed with their father, and Walter Lee, who was accidentally killed in 1887 at the age of eighteen. Mr. Riley is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R. He is a Republican in politics, but has never held or sought public office. Himself and wife are members Of the Presbyterian church.

  ISAAC BARTON, treasurer of the E. Keeler Company, was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1838, son of Isaac and Mary A. (Maitland) Barton, natives of that county. His father was a mechanic and worked at his trade all of his life. He died in Berks county, and his widow survives and resides in Reading. Isaac was reared in his native county and received a public school education. He lived prin-cipally with his grandfather, and after leaving school at the age of eleven years, he began work in a woolen factory in Reading, Pennsylvania, where he remained for three years. After boating on the canal for one season, he carried the mail on horseback for three years from Reading to Philadelphia and Sunneytown, making a trip every day in the week except Sunday. In 1854 he began the trade of boilermaker with Thomas, Carson & West at Norristown. One year later this firm failed, and Mr. Barton worked at the following places: Tamaqua, Mauch Chunk, Allentown, Reading, Wetherly, Hazelton, Aurora, Illinois; Aurora, Indiana; Memphis, Tennessee, and Scranton, Pennsylvania. He came to Williamsport in 1864 and was with the firm of J. Heathcoat & Company until 1878 when the firm failed. It was subsequently reorganized under the firm name of the E. Keeler Company, of which he is at present the treasurer. During the war Mr. Barton served as one of the Emergency Men who assisted in repelling the invasion of his native State. He was married in 1866 to Susan Keeler, of Norristown, who died in 1881; they had one child, who was drowned in the Susquehanna river. Mr. Barton is a member of the I. O. O. F., the O. U. A. M., and the P. 0. S. of A. He is a stanch Republican, and an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  JOHN ARTHUR, proprietor of the Park Machine Shops, was born in Scotland, in August, 1819, son of William, a ship carpenter, and Elizabeth (McConachy) Arthur. He received his education in the schools of his native country and learned the blacksmith trade. In December, 1839, he immigrated to America and was first employed in Simmonsís ax factory at Trenton, New Jersey. From there he moved to Burlington, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, where he cleared a farm, erected a steam and water mill on Brownís creek, and was extensively engaged in manufacturing lumber and shipping the same on rafts down the Susquehanna river and to New York and Philadelphia markets. He came to Williamsport in 1865, and one year later erected a blacksmith shop which has grown to its present size and capacity, and in which he makes a specialty of repairing and manufacturing saw mill machinery. In 1887 he established a similar business in Emporium, Pennsylvania, and conducted the same successfully until 1891, when he sold. He is a Republican in politics, and has served as a member of the common council for two years. He was married in 1841 to Miss Nancy A., daughter of William Knapp, of Burlington, Bradford county, and to this union have been born four children: Elizabeth, who married C. K. Whiting; William; Lawrence, and John. Mr. Arthur is a member of the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JAMES THOMAS was born in Liberty township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, December 31, 1848, and is a son of Isaac and Elizabeth Thomas, the former a native, of Pembrokeshire, Wales, born May 16, 1813, and the latter born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, June 13, 1809, in the brick house that formerly stood on what is known as the Fritz property, East Third street, one of the first brick buildings erected in Williamsport. She was a daughter of Samuel and Margaret Landon, well known pioneers who stood high in the community. Isaac Thomas came to the United States in 1839, and located in Tioga county, Pennsylvania. He was an expert mineralogist, and was identified with the first mining interests near Blossburg and Morris Run. He afterward became extensively engaged in farming, and at the time of his death, which occurred in 1888, he was the owner of a large amount of real estate in that county. Mrs. Thomas survived her husband only one year. They reared a family of six children: William L., Margaret J., wife of Merrick Crandle of Bradford county, Pennsylvania; Samuel L., who died in 1885; John; James, and Henry. The surviving sons, excepting the subject of this sketch, are residents of Tioga county.

  James received a public school education, and remained on big fatherís farm laboring hard in the interest of his parents until he attained the age of twenty-three years. In 1873 he engaged in the agricultural implement business, the territory in which he worked comprising Tioga and adjoining counties. He removed to Williamsport in 1878, where he enlarged and continued that business. Mr. Thomas is one of the pioneers of this branch of trade in central Pennsylvania, and has probably done more to give the business tone and character than any other man in the State. He commenced business on what would now be considered an extremely small capital, which money he earned while employed on his fatherís farm. His principle in life was, to go carefully and according to the amount of his capital, and it is admitted that he has built up through the passing years the finest wholesale and retail trade in his line in central Pennsylvania. In 1889 he realized the necessity of erecting a carriage and machinery repository on East Third street, known as Thomasís Block, giving him the most commodious quarters in the State.

  In 1878 Mr. Thomas assumed the management of the business of the South Bond Chilled Plow Company in Pennsylvania and adjoining States, and by his sterling and persistent push he has organized a territory and established a trade equaled by but few manufactories in the country, and during the time he has commanded the largest salary of any man connected with the company. He is strictly conscientious, as well as painstaking, has always looked after the smallest details of his business, and owes his success to his indomitable industry and keen business foresight. Mr. Thomas is one of the directors of the Williamsport Board of Trade, is a stockholder and director in the Merchantsí National Bank, and is identified with many other leading enterprises of Williamsport. He is largely interested in real estate, and is recognized as one of the prominent and enterprising business men of his adopted home. He is a strong Republican, and though generally supporting the men and measures of his party, believes that only the best men should be elected to office. Mr. Thomas was married, October 7, 1874, to Clara A., daughter of S. H. Levegood of Liberty, Pennsylvania, who has borne him five children: Ward Lu Clair, a bright and promising boy whose young life was cut short by death, August 6, 1891, in the sixteenth year of his age; Romaine W.; Ruby E.; James Raymond, and George L. Mr. Thomas and family are connected with the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JOSIAH EMERY Was born in Canterbury, New Hampshire, November 30, 1801 and traces his ancestry through Josiah, Moses, John, John, John, John, to Nathan Emery. He was the third of sixteen children born to Nathan and Betsy (McCrillis) Emery and attended Kimball Union Academy in his native State until the age of nineteen, when he entered Dartmouth College. Here he remained until reaching his majority, and then followed teaching for six years. He was graduated from Union College, Schenectady, New York, in 1828, and read law in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, where he located in 1829 and practiced that profession from 1831 to 1871. He served as district attorney for Tioga county, and as commissioner of bankruptcy and of drafts during the war. He took an active interest in literary work, was trustee of the Wellsboro Academy for many years, frequently wrote for various literary journals, and published his recollections of early life in Tioga county, which attracted much attention. He came to Williamsport in 1871, practiced his profession for a short time, and was for nine years a member of the school board, serving one term as president of that body. He founded the public school library in Williamsport, and the Emery school building was named in his honor. He was a self-made man in the strictest sense of the word; in politics he was a Whig, voted for William Henry Harrison, and became a Republican when that party was organized. He served as postmaster in Tioga county during the administration of James K. Polk. Mr. Emery was married, February 12, 1830, to Julia Ann, daughter of Hon. John Beecher, of Tioga county, who died, July 24, 1871, followed by her husband, April 28, 189.4. Both were prominent members of the Episcopal church, and to them were born eleven children: Mary C., Charles D., Martha P., who was educated at Dickinson Seminary, taught school in the South prior to the rebellion, married Charles S. Bundy, and died, December 19, 1867; Eva V., who married Rev. E. J. Gray; Elizabeth E.; John Beecher; William V.; Clara B., who married John H. Price, and died June 7, 1884; Annie, deceased; George, deceased, and Frank B. Mary C. Emery, the eldest of these children, was for many years a teacher at Wellsboro, and was teacher of mathematics in the Huntsville Female College, Huntsville, Alabama, when the rebellion broke out. She then returned to her home in the North. She was first married, December 21, 1854, to I. M. Ruckman, and to this union was born one child, Annie E., who died November 16, 1860, in Alabama. Mrs. Ruckman was married a second time, to George S. Ransom, who was born, July 1, 1820, in Warren county, New York, and died in Williamsport in 1888. Mr. Ransom received a common school education, and followed lumbering the greater part of his business life. He located at Montoursville in 1863 and embarked in lumbering on Loyalsock creek until 1865, when he removed to Williamsport. He was an older in the Second Presbyterian church, and a Republican, in politics. He was the father of one son, William E., who is a lawyer.

  Charles D. Emery, son of Josiah, was admitted to the Lycoming county bar, and served as acting, consul in South America. He now resides in Seattle, Washington, and was married, March 8, 1858, to Lavina D. Evans.

  Elizabeth E. Emery, daughter of Josiah, was graduated from Dickinson Seminary, and February 10, 1863, was married to Joshua Knapp, who was born January 27, 1837, and died May 7, 1869. She went west in 1880 as a missionary under the auspices of the Episcopal church, and for a time was principal of Hope school, Springfield, Dakota.

  JOHN B. EMERY was born, December 28, 1843, son of Josiah and Julia Ann (Beecher) Emery. He was educated in the common schools and the Wellsboro Academy. He enlisted in Company I, Forty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and saw service through the entire war, participating in the battles of Hilton Head, South Carolina, and with the Army of the Potomac at the second battle of Bull Run, South Mountain, and Antietam. He was promoted corporal for meritorious conduct at Antietam, and was with the Ninth Corps in their operations in Kentucky and Mississippi, and with the Army of the Potomac from Cold Harbor to Petersburg. December 14, 1863, he was captured at Flat Gap, Tennessee, and confined in Belle Isle and Richmond prisons until April 2, 1864, when he was released. He was tendered the position of first lieutenant of Company G, Twenty-fifth Regiment, in December, 1864, but declined the responsible opposition. Returning from the war he became a clerk in the freight office of the Northern Central railroad at Williamsport. In March, 1866, he went to Kansas, and in company with thirteen others crossed the plains with a wagon train destined for Salt Lake City. They were attacked by Sioux Indians, September 4th, on Lodge Pole creek, and all their stock was driven off by the savages, who surrounded them until the 11th of September, when troops from Fort John Buford, on Laramie plains, came to their relief. Mr. Emery acted as night herder for a Mormon mule train from September 16th to October 16th, when they reached Salt Lake City. He returned to Williamsport in the spring of 1867 and became clerk for the Northern Central railroad. In 1870 he went to Wisconsin in the employ of a large lumber firm. In the spring of 1871 he was appointed agent for the Catawissa railroad at Tamaqua, and in 1872 he became general agent for the West Branch Lumber Company, and freight solicitor for the Pennsylvania railroad. In 1881 he established the lumber firm of J. B. Emery & Company, which was merged into the Emery Lumber Company, December 7, 1891. Mr. Emery is one of the founders of the Daily Republican, was one of the organizers of the Ross Club, is a stockholder in the Athletic Park Association, and is a charter member of Reno Post, G. A. R., and of the Union Veteran Legion. He is a stalwart Republican, has been chairman of that partyís county committee, and has served as auditor, school director, and select councilman for the city of Williamsport. April 1, 1890, he was appointed postmaster of this city, and has greatly improved the service, having added two mounted carriers and established a sub-postoffice and two stamp offices. He married Helen A. Otto, and to this union have been born two children: Frank O. and Julia. His brother, William V. Emery, is a member of the Emery Lumber Company, and was married to Emily S., daughter of W. B. Leas, and to them have been born three children: William L.; Mary S., and Eugene M.

  GEORGE S. EVES, retired, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1825, son of John and Jemima (Woolever) Eves. John Eves was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1795, and married Jemima Woolever, a native of New Jersey. They moved to Lycoming county in 1847, settling on a farm near Montoursville known as the Governor Shulze farm; there they remained six years and then returned to Columbia county, where he died, September 12, 1856. His father, William Eves, was a native of Dublin, Ireland, and settled in Columbia county, before the beginning of the Revolutionary war. Three of John and Jemima Evesís children are living, and residents of Williamsport: William; George S., and Clark W. George S. received his education in the common schools, and in 1852 located in Montoursville, where he followed the blacksmith trade until 1863, when he removed to Williamsport. He was elected county treasurer in 1863, filled that office for one term, and afterwards engaged in the mercantile business with J. C. Green and did an extensive business under the firm name of Green & Eves for fifteen years. In 1880 he was elected to the State legislature and was a very creditable and valuable representative. He sold his mercantile business in 1883, and has lived a retired life ever since. He was married in 1869 to Miss Ada, daughter of George and Cornelia Cramer, of New Jersey. Mr. Eves was reared in the faith of the Quaker church, and is a Democrat in politics.

  EMANUEL PIDCOE was born in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 20, 1817, and is the youngest son of Benjamin and Anna Pidcoe. He was reared on the homestead farm, and received a common school education, He followed agricultural pursuits in his native township up to 1890, when he moved into the city 9f Williamsport and retired from active business. He has conducted a milk route for twenty-two years and is still the owner of the same. Mr. Pidcoe was married, January 24, 1841, to Amy, daughter of James V. Marshall of Hepburn township, and has one son, Milton S., who was born in 1843, and is a member of the milling firm of Hayes, Pidcoe & Company of Montoursville. He was originally a Whig, and subsequently a Republican, and filled the office of assessor in Hepburn and Eldred townships. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church, in which denomination he fills the position of elder.

  HORACE H. BLAIR was born in Chillisquaque township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, March 9, 1814, son of Samuel and Rebecca (Hetherington) Blair. His father was a native of Ireland, and came to America with his parents in childhood. At the age of eighteen years he enlisted in the army of the Revolution, and served for five years. Upon the close of that struggle for liberty he engaged as a boatman on the Susquehanna river, and also followed farming. Blairís Gap was named in his honor. His wife was a native of Northumberland county, and reared a family of thirteen children, Horace H. being now the only survivor. One son, David, was captain of a packet boat for nine years; he also kept the Mount Vernon House in Philadelphia a number of years, and held a position in the United States mint of that city. Samuel Blair died in 1824; his wife survived until 1846. Both died in Northum-berland county. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native township, and was educated in the common schools. He subsequently engaged in teaching, before the existence of the public school system, afterwards attended the public Schools and completed his education, and taught for several years. In 1843 he took charge of the schools of Lewisburg, and remained there until 1851. During this time he was elected auditor of Union county, and served two terms in that office. In 1851 he came to Lycoming county, and was engaged in keeping hotel at Port Penn, near Muncy, for eleven years. In 1862 he moved to Muncy and took charge of the Petrican house. In the fall of 1860 he was nominated on the Democratic ticket for the office of register and recorder, but was defeated. He was again nominated in 1863, and elected to that office. He served as register and recorder three years, after which he was appointed deputy sheriff and filled that position until 1874. He was then elected prothonotary and clerk of the court of common pleas, and filled that office for three years. At the expiration of his term he was elected alderman of the Third ward, in which office he served five years, and was then elected overseer of the poor and secretary of the board, in which he served three years. In 1800, at the age of seventy-six, Mr. Blair retired from active business life. He is a stockholder in the Edison Electric Illuminating Company and the Merchantsí National Bank. He Joined the Masonic order in .1865, and was one of the charter members of the I. O. O. F. in Lewisburg. He was a Whig up to 1854, when he became a Democrat, and has since been a stanch supporter of that party. Mr. Blair was married in 1843 to Rachel Gulick, and has three children: Charles L., of Kansas, where he is engaged in the stock business; Ella, who has been connected with the mercantile houses of Thompson, and Thompson, Gibson & Company as clerk five years, as bookkeeper fifteen years, and since October 1, 1891, as a member of the firm; and Florence P. Mr. Blairís family is connected with the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  G. E. OTTO SIESS was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, September 14, 1835, son of Andrew Joseph and Mary Magdaline Siess. He was reared in his native land, and received his education in the common schools of that country. He learned the book binderís trade, and worked at that business in Germany for five years, and subsequently worked for several years in Paris, France. In 1854 he came to the United States, and first located in Scranton, Pennsylvania. In 1855 he came to Williamsport, where he found employment in a saw, mill, and by close economy he was able to save a small amount out of his wages. He afterwards engaged with Frank Campbell in the book binding business, and purchased the plant in July, 1856, and the following year he removed it to the old site of the Gazette and Bulletin office. In 1858 he removed his plant to the corner of Pine and Fourth streets, where he also established a con-fectionery and fruit store in connection with his bindery. In 1861 he moved to the Academy of Music building, where he remained until 1868, and then removed to near the corner of William and Fourth streets. He disposed of his confectionery and fruit store, purchased new machinery and engaged in the book binding business exclusively. In 1874 he purchased the building now occupied by his son, William C., next to the Trust Building, where he continued his business. Mr. Siess was the pioneer of the book binding business in Williamsport, and established the first bindery between Elmira and Harrisburg. In 1877 he purchased the Times, and in October, 1870, he bought the Banner and published the paper for five months. He sold it to Jacob Sallade, February 26, 1880, and retired from the printing and book binding, business. Mr. Siess was married in 1856 to Elizabeth, daughter of Barnbart Ziegler, of Williamsport, who bore him a family of five children as follows: William C., who is engaged in the book and stationery business on West Fourth street; Mary, wife of Charles F. W. Flock; Louise, wife of W. D. Leeds; Amelia, wife of John Gerrsting, of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, and Tille, all of whom are residents of Williamsport. The family are members of the Lutheran church, and politically adhere to the Democratic party. Mr. Siess is a stockholder and director in the Susquehanna Trust anti Safe Deposit Company, and is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, the Savings Institution, and the old Demorest Sewing Machine Company. He is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  GODFREY HESS was a native of Alsace, France, where he was reared and educated. He immigrated to the United States, and was married in New York City to Rosanna M. Laedlein, also a native of Alsace, and in 1830 he settled in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. He was employed in the building of the canal, and also on the Ralston and Williamsport railroad, now the Northern Central. He afterwards engaged in the mercantile business on the corner of Pine and Fourth streets, in Williamsport, where he carried on a general store for about thirty years, retiring from mercantile pursuits in 1865. He was also a dyer and a candle manufacturer, and was engaged in the lumber business for some years. He shipped lumber by boat to Philadelphia, and lost heavily in the great flood of 1847. He was one of the organizers of the Savings Institution of Williamsport, and was treasurer of the same for several years. He was a Democrat, and served as a member of the borough council and afterwards of the city council. He was prominent in the erection of the German Lutheran church, to which organization he and wife belonged. He died in 1879; his wife survived until December, 1890. They reared a family of five children, as follows: John Henry, who enlisted in Company G, Nineteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and died of typhoid fever while in the service; Sophia, deceased; Godfrey; Louisa, wife of Adolph Niemeyer, and Harriet, wife of Henry Metzger, all of whom are residents of Williamsport.

  GODFREY HESS, company manager of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company and the Williamsport Steam Company, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, December 23, 1844, and is a son of Godfrey and Rosanna M. Hess. He was reared and educated in this city, and learned the shoemakerís trade, and afterwards the photographerís and carpenterís trades. He was engaged in the photographing business for a number of years, and still has a copying establishment in this city. He is president of the Wilkinson Truss Company, Limited, and was one of the organizers of that company. He is a stockholder and director in the Savings Insti-tution, and a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank. He is a stockholder and manager of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, and is manager of the Williamsport Steam Company. Air. Hess was married in 1879 to Elizabeth, daughter of Ludwig and Catherine B. Finkbeiner of Loyalsock township, and has four children: Rosa; John E.; Godfrey, and Mary Elizabeth. The family are members of the Lutheran church. He is a Democrat, and has served in the city council one term.

  FREDRICK N. PAGE, treasurer of the Williamsport Furniture Company, was born in Athens township, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, December 5, 1832, son of Thomas and Anna (West) Page, natives of England. His parents came to the United States in 1830, and first settled in Baltimore, Maryland, and soon afterwards moved by wagon to Bradford county, Pennsylvania, where the remaining years of their lives were spent. They purchased his farm, and resided upon it up to their decease. They reared a family of ten children, seven of whom are now living. They were consistent members of the Baptist church, and died in that faith. The subject of this sketch was the fifth child, and was reared on the homestead farm. He received a common English education in the country schools of that period, attending school up to the age of fourteen. He then left home and engaged in clerking in a general store in Athens, and on reaching his majority he purchased an interest in the business. About three years later he bought out the entire business, and conducted it up to 1865; when he sold his stock and engaged in the furniture trade in Titusville, Pennsylvania. In 1867 he came to Williamsport and opened a large retail furniture store on Fourth and Hepburn streets, and continued to do an extensive business for ten years, when he lost his entire capital by failures of other parties and was compelled to dispose of his business. Previous to this he had become one of the original stockholders of the Williamsport Furniture Company; in 1877 he became actively engaged with that institution; he has since been treasurer and manager of the same, and has increased the business from $35,000 to $350,000 annually. Mr. Page is one of the originators of the New York Furniture Exposition, and is one of the executive committee of that enterprise. He was married in 1853 to Maria D., daughter of Andrew French, of Milford, Connecticut. She died in 1877, leaving three sons and four daughters: Mildred, wife of James Maynard, of Williamsport; F. West, who has charge of the Brooklyn office of the Williamsport Furniture Company; Nellie; Martha, wife of C. E. Else, of this city; S. John, at the Philadelphia office of the Williamsport Furniture Company; A. Thomas, teller of the Williamsport National Bank, and Ethel. Mr. Page was again married, in 1881, to Martha, daughter of Edwin White, of Williamsport. He and wife are members of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, and he is a vestryman in that organization. Mr. Page is a member of the Ross Club, and in politics he has always acted with the Republican party.

  RALPH ELLIOT was born, November 22, 1798, in Fritlick, County Tyrone, Ireland, and came to America with his parents on board the sailing ship Radies in 1812. The voyage was an adventurous one, lasting twenty-seven days, during three of which the ship lay entangled among ice-fields. Upon arriving at New York the Elliots went to Philadelphia and settled in Kensington. There young Ralph went to work in a cotton factory, where he remained six months, receiving "I per week wages. At the end of that time he managed to get some schooling, and when not engaged in his studies worked on his fatherís farm. He remained in Kensington until 1820, when he settled in Newberry, Lycoming county, and carried on a store for two years with such success that he was able to remove to Williamsport and build a handsome brick structure, wherein he carried on a mercantile business until 1841. In the meantime, May 22, 1832, he married Mary, daughter of William Gibson, who became the mother of six children: Mary R.; Rebecca J., William G.; Henry C.; Ralph P., and Annie E. In 1841 he removed to his farm on the West Branch of the Susquehanna river in Armstrong township, where his wife died, March 1, 1855. In 1864 he sold the farm and removed to Williamsport. Two years later he purchased the large brick house in this city where he died, April 1, 1889. He and his wife were members of the First Presby-terian church of Williamsport. Mr. Elliot was one of the originators of the Market Street bridge across the Susquehanna river, was a director and a large stockholder in the same at the time of his death, and was at one time a director in the West Branch Bank.

  WILLIAM G. ELLIOT, manufacturer, and manager of the National Paint Works, was born in Williamsport, July 19, 1840, son of Ralph and Mary (Gibson) Elliot. He removed with his father to Armstrong township when he was quite young. His education was received in the public schools, Dickinson Seminary, and the Philadelphia high school. Returning from school he resumed rural pursuits Oil his fatherís farm for two years, when he began his business life as a clerk in a store at Canton, Missouri. He returned to his Dative city in 1859, and followed farming, until the rebellion was begun, when he enlisted in Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and saw service until honorably discharged, having participated in the battle of Falling Waters, Virginia. He embarked in the mercantile business in Williamsport for five years after returning from the war, after which he went to Oil City, Pennsylvania, where he was quite successful in the oil business. He subsequently erected a fine block 208 feet long and fifty-two feet wide, three stories high, on the corner of Fourth and Pine streets, containing a number of store-rooms, offices, and lodge rooms, together with a theater on the second floor known as the "Academy of Music," which was thrown open to the public, December 10, 1870, and up to this date it stands with a reputation unexcelled, In 1872 he was appointed express manager for the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, with his office at Williamsport, and held. that important position until the spring of 187 V; he then began the manufacture of asphalt and paint, out of which has grown the National Paint Works of which he is manager, and which is more widely known among the railroad and bridge building corporations than any other similar estab-lishment in this country. Mr. Elliot was married, January 2, 1862, to Emily M. Ellis, and they have three children: May E.; Norman, and Wistar M. Mr. Elliot is an active and enthusiastic Republican, and belongs to the Ross Club. The family are attendants at the First Presbyterian church and live in a beautiful residence on the corner of Fourth and Elmira streets, purchased in 1884 by Mr. Elliot, who is an example of success attained by persistent industry, natural aptitude for business, and recognized integrity.

  GEORGE SLATE was a native of Ontario county, New York, where he was born, February 5, 1815. His mother died when he was six months old, and his father went to California in 1819. He was reared by friends and was apprenticed to the shoemakerís trade. He came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 29, 1833, where he followed various occupations, working at his trade and also in the foundry of John B. Hall. In 1825 he formed a partnership with John Corson and engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes in the evenings, working for Mr. Hall during the daytime. In 1837 the firm of Slate & Fulmer was established, and purchasing, the tannery which was founded by George Fulmer in 1813, they embarked in that business and also engaged in the manufacture of leather belting. This partnership existed up to 1856, when Mr. Fulmer retired from the firm, and Mr. Slate continued the business alone until 1868. In that year he took his son, Hyman A., into partnership, under the firm name of George Slate & Son, and continued under that name until 1880, when J. Walton Slate was admitted and the title of the firm became George Slate & Sons. He retired from active business in 1886, turning over his affairs to his sons, Hyman A. and J. Walton, when the firm of George Slateís Sons was organized. Mr. late was twice married, first in 1843, to Sarah, daughter of George Fulmer, who bore him six children: Hyman A.; J. Walton; George Fulmer, who served two years in the war of the rebellion, and died in 1864; and. Ellen, Sarah, and Rosa, all of whom are dead. Mrs. Slate died in 1857, and he subsequently married Charlotte H., daughter of Thomas P. Simmons, of Williamsport. Two children were born of this union: William H., a clerk in the Philadelphia and Erie railroad office, and Crecy S., wife of Harvey L. Simmons of Brooklyn, New York. Mr. Slate died, December 11, 1889; his widow survives him. He was a member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church from the time of his arrival in Williamsport up to 1860, when he joined Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he served as a steward and trustee. He was a member of the building committee of both churches. Mr. Slate was a Republican, and filled various minor offices. He was an exemplary, upright man, and was highly respected. by a large circle of friends and acquaintances.

  HYMAN A. SLATE, manufacturer of leather belting, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, May 19, 1847, and is the oldest surviving son of George and Sarah Slate. He was educated in the public schools of the city and at Dickinson Seminary, and is also a graduate of Eastmanís Business College. At the age of fifteen he entered his fatherís office as bookkeeper, and in 1868 his father gave him an interest in the business. They were engaged in the tannery business up to 1889, in connec-tion with their belting business, but in that year they tore down the tannery and erected their present building on Government place, which is one of the substantial structures in the city. This firm is the successor of one of the pioneer tanneries of Williamsport, and is the oldest business house in the city, the business being ,continuous from grandfather to grandsons. In 1861 Mr. Slate went out as a drummer boy in Company B, Thirty-Seventh Regiment, Emergency Men and served six weeks. He was out again for a short period in 1862. He was married in 1872 to M. Virginia, daughter of Dr. John W. Wright, of Baltimore, Maryland. Mrs. Slate is a great granddaughter of Ellis Walton, the second prothonotary, recorder, and clerk of Lycoming county. She is the mother of four children: Anna Blanche; Florence Walton; George, Jr., and Martha Virginia. He and wife are members of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Slate is a Republican, is a member of the city council, and the G. A. R., and is one of the charter members of the Ross Club.

  J. WALTON SLATE was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 24,1851, and received his education in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He, entered his fatherís office in 1872, and became a member of the firm in 1880. He was married in 1885, to Elvira, daughter of John Hampton, of Philadelphia, and has two children: Sarah Fulmer and John Hampton. He is a Republican in politics, a charter member of the Ross Club, a director of the Y. M. C. A., and a member of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  JOHN K. CRAWFORD, dealer in leather, etc., was born in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county, May 14, 1827, and is the youngest living son of William and Rebecca Crawford. He was reared in Eldred township, and received a common school education. At the age of twenty, he and his brothers, Nicholas, Jonathan, and William, engaged in the tannery business at Warrensville, and he has ever since followed that line of trade. In the spring of 1858 he located in Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the manufacture of leather, etc. Some fourteen years ago he erected his present tannery near the crossing of the Philadelphia and Reading and the Philadelphia and Eric railroads, and has since operated the same the office and salesroom are on Market street. He was also engaged in the lumber business on Loyalsock creek about ten years, and has owned and operated the Warrensville flour mill for the past twenty years. Mr. Crawford was married, Jan-uary 1, 1852, to Mary, daughter of Samuel L. Casnor, of Warrensville, Lycoming county, and has three children: Elsie Jane; Annis Hyman, and Harrison Tallman. Mr. Crawford is a Republican, and has served as a member of the common council, and has been president of the Board of Health for ten years. He was assessor of the First ward for thirteen successive years, and has always taken an active interest in public affairs.

  HARRISON TALLMAN CRAWFORD, junior member of the firm of J. K. Crawford & Son, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1861, and is the only son of John K. and Mary Crawford. He was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, and also attended the Muncy Normal School and the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1885 he became a member of the present firm, having previously learned the tannerís trade in his fatherís tannery, and worked at the same for five years. He is a Republican, is connected with the I. O. O. F., and is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. He was formerly secretary of the Sunday school in the Third Street Methodist Episcopal church, of which organiza-tion his mother and sisters were members, but have recently united with the First Presbyterian in order that the family might have a church home together.

  HENRY S. MOSSER, of the firm of J. K. Mosser & Company, tanners, was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, September 13, 1857, son of J. K. and Maria (Keck) Mosser, natives of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania. His father settled in Allentown in 1849, and is one of the pioneer tanners of that county. He is still actively engaged in the business, and has tanneries in Clearfield and Wyoming counties, and in Allentown and Newberry. In 1876 they erected the tannery at Newberry, and Henry S. has since had charge of it. The Lycoming tannery is the largest in this section of the country, and in the manufacture of union crop leather it is one of the largest in the State. Mr. Mosser was married, October 9, 1879, to Mary Grimm, of Lehigh county, and has a family of five children: Helen; James; Miriam; Henry, and Louis. He, and wife are adherents of the Lutheran church. Politically he is a Republican.

  AUGUSTUS SCHUMANN, tanner, was born in Frankenhausen, Province of Saxony, Germany, July 10, 1827, son of Gotfried and Minnie Schumann. He was educated in his native country, learned the tannerís trade, and immigrated to America in 1851. He worked for a Mr. Slate in his tannery in Williamsport and subsequently was employed in cutting timber in the woods along Lycoming creek. He was employed by Mr. Dittmar to help build his furnace in Williamsport, also the gas works of that city, in which Mr. Schumann worked for eight years. On account of failing health he was obliged to seek another occupation and consequently started his present business on Fourth street, and in 1871 embarked in the leather and finding business, which has constantly increased. He is also the largest dealer in hides in Williamsport. He is a member of Williamsport Lodge, No. 570, I. O. O. F., was one of the organizers of the same, and is a Democrat in politics. He was married in 1854 to Miss Amelia, daughter of Christian Dittmar, and to this union have been born five children: Fannie, who married John A. Haust; William; August; Marie, who married Dr. C. D. Hunt, and Amelia. Mr. Schumann and family are members of the German Lutheran church.

  DAVID STUEMPFLE, proprietor of the West Branch Stone Works, and dealer in coal and brick, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, March 6, 1830, son of John and Annie Mary Stuempfle. He was reared and educated in his native land, and located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, April 15, 1853. He worked in a saw mill one year, and then took up the stone masonís trade, and from 1857 to 1867 he was foreman in charge of the mason work on the Pennsylvania railroad from Sunbury to Emporium. In the latter year he formed a partnership with Gottlieb Gerstenlaur, and engaged in contracting. They erected the county jail and other buildings, but at the end of two years his partner died, and Mr. Stuempfle continued the business alone. He is now the largest contractor and dealer in stone, etc. in the city, and has been very successful in business. He is a partner and one of the directors of the Williamsport Brick Company, and is the owner of the South Side Brick Works, which he established in 1875. Mr. Stuempfle was married, August 2, 1853, to Catharine Barbara Huegele, of Wurtemberg, Germany, who has borne him the following children: Rosa, wife of Frederick Mohn; Gustave Adolph; Mary Sophia, wife of J. H. Bader, John Frederick; Catharine Barbara, and Herman Otto. He is a Democrat, and has served as a member of the school board from the Second ward one term. The whole family are members of the German Lutheran church, and he is a trustee in that organization. During the past twenty-five years Mr. Stuempfle has accumulated a handsome competence, and is recognized as one of the substantial and representative business men of Williamsport.

  CAPT. DAVID BLY was born at White Deer Mills, Union county, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1839, son of John and Lydia (Rhoads) Bly. His father was a native of Virginia, and moved with his parents to Union county when a young man, where he married Lydia Rhoads, a native of Berks county, Pennsylvania. They afterwards removed to Watsontown, Northumberland county, where John Bly was interested in the lumber business, as a member of the Watsontown Lumber Company. He died in Watsontown; his widow survives him and resides in that borough. Captain Bly is the second in a family of ten sons, nine of whom are living. Four of the sons participated in the war of the rebellion. Joseph was a member of Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, James and William were members of the same company, and after their terms of enlistment expired they re-enlisted in the Seventh Cavalry. David enlisted in Company G, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and subsequently served as captain of Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-first Regiment. Our subject received a common school education, and at the age of seventeen began clerking in the store of Ario Pardee, of Watsontown, and was serving in that capacity when Lincoln made his first call for troops. He immediately enlisted in Company G, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volun-teers, and served in the ranks three months. After his discharge he returned to Watsontown and resumed clerking. In May, 1862, he received a commission from Governor Curtin as second lieutenant and recruiting officer. He recruited 131 men in Northumberland and Union counties, and early in August, 1862, he reported with his company at Camp Curtin, near Harrisburg, and was mustered in as captain of Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers. Captain Bly served fourteen months, and besides various minor engagements, he participated in the famous battles of Second Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. After completing his service Captain Bly found employment with the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Company as civil engineer and was assigned to the Western division, with headquarters at Erie. His duties were confined principally to harbor improvement, rights of way, etc., and he remained there until March, 1865. He then located in Pittsburg, and engaged in business as an oil broker, and afterwards operated a refinery. He was forced to abandon this business, because of the aggressive and grasping actions of the Standard Oil Company, and retired from the oil trade at Pittsburg in 1877. He came direct to Williamsport, and engaged in the same business, but after a short period was again compelled to abandon it. Captain Bly then engaged in the marketing of bituminous coal, and in 1888 he organized the Kettle Crook Coal Mining Company. He served as the first president of the company, and is now the general manager. He is the owner of the property known as the White Deer flouring mills, and is engaged in the manufacture of flour and other grain products. Captain Bly is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and various other institutions of the city, and was one of the organizers of the first Board of Trade. In politics he is a Republican, though not a strong partisan. While living in Pittsburg he served as a member of the city council one term. He has been a member of the school board of Williamsport three years, and was president of the board in 1887 and 1888. During his presidency the high school building, on the corner of Third and Walnut streets, was erected. Captain Bly is a prominent member of Reno Post, G. A. R., and was its Commander in 1891. His family consists of his wife and one daughter, and they are attendants of Trinity Episcopal church.

  GEORGE H. SANFORD, proprietor and manager of the Kepford Soap Company, is a son of David B. and Mary (George) Sanford, natives of New Jersey, and was born in Freehold, New Jersey, November 5, 1840. He was educated at the Freehold Institute and in the grammar schools of New York City, and at the age of fourteen, successfully passed an examination for admission to the New York City College. His father intended that he should enter the legal profession but was persuaded by the boy to permit him to adopt a business life on condition that his studies should be continued during his spare time. He entered the service of the Hayward Rubber Company in New York City and remained with them and the other companies with which they became associated until 1877, when he was appointed by Christopher Meyer to be the selling agent in charge of the business of the New Jersey Rubber Shoo Company with headquarters at New Brunswick, New Jersey. Mr. Meyer afterward added the Meyer Rubber Companyís production to that of the New Jersey Company and Mr. Sanford was given charge of the business of both companies with office and salesrooms in New York City. He remained with these companies until April 1, 1884, when he was persuaded by the president of the American Rubber Company of Boston, to take charge of the sale of their goods. He remained with them only a year the associations and surroundings being distasteful and the goods manufactured unsatisfactory to him. In the spring of 1885 he accepted the sale of the goods of the Lycoming Rubber Company with his headquarters in Boston, where he continued until May 1887, when he changed his location to the main office of the company at Williamsport, where he has since resided with his family. In the spring of 1890 he organized the Kepford Soap Company, his object being to provide a business for his two oldest sons. The soap business developed more rapidly than was anticipated and assumed such proportions that on the 1st of April, 1890, Mr. Sanford was compelled to sever his connection with the Lycoming Rubber Company and devote his entire time and attention to the business of the Kepford Soap Company. Mr. Sanford has been a Republican in politics ever since the formation of the party. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and was a member of the famous Seventh Regiment of New York City before and during the war. He was married to Kate Stiles, of Rochester, Pennsylvania in 1866. She died in 1883, leaving a family of five sons. He since married Nora Josten, of New Brunswick, New Jersey, who has borne him two children. The family are members of the Episcopal church.

  HUGH MCDONALD, manager of the Demorest Sewing Machine Works, was born in Argyleshire, Scotland, July 16, 1852, son of Norman and Jane (Boyd) McDonald. His mother died in 1857, one year after his father immigrated with his family to Canada. Norman McDonald is a man of fine education, and taught in a college in Edinburgh, Scotland, and also in the schools of Canada. While a resident of Canada, though not an ordained minister, he occasionally supplied the pulpit in the Presbyterian churches. He now resides with his son in Williamsport. Our subject was educated in the common schools of Montreal, and learned the machinistís trade, which he has worked at for twenty years. In 1877 he located at Rouseís Point, New York, where he started a factory for the Williams Manufacturing Company, and in 1878 he started a factory for the same company in Plattsburg, New York. He had charge of the latter institution, as general manager, until 1889, when he came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, for the purpose of establishing the plant of the Demorest Sewing Machine Company. This he accomplished successfully, and has since been general manager of the works. Mr. McDonald is the patentee of many of the parts used in the manufacture of the Demorest sewing machine; hence he is an invaluable man to that company. He also has a patent on a bicycle, which the company is now manufacturing. He is agent for Lycoming county for William Jessop & Sonsí celebrated steel and machinistsí supplies of different kinds. He has one-third of the stock in the New York Cycle Company, of which he is vice-president, and is a stockholder and director in the Athletic Park Association and Junction Passenger Railway Company. Mr. McDonald is prominently connected with the Masonic order, in the lodge, chapter, and commandery, and is also a member of the K. of H. and the I. O. O. F. He is an active supporter of the Demorest Base Ball Club, an institution in which Williamsport takes much pride. Though a Democrat in politics, he takes no active interest in political matters, his duties at the Demorest works requiring his whole time and attention. Mr. McDonald was married in 1874 to Emma J. Saunders, of Ontario county, New York, and has two children: Agnes Maude and Harry Collon. He and family attend the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  CHARLES R. HARRIS, manufacturer, was born in Waterville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1858, son of. Jacob and Eliza (Bitters) Harris. He received his education in the public schools, and remained in his native village until he was twenty-one years old. He began the study of telegraphy, but before completing the same he abandoned it and engaged in the general mercantile business at Waterville for four years. He continued the same business in Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, and Cortland, New York, where, after one yearís business career, he received an injury in a railroad collision, and was compelled to give up business and spend some time in Florida for the benefit of his health. While living in Cortland he devoted some attention to the invention of a suspender buckle, taking out a patent on his first buckle while living in that place. He has constantly been improving on the first invention from time to time, and now has thirty-two different patents on suspender trimmings. and others that are yet in the patent office. He has also invented and patented many other useful articles. In 1885 he located in Jersey Shore, where he began the manufacture of his wire buckles, and removed the business to Williamsport in 1886. The capacity of the work at Jersey Shore was twenty-five pairs per day; when beginning in Williamsport it was increased to 1,000 per day, and by being increased continually from time to time, it now has a capacity of 40,000 pairs per day, and is the largest concern of the kind in the United States. Their products are sold in every town in the United States, requiring, the services of thirty-two traveling men. The present firm consists of Mr. Harris, William and Solomon Silverman, and Joseph E. Austrian. Mr. Harris has completely revolutionized the suspender business, and has a line of the most complete patents in the country. They employ from 150 to 200 hands, who with their improved methods of manufacture, do the work of 700 to 800. This concern has done a great deal toward the booming of Williamsport, since four other suspender factories have been established in the city and several others in the county, and as they use a large number of paper boxes, they have also been instrumental in making a success of the paper box industry of the city. Mr. Harris is largely interested in the Backus Manufacturing Company, and is a director of the same. He is a Democrat, a member of the Royal Arcanum, is a director in the Y. M. C. A., is president of the board of directors of the City Mission, and with his wife belongs to the First Baptist church, of which he is deacon. He was married in August, 1881, to Ida, daughter of Robert Maffett, and to this union have been born three children: Raymond L.; Mabel, and Charles La Rile.

  ALLEN M. TAYLOR was born in Bototourt county, Virginia, May 15, 1817, and is son of William and Elizabeth (Brown) Taylor, natives of England and Scotland, respectively, who were married in this country. William Taylor was a ship carpenter, and worked in Richmond, Virginia. Allen M. lived in his native county until he was seven years old, when his father died and his mother removed with her family to Nashville, Tennessee; two years later she settled in Fountain county, Indiana, where one of her oldest sons was living. After reaching maturity the subject of this sketch engaged in stage driving. In 1830 he came to Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, and for twelve years was a stage driver between Williamsport and Tyrone. At the end of that period he became agent for the company, and located in Williamsport. He had charge of the stage routes between Williamsport and Tyrone, and from Williamsport to Harrisburg, Lewisburg, and Pottsville. Ten years later Mr. Bailey, a member of the company, died, when Mr. Taylor purchased an interest, and continued in the business as a member of the firm of Eder, White & Company. When the railroad was completed to Williamsport the stage business was abandoned, and since then Mr. Taylor lived in the West until 1880, when he returned and makes his home with his son, M. E. Taylor, at the old homestead on Market street. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church. In politics he is a Democrat, and during his early days he took an active interest and was very influential in local party affairs. He was married in 1848, to Sarah E., daughter of George Irvin, of Jersey Shore. She died in October, 1880, leaving two children: William H., and M. E., who is a clerk and superintendent of the Elk Coal and Coke Company.

  WILLIAM H. TAYLOR, general manager and treasurer of the Self-Locking Suspender Company, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and is the eldest son of Allen M. Taylor. He was educated in the public schools of the city, tip to the age of twelve years, and then engaged as a clerk in the store of Knapp & Thompson. He afterwards clerked for L. L. Stearns several years, and subsequently had charge of the business of A. B. Noyes. He then purchased the grocery business of Crocker & Company, and afterwards admitted his brother, M. E., to an equal partnership, and conducted business under the name of Taylor & Company. Disposing of his store he went to Elk county, where he assisted in organizing the Elk Coal and Coke Company, which was afterwards merged into the Fisher Coke Company, and he was general manager and treasurer. Mr. Taylor became connected with the Self-Locking Suspender Company, January 1, 1891, and has since been the general manager and treasurer. He was a stockholder and director in the Lumbermanís National Bank, and is similarly interested in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He was a stockholder and director in the Maynard Street Bridge Company, is a director and stockholder in the South Williamsport Land Company, and is a member of the Susquehanna Boom Company. He was one of the organizers of the Williamsport Board of Trade, and is a charter member of the Ross Club. Mr. Taylor is a Democrat, has served in the common council one term, and is a member of the district fire committee. He was married, October 9, 1878, to Lizzie, daughter of Mahlon Fisher, of Williamsport. He is a trustee in the First Baptist church, and for thirteen years has been treasurer of that organization.

  FREDERICK MANKEY was born in Prussia, Germany, February 23, 1833, son of Andrew and Gotliebe (Bendit) Mankey. He was educated in his native country, and learned the trade of a locksmith and machinist. In 1857 he migrated to America, and was first employed in the machine shop of Davids & Schlouch, of Easton, Pennsylvania, where he remained for two years. April 1, 1859, he arrived in Williamsport, where he was employed by Philip Moltz for two years, after which he started a locksmith shop on Fourth street. In 1861 he enlisted in Company E, Fourth Pennsylvania Reserves, Thirty-third Regiment, was corporal, served one year, and was honorably discharged on account of physical disability. In 1869 he began the manufacture of furniture, and made the first furniture that was disposed of at wholesale in Williamsport. After two years he became associated with D. B. Hubbard, and in 1865, F. W. Page was taken in as a member of the firm of Mankey & Hubbard. This firm was organized into a stock company in 1882 or 1883, and was called the Williamsport Furniture Company, of which Mr. Mankey was president until February, 1889. He then started the Mankey furniture factory at Emporium, Pennsylvania, and is still interested in the same. In 1886 the Mankey Decorative Works of Williamsport were founded under his patents, and he was president of the same for two years. Mr. Mankey has taken out over 200 patents for general wood decorations. He is a member of Lodge No. 106, A. F. and A. M., Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, and Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22. He was married in 1859 to Miss Magdalene Wirth, who died in 1878, leaving four children: Charles F.; Harry J.; Emily L., and William O. He was again married in 1879 to Miss Emily Volkmar, of Williamsport, and to this union have been born three children: Mary L.; Frederick William, and Charlotte. Mr. Mankey is a Republican in politics, and is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  FRANK T. WYCKOFF, proprietor of the Wyckoff Pipe and Creosoting Company, was born in Elmira, New York, September 17, 1856, son of C. W. and Cynthia (Treman) Wyckoff, natives of New York State. He was educated in the public schools of Elmira, and afterwards attended the Sewardís College. In 1882 he came to Williamsport and established his present plant, where he has Since been engaged in the manufacture of wooden water pipes, wooden casings for steam pipes, tubing for electrical wires, and creosoting lumber. It is the only manufactory of wooden pipes in the West Branch valley, and the only one in the State that prepares creosoted lumber. Mr. Wyckoff does a very extensive business, and since coming to Williamsport has met with gratifying success. He was married in 1878 to E. Anna, daughter of Alexander Corel, of Chemung county, New York, and has one son, Spofford Frank. Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff are members of the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport. He, is independent in politics, and believes in supporting the man best fitted for the office, irrespective of his political views. Mr. and Mrs. Wyckoff are descendants of old Revolutionary families, Mr. Wyckoff being a member of the Sons of the Revolution Society and Mrs. Wyckoff of the Colonial Dames.

  LAVALETTE TABER was born in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, December 11, 1827, son of Nathan B. and Nancy (Granteer) Taber. His paternal grandfather, Bunker Taber, was a native of Massachusetts, and located in Bradford county, Pennsylvania, at an early date, where he entered a tract of land, which he cleared and improved. He lived and died on that farm. Nathan B. was born in Bradford county, and received a very good education. He married Nancy Granteer, and located in Canton township, Bradford county, and served as clerk of Canton for many years. He was first a Whig, and in after years a Republican. He and his wife were adherents of Universalism, and died in .1862 and 1861, respectively. They reared a family of five sons and three daughters, five of whom are living: Eliza Ann, widow of Seth Loomis; Cyrus; Lavalette; Emily, wife of O. B. Granteer, and George F. The subject of this sketch lived in his native county until he was twenty years of age, and has always been engaged in the lumber business. He first established a saw mill at Greenwood, Bradford county, and subsequently ran a mill for his brother several years. In 1857 he came to Williamsport, and the following year ran a saw mill in West Virginia, then returned to this city and worked for A. T. Nichols, Slonaker Smith, and Prey & Brown, successively. He afterwards took the mills at Roaring Branch and operated them for three years, and then returned to Williamsport. He engaged in the saw mill business under the firm name of Eyster, Dunning & Taber, which continued up to 1873, and then was changed to Taber & Goodrich. The mill was burned in 1874, and in 1875 Mr. Taber engaged in the planing mill business, but was burned out in 1885. In 1886 he built his late planing mills and conducted a successful business up to February, 1892, when he was again burned out and has not rebuilt. During the war Mr. Taber worked in the construction corps. He is a Republican, and has served as a member of the council from the Fourth ward for three years. He was married in 1854 to Mary Ann, daughter of Arkey Lake, of Lycoming county. She died in 1867, leaving, one child, Charles A. Mr. Taber was again married in 1869, to Gertrude H., daughter of Jesse Harding, of Wyoming county, who has borne him one child, Jesse H. The family are attendants of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM SIPE, deceased, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1826, and was a son of Philip Sipe. He settled in Williamsport in 1863, where he soon after engaged in the pottery business, which he had learned from his father, and founded the present firm of Sipe & Sons. He was one of the first residents on West Fourth street above the Park Hotel, where he started his business with three wheels, and did a large and increasing business for many years. At first he manufactured redware exclusively, and supplied the country for a radius of 100 miles, being one of the first persons to manufacture that article in Lycoming county. Later he became an extensive dealer in terracotta and sewer pipe and also manufactured stoneware. He married Miss Elizabeth Sutton, of York county, who survives him, and to this union were born three children: Alice, deceased; Luther R., and Oscar W. He was a Democrat in politics, a member of Grace Methodist Episcopal church for many years, and died March 26, .1894. His widow lives in Williamsport and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church.

  LUTHER R. SIPE, son of William and Elizabeth (Sutton) Sipe, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1854. He was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, and learned the potter trade with his father, subsequently becoming a member of the firm of Sipe & Sons. He was married in 1883 to Miss Maria, daughter of John Woolston, of Philadelphia, and to them have been born three children: Mabel; Louise, deceased, and Reba. He is a Democrat in politics.

  OSCAR W. SIPE, son of William and Elizabeth (Sutton) Sipe, was born in York county, Pennsylvania, February 8, 1857. He was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, learned the potterís trade with his father, and subsequently became a member of the firm of Sipe & Sons. In 1882 he was married to Martha, daughter of Tyne Hagenbusch, and to this union were born two children: Boyd and Lewis. Mrs. Sipe died in 1885, and he was again married in 1888, to Mollie, daughter of John Lilly, and to this union have been born two children: John and Mary. Mr. Sipe is independent in his political proclivities, and is a member of the Golden Eagle.

  PHILIP HAAG was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, November 29, 1835, son of John and Catherine (Montz) Haag. He was reared in his native country and educated in the public schools. He emigrated to America in 1854, locating in Williamsport, where he worked at the shoemakerís trade for nineteen years and conducted a shoe store on West Forth street for ten years. In 1875 he began moving houses and buildings and did an extensive business in that line. He is also largely interested in real estate, is a Republican in politics, and belongs to the Knight, of the Maccabees and the Protective Home Circle. He was married in 1858 to Sarah Lehman, and to this union have been born five children: Simon G.; John P.; Mary, who married Charles Davies; Sarah M., who married Philip Strehley, and Hattie. Mr. Haag and family are members of the Evangelical church.

  JOHN VANVORCE was born in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1829, son of Aaron and Lucretia (Churchill) Vanvorce. His father was born on board a ship in Long Island Sound, and his mother was a native of Connecticut. Aaronís parents were natives of Holland, came to America in 17 96, and located in New York City. Six years afterwards they removed to Franklin township, Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, where they resided upon a farm until their death. Aaron was reared in Susquehanna county, and always followed farming. He was thrice married, and has eight children now living. The subject of our sketch is the second child of the first marriage. He was educated in the public schools of his native county and by private tuition, and remained on the homestead farm until eighteen years of age. he afterwards learned the blacksmithís trade, and in 1852 he came to Williamsport and established his present business, which he has ever since continued. He is the pioneer blacksmith of the city, where he has carried on business for forty years. Mr. Vanvorce was married in 18554 to Sarah Matilda, daughter of Daniel Billman, and has two children: H. B. and Sallie. In 1862 he went out with the Emergency Men, and was at Chambersburg during his service. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., and was formerly connected with the I. O. O. F. He is a stanch Democrat; in 1857 he was elected assessor of Williamsport and in 1859 to the city council, and has served nineteen years in the common and select councils. In 1887 he represented Lycoming county in the State legislature, and is one of the representative citizens of his county.

  MALCOLM MACMILLAN, blacksmith, was born in Scotland, August 6, 1847, son of Stuart and Margaret (Bigbie) Macmillan. His parents emigrated to America in 1849, locating first in Providence, Rhode Island, where the father was a clerk in a mercantile store for a number of years. After removing to Effingham county, Illinois, and remaining three years, they returned to Rhode Island, where they lived until their death. Our subject is the seventh of a family of eleven children. He learned the blacksmith trade under Governor Sprague, of Rhode Island, and in 1867 he came to Williamsport, where he has since been engaged at his trade. For a time he was in partnership with John E. Jones, and subsequently with H. Van Buskirk, but since 1888 he has carried on the business on his own responsibility and has one of the largest patronages in the city. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., a member of the Iron Hall, a Democrat in politics, and has served one term as a member of the common council. He was married in 1869 to Miss Sarah, daughter of Robert Porter of Williamsport, and to this union have been born the following, children: Jeannette; Clyde; Margaret; Grace Catherine; Pearl; Nellie, and Glenair. Mr. and Mrs. Macmillan are members of the Lutheran church.

  HENRY O. ERTEL, senior member of the firm of Ertel Brothers, manufacturers of cigar and paper boxes, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 11, 1862, son of Valentine and Magdalene (Schirm) Ertel, natives of Germany, and of Anthony township, Lycoming county, respectively. His father emigrated to America in 1854, and after residing in New York and Philadelphia for several months, he came to Williamsport, where he has since resided. Henry O. Ertel was reared in Lycoming county and received his education in the public schools and the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1878 he started in the re-making of old cigar boxes in a small way, and from that to manufacturing boxes by hand power, which has developed to his present business. They now manufacture very extensively all kinds of paper and cigar boxes with the latest improved machinery, and ship their goods to many cities in Pennsylvania, besides supplying the greater part of the home trade. Mr. Ertel is a member of the Y. M. C. A., with his wife belongs to the German Lutheran church, and is treasurer of the same. He was married in 1886 to Louisa, daughter of Ludwig Kornman, of Williamsport, and to this union have been born two children: Albert and Mabel.

  SAMUEL ERTEL, of the firm of Ertel Brothers, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, March 3, 1860, son of Valentine and Magdalene (Schirm) Ertel. He received his education in the public schools of his native town, worked one year as a type setter, and in 1880 entered into co-partnership with his brother, Henry O. Ertel. He was married in 1890, to Mary, daughter of Ludwig Kornman, and has one child, Louisa. He is a member of St. Johnís Reformed church, and also of the Y. M. C. A.

  JACOB F. GOHL, manufacturer of carriages and wagons, was born in Mifflin township, Lycoming county, September 24, 1835, son of Jacob and Jacobina (Eckart) Gohl. He was educated in the public schools, and in 1854 he went to Jersey Shore, where he learned the carriage makerís trade of George P. Nice. In 1859 he established a business in Salladasburg, in partnership with W. D. Buser. He sold out in 1865, and coming to Williamsport, engaged in the manufacture of carriages under the firm name of J. F. & C. Gohl for sixteen years; since then he has been in business for himself. In 1863 he enlisted in Company K, Thirty-Seventh Pennsylvania Militia, and saw service for six weeks. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, I. O. O. F., West Branch Encampment, No. 36, and Canton Ridgly, No. 8. He was married in 1859 to Elizabeth, daughter of John Pepperman, who died in 1883, leaving four children: Eldridge L.; Wilfred T.; J. Burton, and Jesse C.

  LEVI HARTMAN was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, November 19, 1814, and died in Williamsport, May 2, 1891. On the 25th of January, 1853, he married Rebecca, daughter of Henry Harman, and August 3rd of the same year he and his wife came to Williamsport, where he resided up to his death. He was a prominent contractor and builder, one of the pioneers in that line, and carried on business up to within five years of his death, when he retired and was succeeded by, his sons, who, under the name of Hartman Brothers, have since carried on the business. Mr. Hartman erected many of the most substantial buildings in the city, among them being Dickinson Seminary, the Hotel Crawford, and the Hess Block. There are also towns within a radius of eighty miles where the buildings erected by him yet stand as monuments to his mechanical ability. He saw Williamsport grow from an insignificant village to a flourishing city of 30,000 inhabitants. When he came here there were no railroads, and the general traffic was carried on by wagon and stage coach and flat-boat. He often told bow he used to walk from his home in Williamsport to his work at Trout Run, at such an early hour in the morning that he would find the people in bed on his arrival at that place. This was a distance of fourteen miles, yet twice a week, while his contracts were under way, he would make the trip on foot. Mr. Hartman was a Republican, but never took any active part in politics, attending strictly to his private affairs. He was a prominent member of Pine Street Methodist church, and a trustee in that organization for many years. His widow resides in the old homestead on William street.

  Levi and Rebecca Hartman were the parents of fourteen children, eight of whom survive. John H., born January 29, 1842, married in 1865 Emma, daughter of Joseph Rider, and has one child, Maude. He is a steward in Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. Robert F., born February 18, 1845, married in 1866 Anna M., daughter of William Sharer, and has three children: William Kimball; Cordie H., and Hattie. Samuel P., born January 15, 1847, married in 1870 Emma, daughter of Leonard Ulmer. She died in 1880, and he was again married, in 1888, to Rosie, daughter of Jacob Bay. Charles H., born February 22, 1851, married in 1888 Amelia, daughter of Gottlieb Gerstenlauer. William H., born February 15, 1853, married in 1880 Lydia Walborn, and has one child, Blanche May. He is a steward in Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. Alice M., born January 23, 1854, married H. J. Hartranft in 1879. Albert L., born April 19, 1860, worked as a printer for several years, and has since followed the carpenterís trade. George W., born November 24, 1862, learned the machinistís trade, and has always followed that vocation. The four eldest sons learned the carpenterís trade with their father, and have always been engaged in that business. The whole family are stanch supporters of the Republican party.

  WILLIAM H. C. HUFFMAN, contractor and builder, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, March 4, 1846, son of Elias and Annie (Kneiss) Huffman. His father was a native of Pottsville, Pennsylvania, and came to Williamsport in 1830, where he followed contracting and building for many years. He died in 1880, his wife surviving him one year. They reared six children, four of whom are living: Mary, wife of W. W. Baird; Margaret, wife of Robert A. Brookhart; Elias M., and William H. C., all of whom are residents of Williamsport. The subject of this sketch received a common school education, and learned the carpenterís trade with his father. In 1870 he established his present business, and is now one of the leading contractors and builders of Williamsport. He has erected the Cochran, Payne & McCormick Bank building, the Savings Institution building, the Wilson Block, the Demorest Sewing Machine Companyís buildings, and several others worthy of mention. In 1863 Mr. Huffman enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-Seventh Regiment, Emergency Men, and served thirty days. He re-enlisted in the One Hundred and Ninety-fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served six months. He is a member of Renoí Post, G. A. R., and the P. O. S. of A. He is a 32ļ Mason, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, commandery, and council. Mr. Huff man was married in 1868 to Nena Du Four, of Burlington, New Jersey, and has three children: Nena, who married William H. Crockett, and died June 27, 1892; John E., and Fred Du Four. Mr. Huffman is a Republican in politics.

  GOTTLIEB WALTZ, contractor and builder, was born in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 20, 1847, son of William and Mary (Hurr) Waltz. He received a common school education, and at the age of sixteen he left home to learn the carpenterís trade, which business he has followed up to the present. He was employed by Peter Herdic for several years, and had charge of much of his work. He was superintendent in the erection of the Weightman block and of Trinity church. After the failure of Mr. Herdic he engaged in contracting on his own account, and has since erected many of the best buildings in the city. He built the First Presbyterian church, St. Paulís Lutheran church, the Wadley Memorial church, the Annunciation Catholic church, remodeled Christ church and the court house, erected the Hays Building, and the Young Menís Christian Association building, the Rubber Works building, the Hotel Updegraff, and is now engaged on the chapel of the First Baptist church. Mr. Waltz has been twice married; first to Elsie Carr of Danville, Pennsylvania, who died without issue; in June, 1875, he was married to Fannie, daughter of O. H. Randall of Williamsport, and has five children: Carrie May; Orin Hubbard; William Lee; George Randall, and Abigail Case. The family are members of Erie Avenue Baptist church, in which he is one of the trustees. He is a Republican, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Waltz went to Denver, Colorado, in 1879, where he remained five months, returning thence to Williamsport. In the fall of the same year he went to Pueblo and brought his brother, William, home, he being sick. During the years 1886-87, he was in partnership with A. S. Wagner, doing contract work under the firm name, of G. Waltz & Company.

  WILLIAM H. WALTZ, architect and builder, was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, September 17, 1855, and is a son of William and Mary Waltz. He was reared in his native township, and received his education in the public schools and at Williamsport Commercial College. At the age of twenty he came to Williamsport, and learned the carpenterís trade. In 1879 he went to Denver, Colorado, worked at his trade until April, 1881, and took a trip over the Rocky mountains to the head waters of the Arkansas river. He then went to Pueblo, Colorado, where he was engaged in the building business until November, 1881, when he was taken sick with the mountain fever, and returned to Williamsport. In April, 1882, he formed a partnership with his brother Gottlieb and engaged in contracting and building. Among the prominent buildings of the city that have been erected by Mr. Waltz are the First Presbyterian church, St. Paulís Lutheran church, the Lycoming Rubber Works, and the residence of the late Judge Cummin. The partnership with his brother was dissolved in 1884, and since that date Mr. Waltz has continued alone. He was married in 1884 to Josephine Amelia, daughter of O. H. Randall, of Williamsport, and has one son, Floyd R., and one daughter, Merab C. Mr. Waltz and wife are members of the Erie Avenue Baptist church, in which he has served as chairman of the board of trustees since the organization of the church or for the past five years, and is now chairman of the building committee. Mr. Waltz was assistant superintendent in the erection of the government building in Williamsport, under Harrisonís administration. He is a stanch Republican, and is a member of the Knights of Malta.

  ANDREW H. WALTZ, of the firm of Waltz & Hoyer, contractors and builders, was born in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 28, 1859, son of William and Mary (Hurr) Waltz. He was educated in the township schools, and remained on the homestead farm until reaching his majority. He learned the carpenterís trade with his brothers, Gottlieb and William H., and worked for them several years. In December, 1889, he formed a partnership with E. A. Hoyer, and the firm of Waltz & Hoyer has since been engaged in contracting and building. This firm has erected many of the best buildings in the city, among which may be mentioned the residences of Mrs. Ephlin, John L. Swick, Fred Lamade, L. Maxwell, and T. W. Spence. They also erected the Grit building, which is one of the handsomest and most substantial structures in the city, and the store building of Stevenson & Crounce. They erected the Presbyterian church at Pottsgrove, and the residence of John L. Voris. The firm of Waltz & Hoyer is the agent for the Acme cement plaster for the counties of Potter, Clinton, Tioga, Bradford, Sullivan, and Lycoming. They also deal in general plaster supply, and are agents for the Bostwick patent fire proof steel lath. Mr. Waltz was married, December 25, 1882, to Lizzie, daughter of Dietrick Lamade of Williamsport, and has two children: Clara and Ora. He and wife are members of the German Baptist church, and he is connected with the P. H. C.

  EDWARD A. HOYER, Of the firm of Waltz & Hoyer, contractors and builders, was born in Piatt township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1864, son of William E. and Louisa (Friedel) Hoyer, natives of Germany. His father came to this county in 1849, and his mother in 1832; the latter was nine years old at the time, and accompanied her parents, who first lived in New York, whence they moved to Berks county, Pennsylvania. In 1856 they settled in Piatt township, Lycoming county. William E. Hoyer had been married in Germany, and lost his wife by death, prior to coming to this country; they had several children, one of whom, August, came to the United States, but afterwards went back to Germany. William E. Hoyer was a shoemaker, and moved to Williamsport in 1871, where he continued to work at his trade until disabled by sickness; he died, January 29, 1880. In June, 1861, while a resident of Piatt township, he enlisted in Company E, Fourth Penn-sylvania Volunteers, and ser4d with the rank of sergeant until his discharge, March 31, 1862. He subsequently re-enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was honorably discharged, May 31, 1865. He participated in the battles of Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and the closing scenes around Richmond, and was slightly wounded in one of his knees. He was a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., a Democrat in politics, and was connected with the German Reformed church. His widow survives him. Edward A. is their only child, and has always, lived in this county. He attended the public schools of Williamsport until thirteen years of age and then went to work in the lumber mills, and attended the night school taught by Professor Wood, where he graduated. He was next employed by William H. Waltz and did office work, and at the same time learned the carpenterís trade. In December, 1889, he became a member of the firm of Waltz & Hoyer, and has since been engaged in contracting and building. He is a member of the Sons of Veterans, and is an active supporter of the Prohibition party. Mr. Hoyer was married in 1885 to Fannie Jeanette, daughter of Jacob Bailey of Antes Fort, Lycoming county, and has three children: F. Ray; C. E. Franklin, and Martha Louisa. He and wife are members of the Disciplesí church, of Williamsport, in which he holds the office of trustee.

  GEORGE W. TALLEY, architect and builder, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1837, son of Charles R. and Elizabeth Parks Talley. His father. was a native of Wilmington, Delaware, a millwright by trade, and his mother was a native of Somerset county, Pennsylvania, both prominent members of the Presbyterian church. Our subject was reared in the village of Dauphin until he was seventeen years old, receiving his education in the common schools. At that time he went to Philadelphia, where he served ail apprenticeship under George H. Dougherty of that city for four Years, afterwards following his trade in that city for one year. He then went to Nashville and Columbia, Tennessee, and was living in the latter place at the breaking out of the rebellion. He was forced to drill with a mounted rifle in Columbia, Tennessee, but finally succeeded in getting his business in shape, and left for the North on the last train leaving Columbia before the war had actively begun. He was living in Harrisburg from May, 1861, until 1865, when, in the latter date, he enlisted in Company I, Seventy-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until January, 1869, being with the Fourth Corps on their journey to Texas. Returning from the war, he lived in Harrisburg until the spring of 1867, when he located in Williamsport, where he has built many of the best residences of the city, and has the reputation of being one of the best architects of the place. For the past year he has been actively engaged in erecting the Riley machine shops at Lynchburg, Virginia. He was married, November 26, 1874, to Miss Augusta, daughter of John Miller, of Philadelphia, by whom he has three children: Wilson; Ralph, and Harvey. He is a member of the Masonic Order, is a Democrat, and with his family belongs to Grace Methodist Episcopal church.

  ANSON ARTLEY, contractor and builder, was born in Anthony township, Lycom-ing county, Pennsylvania, August 30, 1851, son of Benjamin and Annie (Williamson) Artley. He received his education in the township schools, learned the carpenterís trade, which he has followed ever since, and is one of the leading contractors of the city of Williamsport. Among the principal buildings which he has erected are the High School building on Third street, the residences of A. D. Hermance, John B. Emery, Elias Deemer, and John Price, and the Republican building. Mr. Artley is also interested in real estate in Williamsport, and before locating here he spent six years in the oil fields of northwestern Pennsylvania, where he erected many buildings. He is one of the organizers of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, is treasurer of that lodge, and is an active Prohibitionist. He was married in 1875 to Miss Allie, daughter of Amos Harmon, and to this union have been born seven children: Lettie; Harry, John; William; Mary; Lois, and Allen. Mr. and Mrs. Artley are members of the Disciplesí church, of which he is a deacon, and is also all active member of the Y. M. C. A.

  JUSTUS DITTMAR, contractor, was born in Saxony, a province of Germany, May 11, 1821, son of Christian and Christina (Schosel) Dittmar. He was educated in the free schools of his native country and learned the trade of mason, bricklayer, and plasterer. He immigrated to America in 1847, landing at New York City on September 20th of that year, and there he remained until the following July, when he located in Easton, Pennsylvania, and built a furnace in New Jersey, opposite that city. He also built the Clinton iron furnace at Easton, and in 1851 came to Williamsport, where he thereafter followed his trade. In 1854 he built the first iron furnace in Williamsport, and in 1855 he built the brick work for a culvert on the Philadelphia & Erie railroad near Jersey Shore. In 1855 he constructed the first gas works at Williamsport, under the direction of Dr. W. Downosky, afterwards serving as superintendent of the same for twenty-nine years. In 1885 he became identified with Peter Herdic in the contracting business, and designed and superintended all work completed by them, In 1890 he built a reservoir in Mosquito valley for the Williamsport Water Company; in 1891 he built a reservoir oil Hagermanís run for the same company, and after completing this he laid over 6,000 feet of pipe for them. While associated with Peter Herdic he constructed the Orlando water works, and is now a stockholder of the same. He is a member of the F. and A. M., and is one of the organizers of Williamsport Lodge, No. 570, I. O. O. F., is Past Grand of the same, and has represented it in the Grand Lodge. He was one of the organizers of the German Beneficial Society, and has been president of the same. He is independent in politics. He was married in 1851 to Miss Veronica Steinhilper, and to this union have been born ten children: Charles, who is superintendent of the gas works at Elmira, New York; Justus, who is a plumber and gas fitter of Williamsport; Henry, who lives in Orlando, Florida; Christina, who married John E. Foucard, saw manufacturer of Williamsport; Louis; Frederick; Edward; and Warren, Justus, and John, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Dittmar are prominent members of tile German Lutheran church.

  CHARLES M. LAWLER was born, March 17, 1840, in Jersey City, New Jersey, He was reared in Orange county, New York, where he attended public and private schools until the age of fifteen years, when in 1855, he was employed as weighmaster for the New York and Erie Company at Piermont, New York. The following year he was made ticket agent for tile Canandaigua and Niagara Falls railroad at Niagara Falls. In 1857 he was appointed yardmaster at Toledo, Ohio, by the Lake Shore and Michigan Southern road, and from 1858 to 1860 he served as conductor of a mixed train on the Pittsburgh, Fort Wayne and Chicago road. He then became a pioneer agent for the Missouri Pacific from Jefferson City to Sedalia, Missouri. At the, time General Jacksonís forces were repulsed at Booneville, Missouri, by General Lyon, on Jacksonís retreat the bridges were burned on the Osage river, cutting off entirely any communication between Jefferson City and the Yellow river a gap of forty-two miles. General Superintendent McKissock Put Mr. Lawler in charge of this portion of the road until the bridges were rebuilt and the business resumed. In the fall of 1862 he was appointed agent for the Chicago and Northwestern road at Green Bay, Wisconsin, where he remained for one year, afterwards serving two years on the construction of the Peninsula division of the same road. He was then appointed road and trainmaster, and subsequently assistant superintendent of the Peninsula division, and continued until 1871, when he became general agent for the Chicago and Northwestern at Milwaukee. In the fall of 1872 he accepted the position of division superintendent of the Chicago and West Michigan road between Grand Rapids and Now Buffalo, with headquarters at St. Joseph, Michigan. In 1881 he was appointed joint agent for the Missouri Pacific and Wabash roads at Chicago. One year later he was made general superintendent of the Sioux City and Pacific, Fremont and Elkhorn, and Missouri Valley roads, which position he held until June 1, 1887. He then took the position as division superintendent of the Williamsport division of the Philadelphia and Reading railroad, and on March 15, 1892, he was promoted to the general superintendency of the main line from Newberry Junction to Port Clinton, the Herndon branch, the Shamokin and Mount Carmel branches, the Bloomsburg and Hazelton branches, and the Catawissa road from West Milton to East Mahanoy Junction. Mr. Lawler was married in 1870 to Fannie M. Hulse. He is a director in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, the Lycoming Electric Light Company, and the Williamsport Gas Company. In politics he is a Republican.

  ROBERT NEILSON, general superintendent of the Philadelphia and Erie and the Northern Central divisions of the Pennsylvania railroad, was born in Ontario, Canada, August 19, 1837. He graduated from the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York, in 1861, and entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company in October, 1863, as rodman on the Philadelphia and Erie railroad. From March, 1864, to September, 1865, he was rodman on the Middle division of the same road, and from September, 1865, to January, 1868, he was resident engineer of the Middle division. From January, 1868, to January, 1870, he was resident engineer of the Middle division of the Pennsylvania railroad, and from 1870 to 1874 he was superintendent of the West Pennsylvania division of that road. From February, 1874, to September, 1881, he was superintendent of the Elmira and Canandaigua division of the Northern Central railroad. From September, 1881, to January, 1883, he was general superintendent of the Philadelphia and Erie, and of all divisions of the Northern Central railroad north of Harrisburg. In the latter year Mr. Neilson was made general superintendent of all the lines of the Northern Central railroad, in addition to the Philadelphia and Erie, which position he has since filled. He is a member of the Brandon Park Commission, and takes an active interest in the growth and prosperity of his adopted home. He is a member of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, and a gentleman of high standing and character in the com-munity.

  EZRA B. WESTFALL, superintendent of the Eastern and Susquehanna divisions of the Pennsylvania railroad, the Summit Branch, and the Northern Central, from Sunbury to Harrisburg, and from Montandon to Bellefonte, was born in Bardstown, Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1837, son of Abraham and Elizabeth (Dempster) Westfall, of German and Scotch ancestry, respectively. His father was a native of Owego, New York, and was captain of a packet boat on the Pennsylvania canal, running from Johnstown to Pittsburg, and an engineer of stationary engines at incline planes on the portage railroad. His mother was a native of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania. The parents of our subject removed to Cambria county, Pennsylvania, when Ezra B. was about three years old, and his boyhood years were spent in several counties along the line of the portage railroad and wherever his fatherís business caused them to reside. He received a common school education, and at the age of seventeen began working on the portage railroad. In 1854 he entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, as a brakeman on a freight train running from Pittsburg to Johnstown, and after seven months he was promoted to conductor of a train. He filled this position for two years and a half, then worked as fireman of an engine on mixed trains for the same period, after which he was placed a charge of an engine. In 1863 he came to Williamsport, worked as, conductor of a freight train for three months, and was then made dispatcher at this station for the Elmira, the Catawissa, and the Philadelphia and Erie railroads. In August, 1863, he was made trainmaster of the eastern division. which extended from Sunbury to Renovo, and filled that position ten years. He was then transferred to Sunbury, and became superintendent of the Sunbury division, and in 1877 he was transferred to the Middle division with headquarters at Renovo. In August, 1883, he was placed in charge of the Eastern division, with headquarters at Williamsport, and has since held that position. Mr. Westfall is interested in the Vallamont Land and Improvement Company. He is a Republican, and served for two years in the city council, representing the Fifth ward. He is prominent, in the Masonic Order, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery, and is also connected with the Mystic Shrine. Mr. Westfall was married in 1860 to Mary A., daughter of Robert Binsley, of Allegheny county, Pennsylvania, who has borne him seven Children: three who died in childhood; Alice B.; Lillian M.; Mary Ada, wife of John A. Rankin, and Jesse A., deceased. Mrs. Westfall is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  HIRAM R. RHOADS, president of the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company and the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company, was born in the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1845, son of William and Elizabeth (Scott) Rhoads, who came to Lycoming county in April, 1859, where the remaining years of their lives were passed. The subject of this sketch received a public school education, and in 1863 he entered the service of the Pennsylvania Railroad Company, with which he was connected until 1887. In 1878 he became identified with the Bell Telephone Company, as agent of that company for central Pennsylvania, and opened the second telephone exchange in the State in Williamsport, May 1, 1879, the city of Erie having the first exchange. He also opened the telephone exchange in Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, January 1, 1880. In the face of much opposition and many discouragements, Mr. Rhoadís labored to introduce the telephone throughout Williamsport and build up a paying business, and to his untiring perseverance and unswerving faith in the final triumph of the telephone as an indispensable attribute in every progressive business house and office, is due its early introduction into this city, and the financial success of the local company. In September, 1880, the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company was organized, of which he has since been president. He was one of the organizers of the Lycoming Electric Company, and is a director and secretary of the same. He is president of the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company, succeeding John Lawshe in October, 1890, and he raised the funds to purchase the plant from the original company and convert it into an electric road. He is a director and one of the corporators of the Merchantsí National Bank, was identified with the Packer Land and Improvement Company, and is largely interested in real estate in the city of Washington, D. C. Mr. Rhoads is a Democrat in politics, and has served as a member of the select council. He was one of the organizers of the Ross Club, and is vice-president of that institution, He is prominent in Masonic circles, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery. In 1868 he was married to Mary E., daughter of Alfred Howell, of Williamsport, and has a family of four children: Mary H.; Florence O.; Edith R., and Phoebe E. The family are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Rhoads has been quite successful in the various business enterprises he has been associated with, and is recognized as one of the foremost operators in electric circles in this section of the State. He has been largely instrumental in the founding, progress, and development of several of the electric enterprises in Williamsport and vicinity, and is a gentleman of broad views and commendable public spirit.

  JOHN LAWSHE was born in Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1826, and is the youngest son of Abraham and Anna H. Lawslie. He was reared in Jersey Shore, and was educated at the Jersey Shore Academy. He learned the tannerís trade with his father, and subsequently went to Philadelphia, and was salesman in a dry goods and jobbing house. In 1849, when the California gold excitement stirred the country from ocean to ocean, he caught the gold fever and sailed for the Pacific coast. Reaching the gold fields in safety, he worked in the mines until 1852, and then returned to his home in Jersey Shore, making the entire trip on the back of a mule, and taking plenty of fline to view the country while riding through it, He began railroad contracting on the Philadelphia and Erie railroad. From 1859 to 1861 he was first agent for the Northern Central railroad at Jersey Shore and the Philadelphia and Erie at Williamsport, and then went to Oceola Mills, Clearfield county, and purchased a tract of timber land and mill property, as a member of the firm of Lawshe, White & Company. This firm was afterwards merged into the Moshannon Land and Lumber Company, and Mr. Lawsho was general superintendent of the same. He was manager of the Kittanning Coal Companyís operations at the same point, and was president of the Connellsville Gas and Coal Company, of Fayette county. In 1872 Mr. Lawshe was elected a member of the State legislature from Clearfield county, and during his term he served on the committees of ways and means, railroads, and education. In 1877 he moved to southern California, and engaged in gold and silver quartz mining and in growing fruit, remaining there until the spring of 1885. He then returned to Williamsport and has since been prominently identified with the growth and prosperity of the city. In 1886 he was elected president of the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company, and served in that capacity until 1890, and since that date he has been secretary and treasurer of the company. He wag a director in the Lumbermanís National Bank, and one of the organizers of the Susquebarma Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and is a director and second vice-president and chairman of the finance committee of the latter institution. He was chairman of the building committee in the erection of the new bank building. He is a stockholder, director, and treasurer of the Lycoming Electric Light Company, and is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, a stockholder and director in the Otto Furniture Company, and a stockholder in the National Furniture Company and the Heller Printing Company. Mr. Lawshe has been a prominent Mason since 1852, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery. He is a stanch Democrat, and was chairman of the Democratic county committee for San Bernardino county, California, during the Cleveland campaign of 1884. Mr. Lawshe has been twice married. February 26, 1852, he married Julia P., daughter of Robert S. Bailey, of Jersey Shore. She died, June 26, 1865, and he was again married, October 23, 1866, to Charlotte H. Bailey, a sister of his first wife. He and wife are members of the Third Presbyterian Church of Williamsport, and he is a director in the Young Menís Christian Association.

  HIRAM MUDGE, secretary of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 25, 1822, son of Silas and Joanna (Lundy) Mudge. Silas Mudge was a native of Connecticut, a soldier in the war of 1812, and settled in Lycoming county after the close of that war. For three years he was engaged in teaching school, and after he was married to Joanna Lundy, he settled in Hepburn township, where he cleared a farm and lived thereon until his death. His wife was a native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and came to Lycoming county with her parents in 1809. Hiram received his educa-tion in the schools of his native township, and came to Williamsport in 1838, where he was employed as a clerk in a store for twelve years. In 1851 he went into the general mercantile business with Abraham Updegraff and continued for about six years. At the reorganization of the West Branch Bank, he was engaged as a clerk, where he remained for four years; he then formed a partnership with John S. Grafius, and engaged in the mercantile business for four years under the firm name of Grafius & Mudge. In 1863, in company with Abraham Updegraff, he instituted the organization of the First National Bank, which was finally consummated in 1864. He was cashier of this institution for nearly eight years. In 1874 he embarked in the grocery business, and after continuing for three years he became connected with Holden, Lentz & Salladeís Real Estate Savings Institution, which was re-organized low and changed to the City National Bank of Williamsport. After serving as vice- president of this bank for over four years, he was employed as teller in the Lumbermanís National Bank, and when the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company was organized he was made its secretary, which position he has held ever since. Mr. Mudge is also an agent for the Weightman property, and also for valuable interests owned by R. J. C. Walker. He has served as burgess of Williamsport, filled the office of city treasurer for three years, and was a member of the borough council. He was married in September, 1852, to Miss Fannie Smith, of Wyoming county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born ton children, six of whom are living: Emma; who married E. F. Noble; Harry; Jennie; Frank; Charles, and Josephine. Mr. Mudge and family are members of the Third Presbyterian church, of which he was one of the organizers, and at present holds the office of ruling older; he is also trustee of St. Johnís Lutheran church, helped to organize and build the same, and is trustee and treasurer of the Williamsport City Mission.

  SAMUEL JONES, treasurer of the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, was born in Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1819 son of Thomas and Maria (Housel) Jones, pioneers of that county. He was reared in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and received his education in the common schools of that town, which at that period were not of the best. In early boyhood he commenced clerking in a store in Lewisburg, and in 1837 he came to Williamsport and engaged with Henry and William Lyon, merchants. He clerked in their store for two years, and was afterwards employed for a few years as a clerk by Samuel H, Lloyd, who was proprietor of a stage route from Williamsport to Milton and Jersey Shore. In 1843 he was deputy prothonotary under Hepburn McClure. In 1845 he became connected with the West Branch Bank as a clerk and was subsequently appointed cashier of that institution. Upon the organization of the Lumbermanís National Bank in 1865, Mr. Jones was appointed cashier, and continued to fill that position up to August, 1888, when the charter was surrendered. When the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company was organized he was made its treasurer and has remained such ever since, He was one of its original stockholders, and his long experience in the banking business fitted him well for the position which he now fills. Mr. Jones is the pioneer banker of Williamsport, and few men in the business are more thoroughly acquainted with all the details of banking finance. He was married in 1848 to Rachel, daughter of Joseph W. Smith, of Lycoming county. Mrs. Jones died in 1868, leaving, three children: Susan, wife of J. Cooke Sturdivant of Williamsport; Mary, wife of John C. Gibson of Williamsport, and Emily, wife of H. S. Andrus of Pittsburg. Mr. Jones is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and is one of the oldest and best known business men of the city.

  ADOLPH NIEMEYER, treasurer of the Savings Institution, was born in the Kingdom of Hanover, Germany, April 12, 1835, son of Rev. Carl George and Sophia (Gade) Niemeyer, the former a minister in the Lutheran church, who, after celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of his ordination, retired from the ministry and is Dow living in the city of Brunswick. The subject of this sketch was reared under the parental roof, and was prepared for college by his father. He entered the college of the city of Brunswick, where he pursued his studies three years, and for the succeeding three years was engaged in a mercantile house in Brunswick. In 1855 he came to the United States, and located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he resided until 1857, and then went to Wisconsin, where he served as clerk for the board of supervisors. In 1865 he was appointed to a clerkship in the treasury department in the city of Washington, D. C., and filled that position three years. Returning to Williamsport in 1868, he formed a partnership with G. E. Otto Siess, in the book and stationery business. In 1870 he retired from that partnership, and accepted the position of treasurer of the Savings Institution. For the past twenty-two years Mr. Niemeyer has filled that position in a satisfactory and creditable manner. He is a Republican, and served as county auditor one term, and city auditor for two terms. He was married in 1867 to Louisa, daughter of Godfrey Hess, of Williamsport, and has four children: Carl Hess; Sophia; Emma, and Louisa. Mr. Niemeyer and wife are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church, and he is one of the trustees of that body. He is a member of the Masonic order, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  J. H. BOYER, cashier of the Merchantsí National Bank of Williamsport, was born in West Brunswick township, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, October 17, 1847. He was reared in that county and received his education in the public schools and at the State Normal School, Kutztown, Pennsylvania. He remained on the homestead farm until he was twenty-two years of age, when he learned telegraphy, and in 1870 was engaged by the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company as operator at Chestnut Hill, Philadelphia. He was promoted to various positions, and in 1876 came to Williamsport as freight and ticket agent, and was subsequently promoted to division agent. May 1, 1887, he resigned his position with the Philadelphia and Reading to accept his present position as cashier of the Merchantsí National Bank, which he has since filled in an efficient and satisfactory manner. In 1888 he established the firm of Boyer & Company, in the real estate, insurance, and coal business. This firm sold out their retail coal business in 1889, and have since conducted the wholesale coal trade, real estate, and insurance. Mr. Boyer is one of the organizers and directors of the Pennsylvania Telephone Company, and is a stockholder in the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company. He is a Mason, and a member of Lodge No. 106, also chapter and commandery, and is connected with the I. O. O. F. In politics he is a Democrat, and is a member of the select council from the Third ward. Mr. Boyer is married, and his family consists of a wife and two children. He is in every sense of the word a self-made man, and is highly respected by the leading citizens of his adopted home. He is a member and a trustee of the First Presbyterian church, of Williamsport. Mr. Boyer is treasurer and joint owner of the Grand View Cemetery Company; is interested in the Williamsport Upholstering Company, and the Keystone Lithograph Company, and represents and owns valuable real estate interests in this city, having recently acquired the one-fourth ownership of the Watson Farm Syndicate.

  WILLIAM H. SLOAN, cashier of the First National Bank of Williamsport, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, December 6, 1845, and is a son of Robert and Hannah (Harris) Sloan, natives of Lycoming county. His grandfather, Alexander Sloan, was a native of York county, Pennsylvania, and came to Williamsport about 1808. He engaged in the furniture and undertaking business, and his son Robert succeeded him. Both are well remembered as successful and upright business men. William H. received a public school education, and commenced his business life as a clerk in a store. In 1865 he entered the employ of the First National Bank as a messenger boy, and in 1871 he was made cashier of that institution, which position he has filled in a capable and creditable manner for the past twenty-one years. He is one of the directors of the bank, and is a director in the Williamsport Bridge Company and manager and secretary of the Williamsport Cemetery Company. Mr. Sloan is an elder in the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and in his political views affiliates with the Republican party.

  COL. SAMUEL WILSON was born in 1831, on his fatherís farm, one mile from the town of Lewisburg, Union county, Pennsylvania. He is a descendant of Samuel Wilson, a native of Ireland, who came to what is now Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, nearly 200 years ago, and purchased a tract of land in Derry township. He brought with him from Ireland his son James, a lad of nine years, who afterwards became a well known surveyor of Buffalo valley. In 1768 James Wilson visited Buffalo valley, and selected a large tract of land, which is designated in the records as "Wilsonís Choice," situated on the north side of Buffalo creek about half a mile from the mouth of that stream. In the spring of 1772 James Wilson again came to Buffalo valley in the interest of John and Thomas Penn, to survey what was then called the "now purchase." He surveyed his previous selection on Buffalo creek, purchased it, and gave it to his son William. The latter settled upon the land, and reared a large family, who married and became connected with many leading families in Union county. His sons, Thomas and Samuel, purchased the interests of the other heirs in the old homestead, and divided the land equally between themselves. Samuel Wilson married Elizabeth Nevius, whose mother was a daughter of Colonel Chamberlin and a sister of Moses Chamberlin, now a resident of Milton, Pennsylvania, and became the father of twelve children, as follows: Mary; Elizabeth; Sarah Ann; William; Lucretia; Thomas; Samuel; Eliza; John; James; N. Maria, and George P. Of this large family, five boys and three girls are now living.

  The subject of this sketch was the third son of Samuel and Elizabeth Wilson. He was educated in the common schools and at the Lewisburg Academy, and com-pleted his studies at Bucknell University in 1852. After leaving school he engaged in railroad construction, and was located at Mount Vernon, Indiana, on the Ohio and Mississippi railroad. In the fall of 1854 he was employed in building the North American and European railroad, in the Province of Now Brunswick, and returned to Lewisburg in 1856. In 1857 he became interested in a foundry and machine shop at Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, where he was engaged when the war commenced. In April, 1861, he assisted in recruiting a company called the Humes Guards, of which he was commissioned first lieutenant, May 6, 1861, but receiving no assurance that their services would be accepted the company disbanded. In June following Colonel Wilson recruited a company for E. G. Chorman, of Philadelphia, and reported with his men in that city about the middle of July. The company was mustered in, July 23, 1861, as Company B, of Chormanís Independent Mounted Rifle Rangers, afterwards known as the Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry. Our subject was commissioned first lieutenant, and as his company was the foundation of the regiment, it remained in Philadelphia until October, and was then sent to Washington. After encamping near the Soldiersí Home for a month, it was sent across the Potomac, and engaged in scouting duty. On the 26th of February, 1862, our subject was promoted to captain of Company L, and served in the Army of the Potomac until October 17, 1864. He was captured, December 2, 1862, and confined in Libby prison, but was soon exchanged and returned to his regiment. He was promoted to major, but never commissioned, and was commissioned lieutenant colonel of his regiment, December 23, 1863. He was a brave and gallant soldier, and was wounded five different times, twice in the right arm, once in the left arm, was struck by a piece of shell in the left hip, and had his right log above the ankle fractured. He received a letter from General Meade recommending him to the President for promotion, because of services rendered, and received a colonelís commission from the President, dated April 20, 1865. This was the first presidential commission received by any officer of the regiment. Colonel Wilson was mustered out of the service, October 17, 1864, having served three years and three months. He returned to his home, and then went to Titusville Pennsylvania, where he engaged in the oil business. After one yearís experience in that business he returned to Jersey Shore. In the fall of 1870 he was elected on the Democratic ticket to the legislature from the counties of Lycoming, Union, and Snyder, and in the fall of 1871 he was re-elected to the same office from the counties of Lycoming, Clinton, and Sullivan. In the fall of 1879 he was elected sheriff of Lycoming county, removed to Williamsport, January 1, 1880, and filled that office three years. He then engaged in the real estate business, which he has since continued to prosecute. Colonel Wilson served as deputy collector of internal revenue for the counties of Lycoming, Potter, Tioga, and Bradford, from December 1, 1886, until July 11, 1889, under C. B. Staples, and served under Thomas F. Penman, Mr. Staplesís successor, from the latter date up to October 1, 1889. In January, 1891, he was elected treasurer of the Williamsport and Binghamton Railroad Company, and still holds that position. He has been one of the board of managers of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company since its organization, also a director of the Williamsport Bridge Company. He is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and one. of the charter members of Encampment No. 47, U. V. L. He has been a member of the Masonic order for many years. Colonel Wilson was married, December 29, 1864, to Harriet B., daughter of Robert McGowan of Jersey Shore, who bore him two daughters: Mary, wife of H. R. Laird of Williamsport, and Elizabeth S. Mrs. Wilson died, March 4, 1873. She was a member of the Presbyterian church, to which denomination Colonel Wilson belongs. He is a stanch Democrat, and has always given his active support to the measures and principles of that party.

  ALLAN GRINNELL DODD was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, October 21, 1829. By the death of his parents he was early in life thrown on his own resources, and in 1850 he located in Lycoming county, where he resided until his. death. On the 14th of September, 1851, he married Emily, daughter of John Stiger, one of Lycomingís pioneers. The children of this union were George A., now captain in the Third United States Cavalry; Alice, wife of David Albert; Jennie, deceased; William H., deceased, and Charles E., a businessman of Williamsport. From 1851 to 1862 Allan G. Dodd was generally identified with the lumber interests of the county, following that business in different localities. Early in the 150ís he was engaged in business at Block House and DuBois, and later on Lycoming creek at Fieldís Station as a member of the firm of Dodd & Channell, from which he retired in 1855. He then located in Williamsport, remaining there until the spring of 1859, when he settled near the mouth of Loyalsock creek. Subsequently he acquired lumber interests on Plunkettís creek, near the site of Proctorville an on Wallis run.

  Owing to private affairs at the beginning of war of the rebellion, he was deterred from entering the service until 1862, when he responded to the call of Governor Curtin for volunteers at about the time of Leeís first invasion of the State. After his term of service had expired he returned to his home, adjusted his private business, and re-entered the service in September, 1862, as first lieutenant of Company A, One Hundred and Seventy-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. He remained continuously on duty with that organization until honorably mustered out of the service with his regiment in August, 1863. Returning once more to his home he placed his private affairs in a more satisfactory shape, and in August, 1864, he again entered the service, as first lieutenant of Company I, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers. He participated with this command, then a part of the Ninth Army Corps, in all the campaigns and fights in which it was engaged up to April 2, 1865, on which day he was mortally wounded while leading a battalion in a gallant charge on the enemyís works in front of Petersburg, Virginia, dying from the effects of his wounds, April 6, 1865. As a citizen Lieutenant Dodd was possessed of a high sense of honor, justice, and integrity, and was endowed with those sterling qualities which characterize the American citizen and patriot. As a soldier he was brave and generous to a fault, showing an utter disregard of danger in action, and fighting for country and principle, rather than for advancement and self-aggrandizement. Among the older and middle-aged citizens of Lycoming county, Allan G. Dodd is, remembered as a man of extraordinary moral and physical courage, an unswerving and uncompromising patriot, and a brave, gallant, soldier who sacrificed all for his country, and of whom his country and state may well be proud.

  CAPT. GEORGE ALLAN DODD was born in Rose Valley, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 26, 1852, son of Allan G. and Emily Dodd. His father having been mortally wounded in the service of his country, April 2, 1865, the son was left at an early age to the care of his mother. So well did he improve such educational advantages as he could obtain that after a competitive examination he secured the appointment to the United States military academy at West Point, New York, from the Eighteenth congressional district of Pennsylvania, in June, 1872. He was graduated June 14, 1876, and was commissioned a second lieutenant in the Third United States Cavalry to date June 15, 1876. He was advanced to first lieutenant in the same regiment, February 29, .1880, and to captain August 31, 1889. He has been constantly on active duty, excepting for two years beginning with October, 1888, when he was on recruiting detail at Philadelphia, which he accepted in consequence of impaired health. He participated in arduous campaigns in Wyoming, Dakota, Nebraska, Colorado, Arizona, and Indian Territory, commanding a troop a large part of the time from 1880, and at intervals was in command of from one to four troops of cavalry. He served successively under Generals Crook, McKenzie, and Merritt. For nearly two years he was in command of a body of Sioux Indian scouts. While in Arizona in 1882 he commanded Apache scouts in active duty against hostile Apaches. Among the fights and campaigns in which he participated were the defeat of the Southern Cheyennes in the fight of the Big Horn, November 23, 1876; campaign against Chief Josephís band of hostile Nez Perces in 1877; actions with hostile Cheyennes in 1879; the expedition for the rescue of Major Thornburgís command on White river, Colorado, in 1879; against the Ute Indians in western Colorado in 1880; the engagement of Big Wash of Chevelouís Fork, Arizona, July 17, 1882, when the Indians were badly defeated; against Geronimoís and other bands of hostile Apaches during 1883; against Kiowa Indians between 1885 and 1887. Since February 4, 1891, Captain Dodd has commanded a troop and the post of Fort Hancock, Texas. He was married to Agnes Clara Steele, daughter of a retired army officer, of Washington, D. C., in the summer of 1880. They have children as follows: Agnes, Katie, Charles, George, Mary, and William. Captain Dodd has received the recognition of the War Department for various valuable improvements in cavalry accoutrements, as well as for his successful effort in developing the system of training cavalry horses to the skirmish drill. During the sixteen years of his service he has only returned once to his home in this county, where he is held in high regard and where his honorable career is watched with pride by his many warm friends.

  GEORGE BUBB, wholesale merchant, and president of the Lycoming National Bank, was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1820. He is a son of Michael and Mary (Fribley) Bubb, the former a native of Germany, and the latter of Lycoming county. Our subject was reared on the homestead farm, and received a common school education. In 1848 he engaged in the mercantile business in Montoursville, and continued in the business for twenty-five years. About 1851 he engaged in the lumber trade, and has since been prominently identified with the lumber interests of the county. He was in partnership with William Weaver, of Montoursville, in the lumber business about thirty years. In 1862 he was appointed collector of internal revenue, for the Sixteenth congressional district, and filled that office four years, but upon the accession of Andrew Johnson to the presidency, Mr. Bubb was removed from office, because he did not uphold the views of the President. In 1869, however, he was re-appointed by President Grant, served four years, and resigned in the spring of 1873 in favor of John H. Burrows. Mr. Bubb removed to Williamsport in November, 1873, and has since been one of its most active and prominent citizens. He has served as a member of the school board and in the city council, and has given an ardent support to all measures calculated to improve and benefit his adopted home. In 1869 he became a member of the wholesale grocery firm of Corcoran, Weaver & Company, which in 1876 became Corcoran, Bubb & Company, Mr. Weaver retiring from the firm. In 1880 Henry C. Bubb succeeded Mr. Corcoran, and the firm of George Bubb & Sons has since been recognized as one of the leading business houses in this section of the State. In May, 1871, Mr. Bubb was the principal organizer of the wholesale and retail boot and shoe firm of J. E. Dayton & Company, which since 1873 has been engaged in the manufacture of boots and shoes. Mr. Bubb was one of the organizers of the First National Bank and a director in that institution until 1875, when he sold his stock. In 1875 he purchased stock in the Lycoming Savings Bank, which was converted into the Lycoming National Bank the same year, and he was elected president of that institution, and has filled that position continuously up to the present. Mr. Bubb was one of the charter members of the Sergeant Lumber Company, the Otto Chemical Works, and the Hermance Chemical Works. He was married, October 1, 1850, to Sarah Jane, daughter of Nathaniel Burrows, of Montoursville, and has a family of five children: Nathaniel Burrows; Mary H., wife of James Lewars, of Williamsport; Henry Clay; Alice M., and Nellie T. Mr. Bubb is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and was one of the trustees of that organization for many years. He took an active part in the erection of the now church building, and was chairman of the building committee. In early life he was a Whig, and cast his first vote for Henry Clay, and since the organization of the Republican party he has been one of its staunchest supporters. During the great flood of 1889, not with standing the fact that he was among the heaviest losers in the city, he subscribed to the relief fund, and did all in his power to mitigate the sufferings of his follow citizens.

  NATHANIEL BURROWS BUBB, of the firm of George Bubb & Sons, was born in Montoursville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1851, and is the eldest son of George Bubb. He was educated in the public schools, and at the Bing-hamton Commercial College, Binghamton, New York, graduating from the latter institution in 1868. At the age of eighteen years he engaged in the wholesale grocery business, as a member of the firm of Corcoran, Weaver & Company, where he remained for seven years. On the 1st of May, 1876, the firm moved to its present location, Mr. Weaver retiring, and they continued to do business under the name of Corcoran, Bubb & Company. In 1880 Henry C. Bubb became a member of the firm, and the present firm of George Bubb & Sons was organized. It is the oldest grocery house in the city, as well as one of the most prominent wholesale establishments in the Susquehanna valley. Mr. Bubb was one of the organizers of the Clearfield Coal Company, and he is treasurer of the same. He is secretary and treasurer of the Otto Chemical Company, is manager of the Hermance Chemical Company, and is president of the Fisher & Hinkle Company, and the business manager of that firm. He is also manager of the Sergeant Lumber Company, is identified with Strieby, Sprague & Company, and is senior member of the firm of N. B. Bubb & Company, lumber manufacturers, and extensive operators in Cameron, county. He is also secretary of the Williamsport Board of Trade. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming National Bank, and is one of the most prominent and enterprising young businessmen of the city. He is an active supporter of the Republican party, and is a member of the Masonic order and prominently connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery. Mr. Bubb was married in 1876 to Rebecca, daughter of D. F. Agnew, of Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, and has four sons: Harry Agnew; George Lashells; Nathaniel B., and James Lewars. He is a member and trustee of the First Presbyterian church.

  HENRY CLAY BUBB, junior member of the firm of George Bubb & Sons, was born in Montoursville, Lycoming county, March 13, 1856, and is a son of George Bubb. He received a public school education, and in 1872 entered Lafayette College, where he took a practical course. In 1874 he took charge of the shipping department of J. E. Dayton & Company. He went to Montgomery in 1877, and became a member of the firm of Henderson, Bubb & Company, general merchants, with which he was connected until 1880, when he sold his interest and became a member of the present firm of George Bubb & Sons. Mr. Bubb has general charge of the purchasing, and the general management of the grocery business of the firm. He is also a member of N. B. Bubb & Company, lumber dealers, and is a director in the Fisher & Hinkle Company. He is a stockholder and director in the Otto Chemical Company, and is a member of the Hermance Chemical Company, and of Strieby, Sprague & Company. Mr. Bubb was married at Erie, Pennsylvania, in 1884, to Sarah, daughter of John Hays, and has two children: John Hays, and Harry Burrows. He is a member of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport, was one of the organizers of the Ross Club, and is an active supporter of the Republican party.

  ALEXANDER BEEDE, wholesale grocer, was born in Orange county, New York, August 21, 1830, son of Addison C. and Sarah (McDonald) Beede, natives of New Hampshire. His mother died when he was an infant, and his father resided in Orange county up to his death. Alexander remained in that county until he was fifteen years old, and then removed to Elmira, New York. He received a public school education in the schools of Orange county and Elmira, and subsequently served an apprenticeship at the tinsmithís trade. He worked at that business for ten years, and in October, 1856, he came to Williamsport, and continued the same. In 1862 he became general manager of the wholesale grocery house of H. L. Holden, which position he occupied six years, succeeding Mr. Holden in the business in 1868, as a member of the firm of Beede, Corcoran & Burrows. After one year Mr. Corcoran retired, and the firm became Beede, Burrows & Company, by the admission of Thomas Polleys to a partnership. In 1880 Mr. Burrows retired from the firm, and since that date the name of the firm has been Alexander Beede & Company. It is the successor of the oldest wholesale grocery house in Williamsport, and does an extensive business in this section of the State. Mr. Beede is a stanch Democrat, and has often been importuned to accept office, but has always refused. He is a member of the Presbyterian church, and is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, being connected with the lodge, chapter, commandery, and consistory.

  THOMAS POLLEYS, of the firm of Alexander Beede & Company, wholesale grocers, was born in Malden, Massachusetts, October 14, 1818, and removed to Bradford county, Pennsylvania, in boyhood, and was there reared and educated. He learned the tinnerís trade, and worked at the business in Elmira, New York. He came to Williamsport in 1856, and has since been a partner with Alexander Beede in the stove and tinning business, and later in the grocery business. He was married in 1845, to Lois Ann Smith, of Orange county, New York, but has no children. He is a Republican in politics.

  L. L. STEARNS, merchant, was born in Hopkinton, Middlesex county, Massachusetts, April 3, 1823, son of John and Abigail (Legg) Stearns, natives of that State and farmers by occupation, who removed to Tompkins county, New York, in 1826, where they resided until their deaths. Our subject was principally reared in Tompkins county, and received his education in the public schools and at an academy in Groton, New York. In 1850 he came to Lycoming county, and followed the mercantile business at Jersey Shore. In 1861 Air. Stearns was appointed sutler of the Eighth Pennsylvania Calvary, and served three years in that capacity, and subsequently hold the same position in General Greggís brigade. After the close of the war he opened the first northern stock of goods at Lynchburg, Virginia, where he remained. six months, and then returned to Jersey Shore. In the fall of 1865 he opened a general store on the corner of Market and Third streets, Williamsport, where he carried on business until October, 1889. In the meantime he had purchased the property then known as the City Hotel, in December, 1888, and converted it into a store room, of which he took possession, October 11, 1889. In 1883 he admitted his three sons as partners, and has since done business under the firm name of L. L. Stearns & Sons. He is one of the charter members of the Demorest Sewing Machine Company, the National Furniture Company, and the Lycoming Opera House Company. He is also a member of the Ross Club, of which his sons are charter members. Mr. Stearns was married, September 17, 1844, to Catharine, daughter of Robert Muir, of Tioga county, New York, and to this union have been born five children: Delphine, wife of James S. Lawson; J. A.; Emil, Abgail, wife of Anthony G. Lyon; George L., and Charles R. He is a Republican in politics, and is an adherent of the Presbyterian church.

  J. A. STEARNS, eldest son o f L. L. Stearns, was born in Tompkins county, New April 12, 1848. He received his education in the public schools of Jersey and at Barnumís Business College, Springfield, Massachusetts. He was afterwards interested several years in the oil fields of Bradford, Pennsylvania, and 1883 became a member of the firm of L. L. Stearns & Sons. He is a stockholder Demorest Sewing Machine Company, the National Furniture Company, and Lamason Cash System. He is a charter member of the Ross Club, and in politics is a Republican. Mr. Stearns was married, November 5, 1873, to Sarah, daughter of Dr. Thomas Lyon, of Williamsport who is the mother of one son, Thomas L.

  GEORGE L. STEARNS was born in Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, November 1, 1853, the second son of L. L. Stearns. He received a public school education in native town, and subsequently attended Dickinson Seminary. He learned, the mercantile business with his father, and became a member of the firm of L. L. & Sons in 1883. He is a Republican, and is a charter member of the Ross Club.

  CHARLES R. STEARNS was born at Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1856. as educated in the public schools of that borough, and afterwards attended the Pennsylvania State College, Centre county, and Eastmanís Business College, Poughkeepie, New York. In 1883 he became a member of the firm of L. L. Stearns & Sons. He was one of the organizers of the Lycoming Opera House Company, a member of the board of directors and of the building, committee. He is a holder in the Demorest Sewing, Machine Company and is a member of the board of directors and building committee. He is a stockholder in the Demorest Sewing Machine Company and the National Furniture Company and is a charter is a charter member of the Ross Club. He was married, January 1,1885, to M. J., daughter of J. Walker Hays, and of this union three children survive: Rachel H.; Catharine, and Emily L. Mr. Stearns and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church, and in politics he is a Republican.

  JOHN THOMPSON, was born on Lycoming creek, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and was a member of one of the pioneer families of the West Branch valley. He learned the tannerís trade and followed that business for a number of years in Clinton county. In 1841 he settled on a farm in Muncy township, Lycoming county, and in 1856 he moved to Williamsport and retired from active business. He married Susan, daughter of Thomas Updegraff, of York county, Pennsylvania, an early settler of this county. She was born in Williamsport, and reared a family of eight children, four of whom are now living: James, of Philadelphia; Thomas U. of Topeka, Kansas; William F., of Williamsport, and Martha, wife of Frank Levan, of Williamsport. Mr. Thompson died in 1869, his wife surviving him until 1872. They were members of the Methodist Episcopal church. In early life he was a Whig, but upon the formation of the Republican party he became identified with that organization, and ever afterwards voted the Republican ticket.

  WILLIAM F. THOMPSON, senior member of the firm of Thompson, Gibson & Company, dry goods merchants, was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, March 18, son of John and Susan Thompson. His parents removed to a farm in Muncy township, Lycoming, county, soon after his birth, and his primary education was obtained in the public schools of that locality. He removed with his parents to Williamsport in 1856, and completed his education at Dickinson Seminary. He left school to engage in the mercantile business. In 1877 the firm of R. W. Gibson & Company was organized. In 1888 the present firm of Thompson, Gibson & Company was established, and is recognized as one of the leading dry goods houses in Williamsport. In 1862 Mr. Thompson went out as quartermaster sergeant of the One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served nine months. He also served in the one hundred daysí service. Mr. Thompson was married in 1865 to Clara M., daughter of John A. Otto, of Williamsport.

  JOHN WENNER, wholesale and retail grocer, was born in Prussia, Germany, in February, 1830, son of Jacob and Barbara (Lawson) Wenner. His parents immi-grated to the United States in 1846, and located in Nippenose valley, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, where they purchased a piece of land and engaged in farming. They cleared up the farm and lived upon it until their death, dying as they bad lived, practical members of the Catholic church. John is the third in a family of eight children, and was about sixteen years old when his parents came to this county. He received a common school education in his native land, and was taught those habits of industry and economy so essential to success in life. Soon after his parents settled in the Nippenose valley he went to Jersey Shore, where he found employment in a hotel. He remained working in one hotel for fifteen years, and in 1801 went to Lock Haven, where he was porter of the Fallon House for one year. In 1802 he came to Williamsport, and for one year was porter of the City Hotel, and next engaged in the barber business. He continued barbering for several years, and then entered the grocery house of Knapp & Thompson, and afterwards engaged with, L. L. Stearns & Sons, with whom he remained five years. On the 1st of April, 1880, he established his present business, on West Fourth street, and has since built up an extensive and prosperous wholesale and retail trade. He is a stockholder in the Demorest Sewing Machine Company, and is one of the active, enterprising, and substantial business men of the city. Mr. Wenner was married in 1854, to Katie, daughter of Christian Neddinger, of Lycoming county, and has a family of four sons and one daughter, as follows: Henry; Jacob; John; Edward, and Mary. He is a Democrat in principle, but an independent voter. Mr. Wenner and family are members of St. Bonifacius Catholic church, of which he is one of the most liberal supporters.

  JOHN A. GAMBLE was born in Jersey Shore, July 29, 1839, son of James and Elizabeth (Brenernan) Gamble, of Columbia and Lancaster counties, Pennsylvania, respectively. He received his education in the West Branch high school of his native borough, and in 1861, in partnership with John Sebring, he engaged in the mercantile business at that place, continuing. until 1873, when he removed to Williamsport. For some time he was engaged in the planing mill business and the book and stationery trade, and in 1882 became a member of the firm of Shopbell, Gamble & Company. In 1888 he embarked in the grocery business under the firm name of John A. Gamble & Company, and still retains a financial interest in both of these firms. He was one of the organizers of the South Side Refining Company, of which he and William M. Harrison are sole proprietors. He is a director in the, Lycoming National Bank, a director in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company, and a director in the Lycoming Rubber Company. He is executor of the estates of his father, Judge Gamble, and brother, James M. Gamble, also of his uncle John A. Gamble. He was married in 1865 to Creacie E., daughter of J. J. Sanderson, and to this union have been born three daughters: Ellen; Barrie, and Margaret B. He is a Democrat in politics,. and with his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  PIERSON L. KOONS, grocery merchant, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 1, 1842, and is a son of George and Mary (Konkle) Koons. His father was born in Cumberland county, Pennsylvania, and his mother in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county. They were married in this county, and settled on a farm in Loyalsock township, where they resided until within a few years and then removed to Williamsport, where they have since lived. They reared a family of thirteen children, ten of whom are now living and are residents of Williamsport and vicinity. They are as follows: Pierson L.; Sarah Lloyd, wife of John Crownover; George W.; Peter; Walter; John; Hiram; Mary Jane; Henry T., and Ella. The parents and children are adherents of the Methodist Episcopal church. The subject of this sketch was reared on the homestead farm in Loyalsock township, and was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He was afterwards employed by the lumber firm of E. B. Eyland & Company, with whom he remained seven years. He then engaged in the grocery business, in partnership with Joseph M. Neece, and the firm of Neece & Koons carried on business for six years and a half. The partnership was dissolved in 1881, and Mr. Koons has since continued business alone. He is one of the leading grocers of the city, has built up a fine trade, and is a gentleman of enterprise and public spirit. During the war of the rebellion he was drafted, but furnished a substitute. He is a stanch Republican, and takes quite an active interest in public affairs. Mr. Koons was married in April, 1873, to Alice A., daughter of John Neece of Muncy Creek township, and has one son, George John. He and wife are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which organization he holds the office of steward. He is a member of Eureka Lodge, F. & A. M.

  TIMOTHY CURTIN, merchant, was born in Wayne county, Pennsylvania, August 27, 1843, son of Daniel and Catharine (Mullin) Curtin, natives of Ireland. His parents immigrated to Pennsylvania about 1838 and engaged in farming in Wayne county, where they spent the balance of their lives. They were members of the Catholic church, and reared their children in that faith. The subject of this sketch grew up in his native county, where he received a common school education. At the age of seventeen he went to Scranton, Pennsylvania, and learned the boiler makerís trade at the Dixon Boiler Works. He came to Williamsport in December, 1864, and worked at his trade for Heatheote & Company, and afterwards had charge of their plant for four years. In 1870 he formed a partnership with Edward Fitzpatrick and established his present mercantile business. In 1873 Mr. Curtin erected his present store building on West Fourth street, which he has since occupied. Mr. Fitzpatrick retired from the firm, July 1, 1889, and Mr. Curtin had since conducted the business alone. Since coming to Williamsport he has been quite successful, and is recognized as one of the substantial men of the city. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, and has given his active support to many other public enterprises. He is a stanch Democrat, and served one term as a member of The city council. Hr. Curtin was married in 1877 to Catharine Garvey, a sister of the Rev. Eugene A. Garvey, pastor of the Church of the Annunciation, Williamsport. Seven children have blessed this union, as follows: Mary; Catherine; Margaret; Agnes; Claire; Eugene, and Joseph. The family are members of the Catholic church, and Mr. Curtin is one of the most liberal supporters of that denomination.

  JOSEPH G. STONESIFER, grocer, was born in Carroll county, Maryland, October 22, 1843, son of Benjamin and Susan (Freed) Stonesifer, natives of that county and farmers by occupation. His parents reared a family of seven sons and four daughters, eight of whom are now living, and are as follows: Peter, of Canton, Ohio; Susan, wife of Captain Henry Morningstar, of Hanover, Pennsylvania; Reuben, of Williamsport, who served in the rebellion; Israel S., of Gettysburg, who was a lieutenant in the Ono Hundred and Sixty-fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers:, John, of Hanover; Joseph G.; Elias, of Springfield, Ohio, who served in the One Hundred and Thirty-eight Pennsylvania Volunteers during the entire war, and Daniel. The parents were members of the Lutheran church, and died in Adams county and York county, Pennsylvania, respectively. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county, and received a public school education. He afterwards found employment in a machine shop, where he was working when the war commenced. On the 7th of August, 1861, he enlisted in Company I, Eighty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served with his regiment until the battle of Monocacy, July 9, 18034, where he was captured. He was confined in Libby prison until February 22, 1865, when he was exchanged, and two months later was mustered out of service. He was with Grant from Culpepper to the close of the war, and excepting the period when a prisoner, he participated in all of the battles and campaigns in which his regiment served. After the war he located in Adams county, Pennsylvania, and one year later removed to Renovo, where he worked at the carpenterís trade. In 1867 he came to Williamsport, and in partnership with his brother Reuben he embarked in the manufacture of doors, shutters, etc., and remained in that business for several years. He subsequently entered the employ of Alexander Beede & Company, wholesale and retail grocers, and remained with them until March, 1886, when he opened his present store, and has since built upon of the best retail trades in the city. Mr. Stonesifer was married, April 17, 1885, to Julia K., daughter of John Cramer of Williamsport, and has two children: Bessie Ray and May. The family are attendants of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church. He is a Republican, and quite active in the local councils of his party. He is a member of the Masonic order, also of Reno Post, G. A. R., and the Union Veteran Legion.

  ROBERT B. JOHNSTON, merchant, was born in Albany, New York, June 23, 1833, son of Robert B. and Marion (Blair) Johnston, natives of Edinburg and Glasgow, Scotland, respectively. They came to the United States in 1827, and took up their residence in Albany, New York. His father was a mechanic, and engaged in the manufacture of steamboat machinery. He died in Herkimer, New York. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native city, received a public school education, and subsequently attended Whitesboro Seminary, Oneida county, New York. He came to Williamsport in 1850, and was employed with the lumber firm of Prey & Brown. In 1854 he stocked logs for Quinn & Tinsman, and in the following year for Major Perkins. He then went to what is now Octonto county, Wisconsin, and stocked logs in 1856-57, and subsequently went to Minnesota, where he operated a mill. In the fall of 1858 he returned to Williamsport and was employed as foreman, by Brown & England until the outbreak of the civil war. In July, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Third Pennsylvania Cavalry; he was promoted to a lieutenancy in Company E, and served until compelled to resign by reason of disability. He was engaged a portion of his term of service on recruiting duty, and after resigning he returned to Williamsport. Here he was in the employ of Finley, Young & Company until 1877, when he established a general mercantile business on East Third street. He has since built up a large trade and accumulated much valuable property. Mr. Johnston is a Republican; he has served in the select council for six years, and was a member of the school board for one term. He was one of the organizers of the Williamsport Board of Trade, and has been one of its directors. He has been a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R. and was its delegate to California in 1886. He is a Mason, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, commandery, and consistory. Mr. Johnston was married in 1862 to Mary A., daughter of Ripley Lamb, of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, and has a family of five children: Addie M., wife of H. Q. Staver, of Williamsport; Ella, wife of Edward Frantz of Williamsport; Minnie; Robert B., and Edith.

  WILLIAM SEITZ, merchant, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, March 6, 1854, son of John and Christina (Wagner) Seitz, who emigrated to America in 1854, locating in Williamsport, where the father resided up to his death, January 1, 1892. William Seitz was principally reared in Williamsport and received his education in the public schools. At the age of twelve years he was employed as a clerk in the mercantile store of Sweely & Wallace, and subsequently by Burch & Mussina, after which he was engaged with his father and brother in the general mercantile business for five years. Following this was a five yearsí terra of service with Alexander Beede & Company, and in 1882 the present firm of Seitz Brothers was formed and first began business on the corner of Fourth and William streets, remaining for four and a half years, and removing thence to their present location, where they do the leading crockery and grocery business in the city. He was married in 1888 to Sophia, daughter of John Meyer, of Williamsport, and to this union has been born one child, Louise. Mr. Seitz is a Democrat in politics, is a member of the Knights of the Golden Eagle, and with his wife belongs to St. Markís Lutheran church, of which he is a trustee.

  JOHN T. REED, son of Jacob and grandson of Solomon Reed, because his father Jay sick with consumption for four years and was unable to work, was compelled to assume many responsibilities beyond his years; consequently he was scarcely able to secure a very meager common school education by the time he was twenty-one years old. But by industry, rigid economy, and sacrifice, he managed to secure a liberal English education at Dickinson Seminary, Williamsport. In 1859 he married Elizabeth, daughter of ex-Sheriff T. M. Hall, of Centre county, Pennsylvania, and for some time engaged in the profession of teaching. In 1863 he was elected county superintendent of schools of Lycoming county, and was twice re-elected to the same position. As a superintendent he was popular and brought about many needed reforms. In the beginning of his superintendency grammar, geography, and mental arithmetic were not taught in but comparatively few of the schools of the county. Mr. Reed succeeded in introducing these studies in connection with United States history in all the schools; he also organized the first county institute ever held in Lycoming county, at Muncy. On retiring from office he again entered the school room as principal of the public schools of Montoursville during the Winter season, and as principal of the Lycoming Normal School in summer. He was also principal of the public schools of Renovo for six years. As a teacher Mr. Reed had few equals and no superiors; his services were always in demand and commanded the highest salary. In connection with his professional duties he was engaged in various other pursuits farming and merchandising, and is at present engaged in the latter in Williamsport. He is the father of two children: James H. and Clara F., both of whom are married, the former to a Miss Russell, of Williamsport, and the latter to Dr. Charles Fullmer, of Renovo, to whom is born a son, John Bryan Fullmer., Mr. Reed is a Democrat in politics with Prohibition proclivities, has served as a member of the Board of Health, and with his family belongs to the Fourth Street Methodist Episcopal church. At present he is a member of the Board of Education in the city of Williamsport.

  WILLIAM H. THOMAS, merchant, was born in Mifflin township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1838, son of John and Mary Ann (Coudrick) Thomas. He was educated in the public schools and remained on the homestead farm until 1860, when he entered his fatherís store in Salladasburg; he remained there until 1886, when he succeeded his father to the business at that place. In 1888 he removed to Newberry, where he has since followed the mercantile business. He was appointed postmaster at Salladasburg by President Lincoln, served in that office for eleven years, and was a member of the school board of that village. He was married in 1862 to Mary, daughter of John Fiester, by whom he has six children: Oella May; Effie Rebecca, deceased; Cornie Ellen; Leidy Brice; John Lyon, and Mabel Amanda. Mr. Thomas is a Prohibitionist, and with his family belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church at Newberry, of which he is steward.

  CHARLES A. THOMAS, of the firm of Thomas Brothers, merchants, was born, February 25, 1848, in Mifflin township, Lycoming county, son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, both natives of Lycoming county. He was reared in his native township, and received his education in the schools of his neighborhood. He learned the harness-makerís trade and followed that business in Salladasburg until 1885. In April, 1886, he and his brother, Sylvester C., formed the present firm of Thomas Brothers. They are also interested in farming and have an interest in the grist mill at Salladasburg and are stockholders in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He was married, October 15, 1872, to Sophia C., daughter of Isaac Pepperman, by whom he has two children: Myrtle Grace and Oda Geneva. He and family are members of Grace Methodist Episcopal church.

  SYLVESTER C. THOMAS, son of John and Mary Ann Thomas, was born in Mifflin township, February 22, 1850. He was educated in the public schools of his neighborhood and lived on his fatherís farm until 1866; he then removed to Salladasburg and clerked in the store of John Thomas & Son until 1878, when he and his brother, Charles A., engaged in the mercantile business at Salladasburg, which they continued until they moved to Williamsport. He was married, October 15,1874, to Anna, daughter of Isaac Pepperman, by whom he had one child, Edward M., who died February 12, 1879. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas belong to Grace Methodist Episcopal church, in which he holds the office of steward. He is also a member of the Y. M. C. A.

  JOSEPH EDLER, dealer in flour and feed, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, July 25, 1827, son of Christian and Barbara (Kline) Edler. He received his education in the common schools, and learned the blacksmith trade, which he followed for eight years. In 1860 he and Thomas B. Neece embarked in the mercantile business at Hepburnville, where they continued for three years, Mr. Neece retiring at that time and Mr. Edler remaining until 1865. At this time he moved to Williamsport, and in partnership with Jonathan Neff, engaged in the grocery and provision business and had an extensive trade until 1870. Mr. Neff then withdrew from the firm, and Mr. Edler continued the business alone until the spring of 1871, when he sold out, and the following January went to Michigan, where he was engaged one year in the lumber business. In 1873 he and Joseph R. Hunt operated the White mill, located near the railroad bridge in the city of Williamsport. In 1876 he was engaged in business in Philadelphia, during the Centennial, and in March, 1883, he entered the flour and feed business, in which he has continued ever since, having for a time Albert Wilson as a partner. He is a Prohibitionist in politics, and has served three years on the school board. During the war he furnished a substitute, and assisted his township in fulfilling the requirements of the government. He was married in 1852 to Clara W., daughter of John Neece, and to this union have been born two children: John Roland and Thomas Irvin. Mr. and Mrs. Edler are members of the Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM EDLER, retired, was born in Philadelphia, July 30, 1819, son of Christian and Barbara (Kline) Edler. He received his education in the schools of Williamsport, and was afterwards engaged in boating on the canal for a number of years. In 1865 he embarked in the coal business in Williamsport, which he followed until 1886, since when he has lived a retired life. He is a Prohibitionist in his political views, and has served one term each in the common and select councils of Williamsport. He was married in 1850 to Eleanor T., daughter of Jacob Weaver, and to this union has been born one child, Fannie, who married H. R. Fulmer, of Williamsport. Mr. and Mrs. Edler are members of the Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is trustee and class leader, and has also been a member of the Preachersí Aid Society for many years.

  JOHN R. HAZELET, merchant, was born in Chambersburg, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, in 1844, son of William A. and Elizabeth (Judd) Hazelet, the former a native of that county, and the latter of England. His father was one of the pioneer furniture manufacturers of Chambersburg, and later was engaged in the planing mill business in that town. His parents now reside in Williamsport, and are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. John R. is the oldest in a family of five children. He was educated in the public schools of his native town, and at the Chambersburg Academy, and subsequently learned the trade of painter and decorator. He located in Williamsport, April 1, 1868, established an art store, and has since built tip a prosperous business. It is the only store of the kind in Williamsport, and carries a large stock of all classes of art goods and artistís and decoratorís materials. Mr. Hazelet is a Republican, and a stanch supporter of Republican measures and principles. He was married in 1874 to Sarah B., daughter of John Ransom, and has four children: W. S.; Alice; John Ransom, and Martha. He and wife are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is a trustee and superintendent of the Sunday school.

  NELSON A. HUGHES, of the firm of Hughes & Bowman, dealers in boots and shoes, was born in Ontario county, New York, January 15, 1852, and is a son of Stephen H. and Cynthia (Foster) Hughes, natives of that State. He received his education in the public schools, and afterwards attended Hillsdale College and the Rochester Commercial College, where he completed his education. He was engaged in bookkeeping in Rochester for ten years, and in 1876 he embarked in the fancy goods business at Elmira, New York. He continued there until 1882, and then came to Williamsport and purchased a one-half interest in the retail boot and shoo business of J. E. Dayton & Company. In 1884 he formed a partnership with C. A. Bowman, and purchased the boot and shoe store of T. S. Underhill, on Pine street, which was established by the latter in 1860. The firm of Hughes & Bowman have since enjoyed a prosperous trade, and have won a reputation for dealing in the finest grades of goods that come to Williamsport. Mr. Hughes is one of the organizers of the Athletic Park Association and is president of that institution. He is a member and treasurer of the Williamsport Gun Club, and is recognized as one of the most expert shots in the city. He was a member of the first Board of Trade of the city, and belongs to the present one. He is a member of the Masonic order, and belongs to the lodge, chapter, and commandery. He is also connected with the I. O. O. F., and is a charter member of the Royal Arcanum. Mr. Hughes was married in 1877 to Henrietta M., daughter of Samuel M. Bowman of Toronto, Ontario, and has four children: Roy V.; Edna M.; Arthur V., and Nelson W. He is a Republican, and is an attendant of the Third Presbyterian church, of which organization his wife is a member.

  CHARLES A. BOWMAN, of the firm of Hughes & Bowman, was born in Palermo, Ontario, Canada, October 27, 1856, and is a son of Samuel M. and Ann (Marr) Bowman, the former a native of New Hampshire, and the latter of Milton, Pennsylvania. He was reared in Canada, and at the age of seventeen came to Williamsport. He was educated in the grammar schools of Oakville, Ontario, and at Tiffin, Ohio. After coming to Williamsport he was employed as bookkeeper for J. E. Dayton & Company, and afterwards became traveling salesman for that firm. In 1884 he became a member of the present firm of Hughes & Bowman, and has since been engaged in the boot and shoo trade. Mr. Bowman was married in 1884 to Ida M., daughter of George S. Banger, and has two sons: George S. and Charles A. Mr. Bowman is a Republican, is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and is also connected with the Young Menís Christian Association.

  WILLIAM NEUSCHAFER, dealer in boots and shoes, was born in Prussia, Germany, December 25, 18S7, son of John and Margaret Neuschafer, who lived and died in their native land, his father dying when our subject was only six years of age. He was reared and educated in Germany, and at the age of fifteen he immigrated to Philadelphia, where he arrived in 1852. He learned the shoemakerís trade in that city and worked there until 1859, when he came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania. He continued working at his trade up to 1876, in which year he established his present business on a small scale. Through the passing years he has gradually built up a substantial trade, until today his boot and shoe store is one of the leading mercantile establishments in that line in the city. Mr. Neuschafer was married in 1861 to Margaret Badder, of Germany, who has borne him six children, as follows: George, who died August 24, 1891; Lizzie, wife of Henry W. Warner of Philadelphia.; William G.; Lewis; Harry, and Lillie. The family belongs to the German Lutheran church, and he is a trustee in that organization. He is a member of Williamsport Lodge, No. 570, I. O. O. F., and is Past Commander of Wiley Encampment, No. 3. He is a Democrat of independent proclivities, and believes in supporting the most worthy men for office.

  A. D. LUNDY, general insurance agent and book and stationery dealer, was born in Danville, Pennsylvania, in July, 1836. His father, John Lundy, was a native of Lycoming county and of Quaker descent, and was a merchant tailor at Danville, where he located when a young man and resided until his death in 1859. He married Mercy Morrison, of French birth, who at that time resided at Blackwellís, Tioga county. Our subject is the youngest of a family of seven children and was reared in Danville, where he received his education in the public schools of that place, after which he took up the study of civil engineering. He assisted Colonel Potts in engineering the construction of the Coal Run railroad, and also did engineering work on the Catawissa railroad. He came to Williamsport in 1854, where he was clerk for the superintendent of the Catawissa railroad for several years. In 1858 he moved to Iowa, remained there until 1861, and then returned to Williamsport, Pennsylvania. In 1860 he married Miss Jennie, daughter of J. J. Ayres, and in 1862 became a partner with Mr. Ayres in the book, stationery, and insurance business, in which he has continued successfully from that time to the present. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was discharged in May, 1863. He participated in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, and was second lieutenant of his company tinder Colonel Allabach. In politics he is a Republican, is now State agent for the Sun Fire Insurance Company, and with his firm is State agent for the Pacific Life Insurance Company of California. Mr. Lundy was one of the organizers of and is a director in the Y. Al. C. A., and with his family belongs to the Presbyterian church, of which he has been elder for over twenty years. He is the father of five children: Ayres D.; Cordelia Mercy; Mary B.; Frederick K., and Ethelweyn A.

  CHARLES E. HICKS, dealer in books, stationery, and wall paper, was born at Quakertown, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1849, son of William and Sarah W. (Edkin) Hicks. His father is a native of Quakertown, and his mother of Stroudsburg, Pennsylvania. They came to Williamsport in 1852 and are both residents of this city. Our subject was reared in Williamsport and educated in the public schools, after which he became a clerk in the book store of Sweely & Wallace, subsequently being employed with William M. Harris & Company, and was also five years with Ayres & Lundy. In 1875 he formed a partnership with D. E. Olmstead, and engaged in the dry goods and book business. At the end of two and one-half years this firm was dissolved, and from that time until 1879 Mr. Hicks continued the business individually. J. A. Gamble became associated with him in 1879, and the firm of Hicks & Gamble was thus formed. Since the retirement of Mr. Gamble in 1886 Mr. flicks has conducted the business alone, and carries one of the largest stocks in the city. He is a member of the Board of Trade, belongs to Ivy Lodge, No. 397, F. and A. M., and is a Republican in politics. By the flood of 1889 Mr. Hicks lost his whole stock, amounting to about $7,000. He was married in 1870 to Louisa Ann, daughter of Lewis Weigle, who died in 1888, leaving one daughter, Georgianna. He was again married, in January, 1891, to Catherine B. Wheelock, nee Harvey, daughter of Anderson Harvey. He is a member of the Third Street Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is steward, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school. He was instrumental in securing the erection of a mission church, now Limestone Methodist Episcopal church, on the Montoursville road, of which he is superintendent of the Sunday school. His wife is a member of the First Presbyterian church.

  JOHN M. DEAN, dealer in stationery, wall paper, etc., was born in Livingston county, New York, January 23, 1854, and is a son of Orange and Mary (McDonald) Dean, natives of that county, and farmers by occupation. John M. was reared in his native county, and received a common school education. He came to Williamsport in 1871 and entered the employ of Ayres & Lundy, where he learned the book and stationery business. In 1875 he embarked in that business in partnership with his uncle, Alexander Dean, who has since died. During the past seventeen years Mr. Dean has built up a satisfactory trade, and is one of the leading book and stationery merchants in Williamsport. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, and has always taken an active interest in the growth and progress of the city. Politically he is a Democrat, but takes no active part in political affairs. Mr. Dean was married in October, 1874, to Frances, daughter of James Blauvelt of Ithaca, New York, and has two children: Alexander and John M. Mrs. Dean is a member of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, and he is a supporter of that organization.

  GEORGE B. LEITER, dealer in books, stationery, and wall paper, was born in Greencastle, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, November 18, 1863, son of Jeremiah B. and Harriet S. (Wilson) Leiter. His parents were also natives of Franklin county, and removed to Williamsport in 1871, where they are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church. They have had born to thorn the following children: George B.; Silas C., who was born December 18, 1865, and is a dealer in stationery, etc., at Lock Haven, Pennsylvania; James W., deceased; Ida May; Seth T.; Grace V.; Betha A., and Vernie G. Our subject was reared in Williamsport, received his education in the public schools and the Williamsport Commercial College, after which he spent several years in Philadelphia. Returning to Williamsport in 1884 he entered into partnership with George A. Cohick and Fred R. Miller in the book, stationery, and bookbinding business. He retired from this connection in the following year, purchased his present business from L. S. Tilton, and has since enjoyed an excellent trade. He is the patentee and manufacturer of the game called "Ring-a-peg," and was treasurer of the Williamsport Passenger Railway Company for a Dumber of years. He was married, November 24, 1885, to Miss L. Myrtle McNarney, daughter of Thomas McNarney, of Lock Haven, and has one child, Elsie Reba. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., and West Branch Encampment, No. 136; is Republican in his political proclivities, and with his wife belongs to Grace Methodist Episcopal church, in which he is librarian of he Sunday school.

  AUGUSTE LAEDLEIN, confectioner, was born in Algeria, a French province in Africa, December 16, 1858, son of Thomas and Adell (Tillie) Laedlein, who came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1866, where his mother died the following year. His father is a saddle maker, and resides with our subject. Auguste was eight years old when he came to Williamsport, and he there grew to manhood and received a public school education. At the age of fourteen he went to learn the trade of baker and confectioner in Williamsport, and afterwards worked in Philadelphia. In 1880 he returned from Philadelphia and opened a bakery and confectionery on West Fourth street, where he remained six years. In 1886 he erected the building he now occupies, on the corner of Walnut and Fourth streets, where he has since built up quite an extensive business. He is the leading confectioner and caterer in the city, and also does quite a large outside trade. Mr. Laedlein is a stockholder in the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, and is a member of the Board. of Trade. He was married, October 20, 1881, to Elizabeth E., daughter of C. L. Wittmer of Williamsport, but now a resident of Syracuse, New York. Five children are the fruits of this union: Annie D.; Emma S.; Laura L.; Preston W., deceased, and Robert A. Mr. Laedlein is independent in his political views, and has never taken any active interest in political matters. He is a prominent Mason, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery, and is also connected with the Royal Arcanum.

  JACOB SHEFFER was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, in 1809. His father, John Sheffer, was a native of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, was a tailor by trade, and became one of the pioneer settlers of Williamsport. He was once deputy sheriff of Lycoming county, and moved to Block House, Tioga county, in 1813 or 1814, where he served as justice of the peace for many years, and where he died. He married Susan Reynolds, and with her belonged to the Lutheran church, and to them were born fifteen children, five of whom are now living: Jacob; Susan, who married Daniel Miller; Julia Ann, who married Nicholas Elder; Michael, and George R. Our subject moved to Tioga county with his parents when four years old. He has principally spent his life at farming, in connection with the stonemason and plasterer trade. He married Mary A. Beck, and with her resides on the old homestead in Tioga county, Pennsylvania. They are prominent members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and he is a Republican. They were the parents of eight children, of whom the following are now living: Daniel, who served as a minister in the Methodist Episcopal church for thirty-five years, and is now retired at Cedar Falls, Iowa; Amos, who is a contractor and builder of Williamsport; Ellis, who is a member of the insurance firm of Sheffer & Melick; John, who lives in Tioga county; Lewis, and Perry.

  LEWIS SHEFFER, merchant tailor, was born in Liberty township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1844, son of Jacob and Mary A. (Beck) Sheffer. He received his education in the public schools of his native county, after which he engaged in the mercantile business for some time. In March, 1863, he came to Williamsport, where he clerked in a store for four years, and in 1867 he established his present business. For two years he was in partnership with J. H. Shanbacher in the general merchandise and merchant tailor trade, but since 1869 he has done business on his own responsibility, is one of the oldest merchant tailors in the city, and enjoys an excellent, trade. He has also been extensively engaged in real estate transactions, having erected and sold several fine houses in the city. In 1863 he served three months as corporal of Company B, Thirty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R. He was married in 1867 to Rachel, daughter of Daniel Bower, and to this union have been born three children: Cora, who married Walter F. Anthony; Elmer L., and Harry Wilson. Mr. and Mrs. Sheffer are members of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is superintendent of the Sunday school and steward.

  THOMAS F. CARSKADDEN, merchant tailor, was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1857, son of James and Cereptia (Stradley) Carskadden, natives of Clinton and Lycoming counties, respectively. His father was a bricklayer, and followed that trade up to 1861, when he enlisted in the Thirteenth Pennsylvania Volunteers. He served with his regiment up to the battle of Gettysburg, where he was killed. His widow survives and lives with our subject. They were the parents of four children: Annie, deceased; John W.; Thomas F., and William L. The subject of this sketch was reared in Clinton county until he was eighteen years of age, and received a common school education. He learned the tailorís trade with John Marshall of Lock Haven, and in 1888 he graduated from the John J. Mitchell Cutting School, of New York City. The same year he opened a merchant tailoring establishment in Williamsport, and has since built up a satisfactory trade. Mr. Carskadden has been married twice; first in 1878, to Tincie J., daughter of Theodore Lewis of Williamsport. She died in 1882, leaving one son, William L. In 1885 he married Emma, daughter of Adam Martin of this city, who has borne him two children: Charles F. and Henry A. He is a member of the First Disciplesí church of Williamsport, in which he is a deacon, and is also a teacher in the Sunday school. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and of the K. of G. E.

  HENRY VEIL, senior member of the firm of Henry Veil & Company, was born in Cambria county, Pennsylvania, May 11, 1857, son of Henry C. and Mary (Westbrook) Veil. His father was a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, and one of the pioneers of Cambria county, where he built and operated a tannery up to his death in 1874. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and steward and deacon in that organization. His wife, Mary, died in 1879. Of a family of eight children born to Henry C. and Mary Veil, seven are living, as follows: Charles Henry; Annie, wife of P. H. Levergood; Louisa, wife of W. W. Gleckner; John H.; Angeline, wife of J. H. Linck; Henry, and Mary, wife of Dr. S. S. Miller. The subject of this sketch was reared in Cambria county, and learned the tannerís trade with his father. He worked at that business for several years, and in 1880 he and J. H. Linck rented a tannery at Tyrone, Pennsylvania, and the firm of Linck & Veil operated it until 1882. He afterwards traveled on the road for Mr. Linck selling hardware until January, 1889, when, in partnership with H. G. Mix, he established the firm of Henry Veil & Company, dealers in harness and saddlery hardware. Mr. Veil is a Republican, and served as justice of the peace in Cambria county, and was a member of the council in Tyrone, being elected to both offices in strong Democratic districts. He was married in 1879 to Mary, daughter of Capt. John Irvin, sheriff of Tioga county, and has four children: Frederick; John; Nellie, and Charles. The family are attendants of Grace Methodist Episcopal church.

  JOHN A. SHOEMAKER, dealer in harness and saddlery, was born in Salona, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1859, son of Josephus and Hannah (Willow) Shoemaker, natives of Cumberland and Clinton counties, Pennsylvania, respectively. His father located in Lock Haven in 1856, where he has since been engaged in the harness and saddlery business, and with his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church of that city. Our subject is the oldest of a family of five children, and was reared and educated in Lock Haven, receiving instruction in the high schools and the Normal of that place. He learned his trade with his father, and has since been engaged in the harness business, with the exception of three years which were spent in the grocery trade in Lock Haven, He came to Williamsport, July 4, 1886, and established his present business and enjoys the loading trade of the city. He was married in 1882 to Miss Elizabeth, daughter of Augustus Jones, of Lock Haven, by whom he has one child, Bessie Louise. He is a member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, F. and A. M., Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22, Williamsport Lodge, Royal Arcanum, No. 027, is a Democrat in politics, and with his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church.

  J. FRED CODER, commercial agent of the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, May 28, 1857. He is a son of Samuel and Charlotte (Miller) Coder, natives of Lycoming county, and descendants of two of its pioneer families. His father was born in Fairfield township, and has served as high constable and chief of police of Williamsport for several years, and is one of the well known public officials of the city. The subject of this sketch was educated in the public schools, and also took a course at the Williamsport Commercial College, then under the charge of Professor Davis. He began his business career as a messenger boy in the Western Union telegraph office, and later became office boy in the depot of the Catawissa railroad, at the foot of Pine street. When the Philadelphia and Reading purchased this road, Mr. Coder was given a desk in the freight office, and was steadily advanced, until in May, 1887, he succeeded J. H. Boyer as local freight and ticket agent, having been chief clerk for Mr. Boyer two years previous. June 1, 1892, he was again promoted from the local agency to that of the commercial agency, which position he now holds, with headquarters on West Fourth street, Williamsport. In 1888, at a meeting of the directors of the Lycoming National Bank, he was chosen teller of that institution, but as he had cast his fortunes with the Reading railroad, he decided to remain with that corporation. Mr. Coder is a stockholder in the Athletic Park Association and the Commonwealth Loan Association. He is a member of the Elks and of the Royal Arcanum, and treasurer of the latter society. Though a stanch Republican, he takes no active part in politics, but devotes his whole attention to the duties of his position. He was married in 1881 to Mary H., daughter of the late Capt. Thomas S. Doebler, of the United States Army, and has two children: Edith and Frederick. He and his wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  GEORGE W. HARDER, dealer in sporting goods, was born in Athens, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, April 12, 1852, son of Jacob and Maria (Fritcher) Harder, natives of Seboharie county, New York, and Bradford county, Pennsylvania, respectively. His father was a gunsmith by trade, and in 1860 he moved to Lock Haven, where he retired in 1888 and his wife died in 1870.He is a Republican in politics, and on January 25, 1845, he was made colonel of the Fifth Regiment, Second Brigade, N. G. P., embracing the counties of Lycoming, Potter and Bradford, and held that position for several years. He is the father of four children: George W.; John; Frank, and Emma. George W. was reared in Bradford county and Lock Haven and received his education in the high schools of the latter place, and the State Normal School at Mansfield, Pennsylvania. From 1878 to 1881 he was in the United States mail service, running from New York to Pittsburg, Pennsylvania. Having learned the gunsmith trade from his father, he established a business in Tyrone, Pennsylvania, in 1876, where he remained until 1885, coming thence to Williamsport, where he does the most extensive business in his line in the city. He was a member of the town council and chief of the fire department of Tyrone. He is a, member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, F. and A. M., Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., West Branch Encampment, No. 136, Canton Wieldey, No. 3, Patriarchs Militant, Williamsport Council, No. 927, Royal Arcanum, and in politics is a Republican. He was married in 1876 to Ida E., daughter of John Hanscom, and to this union have been born three children: George; Frank, and Emily. He is one of the organizers of the Athletic Park Association, was one of the organizers of the Will-iamsport Gun Club, and served as president of the same until 1891.; is a director in the Y. M. C. A., and with his wife belongs to the Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is financial secretary, a teacher in the Sunday school, and a member of the board of stewards.

  GEORGE WEAVER, dealer in salt, lime, plaster, cement, etc., was born in York, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1821, son of Jacob and Catharine (Smith) Weaver, who, moved to Lewisburg, Union county, when the subject of this sketch was quite small. They afterwards went to Turbut township, Northumberland county, where his father was engaged in the distilling business. They next removed to the vicinity of Muncy, Lycoming county, and afterwards to Loyalsock township. His father was engaged in the distilling business in that township, and died at Newberry, at an advanced age. He was twice married, and had a family of ten children by his first wife, Catharine Smith, but no children by the last one. George was reared in Northumberland and Lycoming counties, and received a common school education. He then engaged in lumbering and working in a saw mill, and for many years followed boating on the canal. In 1854 he embarked in the mercantile business in Williamsport, which he continued until 1858. For a short time thereafter he was a partner in the milling business at the brick mill now owned by Abram Good on Lycoming creek, and a few years afterwards he purchased a hotel in Armstrong, township, and one year later a farm in Clinton township, where he remained three years, returning to Williamsport in 1867. He established his present business the same year, and has since built up a prosperous trade. Mr. Weaver was married, February 27, 1850, to Elizabeth, daughter of John Heisley, a native of Lancaster county,. who came to Williamsport in boyhood and married Elizabeth Russell. Mr. Weaver has three children: J. H., a coal dealer of Philadelphia; Elizabeth, wife of G. A. Long of Tamaqua, Pennsylvania, and Catharine. Mrs. Weaver is a member of Mul-berry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  MILTON HUBER, druggist, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, February 27, 1843, son of Jonas and Sarah (Stahler) Huber, natives of that county and farmers by occupation. His parents moved to Lehigh county, where they lived on a farm until 1875, when they retired to Hellertown, Northampton county. There Mr. Huber died in 1881, and Mrs. Huber yet resides; both were early identified with the German Reformed church, and he was a Republican in politics. Their family consisted of the following children: Milton, of Williamsport; Clara, wife of Allen Leith, of Northampton county; Eliza, wife of Jacob Leith, of the same county, and William, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. Milton was reared in Lehigh county until he was sixteen years of age, and was educated in Quakertown, Bucks county, under Prof. A. R. Horne. He then went to Norristown, where he learned the drug business, and graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1865. In July, 1869, he came to Williamsport, established his present business house, and is the oldest druggist in the city. Mr. Huber is a member of the State Pharmaceutical Association, and is vice-president of the Lycoming County Pharmaceutical Society. He is recognized as one of the most prominent and successful druggists in this part of the State. He is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, also in the First National Bank, and is one of the substantial business men of the city. Mr. Huber was married in 1873 to Maggie, daughter of ex-Sheriff J. B. McMicken, of Williamsport. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church. He is a Repub-lican in politics, and is prominent in the Masonic fraternity, being a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  JESSE B. DUBLE, Of the firm of Duble & Cornell, druggists, was born in Bartonsville, Frederick county, Virginia, January 16, 1845, son of Jonathan and Caroline L. (Quinby) Duble, natives of Maryland and Pennsylvania, respectively. On the maternal side, the family can be traced back six generations, to William Quinby, of Wales, who settled in Westchester county, New York, some time in the seventeenth century. The subject of this sketch was reared in Berkeley county, Virginia, and was educated at the Martinsburg Academy. During the rebellion he and his father were strong Union men, and in attempting to reach the Union lines, he was taken prisoner and confined at Winchester for two months. Upon his release our subject went to Hagerstown, Maryland, and was employed as an apprentice in a drug store, but in August. 1862, he enlisted in Company I, Seventh Maryland Volunteers, and served in the Army of the Potomac until mustered out at the close of the war, being then sergeant of his company. He participated in all the battles of his regiment, and was wounded at the Wilderness, in May, 1864. Returning to Hagerstown, he resumed the drug business, and completed his course in Baltimore. He came to Williamsport in March, 1860, and entered the drug business Dear Hepburn street, as a member of the firm of Weise & Duble, afterwards removing to his present loca-tion on the corner of Fourth and Pine. In 1871 he took into partnership E. A. Cornell, and the firm of Duble & Cornell has since been regarded as one of the leading drug houses in Williamsport. In 1889 they established a branch store on Fourth street, near the junction, which they have since carried on. Mr. Duble is a member of the State Pharmaceutical Association, was second vice-president of the same in 1881, first vice-president in 1882, and president of the association in 1883 and 1884, He has been vice-president of the Merchantsí National Bank since its organization, and one of its original stockholders. He was one of the organizers of the Edison Electric Illuminating Company, and has served as vice-president since its organization.

  He is first vice-president of the Board of Trade. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R, also of the Union Veteran Legion, and was commander of the latter organization in 1890. Mr. Duble is a Republican, has served for seven years as a member of the city council, and was president of the select council three years. While a member of the common council he introduced the ordinance providing for a topographical survey of the city for a complete system of sewerage; the ordinance was adopted, although strongly opposed, and the plan as laid out by John M. Otto has been carried into effect. Mr. Duble was married, November 4, 1868, to Annie E., daughter of Henry Weise, of Hagerstown, Maryland, who has borne him ton children: Mabel; Clyde; Blanche; Edward; Edith; Arthur and Bessie deceased; Harold, Norman, and one who died in infancy. Mr. Duble and family are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  JUSTIN L. HILL, druggist, was born Dear Hughesville, in Wolf township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 30, 1855, son of Dr. George and Rachel (Hughes) Hill. He was reared in his native township and received a common school education, afterwards attending the Missionary Institute at Selinsgrove and spending one year at Dickinson Seminary. He graduated from the Maryland College of Pharmacy in 1879. Previous to and during the time of his graduation he clerked in the drug business in Baltimore, Maryland. In January, 1881, he established his present business in Williamsport, and has since built up a profitable trade. Mr. Hill is a member of the State and American Pharmaceutical Associations; he was one of the organizers of the Lycoming County Pharmaceutical Society, and is now the president, of the latter. He is a Republican, but takes no active part in political matters. He was married in December, 1885, to Lauretta, daughter of John H. Burrows, of Williamsport, and has one daughter, Helen B. He is a member of the Lutheran church, and his wife is connected with the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. Mr. Hill is a descendant of one of the pioneer families of Lycoming county.

  JOHN PAUL SUESS, druggist, was born in Bethlehem, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, April 13, 1836, son of Volkmar and Susannah (Held) Suess, natives of Saxony, Germany, who located in Northampton county in 1854. He received his education in the public schools at Bethlehem and learned the drag business in South Bethlehem. He was graduated from the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy in 1878, came to Williamsport the same year, and was engaged as clerk for Milton Huber until February 1, 1889, at which time he became a partner with Mr. Huber and remained such until September 1, 1890, when he established his present business on West Fourth street. He was married in October, 1890, to Miss Ida, daughter of J. S. Melick, of Williamsport. He is Past Commander of Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22, K. T., is a member of Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, and of Lodge No. 106, F. and M., and with his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  C. M. MOORE, of the firm of Moore & Company, druggists, and secretary, treasurer, and general manager of the Wilkinson Truss Company, was born in Liberty, Tioga county; Pennsylvania, April 22, 1843, son of Isaac R. and Maria (Waters) Moore, natives of Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, who were early settlers along Little Pine creek in Lycoming county. His father was a machinist by trade and followed that occupation in Elmira, New York, for a number of years, afterwards settling on a farm in Tioga County, Pennsylvania, where he engaged in farming for some time; years later he engaged in lumbering in Jackson township, Lycoming county where he died. Our subject received his education in the public schools and Dickinson Seminary, after which he taught school in Lycoming county, subsequently embarking in the mercantile business in Liberty, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, for twenty years. In 1888 he came to Williamsport and purchased the drug store of Dr. Baker. He was also a member of the hardware firm of Moore, Fulmer & Company for some time. He was one of the organizers of the Wilkinson Truss Company, which was founded in 1890, and has been its secretary, treasurer, and general manager from the beginning. He is a Democrat, in politics, has served as auditor of Tioga county, was a candidate for prothonotary of the same county against General Cox, and although defeated, he reduced the majority 3,300. He was married in 1886 to Miss Margaret, Bodine, daughter of Ellis M. Bodine, of Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born two children: Lou Clare and Bertha B. Mr. Moore is a member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, F. and A. M., and with his family belongs to the Presbyterian church.

  JOHN E. BYRNE, merchant tailor, was born in County Tyrone, Ireland, December 7, 1847, son of Hugh and Martha (McAllister) Byrne, who now reside in Philadelphia. Mr. Byrne was reared in his native country, received a good education, and learned the tailorís trade with his father. In 1868 he emigrated to America, locating first in New York City, where he completed his trade, and afterwards engaged in business in that city and Philadelphia for some time. He came to Williamsport in 1883, and was employed as cutter for Mr. Conway until 1885, when he established his present business, and has built up an excellent trade. He was married in 1875, to Caroline Byrne (no relation), of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born seven children: Mary Ellen; Dennis J.; John; Martha; Caroline; Bessie, and Margarette. Mr. Byrne is a stockholder in the Athletic Park Association and belongs to the Williamsport Rifle and Gun Club. He was also one of reorganizers of the Williamsport Board of Trade. In his political proclivities he is an enthusiastic, Republican, and was one of the organizers and is the president of the Celtic Republican Club of this city. Mr. Byrne and family are members the, Catholic church.

  H. R. REYNOLDS, merchant tailor, was born in Westchester county, New York, June 21, 1857, and is a son of A. B. and Frances (McCord) Reynolds, natives and residents of the same county. He received a public school education, and subsequently attended Dr. Holbrookís Military Academy, Sing Sing, New York. After leaving school he began clerking in the store of Townsend Young, the leading clothing, merchant of Sing Sing, in which establishment he spent eleven years, and through his own merits was gradually advanced from the lowest to the highest position in the store. He also obtained a thorough practical knowledge of the cutting business, and thus equipped he came to Williamsport in February, 1886. In August of that year he opened a merchant tailoring establishment, and soon became recognized as one of the leading merchant tailors in this section of the State. He has built tip a large business, and has won a high reputation in his calling. Mr. Reynolds is a stockholder in the Athletic Park Association, and one of the popular business men of the city. He was married, February 14, 1888, to Annie Y., daughter of Thomas E. Hapgood of Sing Sing, New York. Politically he is a Democrat, and he and wife attend the Third Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JOHN B. BECK, deceased, was born in Shrewsbury, York county, Pennsylvania, February 5, 1813, and grew to manhood in his native county. In 1839 he came to, Williamsport, when that flourishing city was a mere hamlet, and he was identified with its growth and prosperity for half a century. He learned the tailorís trade before coming to this city, and afterwards engaged in that business for a short time. In 1863 he formed a partnership with his son, Samuel M., and engaged in the hardware business. In 1865 another son, Newton X., became a member of the firm, which was known as Beck Brothers & Company. H. L. Beck was admitted to the firm in 1873, and continued the business in partnership with his father until the death of the latter in October, 1890, when he became sole proprietor. In early manhood Mr. Beck began to take an active interest in political affairs, and was a stanch supporter of the Democratic party. He served as sheriff of Lycoming county from 1850 to 1853, and in the latter year he was elected to the legislature and served one term. In 1862 he was again elected to the legislature, and re-elected in 1863. In 1867 he was elected to represent this district in the State Senate, and was a prominent member of that body. At the close of this term Mr. Beck retired from active participation in political matters, although his power and influence were frequently felt afterwards, when matters of great political moment demanded the attention of skilled directors. Mr. Beck was twice married, but survived both wives. His first wife was Mary A., daughter of the Rev. Butler, a well known Methodist minister of York county, Pennsylvania. Four sons and two daughters were the fruits of this union: Margaret J., widow of Thomas Smith: William B., brevetted lieutenant colonel of the United States Army and captain of the Fifth United States Artillery; Emma E., wife of Col. F. E. Embick, of Williamsport; Samuel M., who was born March 16, 1840, was a private in Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, married Miss E. E. Rathmell, and died June 24, 1875; Henry L., and Newton X., who was born October 27, 1843, married Elizabeth Scates, who survives him, and died January 23, 1876. Mrs. John B. Beck was born September 11, 1813, and died December 4, 1870. His second marriage was to Josephine White, Of Philadelphia, of which union there was no issue. Mr. Beck possessed a rugged constitution, and enjoyed robust health up to within a few years of his death. He was widely known throughout the Susquehanna valley, and was highly respected by a large circle of friends.

  HENRY L. BECK was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 5, 1842, and after receiving an education at Dickinson Seminary, he was graduated from Balmars Academy. He was commissioned an officer in the United States Army, and was serving as second lieutenant when Sumter was fired upon. He served during the entire war, was promoted to captain, and participated in the battles of Antietam, Colliersville, Lookout Mountain, Mission Ridge, Chickamauga, Knoxville, the siege of Port Hudson, Louisiana, and many other battles and skirmishes in which, his regiment was engaged. After the close of the war his regiment was stationed on the frontier, and he remained in the service until 1872, when he resigned his commission and returned to Williamsport. In 1873 he became it member of the hardware firm of Beck Brothers & Company, and upon the death of his father in 1890 he became sole proprietor of the establishment. Mr. Beck was married, December 20, 1866, to Elvira J., daughter of Francis Bush, of Boston, Massachusetts, and has one son, John B. He is active in the local councils of the Democratic party, and takes a deep interest in the successes of that organization. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., also of the Union Veteran Legion. He and family are members of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church, in which organization he has been a vestryman for many years. Since entering the hardware business, Mr. Beck has increased the facilities of his house, until today it ranks second to none in this section of the State.

  FREDERICK H. KELLER, hardware merchant, was born in Lititz, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, September 16, 1832, son of Frederick and Maria (Kraemer) Keller, the former a native of Frederickstown, Maryland, and the latter of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county up to his fifteenth year, attended the Lititz Academy, and was afterwards apprenticed to the carpenterís trade at Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, where he spent five years and three months. In 1853 he went to Lancaster and worked at his trade there until the provost marshalís office was established in that town, during the war, when he was appointed clerk to the provost marshal through the influence of the late Thaddeus Stevens, and remained in that office until the close of the rebellion. In the spring of 1866 he came to Williamsport, and for five years was engaged in the leather and finding business. He then became a member of the firm of Kline & Keller, hardware merchants, which existed for about eleven years, when he withdrew from the firm, and established his present business house in January, 1884. From that time to the present Mr. Keller has devoted his entire attention towards building up the large and lucrative trade which he is now enjoying. Prior to the war Mr. Keller was a Democrat, but has since been identified with the Republican party. In 1890 he was elected mayor of Williamsport, and served two years. He was again elected to the same office in 1890, and is the present incumbent. He has made a popular official, and is trusted and respected by his fellow-citizens irrespective of political affiliations. He was married May 22, 1858, to Ellen C., daughter of Andrew Bear, a pioneer of Lancaster county, and has a family of five children: Charles; Edgar; James; William, and Walter. Mr. Keller is a member of the Moravian church, and is prominently connected with the Masonic order.

  JAMES N. KLINE, hardware merchant, was born in Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1846, son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Dodge) Kline, natives of Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, and farmers by occupation. His parents were members of the Presbyterian church, and died upon their homestead in Mifflin county. James N. As reared upon the old homestead in Mifflin county, and received a common school education. He subsequently entered the employ of F. J. Hoffman, Lewistown, Pennsylvania, in whose store he was engaged for some time. In 1863 he came to Williamsport, and began clerking in the hardware store of Lewis McDowell. He remained with Mr. McDowell seven years, and afterwards clerked for S. M. Beck & Company two years. In 1873 he formed a partnership with F. H. Keller and Charles E. Gibson, under the firm name of Kline, Keller & Company. This firm carried on business for three years, when Mr. Gibson withdrew, and Messrs. Kline & Keller continued the business until 1885. Mr. Kline then purchased his partnerís interest, and has since conducted business alone. He is recognized as one of the largest and most prominent hardware dealers in Williamsport, and in the different branches of his extensive business employs twenty bands. Mr. Kline has been a resident of this city for twenty-nine years, and has been engaged in business for Dearly twenty years. As a business man and a citizen he stands high in the regard of the entire community, and his hardware house is one of the best known establishments in Williamsport. In June, 1863, he enlisted in Company K, One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Regiment, Emergency Men, and was on provost duty at Gettysburg after that great battle. He is a Republican, and has served as a member of the school board from the Third ward for several years. He was one of the organizers of the Williamsport Board of Trade, and takes an active interest in all that pertains to the welfare of his adopted home. Mr. Kline is prominent in Masonic circles, and is connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery. He is also a member of the I. O. O. F., and is one of the board of managers and the present Commander of Reno Post, G. A. R. He was married, October 18, 1877, to Mary L., daughter of Wesley Moore, of Newberry. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  JAMES S. LEWARS, hardware merchant, was born in Montoursville, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 26, 1850, and is a son of William and Mary A. Lewars, the, latter of whom is a resident of that borough. He was reared in his native town, and received a public school education. In 1869 he entered Pennsylvania College at Gettysburg, and graduated from that institution in 1875. He afterwards read law with Hon. H. C. Parsons of Williamsport, and was admitted to the bar in 1878. He also taught one term in the Lycoming Normal School during this period. He practiced law tip to 1885, when he purchased his present hardware store and has since continued in that business. He is a member of the firm of Lewars & Company, which is composed of George Bubb, J. R. T. Ryan, Mr. Lewars, and A. P. Gensel. He was married in 1883 to Mary Helen, daughter of George Bubb of Williamsport. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church. Mr. Lewars is an active Republican, and has served as a member of the common council for two terms.

  GEORGE W. CROLL, plumber and gas fitter, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 28, 1837, son of Christian and Mary Ann (Fisher) Croll. His father was a well known merchant tailor of Philadelphia for many years. Our subject was reared in his native city, and received a public school education, afterwards learning the plumberís trade. In 1858 he came to Williamsport, where he worked as a journeyman until 1861. He then established his present business, which is the pioneer plumbing, house of the city, and the largest of the kind in this part of the 9tate. Mr. Croll was a sub-contractor on the government building, and furnished the gas fixtures for the same. He also furnished the fixtures for the Trust Building, the city hospital, and the Hotel Updegraff, and the City Hotel. He is a stockholder in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, also in the Lycoming Opera House Company, and is recognized as one of the enterprising, prominent business men of Williamsport. Mr. Croll was married, December 23, 1861, to Almeda, daughter of Elisha Covert, of Williamsport, and has two children: William, and Marguerite. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. Mr. Croll is a Republican, but aside from casting his vote has not been actively identified with politics.

  J. H. LINCK, hardware merchant, and president of the Williamsport Hardware and Stove Company, was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1844, son of John and Catharine (Heyler) Linck, natives of that county. His father was one of the pioneer farmers of Tioga county, where he settled upon a tract. of land at quite an early date. He was a Republican, and filled the several offices in his township. He and wife were members of the Lutheran church. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county, and received a common school education. In 1864, at the ace of nineteen, he enlisted in Company E, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war. He participated in the battles of Petersburg and Fort Stedman, also in several skirmishes in which his regiment was engaged. After the close of the war he worked as a bookkeeper, and later in a hardware and stove store, and came to Williamsport in 1873, where he succeeded the firm of White & Taylor in the hardware business. He continued the business until 1887, and then organized the Williamsport Hardware and Stove Company, of which he has since been president. Mr. Linck is the builder and owner of the Linck Block, on West Fourth street, and is a man of much enterprise and business energy. He was one of the original stockholders of the Demorest Sewing Machine Company and the Lycoming Rubber Company, and was formerly a director in the latter institution. He is the principal owner of the West End Furniture Company, is a stockholder and director in the Emery Lumber Company, and was one of the original projectors of Grand View cemetery, in which he is a stockholder, and besides his large hardware business, he is extensively engaged in the coal trade. He was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, and manifests a deep interest in everything that has for its object the good of his adopted home. Mr. Linck was married in 1876, to Angie, daughter of Henry Veil, of Johnstown, Pennsylvania. Four children have been born of this union: Edgar; Charles; James, and Nellie. Mrs. Linck is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which denomination the family adhere. He is a Republican in politics, and is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R. He is the owner of and occupies the beautiful home known as Overlook, corner Sixth and Rural avenue, just north of the city limits, and is the owner of the beautiful half-mile drive road connecting the Vallamont drive with Grand View cemetery.

  GEORGE A. COHICK was born in Anthony township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 8, 1841, and is the oldest son of Alexander and Sarah A. Cohick. He was reared in Woodward township, and received his education in the public schools. He learned photography, and carried on that business for thirteen years in Jersey Shore. In November, 1882, he came to Williamsport, and was business manager o f the Sun and Banner two years. He was a part owner in that newspaper plant for some time, and then disposed of his interest and engaged in the book and stationery business, tinder the firm name of Cohick, Miller & Leiter. This partnership lasted but a short time, when Mr. Cohick became sole proprietor and continued the business alone for six years. He next embarked in the furniture business with Avery, Crounse, which they carried on up to 1891, when the firm of Megahan & Cohick was established, and engaged in a general fancy goods business. Late in 1891 this firm was dissolved, Mr. Megahan retiring and Mr. Cohick continuing as sole proprietor up to the burning of his store in March, 1892. He was also an undertaker and embalmer, and carried on that branch of business in connection with merchandising. In April, 1892, he entered into partnership with Henry Welteroth, under the firm name of Cohick & Welteroth, and carries on a general tinning business on Fifth avenue. He is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank and the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. In politics he is a Republican, served as school director in Woodward township, and was auditor and a justice of the peace in Jersey Shore. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., both lodge and encampment, and is major in the uniformed rank; is connected with the R. A., the P. H. C., the P. 0. S. of A., the K. of M., and the K. of G. E. Mr. Cohick was married, August 26,1866, to Elmira, daughter of Joel Potter of Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, and has one daughter, Sarah B., wife of Dr. B. Brown, of Wellsboro, Pennsylvania. He is an active member of the Young Menís Christian Association, and was president of the society in Jersey Shore for many years. He and wife are members of the First Baptist church of Williamsport, and he is a deacon in that organization.

  OLIVER H. YOUNG, of the firm of Mitchell, Young & Company, was born in Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, March 10, 1839, son of George and Mary (Bard) Young. His father was a native of Luzerne county, was a farmer by occupation, and died in Susquehanna county. David Young, the father of George Young, was a native of Chester county, Pennsylvania, and married a Miss Hopkins, of Wyoming. She was one of the refugees of the Wyoming valley massacre. David Young, her son, was a soldier in the war of 1812. George Young died in 1866, and his widow died in 1883; they were the parents of five children: Alice, who married F. P. Hollister, who was once sheriff of Susquehanna county; Jane, who married William Graves; George S.; Oliver H., and John B., who was A member of Company H, Fourth Pennsylvania Reserves, was wounded in the seven daysí fight before Richmond in 1863, and confined in the hospital in Philadelphia, where he died, August 26, 1863. Our subject, Oliver H. Young, received his education in the public schools and at Montrose Academy. He learned the machinist trade, which he followed all through life until April, 1891. Coming to Williamsport in 1867, he took employment with the Williamsport Manufacturing, Company, where he remained four years, afterwards working in the employ of A. T. Nichols until the fall of 1876, Ď when he engaged with Rowley & Hermance, where he remained until he quit the business. He was the last named firmís first mechanical employee, and was superintendent of their works. In 1887 the firm of Mitchell, Young & Company was established, and Mr. Young has since taken an active interest in its affairs. He is a member of Montrose Lodge, F. and A. M., of the Royal Arcanum, and is a Republican. He was married in 1860, to Ellen L., daughter of William L. Vaughn, and to this union have been born three children: John A., who is draughtsman for the Williamsport Machine Company; Charles M., who is draughtsman for the Brown &Sharp Manufacturing Company, of Providence, Rhode Island, and Harry, who died in infancy. Mr. Young and family are members of the Presbyterian church.

  SAMPSON QUIGGLE MINGLE was born, October 15, 1845, on the West Branch of the Susquehanna river, in Wayne township, Clinton county, Pennsylvania. He is a son of Samuel and Elizabeth (Bordner) Mingle, the former a native of Pennsylvania, and the latter of New York State. The family comprised nine children, four boys and five girls, the subject of this sketch being the youngest. Samuel Mingle was a shoemaker, and removed with his family to Pennís valley, Centre county, where he died when Sampson was a little over three years old, leaving a widow with nine children without the means of subsistence. The children, as was then the custom, were bound out until of age, except three, an invalid girl, and the two youngest. Our subject received such an education as four months in each year, spent in a country school, afforded, together with one term at the Aaronsburg Academy, in Centre county, where he made the fires and swept the room to pay for his tuition. One of the experiences of his boyhood days that he often refers to, was the fact that he went barefoot seven months in the year, so as to be entitled to one pair of shoes annually. At the age of fourteen he left his motherís home to work on a farm, at the small remuneration of $4 a month, and when not on the farm he willingly did any kind of labor for the sum of 25 cents a day. After a few years of this kind of life he decided to learn the saddlerís trade, but when he made application for a position the saddler refused to take him, and as the saddler now relates, it was because he thought Sampson would not make a harness maker, and had better stay at farming. Disappointed, but not discouraged, when be found that he was not considered bright enough to learn a trade, he concluded to learn merchandising. He started out to seek a situation, with all he possessed in the world tied in a handkerchief. On leaving his motherís home she said to him: "I canít give you much of this worldís goods, but wherever you are, remember that at morning, noon, and night your mother is praying for you." He went to Lewistown, Mifflin county, whither he made his way on foot and by stage coach, and secured a position in a store to do the rough and dirty work of the establishment. He soon acquired a fair knowledge of the business, and was considered a good salesman. He then went to Lock Haven, where he landed with 25 cents in his pocket, and found a position in a store at a good salary. Here he met and married Rosa Bowers, a daughter of Joshua and Fredericka Bowers, one of the pioneer families of the West Branch valley. Three children have blessed this union, all of whom are living. Bertha; Elizabeth, and Harry Bowers.

  In December, 1877, Mr. Mingle removed from Lock Haven to Williamsport, which he has since made his home. He occupied the position of manager for the Singer Manufacturing Company three years, and after giving up that position he embarked in the piano and organ business, which he has successfully conducted up to the present. Mr. Mingle also engaged in the real estate business on an extensive scale, being the projector and proprietor of Cottage Place Heights. Many handsome homes have been erected in that part of the city, and to his enterprise and public spirit is partly due its transformation from a farm Meadow into one of the most desirable residence sites in Williamsport. He is largely interested in the American Telephone Company, in which he has been a director for a number of years, and was president of the company for some time. He is a Democrat in politics, and is a member of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Mingleís business success has been the result of close attention to his affairs, and in pushing to his full ability every enterprise in which he has embarked.

  REV. JOHN KOEPER, pastor of St. Bonifacius Catholic church, was born in Lenhausen, Province of Westfalen, Prussia, Germany, December 30, 1837. He is a son of Joseph and Mary Catharine (Sauer) Keeper, natives of Germany, who lived and died in that country. He received a good literary education in his native land, and afterwards took a thorough classical course. From boyhood he was intended for the priesthood, and after completing his classical education he studied theology for several years, and was ordained at Paderborn, March 31, 1865. He was appointed pastor of Portas, Westfelica, and was the first Catholic priest of that place since the Reformation. During his student days Father Koeper had often been asked to come to the United States, but refused to do so, because he wished to remain Dear his mother until her death. This event occurred in February, 1869, and in July following, in compliance with the wishes of the Rt. Rev. Bishop OíHara of Scranton, Pennsylvania, he sailed for this country. On the 16th of August, 1869, he took charge of St. Bonifacius parish, and for the past twenty-three years he has been pastor of that congregation. He found it in a very poor condition, both spiritually and temporally, and its finances at a low ebb. He went to work at once with determination and vigor, and the congregation is now in a very satisfactory condition. He has made many improvements, the most important being the substantial brick church which he erected on the site of the old frame structure. The corner stone was laid, June 22, 1873, and the church was dedicated, September 19, 1875. The old frame building was removed to the rear part of the lot, and has since been used for a parochial school, which is connected with St. Bonifacius church, and is in a flourishing condition. In 1874 a lot was purchased and in 1880 a building was erected in which the sisters who teach the school reside. Father Koeper is a gentleman of fine education, and has labored faithfully in building up the spiritual and temporal interests of St. Bonifacius congregation since becoming pastor of that church. He is highly respected by his people, as well as by the best citizens of Williamsport. On the 9th Of April, 1890, he celebrated the twenty-fifth anniversary of his ordination to the priesthood, his silver jubilee, and the large gathering of bishops, priests, and laymen on that occasion was a grand testimony to his high character, and untiring in the cause of religion.

  REV. JOHN M. STECK, son of John and Sarah Stock, was born in Wolf towns, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 19, 1834. He remained at home the farm of his father until his sixteenth year, attending the public schools during winter months, and then entered a store in Hughesville as a clerk and remained upon his twentieth year. The death of his father at this time threw him upon his own resources. About this time he entered an academy where he studied during the summer months, and taught during the winter in the public schools. In 1858 he was admitted to the theological department of the Missionary Institute, Selinsgrove, Pennsylvania, from which he was graduated in 1861. May 5, 1861, he was received into the Lutheran ministry by the Synod of Central Pennsylvania. His first call was to Belleville charge, Mifflin county, Pennsylvania, where he remained as pastor from August 1, 1861, to January 1870. During his ministry the membership of the church was increased from about 120 communicants to over 400, and a new and commodious church edifice was erected at Allenville. June 1, 1870, he commenced his labors as a home missionary at Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania, where he served as pastor until October 1, 1875. The mission became self sustaining in one year and a half. The present church edifice was completed and the parsonage erected during his pastorate. Owing to indications of failing health, he then resigned and accepted a call to Mahanoy City, Pennsylvania, where he remained until March 1, 1880. During his ministry there, the church was enlarged and remodeled, and the membership nearly doubled. A call was then extended him by the Belleville charge, where he had formerly been pastor; the call was accepted, and he again began his labors there, March 1, 1880. He remained there as pastor until September 1, 1883. During this time one of the finest church edifices in the county was erected at Belleville. He then accepted a call from two mission churches, St. Johnís of Williamsport and Messiahís of South Williamsport. The membership of the former at that time was twenty-two, and of the latter forty. He commenced his labors in this new field, September 1, 1883, and labored in the field until September 1, 1887, when the charge was divided. St. Johnís congregation, having become self-sustaining, at once extended a call to him to continue as their pastor. This, however, was declined on account of failing health. During his ministry in South Williamsport, the first subscriptions were received, and work was commenced on their present beautiful church edifice. His next regular pastorate was the Lutheran Church of the Redeemer, Williamsport, Pennsylvania, which he organized April 12, 1891, and of which he is the present pastor. In 1890 he published "Reminiscences of the Lutheran Church in Lycoming County." In 1891 he delivered an historical address at the centennial celebration of Immanuelís Lutheran church in Muncy valley, which was also published; both of these publications have had a large circulation. He was United in marriage to Mary J. Frymire, daughter of Henry Frymire, November 7, 1861. His only son, W. F. Steck, a graduate of Pennsylvania College and Gettysburg Theological Seminary, is at present pastor of the Lutheran church of Phillipsburg, Pennsylvania; the other three children are Maggie C.; Carrie E., and Verna M.

  JOHN FRANKLIN MEGINNESS is one of the best known literary men in Pennsylvania, and the people of the West Branch valley owe him a lasting debt of gratitude for having rescued from oblivion the principal historical incidents relating to their locality, and placing them in permanent form to be handed down from generation to generation. He was born July 16, 1827, in Colerain, Lancaster county, Pennsylvania. His early boyhood was passed upon the farm of his father, Benjamin Meginness, and his education was received in the common schools. He never enjoyed the opportunities for anything more than a common school education, but being possessed from early childhood of a thirst for knowledge, he diligently improved his time at home in study. When a very small boy his parents migrated to Ohio, but soon after returned to Pennsylvania, and about 1832 settled on a farm in Lancaster county. In October, 1843, our subject left home to battle his own way through life., and arriving at Warsaw, Illinois, he took a steamboat and went to St. Louis, Missouri. Subsequently he found employment on another boat and made a voyage to New Orleans. After a varied experience in traveling, he finally found his way back to his native county. He spent the winter of 1845 in school April 9, 1817, he enlisted, "to serve during the Mexican war," with the regular army, and on June 19th of that year he sailed from New York for Mexico. A work written and published by himself in 1891, entitled "The Meginness Family," gives a complete account of his experience in that war. In 1848 he taught two terms of school in Lycoming county.

  On the 25th of October, 1849, he was married to Martha Jane, daughter of William King of Mifflin township, Lycoming county. Soon after they took up their residence in Jersey Shore. June 9, 1852, he became editor of the Jersey Shore Republican, and continued in that position until June 9, 1854. He then associated himself with S. S. Seely in founding The News Letter at Jersey Shore, from which Mr. Meginness retired, August 30, 1855. At this time he began writing a History of the West Branch Valley of the Susquehanna. It made an octavo work of 518 pages, was published in 1856, and was the pioneer history of this part of the State. In 1857 he became editor of The Sentinel, at Peru, Illinois. Early in the fall of 1859 the office was destroyed by fire, and he was out of employment for a time. Finally, through the influence of Stephen A. Douglas, he was employed as an editorial writer on the Springfield Daily Register during the heated campaign of Judge Douglas and Abraham Lincoln for the United States senatorship. It was his good fortune to be present at several of the great debates between these two eminent men. After retiring, from the Register he accepted a position with the Spectator at Carlinville, Illinois. He soon after purchased the paper and when he began to realize something for his labors, the rebellion broke out, and in a few weeks all business was at a standstill. In October, 1861, he sold his paper at a sacrifice and returned with his family to Lycoming county, and in June, 1862, he removed to Williamsport.

  Late in the winter of that year he received an appointment as a clerk under Capt. William Stoddard, assistant quartermaster, Alexandria, Virginia. After two years of service in a subordinate clerical position, Mr. Meginness was made , chief clerk of the bureau of transportation. Shortly before the close of the war he resigned his clerkship, to accept an appointment in the division of referred claims, paymaster generalís office, Washington City, under Col. Jacob Sallade. There he remained three months, and was then appointed to a clerkship in the third auditorís office, Treasury department, under Hon. John Wilson, and assigned to the division of State war claims. After about a yearís service in this bureau, he was transferred to the second comptrollerís office, Colonel Broadhead, Treasury department. While serving in this department, the impeachment trial of President Johnson took place, and he frequently attended the sessions of the high court. He remained in the Treasury until June 1, 1869.

  He subsequently became managing editor of the Lycoming Gazette. Soon after this paper was consolidated with the Bulletin, under the title of Gazette and Bulletin, and he was appointed city editor. Later he became editor and continued until 1872, when he again took, the position of city editor. Four years afterward Mr. Meginness once more became editor in chief and continued as such until 1889, when he retired. During 1888, in addition to his editorial labors, Mr. Meginness started and conducted a monthly magazine, entitled The Historical Journal. In 1889 he rewrote and revised his "Otzinachson," or History of the West Branch Valley, Soon after retiring from the Gazette and Bulletin he wrote and published an exhaustive biography of Frances Slocum, the Lost Sister of Wyoming. During the last thirty years he wrote many letters and sketches for the Philadelphia Times, the Press, Record, New York Herald, Sun, and other journals. As early as 1855 he was a correspondent of the Philadelphia Ledger. In the spring of 1891 he commenced the compilation of the present History of Lycoming County, upon which he spent more than a year of constant labor. Mr. and Mrs. Meginness are the parents of ten children: Mary Virginia. who married William C. Arp; Alice Celinda, who married Jasper F. King; Sarah Rosetta; William Warren; Henry Harvey; Julia Rosabella; Ida Jane; Carrie Armenia; Herbert Eugene, and John Franklin.

  JAMES W. SWEELY, editor and publisher of The Sun, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 24, 1862, son of Samuel and Harriet (Winters) Sweely, and grandson of Jacob Sweely, one of the well remembered citizens of Williamsport. He commenced to learn the printerís trade in the office of the Breakfast Table, and in 1880 he went to Peoria, Illinois, and through the recommendation of Robert J. Burdette he was appointed city editor of the Daily Transcript. After a few months he returned to Williamsport and became a half owner of the Breakfast Table, and subsequently sole proprietor. He advanced the circulation of this paper from 4,000 to 11,000 copies, and brought it up to a high standard as a weekly journal. In 1882 Mr. Sweely went to Pittsburg and established the Sunday Traveler, which he conducted about one year, and then sold and returned to Williamsport, because of a severe attack of typhoid fever which rendered him unable to attend to his editorial duties.

  On the 7th of July, 1884, Mr. Sweely purchased the controlling interest in the Sun and Banner, which under his editorial supervision and wise business management has won its way to a leading place as a fearless, progressive, and enterprising newspaper, with a circulation second to no local daily in the West Branch valley. He is an uncompromising Democrat, and strikes sledge-hammer blows in support and defense of Democratic measures and principles. Mr. Sweely married Carrie, daughter of L. W. Cook of Williamsport, and has two children: Isabel S., and Lucius.

  DIETRICK LAMADE was born in Baden, Germany, February 6, 1859, son of Dietrick and Caroline (Suepfle) Lamade. He was educated in Germany and the United States, having emigrated to this country in 1867. He came to Williamsport in that year and his father having died in 1868 he was compelled to earn his own living. He consequently found employment at various positions in a store for two years. In 1872 he commenced to learn the printerís trade in the office of the West Branch Beobachter. He subsequently worked for the proprietors of the following enterprises: The Williamsport Banner; The Williamsport Sunday Times; in the job office of the Daily Times; in the job office of G. E. Otto Siess; in the job office of the Banner; was foreman of the press room of the Sun and Banner. Was a printer for the government signal station at Williamsport, and at the same time set type for the Sun and Banner; when the government abandoned the signal station he was employed by John B. Reilly in the printing department of the Williamsport Times until Mr. Rielly failed, when he became interested in and was the principal founder of the Pennsylvania Grit, of which he has been manager and general manager since its inception. When this institution Was incorporated Mr. Lamade was elected president and has held that office ever since. Mr. Lamade was married in 1881 to Clara A. Rhen of Williamsport, and to this union have been. born five children, four of whom are living: D. Wilson; Charles D.; Elsie M., and Howard, He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Protected Home Circle, and the Monumental Association. He is a Democrat in politics and with his wife belongs to the St. Markís Lutheran church.

  FRED M. LAMADE was born in Goeshausen, Baden, Germany, August 26, 1861, son of Dietrick and Caroline (Suepfle) Lamade. He came to Williamsport in 1867, where he attended the common schools, and in later years he attended college at Philadelphia. At the age of eleven years he went to work for Jacob Robe, with whom he remained about two years. He was afterwards employed as office boy for the late Peter Herdic. In 1885 he bought an interest in the Grit Publishing Company, and assumed the position of manager of the circulation. In 1886 he was married to Lillie M. Graham, and they had two children: Walter and Margaret. In 1891 Mr. Lamade was elected a member of the school board from the Eighth ward. He is also a member of the Royal Arcanum and the Protected Home Circle.

  GEORGE W. RIANHARD was born in Elmira, New York, November 7, 1858, son of George and Rachel (Ayres) Rianhard. He was educated in the Williamsport public schools and the Williamsport Commercial College. At the age of fourteen he began to learn the printerís trade in the office of the Gazette and Bulletin, and after serving an apprenticeship he was in the employ of that paper in all of its various departments until March 9, 1884, when he was interested in starting the Pennsyl-vania Grit. For a time he had charge of the job department of that paper and afterwards became the editor, which position he filled until July 1, 1892. Mr. Rianhard was married, December 28, 1882, to Anna L. Schafer, daughter of Conrad Schafer; they are the parents of two children: Franklin Arthur and George Conrad. He is a member of Williamsport Lodge, No. 173, B. P. 0. E., of which he was the founder. He is also a member of the Lycoming Opera House Company. In his political affiliations he is a Democrat.

  JOHN P. DWYER, editor of the Republican, was born, March 27, 1865, in Lock Haven, Pennsylvania, son of Anthony and Catharine (King) Dwyer. His father was a merchant for many years, and died in 1872. His mother is living at Renovo. Mr. Dwyer was educated in the common schools, and at the age of thirteen he began clerking in a store, where he remained for three years. At the age of sixteen, in company with James Reilly, he established the Renovo Evening News, the first daily paper published at that place. He was therefore the youngest proprietor and editor of a daily newspaper in the United States. He remained in Renovo until the fall of 1889, when he took his present position. As evidence of his enterprise it is worthy of mention that during the great flood of June, 1889, it was impossible to get the regular paper on which to print the edition, and he consequently bought enough wall paper from a dealer and printed the Evening News thereon. This stroke of business enterprise to supply his patrons with the News won favorable comment from the leading papers all over the country. Mr. Dwyer was married, September 4, 1889, to Mary Ryder of Renovo, and to this union have been born two children: Petronilla, and Francis J. He is a member of the Catholic church, is connected with, Father Matthewís Total Abstinence Society, and politically he is a Democrat.

  GEORGE S. LENHART, editor and publisher of The Breakfast Table, was born, February 25, 1860, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, son of George H. and Sylvania (Sanders) Lenhart, also natives of that city. When a boy he removed with his parents to Middletown, Dauphin county, where the father was engaged in the mercantile business for many years; he also acted as agent for the Adams Express Company several years at that place. Our subject was educated in the public schools at Middletown. After teaching school one term in Adams county he spent two years in the academy at Bucknell University. In 1881 he began reporting for the Williamsport Sun and Banner. One year later he withdrew and took charge of the Berwick Gazette for some time. He was afterwards employed as editorial writer for the Easton Daily Argus. From there he went to Jersey City, New Jersey, where he was engaged to do special writing for the Evening Journal, remaining four years. In 1887 he came to Williamsport and has since been editing and publishing the Breakfast Table. Mr. Lenhart is an active Republican, and is a member of the Republican County Committee, a member of the Executive Committee of the State Republican League, a member of the Republican State Committee from Lycoming county, and belongs to and is one of the executive committee of the Young Menís Republican Club of Williamsport. While at Bucknell University he founded Delta Chapter; at Easton he established the Sigma Deuteron at Lafayette College, and at Jersey City he was historian of the Grand Chapter of the college fraternity, Phi Gamma Delta. While in Berwick he assisted in organizing the John H. Stayer Camp, Sons of Veterans, and was the first captain of that Camp. Mr. Lenhart was married, October 15, 1884, to Helen, daughter of J. B. McLaughlin, teller of the Lewisburg National Bank.

  PROF. JOHN F. DAVIS, founder of the Williamsport Commercial College, was born in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, April 21, 1840, son of John and Rachel (Stratton) Davis, natives of Franklin county, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, respectively. His father was a brick maker and contractor in Franklin county for many years. He filled various political offices in his township, and was a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He and his wife removed to Williamsport in 1876, where both died in 1878. The subject of this sketch was their only child that grow to maturity, At the age of eight years his parents removed to Pittsburg, and soon afterwards to Fulton county. He received his education in the academic schools of Chambersburg, and at Iron City Commercial College of Pittsburg. From 1863 to 1865 he was superintendent of schools in Fulton county. Professor Davis entered the East Baltimore Conference in 1866, and in the division he fell to the Central Pennsylvania Conference, of which he was a member until 1880. In August, 1865, he came to Williamsport, and became a teacher in the commercial department of Dickinson Seminary. In the latter part of 1865 he founded the Williamsport Commercial College, and was at the head of that institution fourteen years; under his management it attained a wide reputation. In 1879 he sold the college and established a similar institution at Altoona, Pennsylvania, which he conducted four years, and then engaged in the life insurance business. He is manager of the Union Central Life Insurance Company for northeastern Pennsylvania, and for the southern tier of counties in New York. He was elected city superintendent of schools in Williamsport in May, 1872, but resigned after three monthsí service. He served as school director from the Fourth ward, and has always taken a deep interest in the progress of education. In 1876 he was the candidate of the Greenback party for Congress in this district, receiving 1,537 votes, and was again the candidate of that party in 1878, and received 10,163 votes. Since that time he has affiliated with the Democratic party. He is a member of the Masonic order, and of the I. O. O. F. Professor Davis was married in 1867 to Eliza Jane, daughter of Hon. A. C. Davis, of Fulton county, Pennsylvania, and has three children: Jennie D.; Alice R., and Andrew C. He and family are members of High Street Methodist Episcopal church, and he is one of the trustees of that organization, and also superintendent of the Sunday school.

  S. T. STEPHENSON, proprietor of Stephenson Business College and Institute of Shorthand, was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, November 14, 1854, son of George W. and Elizabeth Ann (McCloskey) Stephenson, also natives of that county. His father was a farmer by occupation, and prior to his death, which occurred in October, 1891, he retired from the farm and lived in Lock Haven, where his widow now survives; she is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which her husband also belonged, and in which he was class leader and steward. Our subject was the eldest of four children, and was reared in Clinton and Centre counties, Pennsylvania; he was educated at the Millersville State Normal School, and graduated from the Lock Haven Normal School in 1881; he was also graduated from the Eastman Business College, Poughkeepsie, New York, in 1883. After having officiated as principal of the public schools of Lock Haven for some time, he was engaged for a period at bookkeeping in Lock Haven and Williamsport, and at the Washington Iron Works. In 1885 he became an instructor in Woodís Business College, and in 1890 he established his. present College and Institute of Shorthand, in which he has had phenomenal success. He was married in 1876 to Miss Mary E., daughter of Jacob R. Leathers, of Mount Eagle, Centre county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born five children: Bliss; Elsie; Lula; Emery, and Letitia. Mr. Stephenson is a Prohibitionist in his political proclivities, and with his wife belongs to Grace Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has served as steward, and in which he is superintendent of the Sunday school.

  FRED. M. ALLEN, principal of Williamsport Commercial College, was born in Smethport, McKean county, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1854, son of F. A. and Jane (Martin) Allen, the former a native of Massachusetts, and the latter of New York State. His father was a prominent educator, and obtained his education through his own efforts. He had charge of the schools of McKean county and Chester county, successively, and was the first principal of the Mansfield Normal School, Tioga county. He conducted more institute work than any man in the State during his career, was one of the pioneers in that work, and was employed by the State superintendent to do institute work. He died in 1879. He was a Republican in politics," and an adherent of the Protestant Episcopal church. The subject of this sketch is, second in a family of three children; he was reared in Mansfield, Pennsylvania, and was educated in the normal school of that place. At the age of twenty-one he opened a bookkeeping department at Mansfield, and for three years was proprietor of the Allen Business College, Elmira, New York. In 1885 he came to Williamsport, and has since had charge of Williamsport Commercial College. He has greatly improved that institution, and his school enjoys a large and well deserved patronage. He is an adherent of the Republican party, and a stanch supporter of Republican principles. Mr. Allen was married in 1879 to Clara, daughter of Rev. J. B. Wentworth, of Buffalo, New York, and has two children: Jennie and Richard. He and wife are members of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  LORENZO DOW POTT was born in Muncy, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1829, son of John and Eliza (Taggart) Pott, natives of Pottsville, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, who moved to Muncy, about 1820, where his father followed the occupation of a tailor. John Pott was born April 25, 1791, and served in the war of 1812. His wife was born April 9, 1796, and bore him quite a large family, four of whom are now living: Robert, who has been teller of the First National Bank of Williamsport since its organization; Charles Wesley, of Sparta, Wisconsin; Lorenzo Dow, of Williamsport, and Catharine, wife of William Flack, of Watsontown, Northumberland county. The family removed to New Columbia, Union county, about 1832, where the father died, September 22, 1834. His widow survived until March, 1889, and died in Watsontown. They were members of the Protestant Episcopal church. The subject of this sketch was reared in Muncy and New Columbia, Pennsylvania. After the death of his father he was apprenticed to a farmer named Charles Royer, and remained with him until he was eighteen years of acre. He then carne to Williamsport and learned the shoemakerís trade with Williams & Weiss, which business he has since followed. In 1861 he enlisted in Company D, Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three months and then re-enlisted in Company I, Thirty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, in which he served thirty days. In 1864 he joined Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, as second lieutenant, and served with his regiment until discharged, February 13, 1865. Mr. Pott was married in 1856, to Catharine, daughter of Jacob Hill, of Muncy Creek township, who bore him two sons: Alfred H. and Charles R. He and wife are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F and of the G. A. R.; is a Republican, and has served as a member of the school board for one term.

  CHARLES R. POTT, late proprietor of Pottís Shorthand and Business Collage born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, May 17, 1866, the youngest son of Lorenzo Dow Pott. He was reared in this city, and graduated from the Williamsport high school in 1884. He learned stenography by studying at night, and worked for several firms and also in the United States court. He established his school on the 25th of August, 1884; it is the oldest shorthand college in the city, and after opening his school, Mr. Pott did a great deal to forward the profession in this part of the State. He graduated a large number of efficient stenographers and typewriters, who have found employment in the different towns and cities of the country. Mr. Pott was a member of the Sons of Veterans, an active supporter of the Republican party, and a member of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church. He died on the 1st of June, 1892, at the age of twenty-six years and fifteen days.

  GEORGE W. NICELY, farmer, was born in Delaware township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1828, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Fox) Nicely. His father was a native of Bucks county and moved with his parents to Northumberland county, where he spent the balance of his life. He married Rebecca Fox, and was one of the prominent farmers of Delaware township, where he died December 11, 1877, at the age of seventy years. In early life he was a Democrat, but afterwards became identified with the Republican party. He was the last associate judge of Northumberland county, and served continuously in that office from August 4, 1869, to November 30, 1875. He was an elder in the Lutheran church for many years, and both he and his wife were members of that denomination. They were the parents of ten children, eight of whom are now living, as follows: George W.; M. A., of Dewart, Northumberland County; Joseph, of the same village; Stephen, of Kansas, who served in the Seventh Pennsylvania Cavalry during the entire rebellion; Mary, widow of William Bryson of Delaware township, Northumberland county; John F., who resides at Montoursville; Alfred S., of Dewart, and Oliver P., of Montoursville. Their mother died in 1887. The subject of this sketch was reared in Northumberland county, and was engaged in f arming near Milton for a number of years, afterwards going to West Virginia, where he engaged in the lumber business. Returning to his native county he embarked in contracting, building the roadbed and culverts on the Philadelphia and Erie railroad. In 1861 he settled on his present farm of 140 acres, which is now within the city limits of Williamsport. For fourteen years he was engaged in the wholesale and retail agricultural implement business in this city, in which he was very successful. Mr. Nicely was first married in 1853, to Elizabeth Finney, of Northumberland county, who died in 1856, leaving one daughter, Eva, wife of John Ault of Woodward township. He was again married, in 1860, to Harriet, daughter of John Reighard, who has borne him four children, three of whom are living: Mary; Joseph, and Harry. He and family are members of the Presbyterian church of Newberry, and he was one of the building committee in the erection of the new church building. Mr. Nicely is a Republican, and has filled various township offices, but is now comparatively retired from the active duties of business and public life.

  JOHN H. LLOYD was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, December 15, 1833, son of Charles and Susan (Hollingsworth) Lloyd. Charles Lloyd was a native of Fairfield township, Lycoming county, where his parents settled at an early date. He was a farmer all his life, and died in his native township. He was twice married; by his first wife he had six children, four of whom are living: Frances, widow of John Petrican; John H.; Sarah, who married Henry Petrican, and William, of Germantown, Pennsylvania. His second wife was Margaret Fell, of which union no children were born. He was one of the organizers of the West Branch Bank, and a stockholder in that institution. He at one time operated what is now the Hayes mill, at Montoursville, and also established the paper mill in that place, being a Member of the firm of Lloyd, Starr & Frey. He was a member of the Society of Friends, was first a Whig in politics, and afterwards a Republican. The subject of this sketch was reared on the homestead farm, and was educated in the public schools of Williamsport and at Dickinson Seminary, also attending a boarding school in Norristown, Pennsylvania. He followed farming up to 1888, and then came to Williamsport, where he has since lived a retired life. In 1862 he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and Thirty First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until honorably discharged in May, 1863. He was in the battles of Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. He is a Republican, and served as constable of Montoursville one term. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R. Mr. Lloyd was married in 1873 to Rebecca M., daughter of Charles Harris, of Loyalsock township, and has one son, Charles H. He and wife are adherents of the Presbyterian church.

  JOHN HEILMAN, retired, was born in Clinton township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1821, son of John and Hannah (Rentz) Heilman. He was educated in the schools of his neighborhood, and was brought up on a farm. During the years 1867 and 1868 he was in partnership with the Stadons, in the manufacture of woolen goods in Williamsport. He was married in 1848 to Miss Sarah Ulch, daughter of Henry Ulch, who died September 2, .1858, leaving five children, three of whom are now living: Russell P., who is a physician at Emporium, Pennsylvania; Hannah R., who married William Dickson, and afterwards, Banister Coffers; and Mary C., who married John S. Hays. He was again married, in 1860, to Miss Letitia R. Gibson, and to this union have been born five children: Annie L., who married Edward M. Bates; Stella, who married Charles Weidenhamer; Oren G., who is an instructor in Cornell University; Norman L., and Maggie. After his first marriage Mr. Heilman located on a farm in Clinton township, where he remained until 1860, when he moved to Williamsport and lived a retired life for eleven years; after this he returned again to the farm for five years, and then took up his permanent residence in Williamsport. He is independent in his political proclivities; he was once an overseer of the poor in Clinton township, and was a member of the school board of Williamsport for four years. With his family he adheres to the Presbyterian church. He is one of the well to do citizens and large real estate ownersí of Williamsport and Watsontown, and also owns 640 acres of timber land in Ashland county, Wisconsin.

  REV. ALEXANDER LONGSDORF was a native of Baltimore, Maryland, and removed to Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, in childhood. He was reared in that county, and obtained a good education through his own efforts. He became a minister in the Evangelical church, and had charge of churches in Northumberland and Clinton counties. While a resident of Schuylkill county he married Rebecca Kiessling, a native of Philadelphia, whose parents removed to Schuylkill county when she was a child. In 1842 he came to Lycoming county and located in Loyalsock township. He had charge of the circuit extending from Muncy to Lock Haven and Block House. He was presiding elder of the Baltimore district for one term, and served in the Warren and Pittsburg district eight years. He continued in the active duties, of the ministry up to his death, which occurred in February, 1878. By his marriage to Rebecca Kiessling, he became the father of nine children, as follows: Sarah, wife of James Eder, of Loyalsock township; Daniel, of Williamsport; Mary, wife of Abraham Meyer, of Cogan valley; Elizabeth, wife of James N. Fellows, of California; Henry H., of Binghamton, New York; John C., of Liberty, Tioga county, Rev. J. Max, of Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, a minister in the Evangelical church; Charles L., of Gettysburg, and Julia, of Loganton. Mrs. Longsdorf died in 1849, and he afterwards married Sarah Keeport, of Lycoming county, who survives him.

  DANIEL LONGSDORF, alderman, was born in Jackson township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, October 9, 1836, and is the eldest son of the Rev. Alexander Longsdorf. He removed with his parents to Lycoming county when he was six years old, and was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He learned the harness makerís trade, and worked at that business for ten years; he also clerked in a store for some time. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served with his regiment until the battle of Fort Fisher, January 15, 1865, where he was so severely wounded in the left arm as to necessitate its amputation, and compel his retirement from active service. He also participated in the battles of Petersburg, Richmond, and Chapinís Farm. On his recovery, he taught in the public schools of Williamsport for nine years, and was principal of the Washington building, junior department. In 1876 he was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of city treasurer, and filled that office for twelve-consecutive years. In 1890 he was chosen as alderman of the Fourth ward, and was also the assessor and tax collector of that ward six years from 1870 to 1876. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., has served as quartermaster of the post for eight years, and has also filled the office of Commander. Mr. Longsdorf was married in 1859 to H. C., daughter of Jacob Hoffman, of Williamsport, who died in March, 1880, leaving five children: William H.; Owen E.; Ella F., wife of Robert Coney, of Williamsport; Mary R., wife of H. S. Stine, and Anna R. He was again married, in 1881, to Hannah M., daughter of J. H. Maurer, who has borne him two children: Alvin A., and Daniel H. He and wife are members of Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  JACOB REED, alderman of the First Ward, was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, December 7, 1821, son of Jacob and Rebecca (Bittle) Reed, natives of that county. His father was superintendent of the New York Coal Company, the first to operate in Schuylkill county. He was afterwards elected to the office of alderman in Pottsville, and filled that position for fifty-four years, and was also chief burgess of that city. Our subject received his education in the Pottsville Academy, became a contractor and coal operator, and was extensively engaged in the coal business in Pottsville. He came to Lycoming county in 1859, located in Williamsport, and was a jobber in Woolverton & Tinsmanís lumber mills for sixteen years. April 1, 1881, he was appointed alderman by the Governor of the State, and has since been elected to that office. He was also engaged in the mercantile business for ten years in Williamsport. He was married in 1843 to Miss Priscilla, daughter of Evan Lewis, of White Deer valley, who died, January 1, 1887, leaving two children: John B. and William Morgan. He was again married to Elizabeth Ruffner; of Northumberland county, Pennsylvania. Mr. Reed is a Republican in politics, has been United States pension agent for several years, and with his family belongs to the Lutheran church.

  JOHN L. GUINTER, prothonotary, was born in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county, June 22, 1849, son of John and Catharine (Stiger) Guinter. He was reared on a farm, and received his education in the common schools of his native township. He then engaged in clerking and in bookkeeping; afterwards he carried on the grocery business, and later engaged in the manufacture of cigars in Williamsport. In all these undertakings he met with well deserved success. In 1886 he was elected prothonotary of Lycoming county, and in the autumn of 1889 he was re-elected to the same office by one of the largest majorities ever given for a county office in Lycoming county. For the past six years he has filled the position with commendable credit to himself, and to the entire satisfaction of the people. Mr. Guinter has always been identified with the Democratic party, and has taken an active interest in the success of the principles and measures of that organization. In June, 1888, he was appointed commissary sergeant of the Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania, and still holds that rank. He is one of the enterprising citizens of Williamsport, and is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, also secretary and treasurer of the company, and was the principal promoter of that very necessary project. He is a stockholder in the Susquehanna, Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and of the Athletic Park Association, and has shown the same energy and intelligence in these several enterprises that have characterized his business life since reaching manhood. Mr. Guinter has recently erected the City Hotel, on Pine street, which is quite an improvement to that part of Williamsport. He was married, January 27, 1873, to Eliza, daughter of Mark Harrison, of Union county, Pennsylvania. They are the parents of five children: William; Raymond Clyde; Norman Harrison; John L., and Myrtie Ludell. Mr. Guinter is a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., and is one of the best known and most respected public officials in Lycoming county.

  CHARLES J. CUMMINGS, Register and Recorder, and Clerk of the Orphanís Court of Lycoming county, was born in Lewis township, (now Gamble,) Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 19, 1860. His parents, Patrick and Elizabeth (Kelly) Cummings, were among the pioneers of that section, where they settled in 1843. His father was engaged in lumbering and farming, and died, March 16, 1873; his widow still survives him. Mr. Cummings was reared in Lycoming county, received a common school education, and afterwards attended the Muncy Normal School and the Williamsport Commercial College. He then engaged in teaching, which voca-tion he followed ten years. He taught in the Ralston school and at various other points, and was principal of the South Williamsport high school in 1888 and 1890. During, his boyhood years he assisted in supporting his widowed mother, besides earning the means with which to obtain an education. Mr. Cummings has been prominent in the local councils of the Democratic party since attaining his majority, and has figured prominently in educational circles, having served two years as secretary of the School Directorsí Association of Lycoming county. In 1884 he was secretary of the Democratic county convention, in 1887 he was chairman of the Democratic county convention, and in May, .1890, he presided over the convention of school directors of Lycoming county. In the winter of 1889-90 he was urged to become a candidate for county superintendent of schools, but declined in order to enter the field for register and recorder, to which office he was elected in November, 1890, by the handsome majority of 1,320 votes. Mr. Cummings possesses that courage and perseverance so necessary to success in any calling. He is a popular representative of the young Democracy of the county, and is a member of the Catholic church. As an officer he has won the respect and confidence of the public. Through his industry he has accumulated considerable property, and is a stockholder and director in the Lycoming Opera House Company. He was married, November 25, 1891, to Miss Ella R. McGoughran, of Brooklyn, New York.

  JOHN HEILEMAN, treasurer of Lycoming county, was born in Germany, January 30, 1860, son of Michael and Mary (Dangle) Heileman, who came to the United States in 1867 and located in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. His father is a wagon maker, and followed his trade in Williamsport for many years. He resides in South Williamsport, his wife having died in 1865. The subject of this sketch came to Lycoming county with his father, and was educated in the public schools of Williamsport. He then worked in the saw mills, and after the flood of 1889 he purchased an interest in a brick manufacturing company in South Williamsport, which he sold out in 1891. In November of the latter year he was elected treasurer of Lycoming county, by a majority of 1,300. Mr. Heileman has been quite prominent in the local councils of the Democratic party, and prior to his election as treasurer he served as tax collector and in various other offices in South Williamsport. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, and in the Market Street bridge Company. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., the R. A., and of the Turn Verein Society. Mr. Heileman was married in 1883 to Emma, daughter of Joseph Mahl, of South Williamsport, and has three children: Joseph; Clara, and George. The family are members of the Market Street Lutheran church.

  EDWARD W. MICHAEL, sheriff of Lycoming county, was born in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, December 7, 1848, son of Peter and Esther Michael of that township. He was reared on the homestead farm, where he remained until reaching his majority, receiving a common school education in the district school of his neighborhood. At the age of twenty-three he married and moved to a farm in Wolf township, which he rented from his father-in-law and subsequently purchased. For fifteen years he was engaged in the agricultural implement business at Hughesville, in partnership with C. B. Vandine. He served as tax collector and overseer of the poor in Wolf township, and in 1888 he was elected sheriff of the county on the Democratic ticket by a majority of 960 votes, and is now filling that office. Mr. Michael was married in 1869 to Carrie, daughter of Abraham Bugh, of Wolf township, and has two children: Charles R. and Harry L. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church. Mr. Michael is largely interested in real estate in Wolf township, where he has spent the greater portion of his life.

  JOHN R. BUBB, county commissioner, was born in Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, August 5, 1834, and is the eldest son of Abraham and Elizabeth Bubb. He was reared in his native town, where he received a public school education, and after-wards spent two years at Dickinson Seminary. He worked at the tailorís trade with his father for nine years, and was afterwards engaged with him in the lumber business on Pine creek up to 1865, and then located in Jersey Shore. In March, 1870, he removed to Newberry, and worked on the Williamsport boom for Brown, Clarke & Howe, and Dodge & Company seventeen years. In 1887 he was a candi-date for county commissioner, but was defeated for the nomination, and in 1889 he was again a candidate, and was nominated and elected on the Democratic ticket, to serve until 1893. He served as constable of the Seventh ward for fifteen years, and filled the office of tax collector seven years. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company. Mr. Bubb has been thrice married. His first wife was Rachel Campbell, of Campbelltown, Pennsylvania. She died leaving three children: Elizabeth, wife of Henry Martin, of Newberry; Laura, wife of Peter Bowers, of Williamsport, and Rufus R., of California. He was next married to Antoinette Sufforn, of New York State, who died without issue. His present wife was Elizabeth N. Boyer, of Lycoming county, who has borne him two children: Minnie May, and Walker M. He and wife are members of the Presbyterian church of Newberry.

  JOHN E. HOPKINS, deputy prothonotary of Lycoming county, was born in Havre-de-Grace, Maryland, July 28, 1852, son of John and Elizabeth (Irwin) Hopkins, natives of the same county. His father was constable and collector for twenty-six years, and was also engaged in the mercantile business in Maryland. About 1882 his parents came to Williamsport, and made their home with our subject. His father died in April, 1886, but his mother still survives. Their family consisted of six children, as follows: John E., of Williamsport; Irwin, of Baltimore, Maryland; William, of Philadelphia; Deborah L., wife of Edward Riley, of Williamsport; Parozett, of South Williamsport, and Archer, clerk of this city. The subject of this sketch was reared in Rarford county, Maryland, and was educated in the public schools, and at Bryant & Strattonís Commercial College, Baltimore. He came to Williamsport in April, 1877, and took charge of the lumber interests of Hotchkiss & Barber, and afterwards became connected with the Emery Lumber Company, and Edgar Munson. Before coming to this county Mr. Hopkins was shipper for John DuBois, at Havre-de-Grace, Maryland, and thus became familiar with the lumber trade. After severing his business connections with Mr. Munson, he engaged in the hay, grain, and feed business in Williamsport, which he conducted for six years. In 1887 he was appointed deputy prothonotary, and has since filled that office in a satisfactory manner. He is a Democrat, and an unswerving supporter of his party. He was the Democratic chairman of the city from 1885 to 1891. Mr. Hopkins was, married, April 30, 1878, to Martha, daughter of John Good, of Williamsport, and has a family of five children: John; Roland; Bessie; Maxwell, and Earling. He is a member of the Protestant Episcopal church, and his wife in connected with the First Baptist church. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. and the Royal Arcanum, and was one of the original stockholders of the Lycoming Opera House Company.

  ORLANDO L. NICHOLS, deputy register and recorder, was born in Union, Broome county, New York, May 29, 1854, son of O. L. C. and Elizabeth (Derr) Nichols. His father was a native of Ulster county, New York, and a construction foreman on a railroad. He came to Williamsport in 1856, became connected with the Pennsylvania Railroad Company as station baggage master, and filled that position at the Pine Street station for many years. He afterwards acted as real estate agent for William H. Armstrong, and was also engaged in the produce business at the market house up to his death in 1869. He was an active member of the Republican party, also of the I. O. O. F. and the Baptist church. He was a soldier in the rebellion. His wife was a daughter of Joseph Derr, who was a descendant of Ludwig Derr, the founder of Lewisburg, and still survives him. She is a member of the Lutheran church. Their family consisted of seven children, four of whom are living, as follows: Elizabeth K, wife of W. D. Crooks, of South Williamsport; Orlando L.; Frank A., who is engaged in the manufacture of lumber in the State of Michigan, and Ida B., wife of G. C. Achenbach, of South Williamsport.

  The subject of this sketch was reared principally in Lycoming county, was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, and has been engaged in clerking, saw milling, etc. Mr. Nichols was president of the school board of South Williamsport for two years, and has served as chief burgess of that borough for one year, being the first Democrat ever elected to that office. In 1885 he was appointed deputy register and recorder by George W. Gilmore, and has filled that position ever since. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, and takes a deep interest in the growth and development of Williamsport. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and is quartermaster of the Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania. Mr. Nichols was married, M arch 10, 1885, to Mary V., daughter of P. S. and Mary A. Bierley, of Petersburg, Centre county, Pennsylvania, and has four children: M. Bessie; Walter B., and Ida Leonard. The family are members of the Lutheran church.

  PATRICK C. FLANAGAN was born in Cascade township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 8, 1860, and is a son of Patrick and Catharine (Driscoll) Flanagan, who were among, the first settlers of that township. He remained with his parents during his boyhood years, working for his father in the woods, in the blacksmith shop, and on the farm. His education was received at the public schools, and at Montoursville Normal School. Having a mechanical mind he early acquired a knowledge of steam engineering, and in 1883 he accepted a position with Funston & Cullian, and in 1884 with L. M. Castner, with whom he remained until January, a 1891. He then resigned his position in order to accept an appointment as one of the deputies in the office of Charles J. Cummings, register and recorder of Lycoming, county, which he still holds. Mr. Flanagan is a member of the, American Order of Steam Engineers, and has served as secretary of that body for three years. He was twice a delegate to the grand council at Philadelphia, and also a delegate to the supreme council convention at Manchester, New Hampshire, in 1888, and Boston, Massachusetts, in 1889. He is an ardent Democrat, and since his majority has been actively identified with the local interests of that party, and has served as a delegate to the county convention several times. Mr. Flanagan was married, January 27, 1892, to Cora M., daughter of George and Margaret J. (Martin) Myers, both of whom are dead. He is a member of the Catholic church.

  WILLIAM H. KIESS, clerk in the office of the register and recorder, was born at Blooming Grove, in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1862, son of Jacob D. and Sophia (Kehrer) Kiess, natives of Lycoming county, and of German origin. His mother died in December, 1862, and several years after her death, his father moved to Iowa. William H. was their only child, and was reared by his grandfather, Abraham Kiess, of Queneshaque, Anthony township. He was educated in the common schools of that township and at the Muncy Normal School. At the age of sixteen he engaged in school teaching during the winter season, and attended school during the summer. In 1883 he graduated from the State Normal School at Lock Haven, after which he taught for two years in the public schools and was then one of the teachers in the Williamsport Commercial College for three years. Mr. Kiess was appointed assistant postmaster of Williamsport in 1888, and filled that position until 1890, when he was appointed clerk in the prothonotaryís office, and in January, 1891, he was appointed to his present position. He is a stanch Democrat, and is now a member of the school board from the Eighth ward. He has been connected with the I. O. O. F. since 1884, and has passed through the chairs. Mr. Kiess was married in 1889 to Annie M., daughter of Levi Bender, of Williamsport. Mrs. Kiess is a member of Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church, and our subject attends the Baptist church.

  JOSEPH WHITEFIELD MILNOR, deputy sheriff of Lycoming county, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 22, 1861, son of Joseph W. and Mary Jane (Taylor) Milnor. He was reared in Warrensville, Eldred township, until he was ten years of age, when his parents removed to a farm upon which he lived until 1879. He received a public school education. In the spring of 1878 he entered the Montoursville Normal School, and in the following year attended the Muncy Normal School. He taught school in Plunkettís Creek township in the winter of 1879-80, and in the fall of the latter year he again attended the Muncy Normal School, and taught in Anthony township in the winter of 1880-81. In the spring of 1881 he entered the Lock Haven Normal School, where he graduated in July, 1882. During the two following winters he taught school in Hepburn township, and also acted as agent for the Sun and Banner. In the spring of 1884 he entered the Williamsport Commercial College, and completed his course in June of that year. In the winter of 1884-85 he taught in the Warrensville schools, and in the fall of the latter year he organized a normal school in that village, and in the winter of 1885-86 he taught in Hepburn township. From that time to January 1, 1888, he was permanently employed on the Sun and Banner as reporter, collector, and solicitor. In 1888 and 1889 he was employed in the county treasurers office under Jerome B. Lundy, and January 1, 1890, Sheriff Michael appointed him deputy sheriff of Lycoming county, which position he still holds. Mr. Milnor was administrator of the N. B. Kimble estate, and is trustee and guardian for Miss Jessie E. Kimble, one of the legatees. Mr. Milnor was married in October, 1888, to Jennie, daughter of Peter and Elizabeth Fague of Wolf township, Lycoming county, and has two children: J. Willard, and Marguerite. The family became residents of Williamsport in 1889 and are adherents of the Lutheran church. Mr. Milnor is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank and the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He is a stanch Democrat, and is a member of the I. O. O. F.

  DANIEL KEELER, clerk of the board of county commissioners, was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 3, 1854, and is a son of Jacob and Lydia (Boyson) Keeler, the former a native of Berks county, and the latter of Dauphin county, Pennsylvania. His paternal grandparents were natives of Berks county, and removed to Mifflinburg, Union county, where they died. His father was a shoemaker, and first located in Washington township, Lycoming county, and afterwards removed to Delaware township, Northumberland county, where he engaged in farming. His mother died in 1886, and her husband subsequently removed to Iowa, where he now resides. The family were Lutherans in religious faith, and Democrats in politics. They reared a family of seven children, six of whom are now living: Reuben and William, of Kansas; Sarah Jane, wife of John Bear, of Iowa; Mary Ellen, wife of Joseph Walters, of the same State; Margaret A., wife of John M. Boyle, of Delaware township, Northumberland county, and Daniel, of Williamsport. The subject of this sketch received a public school education, and also attended a select school in Turbutville. He subsequently taught school in the winter season, and thus earned money to pay for his tuition at the Montoursville Normal School, and with Prof. F. E. Wood, of the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1872 he commenced teaching in Fairfield township, and afterwards taught in Hepburn township, and for one term in Montour county. He came to Williamsport in 1880, and was junior principal of the Everett building for two terms. He then resigned and engaged with S. Q. Mingle, as salesman of musical instruments and sewing machines. He resigned at the end of a year and took charge of the business of the Singer Sewing Machine Company at Lock Haven. He was next appointed principal of the Ross building, Williamsport, which position he filled two terms, and was afterwards principal of the junior department, Washington building, for three years and a half. On the 5th of January, 1891, he was appointed to his present position. Mr. Keeler was married in 1879 to Clara Amelia,. daughter of Christian Edler of Montoursville, and has four children: Mabel Charlotte; Walter Artley; Charles Metzger, and Florence Mildred. Mr. Keeler is a Democrat, and an ardent supporter of the principles of his party. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., is treasurer of the A. L. of H., and is a member of Company D, Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania. The family are adherents of the Lutheran church.

  STAUGHTON GEORGE, controller of Williamsport, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, August 17, 1841, son of Nathan Pynn and Jeanette (Rawlings) George, both natives of Philadelphia. His paternal grandfather and great grandfather were both Revolutionary soldiers, the latter dying from wounds received at the battle of Long Island. His father was a minister in the Methodist Protestant church, and was an itinerant of that denomination for many years. As early as 1840 he traveled through northern and western Pennsylvania, preaching and organizing church societies and Sunday schools, and was prominently known in the city of Philadelphia. He served on the school board in the Second ward of that city. He died in 1863; his widow survived him until 1881. They reared a family of nine children, five of whom are now living, Staughton being the youngest. Our subject received a good education in the public schools of Philadelphia, and in 1854 he entered a commission house, where he remained until the breaking out of the rebellion. On the first call for troops, he enlisted in Company K, Second Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteers, and served under Gen. William McCandless up to the battle of South Mountain, where he received a gun-shot wound in the left hip, which has made him a cripple for life. At the time of being wounded he was serving as first sergeant, and was in command of his company, and on this and previous occasions he was recommended for promotion for "gallantry in the field." His wounds incapacitated him for further duty in the field, and after a lapse of two years he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Veteran Reserve Corps. He served as military assistant at Beverly Hospital, Beverly, New Jersey, and while there he was presented with a valuable gold watch, for his kindness to the men. Lieutenant George was subsequently ordered to Camp Cadwallader, Philadelphia, and was appointed quartermaster. He had charge of the final distribution of the stores and camp equipage, and was the last officer in command of that historic camp. He was next stationed at the Philadelphia arsenal, where he remained until the muster out of his corps, in 1866. Mr. George came to Williamsport in August of that year, and was afterwards appointed by General McCandless to a clerkship in the office of the secretary of internal affairs at Harrisburg. He filled that position four years, and then engaged in the lumber business at Williamsport, under the firm name of S. George & Company. In February, 1888, Mr. George was elected to the office of city controller, by a majority of 447 votes, and was re-elected, in 1890, by a majority of 1,008. He has always been an ardent supporter of the Democratic party, and is one of the influential Democrats of Lycoming county. He has been president of Hancock Veteran Club, and has served as sergeant major, chaplain, adjutant, and commander of Second Reno, Post, G. A. R., of Williamsport. Mr. George was married in Philadelphia, in 1870, to Margaret A. Streeton, of that city. He and wife are members of the Baptist church.

  JOHN J. GALBRAITH, city clerk, was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, February 22, 1847, and is a son of Joseph and Jane (Earley) Galbraith. His father was born and reared in Butler county, and there married Jane Earley, a native of Ireland, and about 1860 moved to Pittsburg. His wife died there, and he afterwards removed to the South, where he spent the balance of, his days. Joseph Galbraith was a great student of the Bible, and both he and wife were members of the Presbyterian church. The subject of this sketch was educated in his native county, and labored on the farm until 1862, when he enlisted in Company M, Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served three years. For the last sixteen months of his service, he was on detached duty at brigade headquarters, doing duty as a non-commissioned. officer. He was seriously injured by accident in 1863, on the march to Gettysburg, and with three exceptions was in every battle fought by the Army of the Potomac from Cedar Mountain to Appomattox. In 1867 he came to Williamsport and entered the office of the Gazette and Bulletin and remained on this paper until 1872. In partnership with W. R. Bierly he then established the Register, and published it for two years, and was also a proprietor of the Breakfast Table for a few months. In May, 1876, he became city editor of the Gazette and Bulletin, retaining that position until the fall of 1882. In 1886 he was elected city clerk, and is now serving his seventh consecutive term in that office, to which he was re-elected six times. Mr. Galbraith is a Republican, and has served as a delegate to the city, county, and State Republican conventions. He was once tendered the nomination for mayor of Williamsport, but declined to accept. He has served as alderman of the Fourth ward for two terms, and was a member of the school board one term. While chairman of the supply committee he voted in favor of erecting the present high school building, and strongly advocated the modification of the course of studies. He was one of the active agents in establishing Reno Post, G. A. R., in which he has filled various offices. Mr. Galbraith was married in 1870 to Sarah J., daughter of Benjamin Smith, of Clinton township, Lycoming county. She died in 1890, leaving five children, as follows: O. H., of the Gazette and Bulletin; Bessie; Annie; Mary, and Frederick Earley. Mr. Galbraith and family are connected with St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  GEORGE HOUSEL, city treasurer, was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, May 7, 1831, and received his education in the common schools of his native county. His father, Wilson Housel, was a native of Hunterdon county, and was a prominent merchant and lumberman for over forty years. His grandfather, Thomas Lowry, was a colonel in the Continental Army. Wilson Housel married Abagail Lowry, of Mercer county, New Jersey, and reared eight children, our subject being the youngest. At the age of twenty George succeeded to his fatherís lumber business, and continued in that line of trade up to 1861, when he came to Williamsport, formed a partnership with Nelson Runkle, under the firm name of Runkle & Housel, and engaged in the manufacture of sawed shingles. This firm was the pioneer in that industry in Williamsport, and shipped the first car load of sawed shingles sent from this city. In 1867 they became associated with Henry Board, and the firm of Runkle, Housel & Beard was organized. They erected the Diamond Planing Mills, and operated them up to 1873. Mr. Housel then sold his interest and engaged in the mercantile business at Jersey Shore, where he remained only nine months. He next became connected with James and Thomas U. Thompson, under the firm name of Thompson, Housel & Company, manufacturers of lumber, which existed tip to 1819. He afterwards spent a year at Easton, Pennsylvania, where he formed a company and engaged in the manufacture of a patent elevated tramway. In 1880 he returned to Williamsport, took charge of the manufacturing business of Lutcher & Moore, and served. as general manager for that firm until they closed out their business in 1890. Mr. Housel was then elected to the office of city treasurer for a term of three years, which position he now occupies. He was married in 1851 to Fannie, daughter of Charles Vorhis, of Milford, New Jersey, and has two children: Robert Lowry, a farmer of Fairfield township, Lycoming county, and Lizzie, wife of Horace R. Hanks, manager for S. Q. Mingle & Company of Williamsport. Mr. Housel is a Republican in politics, and both he and wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church.

  CAPT. EVAN RUSSELL, chief of police of Williamsport, was born in Piatt township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1840, and is the only living son of Edward H. Russell. He was reared in this county, and received his education in the West Branch High School, Jersey Shore, and at Dickinson Seminary, taking a full course in mathematics and civil engineering. He was engaged in surveying for a number of years, and after his removal from Piatt to Nippenose township he operated a grist mill for several years. In May, 186 1, he enlisted in Company A, Fifth Pennsylvania Reserve, and for meritorious service was promoted to the rank of sergeant. In September, 1862, he was transferred to the Signal Corps, United States Army, with the rank and pay of a sergeant of engineers. During his service of three years he participated in nearly every battle fought by the Army of the Potomac, and had many hair-breadth escapes. He had a horse killed at the battle of Antietam, and another wounded at the battle of Fredericksburg. For a time he served as signal officer on board of a gunboat, and in one engagement on the Rappahannock the boat on which he was serving had five solid shots sent through her hull. After his term of service had ended he was mustered out and returned to Lycoming county. In 1868 he was the Republican nominee for prothonotary, and was defeated by only 202 majority. He ran for county surveyor in 1883, but was again defeated by a very small majority. When Daniel Stock was elected prothonotary he appointed Captain Russell his deputy, which office he filled until April 1, 1881; when he was appointed chief of police by Mayor Keller. In July, 1885, he was commissioned by Governor Pattison captain of Company G, Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania. He is a member of the Union Veteran Legion and Reno Post, G. A. R., and may be justly proud of his standing among the veterans of the rebellion. Captain Russell was married in 1866 to Sarah, daughter of James Williamson, of Jersey Shore, and has two children: Hubert H., assistant city engineer, and Margaret, a graduate of Dickinson Seminary. He and family are members of Grace Street Methodist Episcopal church, in which he has served as trustee. Captain Russell is one of the founders and directors of the West Branch Building Association, and is a stockholder in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company.

  SEYMOUR J. NOBLE was born near Olean, New York, March 31, 1821, and died at Williamsport, Pennsylvania, October. 25, 1890. His early life was spent on a farm, and he subsequently engaged in lumbering. In 1871 he came to Williamsport, and in connection with H. C. Miller and Ezra Canfield bought the City Flour Mill. On the death of Mr. Miller he and son, Edward F., purchased the interests of the other partners, and established the firm of Noble & Son, which existed up to his death. The mill retained its old name until 1886, when the plant was entirely rebuilt and the name changed to the Noble Mills. In business Mr. Noble was aggressive, energetic, and enterprising, and a man of the strictest integrity. He was a member of the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport, was an ardent Prohibitionist, and his interest in religious and temperance work greatly aided these causes in the community. Mr. Noble married Maria C. Mills, a native of Cattaraugus county, New York, and his widow and two children survive him.

  EDWARD F. NOBLE, proprietor of the Noble Mills, was born in Cattaraugus county, New York, December 8, 1852, and is the son of Seymour J. Noble. He was educated at Batavia, New York, and learned the milling business with his father. He became associated with the latter in the management of the business, to which he succeeded at his fatherís death. The mill was entirely rebuilt in 1886, and in 1892 it was remodeled and its capacity largely increased. It was the first mill in Williamsport to put in the roller system, and its product enjoys a high reputation. Mr. Noble is a Prohibitionist, and is an active member of the Young Menís Christian Association. He was married, November 4, 1886, to Emma, daughter of Hiram Mudge of Williamsport. He and wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church, in which he is an elder.

  HUDSON R. FLEMMING, miller, was born in Mill Hall, Clinton county, Pennsylvania, January 17, 1852, son of Isaac and Margaret Ann (Stradley) Flemming. He was principally reared in Lycoming county, received a common school education, learned the trade of woodworker and carriage builder, and has followed the same up to 1889. In 1878 he embarked in the manufacture of carriages, and in March, 1891, became a member of the present firm of Flemming & Shollenberfrer, merchant millers, Hepburnville, Pennsylvania. After the flood of 1889 he was purchasing agent for the Market Street Relief Committee, and was appointed secretary and member of the Flood Relief Committee. Mr. Flemming has been a member of the Valley Forge Memorial Association since its reorganization in 1886, and also a member of the board of trustees of the same. He is an active Republican, and in 1885 was elected a member of the school board from the Fourth ward, has held that position ever since, and was its secretary for five years. He was married in 1877 to Miss Sallie, daughter of Alfred Deal, and to this union have been born three children: Walter D.; Cora May, and Earle R. He is a member of the Royal Arcanum, the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, and with his wife belongs to the Pine Street, Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been one of the librarians of the Sunday school for the past ton years.

  EDWARD J. FISHER, of The Fisher & Hinkle Company, manufacturers of biscuit and confectionery, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1864, and is the oldest son of John S. and M. Elizabeth Fisher. He was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, and subsequently was bookkeeper for three years for F. J. Funston & Company. In 1887 he was one of the organizers of the firm of Fisher, Hinkle & Company, which was in the latter part of 1891 changed into the present corporation, and is now the secretary and treasurer of the same. He is a stockholder and vice-president of the Athletic Park Association, of which he was one of the organizers. Mr. Fisher was married in 1888 to Mary A., daughter of George W. Crandell, of Williamsport, and has two daughters, Emily May and Elizabeth Jamison. He and wife are members of the Second Presbyterian church of this city.

  MATTHEW E. DUNN, plumber and gas fitter, was born in the city of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1856, son of Patrick and Mary Ann (Russell) Dunn. His father was a native of Ireland, and came to the United States in boyhood and located in Piermont, New York, where he grow to maturity. He was married in Orange county, New York, to Mary Ann Russell, who bore him a family of six children. He became a railroad contractor, and about 1852 he settled on Lycoming creek in Lycoming county, and was employed in building the Northern Central railroad as foreman in charge of a gang of men. In 1855 he moved to Williamsport, where he resided for many years, and then removed to Caledonia, Elk county, Pennsylvania, where he died. His widow survives, and resides in Elmira, New York. Mr. Dunn was foreman of the Northern Central railroad shops for many years, and was an energetic, industrious man. He was a Democrat, and served as a member of the common council of Williamsport. He was an adherent of the Catholic church all his life, and died, in that faith. To Patrick and Mary Ann Dunn were born the following children: Mary, wife of Henry F. Wheeland, of Elmira, New York; Matthew E., of Williamsport; and James, Daniel, Elizabeth, and Annie, all of whom are residents of Elmira, New York. The subject of this sketch was reared in Williamsport, and received a public school education. He afterwards learned the plumber and gas fitterís trade, and in 1881 established his present business, in which he has been quite successful. He is one of the leading plumbers of the city, and has built up a large trade. Mr. Dunn was married in 1881 to Esther, daughter of John Parks, of Snyder county. His wife is a member of St. Johnís German Reformed church.

  GEORGE G. WYLAND, machinist, was born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, December 28, 1843, son of Jacob and Nancy (Jacobs) Wyland, natives of the same county, where the father died in 1886. His mother is still living, and her children are named as follows: Samuel B.; Lewis H., deceased; George G., and Laura, who married Frank Allen. Our subject received his education in the common schools of Bellefonte, and was principally reared by Hon. Judge Linn. He learned the machinist trade at Milesburg, and came to Williamsport in 1866, where for fifteen years he was foreman of the shop owned by Mr. E. Andrews. In 1883 he established his present business, where he repairs all kinds of machinery. In 1861 he enlisted in Company H, Fourth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after serving three months, he re-enlisted in Company C, One Hundred and Twenty-Fifth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and saw service for nine months, being on detached service as gunner with Battery K, First New York Artillery. He participated in the battles of Antietam and Chancellorsville and others. Mr. Wyland constructed the first steam canal boat that was ever manufactured in Williamsport, and ran the same from that city to Philadelphia and Baltimore. He was married in 1865 to Isabella, daughter of Robert Armstrong, who died in 1869, leaving one child, Lewis H., now engaged in the railroad business in Virginia. He was again married, to Caroline Barclow, of Union county, who at her death left one child, Minnie. He was married a third time, to Alice Chambers, of Mifflinburg, Union county, by whom he has one child, George C. Mr. Wyland belongs to the G. A. R.; is a Republican, and with his wife belongs to the Second Presbyterian church.

  JOSEPH R. CARPENTER, of the firm of Carpenter Brothers Manufacturers of emery and corundum wheels, was born in Anthony township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 4, 1849. He is a son of Jesse B. and Phoebe (Carpenter) Carpenter of Piatt township, Lycoming county, and grandson of John Carpenter, a native of this county, and great-grandson of William Carpenter, who came from England during the Revolutionary war as a soldier in the army of Cornwallis, and subsequently settled in Lycoming county. The subject of this sketch was educated in the schools ,of Anthony township, where his father and grandfather lived, and subsequently took a course at the Montoursville Normal School. He followed agriculture until 1884, .and then engaged in the manufacture of emery wheels at Linden, under the firm name of Stone & Carpenter. At the end of two years Mr. Stone retired, and the present firm of Carpenter Brothers was organized. They moved their plant to Williamsport in 1891, and it is the only firm of the kind in this part of the State. Mr. ,Carpenter was married in 1873 to Emma E., daughter of John McLaughlin of Piatt township, and has three children: Jessie V.; Mack B., and J. Craig. He is a Democrat, and is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  ASHER M. CARPENTER, Of the firm of Carpenter Brothers, was born in Anthony township, September 16, 1857, and is a son of Jesse B. Carpenter, now a resident of Piatt township. He received a public school education in the district schools, and afterwards attended school at Montoursville and Jersey Shore. He was married in March, 1888, to Augusta C., daughter of Henry Jones of Porter township, and has one son, Henry Jones. He became a member of the present firm in 1886, and has been engaged in the manufacture of emery wheels for the past six years. He has been an active Democrat since attaining his majority, and served as auditor of Piatt township, clerk of election, etc. His wife is a member of the Lutheran church.

  CONRAD VILLINGER married Louisa Wochner, and emigrated with her from Germany, their native country, to America in 1853, first locating in Pottsville. He was a brewer, and worked at that occupation in Pottsville for one year, coming thence to Williamsport, in 1854, where he worked at the brewery owned by Mr. Buehler, and afterwards (1864-66) leasing a brewery on Franklin street, which is now known as the Flock brewery, and conducting the same for three years. In 1859-61 he and Mr. Bousch operated a brewery in Danville, after which he was proprietor of the United States Hotel at the corner of Fourth and William streets, this city, for three years. He then engaged in the grocery business at the corner of Grove and Third streets, and continued until his death, March 2, 1877. He was a Democrat in politics, a member of the I. O. O. F., and belonged to the Lutheran church. His. widow survives him and is the mother of five living children: John W.; Minnie E.; Albert; Harry H., and William E.

  JOHN W. VILLINGER, of the firm of J. W. Villinger & Brother, plumbers and gas fitters, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, February 10, 1855, son of Conrad and Louisa (Wochner) Villinger. He was educated in the public schools of Williamsport, learned the plumberís trade, and on April 1, 1884, he engaged in business with Matt E. Dunn. At the end of one year Mr. Dunn withdrew from the firm and Mr. Villinger continued the business alone until June, 1889, when his brother, Harry H., became a member of the firm of J. W. Villinger & Brother. The last named was born in Williamsport, July 23, 1862, received a public school education, and worked in lumber mills and at the butcher business until 1884. Both he and his brother are Democrats in politics.

  JOSEPH G. RATHMELL was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1803, and died in December, 1855. His father, Amariah Rathmell, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and was a son of Jonas Rathmell, a native of England, who was granted a large tract of land in Bucks county by William Penn. Amariah was one of the pioneers of Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, and reared six children, all of whom are dead. They were as follows: John; Mary; Phoebe; Thomas; Amariah, and Joseph G. The subject of this sketch received a good education in the Williamsport Academy (now owned by J. B. Hall) and was one of the pioneer school teachers of Williamsport. He married Sarah, daughter of John Mahaffey, of Lycoming, township. She died in 1887. They reared a family of seven children,. as follows: Mary, deceased wife of James Rothrock; Thomas M.; Ezra; Margaret; Emiline, widow of Samuel Beck; Sarah, widow of Thomas H. Caldwell, and John, deceased. Mr. Rathmell was an adherent of the Whig party, and served two terms as justice of the peace. He was brigade inspector of the State Militia for ten years, and was quite prominent in local military affairs. He was one of the organizers ofí the Second Presbyterian church of Williamsport, and was a member of that church up to his death.

  THOMAS M. RATHMELL was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, February 26, 1820, and is the oldest son of Joseph G. and Sarah Rathmell. He received his education from his father, and under Professor Beardsley, of Lock Haven. He then engaged in boating on the canal, at which he continued for twenty-five years, being the owner of several boats. He next engaged in the lumber business, which he prosecuted for a number of years, and is now retired from the active duties of business life. Mr. Rathmell who married in 1858 to Mary Emily, daughter of Moses Crans, of Orange county, New York, who has borne him three children: Mary, wife of H. S. Meyer; Thomas, who is connected with his fatherís planing mill, and Sarah,. wife of Warren Levergood. He is a Republican, has served in both the common, and select councils, and is now a member of the former. He served on the school broad for six years, half of which time he was treasurer of the board. He joined the Masonic order in 1856, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery. He has been connected with the I. O. O. F. since reaching manhood, and is one of the oldest Odd Fellows in the, city. He is also a member of the K. of P., and is a leading supporter of the Second Presbyterian church.

  JAMES ELLIOTT was born in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and was a son of Ebenezer Elliott, a Quaker, who moved from Bucks County to Lycoming county at an early day and settled in Muncy Creek township. Ebenezer Elliott married a Miss Tobey of Philadelphia, who bore him two children: James and Samuel. His second wife was a Miss Harlan of Muncy Creek township, who became the mother of two children: John and Lydia. None of his children are now living. About 1854 he settled in Muncy, where he died. James Elliott grew to manhood in his native township, and learned the wagon makerís trade at Jerseytown, Columbia county, after which he located in Williamsport. He married Harriet Goldy, and resided in Williamsport up to his death in 1870. His wife died in 1877. Soon after coming to this city he opened a wagon makerís shop, and carried on that business for many years. To James and Harriet Elliott were born ten children, as follows: John G., who died in St. Louis, Missouri; Eliza Ann, widow of Francis Long; Samuel; William G., deceased; Thomas Tanyhill, who served in the regular army five years, served three years and three months in the rebellion in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers and Sixth Regular Cavalry, and died at Reading, Pennsylvania; Mrs. Mary Jane Shelly, of Michigan; James S., deceased, who served three months in the Eleventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, three years in the Sixth Regular Cavalry, and was captain of Company IT, Sixth Colored Cavalry, at the close of the war; and Harriet, Sarah, and Charles, all of whom are dead. Mr. Elliott was a Whig in early days, and afterwards a Republican; he was a class leader for many years in Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  SAMUEL ELLIOTT, foreman of the Philadelphia and Erie car shops, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, June 9, 1833, and is the only surviving son of James and Harriet Elliott. He was reared in Williamsport, and received a public school education. He learned the wagon makerís trade with. his father, and worked with him for several years. In 1856 he found employment with the Williamsport and Elmira Railroad Company as a car repairer, and remained with them until September, 1860. He then became connected with the Philadelphia and Erie railroad, and was located at Lock Haven until 1864, when he returned to Williamsport, and in the spring of 1865 he was made foreman of the car shop, which position he has since hold. Mr. Elliott was married in 1863 to Sarah, daughter of John and Elizabeth Stadden of Turbutt township, Northumberland county. They are the parents of six children, as follows: Harriet; John S.; Elizabeth 24; Samuel, deceased; A. Bruce, and Jennie. He and wife are church members. He is a Republican, and has served in the common council six years.

  FREDERICK D. SCHWEIKER was born in Germany, January 10, 1832, son of John M. and Margaret (Krause) Schweiker, also natives of Germany. He was reared in his native land, and received his education in the high schools of that country, and then entered a wholesale dry goods house as an accountant. In 1870 he immigrated to the United States and located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he found employment with Guy W. Maynard & Company, lumber dealers, and subsequently with the firm of Krause, Herdic & Company. He remained in that business for three years, and then became bookkeeper for Sheffel, Murch & Company, with whom he was employed two years. He then entered the office of H. W. Watson, and took charge of his insurance business for several years, and in 1880 the succeeded Mr. Watson. This insurance agency was established by Mr. Watson many years ago. When Mr. Schweiker succeeded to the business he represented three companies, but ha; since extended his connections and facilities until he is now representing about a dozen first class companies of Europe and America. He controls the insurance of many of the largest and most desirable business and residence properties in Williamsport and vicinity. He is a member of the Board of Underwriters, and a gentleman of large experience and wide acquaintance. Mr. Schweiker is a stanch Republican, but has never sought or desired public office. He was married in 1877 to Frances M., daughter of William Gifford, of Wellsville, Allegany county, New York, and has a family of four children: Margaret; Lawrence; Frederick, and Robert. The family are adherents of St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport.

  FRANK H. MCCORMICK, son of Seth T. McCormick, deceased, was born in White Deer valley, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 24, 1857, and removed with his parents to Williamsport in 1861. He was educated in the public schools of that city, and after completing his education, he read law with his brother, Hon. H. C. McCormick, and was admitted to the bar of Lycoming county in May, 1880. For five years he practiced his profession with his brothers, H. C. and S. T. McCormick, but in 1885 he purchased the insurance business of Louis Schneider, and with Henry J. Campbell, organized the insurance firm of Campbell & McCormick. This firm continued to do business for three years, when Carl Herdic purchased Mr. Campbellís interest, and the present firm of McCormick & Herdic was established. It is one of the leading insurance firms in the, city, and also transacts a large real estate business. Mr. McCormick was married in 1883 to Etta, daughter of Eber Culver, of Williamsport, and has two children C. and Eleanor. He and. wife are members of the Third Presbyterian church. Politically he is an active supporter of the Democratic party, and takes a deep interest in the success of that organization.

  SPENCER W. HILL, of the firm of Hill & Byers, real estate and insurance agents, is a son of Jacob R. and Jamella Hill. He was born in Hughesville, Lycoming county, August 28, 1856, and was reared in his native village. He was educated in the public schools and at the Muncy Normal School, afterwards spending some time at Dickinson Seminary and the State Normal School at Millersville. He then commenced. teaching, and followed that vocation for thirteen years. He was principal of the Hughesville schools for five years, and taught in the Muncy Normal for two years. He subsequently took a course at Williamsport Commercial College, and then located in the city and became manager of the agricultural and implement business of J. H. Mutchler. He afterwards served as corresponding clerk in the office of H. B. Silsby, State agent for the Manufacturersí Accident Indemnity Company, of Geneva, New York, and in 1886 embarked in the real estate and insurance business. In January, 1894, heís associated with him F., B. Byers, and the firm of Hill & Byers is among the leading insurance agencies of this city. Mr. Hill is a Republican; he has served as a member of the school board from the First ward since 1888, and was secretary of the board in 1889. He was married in 1879 to Bella, daughter of William F. Mecum, of Hughesville, and has four children: Victoria M.; Jennie Belle; Raymond S., and Harry D. He is a member of the Masonic order, the I. O. O. F., and the S. of V., and he and wife are connected with Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  DAVID T. MAHAFFEY was born in Newberry, Pennsylvania, June 14, 1850, son of Lindsey and Sarah Jane (Reiley) Mahaffey. He was educated in the public schools and the Genesee Wesleyan Seminary, of the State of New York. In 1869 he was employed as teller in the West Branch Bank, where he remained four years, and was then selected as first teller in the Williamsport National Bank, and filled that position for eleven years. In 1883 he and his brother, D. S. Mahaffey, engaged in the manufacture of kindling wood, under the firm name of the Williamsport Kindling Wood Company, Limited. Mr. Mahaffey has also been identified with the lumbering interests of the county, is a stockholder in the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company, and is treasurer of the Lake Makamo Land Company, of Sullivan county. He is also a member of the Happy Jack Gold and Silver Mining Company, of Ouray, Colorado, of which he is a director and vice-president. He is interested in Mahaffeyís addition to Williamsport, is proprietor of the Williamsport Staple Company, and possesses large farming interests near the city. He is a Republican in politics, and at present is a member of the Board of Health of Williamsport. He was married in 1878 to Miss Alice E. Shaw, and to this union have been born two children: Eleanor and Marian. Mr. and Mrs. Mahaffey are members of the Disciplesí church.

  DELOS S. MAHAFFEY was born, April 14, 1856, in Newberry, and is a son of Lindsey Mahaffey. He was educated at Wyoming Seminary and Cheshire, Connecticut, closing his school days in 1876. In 1878 he was employed as clerk and paying teller in the Williamsport National Bank, where he remained until 1888. He became interested with his brother, D. T. Mahaffey, in the kindling wood business in 1883, and in 1888 he established a fine stock farm at Montoursville, and has about sixty fine bred horses thereon. He was married in 1886, to Mary Ann, daughter of George W. Lentz, and to this union has been born one child, George L. Mr. Mahaffey is a Republican in politics.

  SOLOMON V. VAN FLEET was born in Port Jervis, Orange county, New York, September 13, 1824, son of James S. and Mary (Fredenberg) Van Fleet, natives of that county. His father was a prominent citizen, and served as sheriff of Orange county. He and wife died upon their homestead farm near Port Jervis. . Solomon V. received an academic education, and read medicine for two years, but did not complete his studies or engage in practice. He commenced teaching school, and afterwards became train dispatcher at Piermont, for the New York and Lake Erie railroad, which position he filled a number of years. In 1860 he came to Williamsport and entered the employ of DuBois & Lowe, lumber operators, as confidential clerk, and filled that position for many years with John DuBois. He was a justice of the peace ,one term in Armstrong township. He finally retired from active business life, and has since devoted his attention to his large real estate interests. Mr. Van Fleet was married, October 15, 1853, to Elvira DuBois, an d has four children: Fred, of Williamsport; Walter, a physician near Franconia; Virginia; Florence, and Ida. He is a supporter of the Republican party, and his family are members of Christ Protestant Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM F. DEAN, photographer, was born in Canandaigua, New York, Novem-ber 28, 1856, son of James Fenton and Harriet A. (Benjamin) Dean, who came to Williamsport in 1867, where his father engaged in the mercantile business. He died June 3, 1876, in the faith of the Episcopal church. His widow survives him. William F. is the fourth in a family of six children. He was educated in the public schools of this city, and afterwards engaged in the mercantile business. In 1883 he established the firm of Dean & Cornwell and engaged in photography, which they continued until 1887, when Mr. Cornwell retired and Mr. Dean has since carried on the business alone. He has the leading photographic establishment in this part of the State, and in his business employs six assistants. He has the exclusive right to, the photographing of thirteen furniture factories, and has built up a large and successful business. Mr. Dean was married, April 16, 1885, to Hettie S., daughter of John Kern, of Plymouth, Luzerne county. His wife is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and he is connected with the Episcopal church, in which faith he was reared. He is a Republican, and is prominent in Masonic circles, being connected with the lodge, chapter, and commandery.

  MARTIN ELLINGER was born in 1809; he was a native of France, but immigrated to America in 1834, locating in New York City, where he remained several years. He then removed to Williamsport, where he took charge of the West Branch Iron, Works for John B. Hall, continuing with that establishment for many years. In New York he married Margaret Kahra, who died in 1873. Their family consisted of seven children, all of whom are living: Cornelius; William L.; Lizzie; Anna, who married H. H. Tilley; John F,; Edward M., and Charles H. Mr. Ellinger was a Republican in politics, and a charter member of St. Paulís ĎLutheran church, of which he was a deacon at the time of his death in 1888.

  CHARLES H. ELLINGER was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 18, 1857, son of Martin and Margaret (Kahra) Ellinger. He was educated in the public schools, learned photography, and in 1873 embarked in that business with Mr. Stiltz, which he continued until 1881, at which time the present firm of Hunt & Ellinger was organized. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, I. O. O. F., is Past Grand of the same, and is a Republican in politics.

  FRANK C. HUNT was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1854, son of Edward F. and Adaline (Cox) Hunt. His father was connected with the Williamsport Gazette for a number of years and was a telegraph operator and sign writer. He was chief clerk under George Webb, who was superintendent of the Catawissa railroad for a number of years, was chief clerk in the Veteran Reserve Corps under Colonel Wisewell, was a Republican in politics, and during the war held a position under the United States government. He was a member of Christ church several years previous to his death in 1884. Their family consisted of six children: Edward W.; Frank C.; Ella M.; Mamie F.; H. Bruce, L., and Charles Walter. Frank C. Hunt was educated in the public schools of Williamsport and Washington, D. C. After completing his education he embarked in the mercantile business with W. L. Purdy & Company, subsequently being engaged with Mr. Stiltz in the photographic business, where he remained until the present firm of Hunt & Ellinger was formed. This firm do an extensive business in copying and enlarging portraits, employ hundreds of agents, and get orders from various parts of the United States. Mr. Hunt was married in 1885 to Miss Margaret, daughter of Charles Leighow, of Danville, Pennsylvania, and to this union has been born one child, Charles Edward. Mr. Hunt is a Republican in politics, and his wife is a member of the Market Street Lutheran church.

  DANIEL EDLER, proprietor of the City coal yard, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, February 11, 1831, son of Christian and Barbara (Kline) Edler, natives of Germany. His parents first settled in Philadelphia, and about 1821 they removed to Block House, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, remaining there two years, and thence coming to Williamsport. His father died in Williamsport in 1860, followed by the widow in 1870; they were pioneer members of the Lutheran church, and helped to build the old Lutheran church near the jail on Third street. Five of their children are yet living: William; Christian; Henrietta, who married C. Shiesley; Joseph, and Daniel. The last named was educated in the common schools and attended one term at the old seminary. At the age of twelve years he began boating on the canal, and continued until he was eighteen years old, when he was apprenticed to Abram Page, for three years, to learn the cabinetmakerís trade, and for him he afterwards worked ten years. In August, 1874, he embarked in the coal business, at which he has since continued, and does one of the leading trades of the city. He is an active Republican, and has served sixteen consecutive years as a member of the common council of Williamsport, having been during this period chairman of the fire committee, highway committee, and market committee. He served as a member of the school board for one term, and in 1860 he enlisted in Company K, Thirty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served three months as corporal of the company. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., and is Past Senior Vice-Commander of the same. He was married in 1853 to Elizabeth, daughter of Lewis Weigel, ex-treasurer of Lycoming county, and to this union have been born five children: Mary, who married Milford Watson; Alice; U. S. Grant; Harry, and Lewis.

  JOHN M. MCMINN was born, August 23, 1819, in Montgomery county, Pennsylvania. He was educated at the boarding school kept by Professor Gause at Unionville, Chester county, Pennsylvania. He left school before he was eighteen years of age, and engaged in teaching in the neighborhood of Downingtown, where he became acquainted with the Pyles, who persuaded him to look after their interests at the Washington Iron Works, Nittany valley, Centre county. He was married, October 15, 1844, to Caroline, daughter of Elias P. Youngman. After leaving the iron works he invested his savings with James Hays, of Cedar Run, in the tannery business, in Pennís valley, near Millheim. He subsequently taught school at Milesburg, and afterwards engaged in lumbering with Samuel McKean on the Moshannon. In 1849 he removed to Unionville and took up civil engineering and assisted in building the Bald Eagle and Tyrone plank road, extending from Milesburg to Tyrone. In 1853 he removed to Williamsport. Here he took the position of first assistant under Robert Faries, then chief engineer in the construction of the Sunbury and Erie railroad. He served as city engineer and made the first lithograph map of Williamsport, which was published in 1857. Mr. McMinn became chief engineer of the Tyrone and Lock Haven railroad, now known as the Bald, Eagle Valley railroad, in 1857. In connection with Rev. Cyrus Jeffries he started the West Branch Bulletin, the first number appearing June 6, 1860. In 1866 he engaged in making surveys for the West Branch Canal Company, and during the same year he conducted a preliminary survey which has since developed into the Jersey Shore, Pine Creek, and Buffalo railroad. He afterwards became chief engineer of the Atlantic and Great Western Railroad Company, and conducted their explorations and surveys for a road in the western part of Pennsylvania. He was connected with many other engineering expeditions and was a skillful engineer. In 1869 he sold his property in Williamsport and removed south, locating on a plantation near Norfolk, Virginia. There he died, September 11, 1870.

  FRANK FULMER, coal dealer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 11, 1838, son of David and Catherine (Dietrick) Fulmer. David Fulmer was a son of Adam Fulmer, and died in 1871. His first wife, whose maiden name was Catherine Dietrick, died in 1858, and was the mother of eleven children: Elias; Frank; Joseph; Adam; David; John; Lavina, who married Jacob Berger; Abigail; Susan; Elizabeth, who married John Casselberry, and Sarah Jane, who married H. U. Striker. He was again married, to Catherine Marsh, who survives him and lives in Williamsport. Mr. Fulmer was a stockholder in the Market Street bridge, was a Democrat in politics, filled various township offices, and was a member of the Lutheran church. Frank Fulmer, his son and the subject of this sketch, was educated in the township schools and in 1861 enlisted in Company F, Fifth Pennsylvania Reserves, served twenty-two months, was wounded at Charles City Cross Roads, and was honorably discharged because of the effects of said wound. He re-enlisted in the spring of 1865 in Company E, Third United States Veteran Volunteers, Hancock Corps, served until the spring of 1866, was with the Army of the Potomac, and participated in the battles of Mechanicsville, Gainesís Mill, White Oak Swamp, and others. After the close of the war he followed boating on the canal for nine years, and was then employed in shipping lumber for a Mr. Quinn for a number of years. After serving as a member of the Williamsport police force for two years, he embarked in the saw milling business, erecting a portable saw mill in 1880, which he operated for two years. In the fall of 1882 he established his present coal business, and has built up a good trade. He is a member of Reno Post, G. A. R., and of Camp 47, Union Veteran Legion, is a Democrat in politics, and in 1885 was elected to the office of county commissioner. During his term of office the commissioners built two bridges on Pine creek, one on Larryís creek, and one at Lairdsville. He is at present a member of the school board from the First ward. He was married in 1868 to Mary E., daughter of Charles Fisher, and to this union have been born six children: Florence E.; Jessie Almeda; Frank; David; Charles, and Joseph. Mr. and Mrs. Fulmer are members of the Lutheran church.

  T. L. BALDWIN was born in Lawrenceville, Pennsylvania, in 1818, and moved to Tioga, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, in 1836, when about eighteen years of age. After reaching manhood he engaged in merchandising in that county. He resided there until 1877, when he came to Williamsport, retiring temporarily from active business. He was married to Jerusha De Pui, of Tioga, who bore him a family of nine children, six of whom are now living: Thomas D. and Annie D., both of Williamsport; Vine D., of Boston, Massachusetts; Jabin Bush, of the United States mint, at Philadelphia; Edward Maynard, and Louis, of Williamsport. Mr. Baldwin was a stanch supporter of the Republican party, and during his residence in Tioga county served two terms in the State legislature. He was president of the Tioga County Bank, and an active member of the Protestant Episcopal church. His wife, died in 1877; he survived until April, 1890.

  EDWARD MAYNARD BALDWIN, son of Thomas L. and Jerusha Baldwin, was born. in Tioga, Tioga county, Pennsylvania, July 8, 1862. He was reared and educated in that county, and at the age of sixteen began clerking in a hardware store in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, where he remained five years. He then returned to Tioga county and engaged in the mercantile business with his father, which partnership, continued five years. In February, 1888, he located in Williamsport and embarked in the coal and food business, and is now one of the most prominent coal dealers of the city. Mr. Baldwin was married, June 21, 1887, to Louise, daughter of Guy W. Maynard of Williamsport. He and wife are members of Trinity Protestant Episcopal church. He is active in church work; he is vice-president of Trinity Church Beneficial Association, and was senior warden of the Episcopal church of Tioga for three years. He is a Republican, and served as auditor of Tioga for three years; since coming to Williamsport he has taken an active interest in political affairs.

  WILLIAM H. KILBOURN, coal dealer, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania March 22, 1860, son of Elisha and Maggie (Whittlesey) Kilbourn. His parents, were natives of Connecticut, and settled in Lycoming county in 1848. The father was in charge of the old water mill for six years, and also of the old Williamsport mill for one season, and now lives a retired life with his son, William H. Kilbourn. The mother is a member of the First Presbyterian church, and has two children: Joseph S., who is a molder by trade, and William H. The last named received his education in the public schools at Williamsport, and in 1879 became connected with J. S. Gibson in the coal business, succeeding him in his business in 1889, and is now one of the largest coal dealers in the city. He also ships coal to different towns on the Northern Central and Philadelphia and Erie railroads. He is one of the original stockholders of the Athletic Park Association, is secretary of the same, is a member of the Board of Trade, is secretary of the Merchantsí Retail Commercial Agency, is a Republican in politics, and belongs to the Third Presbyterian church.

  WILLIAM H. HARTMAN, coal dealer, was born in Port Clinton, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, October 12, 1852, son of George and Caroline (Mengel) Hartman, natives of that county. His father was a section foreman on the Philadelphia and Reading railroad for many years, and died in Schuylkill county in 1891. The subject of this sketch was reared in his native county, and was educated in the public schools of Port Clinton. He afterwards clerked in a store in that borough, and in 1881 came to Williamsport and entered the freight and ticket offices of the Phila-delphia and Reading Railroad Company as a clerk. He was afterwards promoted to, chief clerk, which position he held until December, 1890, except for a brief period in 1888 when he was sent to Shamokin to look after the Philadelphia and Reading Companyís interest at that point. In 1890 the Philadelphia and Reading Railroad Company erected an extensive coal yard at the foot of Hepburn street. This was rented by Mr. Hartman, and he embarked in the coal business, and is probably handling more coal than any other dealer in the city. Mr. Hartman is a Democrat, and during his residence in Port Clinton was a member of the borough council and the school board. He is a member of the R. A., the K. of P., U. A. M., and Iron Hall. He was married in 1879 to Nora A., daughter of E. J. Kirlin; of Schuylkill county, and has two daughters: Carrie and Ena. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. Mr. Hartman has also been secretary of the Finley Sunday school for a number of years.

  H. B. MELICK, dealer in real estate, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, February 27, 1833, son of Peter and Margaret (Best) Melick, also natives of Colum-bia county. His great-grandfather, Peter Melick, emigrated from Germany, on the Rhine, and settled in Columbia county, where he purchased a large tract of land, a portion of which constitutes the present sites of Bloomsburg and Light Street. During the time of the Wyoming massacre the Indians came to the home of Peter Melick, the grandfather of H. B. Melick, and took ten horses belonging to Mr. Melick, and strapping bed clothing on the backs of these animals, they left for their camping grounds, after having attempted for three days to murder the family, which had taken refuge in a small fort on Fishing creek. In a short time one of the horses managed to escape and returned home with, the clothing the Indians had stolen and fastened upon its back. Our subject was reared in Columbia county until he was fifteen years of age, receiving his education in the public schools of that county, when he moved to Philadelphia and there learned the carriage-makerís trade at the Dunlap carriage factory. In 1864 he went to Cuba, where he worked at his trade until 1855, when he moved to Lycoming county, and was engaged in the manufacture of carriages in Williamsport for twelve years. In 1867 he embarked in the real estate business, which he has continued ever since. He also engaged in the grocery business from 1867 to 1872 with Cyrus Hamilton, and subsequently with Abraham Clinger. He was associated with Peter Herdic in various enterprises, and during that business connection organized several water companies in different places. He is president of the Cairo, Illinois, water works, the Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, water works, the Selinsgrove water works, and is a stockholder in the Orlando Water Works Company. He is a Republican in politics, has served as a member of the city school board for ten years, was treasurer of the same for two years, and has also been a member of the common council of Williamsport. He was married in 1860 to Miss Eliza, daughter of Stephen Gould, a native of Carbon county, Pennsylvania, who died February 8, 1880, leaving one son, Robert S. Melick, who is a member of the insurance firm of Sheffer & Melick. Mr. Melick was again married, to Alice V. Gould, who died October 21, 1889. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank and the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company of Williamsport.

  THEODORE HILL, real estate dealer, was born in Wolf township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 25,1827, son of Jacob and Louisa (Morris) Hill. Jacob Hill was a son of Jacob Hill, and was born in Wolf township, Lycoming county, in 1801. He was a farmer, merchant, and distiller for many years. In 1852 he located in Ohio, and in 1854 he started for California and has never been heard from since. He married Louisa Morris, a daughter of Daniel Morris. Her father was a native of Mount Holly, New Jersey, and was one of the early settlers of Hughesville; he was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and died at the age of eighty-five years. Mrs. Louisa Hill died in November, 1827. Theodore Hill, the subject of this. sketch, received an ordinary education, and was reared by his grandparents, Daniel and Deborah Morris. He was engaged in the mercantile business in Hughesville, and afterwards in the distillery business. In 1860 he was elected register and recorder of Lycoming county by the Republican party, and served one term, after which he was clerk of the Pennsylvania State Senate. From 1864 to 1878 he was a superin-tendent of the real estate business affairs for Peter Herdic. In the fall of 1869 he was elected to the Lower House of the State legislature, and in 1871 he was elected prothonotary of Lycoming county. In 1878 he was appointed superintendent of the real estate business interests for R. J. I C. Walker and William Weightman, which position he held until January 1, 1890, when he commenced his present real estate business. He was married in 1851 to Anna R., daughter of Christian Kahler, and to this union have been born five children: Clarissa; Chester W.; Lilian A.; Ila Blanche, who married Frank S. Clapp, and Harry H. Mr. and Mrs. Hill are attendants of the Trinity Episcopal church.

  JOSEPH H. MACKEY, of the firm of Mackey & Tallman, insurance agents, was born in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, May 3, 1849, son of Thomas and Catherine (Dentler) Mackey. Thomas Mackey was born in Londonderry, Ireland, and immigrated to America with his parents, in the same ship with William Cameron, a brother of Hon. Simon Cameron. They located in the Buffalo valley, in Union county, Pennsylvania, w here Thomas was married to Catherine Dentler. Soon after marriage he located in Lewisburg, where he was superintendent of the Marsh Foundry for twenty-one years. He died in 1860, was a strong temperance man all through life, and with his wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church. His widow is still living in Lewisburg in her eighty-forth year, and is the mother of seven children, five of whom are living: James K.; Thomas L.; Lidie, who married David Banghart of Lincoln, Nebraska; Maggie, who married Thomas Millspaugh, of Williamsport, and Joseph H. Joseph H. Mackey was educated in his native town, where he remained until 1865, when he went to Ogle county, Illinois, and spent three years learning the carpenterís trade. In 1868 he was. engaged with Culver, Barber & Company in their planing mill for some time, and was with H. W. Early & Company for a number of years. He was also employed by the Millspaugh Brothers for two years in the pattern shop of the Williamsport Machine Company, and in 1863 he embarked in the insurance business. In 1888 he formed his present partnership with Harrison Tallman, and has since done business under the firm name of Mackey & Tallman for the Penn Mutual Life Insurance Company of Philadelphia. Mr. Mackey is a member of the Athletic Park Association, and of Ivy Lodge, F. & A. M., Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, R. A., and Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22, K. T. He is Past Grand of Lycoming Lodge, I. O. O. F., is Past Chief Patriarch of West Branch Encampment, and has been Scribe for the same since 1879. He is a member of Canton Ridgley, No. 8, Patriarchs, Militant I. O. O. F., is secretary of the Pennsylvania Odd Fellowsí Anniversary Association, and is also a member of the committee on credentials of the Grand Encampment of Pennsylvania; is a member of the Grand Lodge of Pennsylvania, I. O. O. F., and is on the committee of transportation of that body, and is treasurer of the Temple Club of this city. He is a Republican in politics, and during the Garfield campaign in 1880 he was captain of Company A, Republican club. He was married, November 17, 1870, to Miss Kate P., daughter of Samuel and Charlotte Coder, and to this union have been born five children: Lottie C.; Edward P.; Fred C.; J. Harry, and Thomas M. Mrs. Mackey is a member of the First Baptist church, while Mr. Mackey belongs to the Mulberry Street Methodist Episcopal church.

  FIRM B. BYERS, of the real estate firm of Hill & Byers, was born in Snyder county, Pennsylvania, July 19, 1803, son of John G. and Mary (Ulrich) Byers, natives of that county. His father was a stone contractor and followed that business for several years. He served in the late war as a member of a regiment of Pennsylvania volunteers, and was corporal of his company. He married Mary: Ulrich, who died in 1885, and was the mother of three children, two of whom are living: Firm B. and Bessie B. He now makes his home with his son, Firm B., and is a Republican in politics. Our subject was reared in Snyder county, and received his education by his own efforts. He came to Williamsport in 1879; in 1883 he was appointed agent for the Prudential Insurance Company, and after one year and three. monthsí service he was made assistant superintendent for central Pennsylvania for three years. At the expiration of that time he was promoted to superintendent and general manager for central Pennsylvania; after serving for three years in that capacity he resigned and formed his present partnership with Spencer W. Hill, and. has done an excellent business from the beginning. He is a Republican in politics, and belongs to the Patriotic Order Sons of America, and Lycoming Lodge No. 112, I. O. O. F.

  GARRETT T. BURD, secretary of the Union Insuring Company, was born in Clinton: township, Lycoming county. His father, John A. Burd, was also a native of Clinton township, who, after receiving an ordinary education, learned the carpenterís trade, and in 1863 enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Forty-third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was killed at the battle of Cold Harbor May 23, 1864. His widow, whose maiden name was Mary Duncan, was again married, to Lawrence M. OíDell, carpenter and builder, who now resides in Montgomery. They belong to the Methodist Episcopal church of that borough, with which Mr. OíDell is officially connected as trustee and steward. Our subject is her only child, and received his education in the township schools, the Muncy Normal, and the Williamsport Commercial College. He learned the machinist trade, thereby earning money enough during the summers to defray his expenses at school during the winter mouths. He taught school for two winters. On coming to Williamsport he was employed by the Williamsport Machine Company, and attended the night sessions of the Williamsport Commercial College. He was subsequently bookkeeper for Breneizer & Company until they ceased to do business. He then engaged in the insurance business as a solicitor for Henry Clinger, subsequently forming a partnership with Mr. Hartranft at Montgomery, Where they did a real estate and insurance business until 1889. He then returned to Williamsport, and January 1, 1891, was made, secretary of the Union Insuring Company. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., and is a trustee of the Methodist Episcopal church of Montgomery.

  RILEY W. ALLEN, Of the Travelersí Insurance Company, was born in Cleveland, Ohio, June 17, 1855. He attended public schools until the age of thirteen, when he learned the trade of furniture ornamenter. At the solicitation of A. H. Heilman & Company he came to Williamsport in 1873, and shortly afterward W. H. Melhuish & Company secured his services as superintendent of their finishing department. When this firm consolidated with the Williamsport Furniture Company Mr. Allen was awarded the contract to take charge of their finishing department. After cottage chamber suites were practically out of fashion, ornamenters could not command remunerative situations. After casting about for some time Mr. Allen embarked in the insurance business as a solicitor for H. W. Watson, in the year 1877. From there he went with A. D. Lundy, who represented the Travelersí Insurance Company, where Mr. Allen developed a peculiar ability for presenting intelligently this corporationís products, and made himself so useful that he was taken in as a partner, and became a member of the firm of A. D. Lundy & Company. From this he graduated into the managership of the Travelers Insurance Companyís offices in the Northern Central district of Pennsylvania, when he was promoted to State special agent, and he at present occupies the dual position of district agent and State special agent. By indefatigable work and careful presentation of facts, Mr. Allen has built up an enviable business. In 1876 he was married to Annie M., daughter of Charles Scheffel. To that union five children have been born, three of whom survive: Bertha L.; Carl G., and Margaret L. Mr. and Mrs. Allen are members of the First Baptist church of Williamsport.

  JUDSON A. OLMSTEAD was born in Columbia county, New York, November 7, 1844, son of Judson and Naomi (Hunt) Olmstead, both of whom were born in Columbia county, in February, 1802. His father was a miller by trade, and successfully operated several different grist mills in Columbia and Wyoming counties. He subsequently removed to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he died in 1890; his wife died in 1871. Both were members of the Baptist church. They were the parents of nine children, four of whom are living: Emma P., wife of E. A. Rowley; Mary Ellen, who married J. W. Cole; Charles D., and Judson A. The last named received a public school education, and remained with his parents until 1862, and then enlisted in Company H, One Hundred and Thirty-Seventh New York Volunteer Infantry. He served as corporal of his company, and was detailed to the ambulance corps. He participated in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Wauhatchee Valley, Lookout Mountain, Buzzard Roost, Dallas, and others, was taken sick at Atlanta, and remained ill four months. After leaving the army he purchased a farm in Van Buren county, Michigan, on which he lived three years, then sold it, returned east, and located in Williamsport in 1867, where he took a course at the Williams-port Commercial College. He was in Clearfield county some time as agent for his father in the sale of agricultural implements, and continued in the machine business for several years. He purchased his fatherís business, and engaged in the manufacture of saw mill machinery and the erection of mills. Mr. Olmstead was married, November 4, 1868, to Harriet C., daughter of Dr. I. R. Meeker. Her father was born at Johnsonís Settlement, New York, January 26, 1814, was educated in the common schools, and removed with his parents to Ohio at an early day. He graduated at Rush Medical College, Chicago, and practiced his profession in Illinois, where he died, December 5, 1856. He married Phoebe Lowell, of New Hampshire, December 22, 1835, who survived him until October 3, 1890. She belonged to the same family as the late James Russell Lowell of Massachusetts. Dr. Meeker was a prominent physician of his locality, a man of excellent judgment, and a conscientious Christian gentleman. The family medicines now manufactured by H. C. and J. A. Olmstead are made from recipes which he used in his practice. In 1878 Mrs. Olmstead engaged in the manufacture of these medicines, and by 1887 her business had grown to such an extent that Mr. Olmstead gave up his previous vocation, and has since given his entire attention to their manufacture and sale. They have an extensive trade for their product all over the country. Mr. Olmstead is a Repub-lican, and is a member of the Union Veteran Legion. He is a stockholder in the Edison Electric Illuminating Company. Mr. Olmstead and wife are members of the First Baptist church, and are the parents of one child, Walter J.

  JOHN M. STEINHILPER was born in Germany, July 1, 1823, son of Ludwig and Fannie (Slay) Steinhilper. His parents came to Williamsport, Pennsylvania in 1847, where they spent the remaining years of their lives. His father was a farmer in Germany, and held an official court position for twenty-nine years. He reared a family of seven children, three of whom are living and are residents of Williamsport: John M.; Jacob, and Fannie, wife of Justus Dittmar. John M., the subject of this sketch, received a common school education in his native land, and afterwards served three years and 9, half in the German army. He immigrated to the United States in 1847, and obtained employment at a Philadelphia water cure establishment, where he remained two years and a half. In 1850 he came to Williamsport and engaged in manual labor. In 1858 he established a grocery store on Franklin street, which he carried on for nine years, and then sold out and engaged in the coal business with Gottlieb Fullmer and remained in that business for six years. The following two years he was in the ice business, and in 1879 he opened a beer bottling establishment, which he carried on up to 1886, and then retired from active business life. He has served as tax collector of the Eighth ward for the past four years, and has also been overseer of the poor the same length of time. He is an active supporter of the Democratic party, and has been judge of. election for several terms. He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. since 1863. Mr. Steinhilper was married in Philadelphia, March 4, 1849, to Theresa Sturn of Germany, and has five children: Eva, wife of Charles A. Foucart, of Jersey City; Mary, who married Samuel B. Harman, of Williamsport; Rosa, wife of George Flock, of Williamsport; Fannie Louisa, a teacher in the public schools, and Louisa Fannie, wife of William C. Hopler of Williamsport. He and family are members of the English Lutheran church. He is largely interested in city real estate, and erected the fourth house on Franklin street in the Eighth ward.

  S. T. FRAIN, proprietor of the Hotel Crawford, was born in Union county, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1840, son of Henry and Catherine (Shoemaker) Frain, natives of Berks county, Pennsylvania, who settled in Union county in 1830. His father died, September 10, 1874, and his mother July 18, 1852; they reared seven sons: Isaac; Henry; George; John; S. T.; Charles, and J. F. Our subject was reared in Union county, where he received a limited education. At the age of twelve years he moved with his parents to Centre county, and there served an, apprenticeship of six and one-half years at the woodworkerís and painterís trades. August 19, 1861, he enlisted in Company A, Forty-Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and after the consolidation of the regiment was a member of Company D, and served over three years receiving wounds in the left leg at Williamsburg, in the right leg at Garnettís Farm, in the right side at Weldon railroad, and in the right ankle and left leg at Spottsylvania, which so disabled him that he was discharged from service and confined in the hospital at Washington, D. C. He participated in all the battles of the Army of the Potomac up to Spottsylvania, joining General Hancock at Camp Curtin, Virginia. His, brother John was a member of Company H, Fifty-sixth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and lost his left hand at Bull Run; his brother Frank was a member of Company D, First Pennsylvania Cavalry, and lost his right arm by a cannon ball at Cold Harbor, and his brother Charles was a member of Company E, and subsequently of Company D, Forty-Ninth Pennsylvania Volunteers. After the close of the war Mr. Frain followed his trade in Harrisburg for six years, afterwards engaging in the grocery business, and still later in the undertaking business, and was the second undertaker in Harrisburg. He then became proprietor of the McClay Street Hotel, and has since kept hotels in Union county, at Millheim, Centre county, and at Selinsgrove, Snyder county. In April, 1890, he took charge of the Hotel Crawford, in Williamsport. He is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and Camp 47, Union Veteran Legion. He was formerly identified with the Republican party, but is now independent in his political proclivities; he is a member of the Williamsport Board of Trade. Mr. Frain was married in 1866 to Miss Cemillia Lichtenwalter, of Lebanon, Pennsylvania, by whom he has one son, Lewis E.

  ADAM APPEL, clerk at the Eagle Hotel, was born on the 27th of June, 1852, in Lewis township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, son of Adam and Christina Ann Appel. His father was born in Bavaria, Germany, and migrated to America in 1841 at the age of twenty-four, accompanied by three brothers - Philip, Jacob, and George and one sister. They came at once to Lewis township, Lycoming county, whither three sisters - Mrs. Catherine Drum, Mrs. Caroline Yoxtheimer, and Mrs. Julia Quiggle had preceded them. The three brothers subsequently located in different parts of the West; of the four sisters, two, Mrs. Quiggle and Mrs. Drum, still reside in Lewis township; the other two died in this county. Adam Appel, Sr., was first employed as a farm laborer, but several years after his arrival he purchased a tract of uncleared land, removed the timber, and reduced it to cultivation. He died in Lycoming township, Lycoming county, October 16, 1886, at the age of sixty-nine; his wife died in 1875. They were the parents of three children, two of whom died in early childhood. Adam Appel, the subject of this sketch, is the only surviving child, and was reared in Lewis and Hepburn townships, Lycoming county. He received a common, school education, and was variously employed at farm labor, etc. from 1867 to 1873; in the latter year he came to Williamsport, and worked at the planing mills, factories, etc. for some years. In 1882 he became connected with the European House as clerk, relinquishing this position in April, 1889, to accept employment in a similar capacity at the Eagle Hotel. Here he has since remained, and enjoys a wide acquaintance and deserved popularity among the traveling public by reason of his courteous, affable, and obliging manners. Mr. Appel was married, April 5, 1887, to Lena, daughter of Anthony and Catharine Raver, of Collomsville, Lycoming county, and they are the parents of two children: Florence and Luella. Mr. and Mrs. Appel are members of St. Maryís Evangelical Lutheran church. Mr. Appel is Also a member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, Lycoming Chapter, No. 222, and Baldwin II Commandery, No. 22, F. & A. MI.; in politics he is a Republican.

  JOHN R. KELLY was born in Philadelphia, January 20, 1861, son of Lawrence and Martha Kelly. He was graduated from the Germantown high school, came to Williamsport on the 1st of April, 1888, and took charge of the Enright Hotel, where he has since remained and which he has made a financial success. He was married, October 30, 1880, to Mary A. Ryan, and to this union has been born one child, Martha.

  L. C. RUNKLE, manager of the Rochester Bottling Company, of Williamsport, was born in Centre county, Pennsylvania, May 14, 1857, son of Daniel and Susan (Grossman) Runkle, natives of New Jersey, who were among the early settlers of Centre county. He was reared in Centre and Clinton counties, received his education in the public schools, and was graduated from the State Normal School at Lock Haven in 1883, and from the Williamsport Commercial College in 1884. After closing his college course he was employed for several years as reporter and collector for the Williamsport Sun and Banner. Severing this connection he took employment with the J. P. Enright Bottling Company, remaining with them and. the Keystone Bottling Company for nearly two years. During President Clevelandís administration he was appointed and served as mail agent between Williamsport and Canandaigua. He was then employed as registered letter clerk at the Philadelphia and Erie railroad station at Williamsport, which position he filled until May, 1888, when he became bookkeeper and collector for the Rochester Bottling Comp any, and in January, 1891, was made the general manager of the same. Mr. Runkle does the leading bottling trade of the city of Williamsport. He is a Democrat in politics. He was married, October 15, 1890, to Miss Edith, daughter of Sylvester Engle, of Hazleton, Pennsylvania.

  QUIN CASEBEER was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1859, son of Samuel and Mary (Gouldy) Casebeer. His father was born in New Jersey, was a millwright , and carpenter by trade, and came to Lycoming county in 1847. His mother was born in Lycoming county and died in 1868, and was the mother of four children: J. B.; Ella, who married Paul Hess; Quin, and Samuel. Our subject received his education in the public schools of Williamsport, and for several years was engaged in the grocery and butcher business. In 1884 he was employed as bookkeeper for the, Williamsport Beef Company, and has held that position ever since. He is a Democrat in politics, and in 1890 was elected a member of the select council of Williamsport, for a term of four years. He was married in 1879, to Miss Annie, daughter of James Pierce, and to this union have been born three children: Walter E.; William G., and John B. Mr. and Mrs. Casebeer attend Christís church.

  W. J. TOMLINSON, veterinary surgeon, was born in Gamble township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 22, 1847, son of Stephen and Margaret (Hoffman) Tomlinson. After attending the public schools in his native township he was employed as foreman in lumber woods for fifteen years by Smith & Company, of Tioga county, Pennsylvania, on Pine creek, and by the Sunbury Lumber Company on Plunkettís creek. In 1883 he went to Philadelphia, where he studied to become a veterinary surgeon under Dr. James A. Marshall, after which he entered the University of Pennsylvania as one of the first matriculates of the veterinary department of that institution. He took a one year course at Philadelphia and a full course at the American Veterinary College, of New York, from which he graduated in 1887, and immediately began the practice of his profession in Loyalsockville, subsequently removing to Montoursville, and in 1880 he located in Williamsport, where he has built up a lucrative business. August 29, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, under Capt. H. B. Essington, and served until the close of the war, participating in the capture of Fort Fisher under General Terry. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming Opera House Company, is a Democrat in politics, and belongs to Reno Post, G. A. R., and to Eureka Lodge, F. and A. M., of Montoursville. He was married, January 6, 1870, to Miss Malina, daughter of John H. Hermon, and to this union have been born five children: Elmer E.; John F.; Flora May; Estella, and Lulu. Mrs. Tomlinson is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Loyalsockville, but attends the Pine Street Methodist Episcopal church of Williamsport.

  DAVID M. KELLER, veterinary surgeon, was born in Columbia county, Pennsylvania, November 13, 1851, son of George B. and Mary (Masters) Keller, natives of Easton and of Columbia county, Pennsylvania, respectively, who moved to Lycoming county about 1855, locating in Muncy Creek township, where the mother died in 1879. His father now lives a retired life in Muncy, is a Republican, and belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. He is the father of seven children: Annie, who married De La Green; Parvin; David M.; Jacob D.; Margaret, deceased; George M., and Harriet, who married Dr. William Reedy. Our subject was reared in Muncy Creek township and educated in the public schools. He was employed on the homestead farm until 1884, when he entered the Ontario Veterinary College, at Toronto, Canada, from which he was graduated in 1886. He immediately began the practice of his profession in Williamsport, where he has done an excellent business. He was married, November 13, 1878, to Miss Jennie Good, daughter of Michael Good. He is a Republican in politics, and with his wife belongs to St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  WILLIAM COLT, cabinet maker and undertaker, was born in Wolf township, Lycoming county, October 3, 1824, son of Thomas and Mary (Andy) Colt. His father was born in Northumberland county, and removed to Lycoming county with his parents. After marriage he resided in Wolf township for a number of years, removing from there to the State of New York. Our subject came to Williamsport in 1839, learned the cabinet makerís trade with Godfrey Lenhart, and has ever since followed that occupation. In 1849 he established his present business at Newberry, and has done an excellent trade there for over forty years. He was a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F., helped to organize the Ionian Lodge, No. 729, I. O. O. F., and is Past Grand of the same. He is also a member of the West Branch Encampment, No. 136, is a Republican in politics, and was appointed postmaster of Newberry under President Lincoln, re-appointed by President Grant, and served in all eighteen years. He was married in 1848 to Matilda, daughter of Frederick Fessler, of Newberry, who died October 25, 1891, and was the mother of three children: Kate W.; A. D., and H. E. Mr. Colt is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Newberry.

  ARTHUR LLOYD is a carpenter by trade and has followed that occupation for many years. His father, David Lloyd, was a lineal descendant of Thomas Lloyd, one of the land commissioners appointed by William Penn in 1684 at the organization of the provincial government. His descendants subsequently located in Canada, whence David Lloyd came to the United States, having deserted from the British army because of sympathy with the American cause in the war of 1812. He made his way to Pennsylvania and settled in Bucks county, removing thence to Muncy, where he served as justice of the peace and was identified with many enterprises of a public character. There he died in 1868, at the age of eighty-two. At Muncy he married Mary Quinn in 1816; Arthur Lloyd was the third child born to this union, and has passed his entire life at Muncy, his native town. He is a Republican, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church, and is the father of four living children: Annetta, who married Lyman Johnson; Sarah, who married Daniel Clapp; Annie, who married H. T. Sallada, and William Q.

  WILLIAM Q. LLOYD, proprietor of Lloydís Laundry and Shirt Manufactory, was born in Muncy, Pennsylvania, June 21, 1850, son of Arthur and Elizabeth (Brewer) Lloyd. He was educated in the public schools and Dickinson Seminary. He learned the trade of a shirt cutter, and was the first regular shirt manufacturer in Lycoming county, which occupation he followed for twenty years, being a member of the firm of Matthewson & Company in 1872. Since that time he has been engaged in business alone. Mr. Lloyd started the first laundry in Williamsport, and in 1879 he erected a first class steam laundry, in connection with which he also has a large and lucrative business in the manufacture of shirts. He is a member of the Order of Elks, and is a Republican in politics. Mr. Lloyd was married in 1874 to Mary E., daughter of George Rothrock, of Williamsport, and of the children born to this union three are living: Harry; Rex, and John.

  HENRY JACOB FLOCK, deceased, was born in Kirch-heilingen, Prussia, Germany, in 1824, son of Carl F. W. and Mary Dorothea Flock. He was reared in his native land and apprenticed to the stone masonís trade, prior to which he received a common school education. He served five years in the Prussian army, and was then discharged from the service. He came to the United States in 1853, and located in Elmira, New York, coming to Williamsport in 1854. He worked at his trade on the bridges of the Pennsylvania railroad, the DuBois mill, and several furnaces in this part of the State, and was engaged at his trade several years. He afterwards followed boating on the canal. In June, 1865, he purchased the City brewery, and operated it up to his death, November 16, 1884. He, however, tore down most of the old buildings, erected new ones, and supplied them with the best modern machinery for the manufacture of beer. He was very successful in the accumulation of property, and left to his widow and children a handsome competence. Mr. Flock was married in 1855 to Eva Barbara, daughter of John and Eva Catharine Metzger, natives of Germany. They reared a family of five sons and one daughter Catharine Elizabeth; Charles Frederick William; Henry Jacob, deceased; John Henry Christopher; Jacob George, and Herman Frederick William. Mr. Flock was a Democrat in politics, and was a member of the I. O. O. F. He was a member of the Lutheran church, to which denomination his widow and family belong.

  CHARLES FREDERICK WILLIAM FLOCK, manager of the City brewery, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, June 18, 1857. He was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and is also a graduate of Williamsport Commercial College. He learned the brewerís trade with his father and worked at the same for sixteen years, and for four years, prior to his fatherís death, he was manager of the business. For six years succeeding that event he was manager and bookkeeper, and had full charge of the business, but for the past two years he has devoted his whole time to its management. Mr. Flock is an active Democrat, and is now serving his second consecutive term in the select council as a member from the Eighth ward. He was a member of the committees of highways and sewers, and gas and water supplies, and was chairman of the joint supply light and water committee. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and of the Turn Verein, and was second lieutenant of Company B, Twelfth Regiment, National Guard of Pennsylvania. Mr. Flock was married, March 23, 1882, to Mary, daughter of G. E. Otto Siess, of Williamsport, and has three children: Henry Jacob; Eva Barbara, and G. E. Otto. He and family are members of the Lutheran church.

  JOHN HENRY CHRISTOPHER FLOCK was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, August 24, 1860, was educated in the public schools, and has since been connected with the brewing business, holding at present the position of assistant manager of the City brewery. He is a Democrat, and is connected with the Turn Verein and the Golden Eagle societies. He was married in 1886 to Elizabeth Foura, and has two children: Jacob Henry and Carl. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

  JACOB GEORGE FLOCK was born, September 15, 1864, received a common school education, and since leaving school has been connected with the bottling department of the City brewery, which is under his management. He married Rosa, daughter of John Steinhilper, of Williamsport. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church, and he is connected with the K. of P. and the Turn Verein societies.

  SAMUEL M. BUBB, lumberman and contractor, was born at the mouth of Pine creek, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 1, 1835, son of Christopher and Olive (Pass) Bubb, natives of this county. His father was born in Fairfield township, and was a farmer and contractor. He settled in Williamsport, and lived in this city for fifty-one years, dying in 1888. He was street commissioner in the city for several terms. In politics he was a Whig in early days, and afterwards a Republican. His wife, Olive, died in 1861. Both were members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. They reared a family of nine children, seven of whom are living and reside in this city, as follows: George; John; Samuel M.; Joseph; Mary, wife of Henry Brown; Harriet, wife of Robert White, and Elizabeth, wife of Lewis Kiefer. The deceased are Michael and James. The subject of this sketch was reared in Williamsport, and received a common school education. For thirty-two years he has been engaged with the lumber firm of White, Lentz & White, and during that time has handled over 300,000,000 feet of logs. He is a Republican, has served as street commissioner of the city, and has been in the city council three years. For the past twelve years he has been a member of the school board, and takes pride in the growth and progress of the public schools. During the war he was a member of Company O, Forty-Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, served three months, and also went out in the State militia under Capt. Thomas Bennett. Mr. Bubb married Ella King, of Hepburn township, but has no children. His wife is a member of the First Baptist church. He is a member of Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F.

  GEARHART VILLINGER, butcher, was born in Baden, Germany, September 24, 1826, son of John and Rose (Ganter) Villinger. He was reared in his native land, and learned the butcherís trade with his father, who carried on that business in Baden. In the spring of 1850 he came to the United States; he first located in New York City, and lived successively in Philadelphia, Reading, and Pottsville, Pennsylvania, remaining in the last mentioned town two years. In 1853 he came to Williamsport, and has since been actively engaged in the butchering business, and has had a stand in the market house for many years, which is recognized as the leading meat market in the city. He is a stockholder in the Lycoming National Bank and the Susquehanna Trust and Safe Deposit Company. He has always affiliated with the Republican party. Mr. Villinger was married in 1853 to Catharine, daughter of Martin Roman, of Germany. Ten children were the fruits of this union, only five of whom are living: Harriet, wife of John F. Moorehead; John F.; Julia, wife of Fred Steuber, and Henry A., all of whom are residents of Williamsport, and Fred, of Scranton, Pennsylvania. Mr. Villinger and family are members of the German Lutheran church.

  HENRY A. VILLINGER was born in Williamsport, March 8, 1865, and is a son of Gearhart and Catharine Villinger. He was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and has followed the butchering business since boyhood. He was married in 1887 to Minnie, daughter of Daniel Maneval, of Williamsport, and has one child, George R. He and wife are members of St. Markís English Lutheran church. He is a member of the K. of M. and of the B. P. O. E. He is a stockholder in the Athletic Park Association and the Williamsport Building and Loan Association. Politically he is a Democrat, and is one of the progressive and enterprising young business men of the city.

  WILLIAM D. BROWN is a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and a son of Joseph and Lydia (Hummel) Brown, natives of the same county. His father was a prominent man in that county, and served as a member of the State legislature. Both he and wife were members of the Lutheran church, and died in Northampton county. William A was educated in the public schools, and after reaching manhood he engaged in the mercantile and lumber business at Easton. In 1883 he came to Williamsport, where he has since followed the lumber trade. Mr. Brown has been thrice married. His first marriage occurred in 1852 to Margaret Unangst, of Northampton county. She died in 1858, leaving three children: Joseph N., who is engaged with his father in the lumber business; Emily, wife of E. W. Woodward, and W. W., a physician of Wyoming county, who died in August, 1890. Mr. Brown was again married in 1860, to Mary Green, of New Jersey, a cousin of Judge Henry Green of Easton, Pennsylvania. She died in 1862, leaving one son, Charles H., now associated with his father, in the lumber business. He married Dr. Jean Saylor, one of the well known physicians of Williamsport, June 11, 1883. During his residence in Northampton county, Mr. Brown was connected with the National Guard for many years. He is a member of the I. O. O. F., and both he and wife are connected with Christ Protestant Episcopal church.

  DAVID R. FORESMAN, proprietor of Foresmanís dray line, was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, July 19, 1838, and is the third son of John and Maria Foresman. He attended school in White Deer valley, and in Centre and Clinton counties, and lived with his parents until 1862. He then enlisted in Company I, Eighteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and served until the close of the war. He went out as a private, and was promoted to first lieutenant, and had command of his company for one year. He participated in most of the battles fought by the Army of the Potomac during his term of service. After the war he engaged in farming in Loyalsock township, whence he removed to Williamsport in 1867, and entered the butchering business. He was also employed in the lumber mills of the city at various times. In 1880 he established his present dray line, which has proven a successful venture. Mr. Forseman was married in 1881 to Emily Mohr, of Muncy, Pennsylvania. He and wife are adherents of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport. He is a member of Reno Post, O. A. R., and wag post Commander in 1884. He is prominent in Masonic circles, and is a member of the lodge, chapter, and commandery. Mr. Foresman is a stanch Democrat, but takes no active part in political affairs.

  WILLIAM B. FORESMAN, of the firm of W. B. Foresman & Brother, dealers in flour, feed, grain, etc., was born in Washington township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1842, and is a son of John and Maria (Follmer) Foresman. He was reared on the homestead farm, and was educated in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary. He afterwards learned the millerís trade and followed that business for many years, working in Lycoming, Centre, and Clinton counties: In 1880 he leased the Bryan mill at Hughesville, and under the firm name of Hudson & Foresman operated it for two years. He then came to Williamsport and engaged in the flour and feed business, as a member of the firm of Foresman & Kelsey. At the expiration of four years he sold out and engaged in the grocery business, and afterwards formed a partnership with his brother, Abner P., and established the flour, feed, and grain business, in which he has since been engaged. Mr. Foresman is a member of the Williamsport Shirt Manufacturing Company, and is interested in real estate in South Williamsport. He was a member of the council when that borough was organized. Politically he is a Democrat, and is a member of the I. O. O. F. During the war he served for a short time in the State militia. Mr. Foresman has been twice married. His first marriage occurred February 9, 1869, to Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Harry Bastian, of Montoursville. She died June 20, 1877, and left two children: Harry B. and Oliver H. He subsequently married Mary Jane, daughter of Ellis Neal, of Montoursville. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  ABNER P. FORESMAN, of the firm of W. B. Foresman & Brother, dealers in flour, feed, grain, etc., was born in Brady township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1847, and is a son of John and Maria (Follmer) Foresman. He received a public school education, and lived with his parents until 1867, when they came to Williamsport and he was engaged in teaming for several years. He then moved to Union county, where he lived seven years, and returned to Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, in 1879. He followed agricultural pursuits until 1891, when he became a partner in the present firm of W. B. Foresman & Brother. He is a stockholder in the West Branch National Bank and in the Williamsport Water Company, and is one of the enterprising business men of the city. Politically he is a Democrat, and served as county commissioner from 1888 to 1891. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. Mr. Foresman was married, January 9, 1878, to Annie B., daughter of Andrew Russell, of Union county, and has a family of three children: Mabel B.; John Russell, and Oliver Perry. He and wife are members of the First Presbyterian church of this city.

  D. R. P. RISSEL, proprietor of the Fashion livery stables, was born in Muncy, Pennsylvania, May 22, 1841, son of Daniel S. and Elizabeth (Gaskins) Rissel, the former a native of Union county, and the latter of Danville, Pennsylvania. His father was a contractor and builder, and among other structures the Lycoming county court house was erected by him. He was elected on the Democratic ticket sheriff of the county in 1856, and served one term. He died in February, 1866. His widow survives him and resides in Williamsport. They were the parents of eight children, four of whom are now living: Erastus and D. R. P., of Williamsport; Sally, wife of N. B. Wilson, of Williamsport, and Alice, wife of William Carpenter, of Corning, New York. The subject of this sketch was reared in Muncy until he was fifteen years old, when he came to Williamsport. In 1862 he engaged in the livery business on Pine street, and in 1875 he removed to his present location at the corner of Willow and Laurel streets. He erected the building, which contains three floors and basement, with a capacity for twenty-six horses. In 1886 he built a carriage house adjoining his stable, and conducts one of the largest and most successful livery trades in the West Branch valley. Mr. Rissel married Christina, daughter of Samuel Harmon, who died January 7, 1884, leaving two sons: David, and. Harry. Mr. Rissel is a stanch Democrat, and is one of the active supporters of this party.

  THOMAS F. SALLADA, proprietor of livery stables, was born in Salladasburg, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 16, 1817, son of John and Rebecca (Welshans) Sallada, natives of Lycoming and Northumberland counties, respectively. His father was one of the prominent farmers of this county, and died upon the old homestead in January, 1878. He was a Democrat, and filled various township offices. He was a member and deacon of Limestone Lutheran church, and was also connected with the I. O. O. F. His widow resides upon the old homestead. They were the parents of five children, as follows: Ella, wife of Alfred Chatham, of Nippenose township;, Thomas F., of Williamsport; Jennie, widow of Rev. A. V. Groupe, of Philadelphia; Abner Pierce, of Nippenose valley, and Lucy, wife of George Gheen, of Williamsport. The subject of this sketch lived upon the homestead farm up to 1859, when the family removed to Crawford township, Clinton county, where he grew to manhood. He was married in December, 1869, to Sarah, daughter of Jacob Stahl, of Clinton county. He afterward engaged in the lumber business which he continued for two years, and remained with his father until the death of the latter. In August, 1880, he removed to Renovo, and engaged. in the livery business in the spring of 1881. He removed to Lock Haven in January, 1882, and in January, 1884, he located in Williamsport, where he has since been engaged in the livery business. He enjoys a large share of the livery trade, and is well known throughout the city. Mr. Sallada is a Democrat, and is a member of the K. of M. He is the father of four children: C. Wilbur; Kate M.; N. Rebecca, and Ernest Hill. The family are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport, and C. Wilbur is connected with the Young Menís Christian Association.

  CHARLES HARMAN, undertaker and proprietor of livery stable, was born in Clinton township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 18, 1849, son of David and Sarah (Waltman) Harman, now residents of Williamsport. His father is a native of Tamaqua, Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, and came to Lycoming county in early manhood, where he met and married Sarah Waltman, a native of this county. He is a carpenter by trade, worked at that business for some years, and then purchased a farm near Montgomery. He resided upon his farm for a number of years, and then came to Williamsport. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church, and he is an adherent of the Democratic party. They are the parents of nine children, seven of whom are living, as follows: Fannie, wife of Nicholas Scheid; Sarah, wife of Jason Van Buskirk; Charles; Emma, wife of M. J. Miller; William; Samuel B., and McClellan, all of whom are residents of Williamsport. Charles remained on the homestead in Clinton township until 1869, when he came to Williamsport and engaged in the livery business under The firm name of Harman & Derr, which partnership was dissolved in 1885, since which, time Mr. Harman has carried on business alone. In 1878 he engaged in undertaking, and is among the leading undertakers in the city, as well as one of its oldest liverymen. He is a Democrat, and has served in the common council one term. Mr. Harman was married in 1873 to Elizabeth, daughter of Adam Lentz, of Williamsport, and has five children: Emma; William; Samuel; Franklin, and Carl. The family are members of St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  DANIEL B. KNAPP was born in Otsego county, New York, April 20, 1830, son of Daniel and Elizabeth (Austin) Knapp. His primary education was obtained in the common schools, and he also studied at Butternut and Norwich Seminaries, in New York State. He subsequently engaged in the mercantile and hotel business at Wilkesbarre, Pennsylvania, where he remained for two years. He afterwards removed to Elmira, New York, and for some years carried on business in that city. He then entered the employ of the Northern Central railroad, and remained with that company two years, when he removed to Lawrence, Kansas, thence to Hannibal, Missouri, where he filled the position of agent for the American and United States Express Companies for six years. Returning to Williamsport, he engaged in the coal business, and after two years spent in that line of trade he re-entered merchandising, in which he continued for twelve years, and then retired from active business life. Mr. Knapp was married in 1862 to Susan T., daughter of the late Judge John Smith, who for many years was one of the prominent and respected citizens of Williamsport. One son, John Smith, deceased, was born of this union. Politically Mr. Knapp was a Democrat until, 1860, since which he has been an active Supporter of the Republican party. He is a member of the Masonic. order, and is one of the well known citizens of his adopted home.

  GEORGE S. THOMPSON was born in Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and in 1850 was married to Elizabeth Van Fosten, a native of Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, with whom he removed to Williamsport in 1852. After repairing what is known as the Tinsman mill, he went to the head waters of Little Pine creek, where he stocked logs for Mr. Tinsman for two years. In 1854 he and his brother, John M. Thompson, formed a partnership in the stocking and cutting of timber for Tinsman & Woolverton. In 1863 he purchased a tract of timber land in Sullivan county, which he worked on until 1870, when he became foreman of the present M. Shaw & Com-panyís mills, then owned by Craig & Blanchard. In 1876 he joined the Laurel Run Lumber Company, of Clearfield county, and continued until 1887. He then located on a farm below Williamsport, where he died in February, 1889. He was a Democrat in politics, a member of the Masonic fraternity, the I. O. O. F., and with his wife, who died in April, 1871, belonged to the Second Baptist church of Williamsport. Four of the five children born to their union are now living: Annie, who married C. B. Baker; K. M.; Abbie, who married J. W. Moore, and George.

  GEORGE THOMPSON, dealer in cigars, was born in Williamsport in June, 1860, son of George S. and Elizabeth (Van Fosten) Thompson. He received his education in the public, schools and at Edinboro Normal, after which he kept books for the Laurel Run Lumber Company until 1880, when he was employed to sell cigars on the road for a Look Haven firm. After traveling during the year 1886 for J. G. Erieg & Son, he again began traveling and selling cigars in 1888, which he continued until January 2, 1892, when he purchased his present store. He was married, March 27, 1888, to Miss Mary L., daughter of James G. and Catherine Erieg, of Williamsport. He is a Republican in politics and belongs to Lycoming Lodge, No. 112, I. O. O. F. Mrs. Thompson is a member of St. Paulís Lutheran church.

  ROBERT S. QUIGLEY was born in Clinton county, Pennsylvania, in 1809, and came to Lycoming county about the year 1840. He married Catherine Smith, daughter of Robert Smith, of Piatt township, and engaged in farming in Susquehanna township. In 1852 he purchased the Stage Office Hotel at Newberry, which he conducted for four years, and then became proprietor of what is now the Seventh Ward Hotel, and managed that for eight years. He was a Republican in politics, and died in 1864, preceded by his wife in 1862. They were the parents of four children: James L.; Annie M., who married John F. Stevenson; W. G., who died July 7, 1891, and was a partner with his brother, James L., in the mercantile business for seventeen years; and Reese A., who married Rebecca Gouldy and died October 28, 1881, and was also a member of the firm of Quigley Brothers, merchants.

  JAMES L. QUIGLEY, merchant, was born, in Susquehanna township, Lycoming county, May 8, 1845, son of Robert S. and Catherine (Smith) Quigley. He was educated in the public schools, and followed log-scaling for a number of years. In 1874 he and his two brothers formed the firm of Quigley Brothers, merchants, at Newberry. He is a Republican, has served in the select council for three years, and is a member of Iona Lodge, No. 729, I. O. O. F. He was married in 1867 to R. S., daughter of William Ramsey, by whom he has one child, Gertrude. Mr. and Mrs. Quigley are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Newberry, of which he is trustee.

  WILLIAM LINCK, merchant, was born in Tioga county, Pennsylvania, April 10, 1856, son of Jacob and Mina (Heyler) Linck, natives of that county, in which the mother is still living. He received his education in the public schools of his native county, and began his business career as a merchant, which occupation he has always followed. He came to Williamsport in 1879, and was connected in business with J. H. Linck until 1889, when he established his present business,. He was married in 1880 to Miss Agnes M. Maffet, daughter of Samuel Maffet, and to this union have been born two children: Mina and Florence. Mr. Linck is a Prohibitionist, and he and wife are members of the Erie Avenue Baptist church, of which he is treasurer.

  JAMES H. SCOTT, of the firm of Scott & Stewart, grocers, was born in Chemung county, New York, June 22, 1838, son of Andrew and Sallie (Mallory) Scott. His father was of Scotch descent and his mother was born in Connecticut. He was reared in Chemung county, and received his education in the Alfred Academy, teaching school in his native county, and afterwards engaging in the mercantile business at Havana, New York. He learned the machinist trade, came to Williamsport in 1869, and in partnership with Mr. A. O. Hart formed the firm of Scott & Hart and engaged in the furniture business for five years, after which he formed a co-partnership with Mr. Reed and conducted a machine shop under the firm name of Scott & Reed for six years. In the spring of 1889, he engaged in the grocery business with C. B. Stewart, where he has since been engaged. Mr. Scott is independent in politics; he was a candidate for sheriff of Lycoming county on the Greenback ticket, but was defeated. He was married in 1862 to Miss Diantha Crandell, daughter of Lehman Crandell, of Havana, New York, and to this union have been born three children: Edna; Vesta, and Walter. Mr. Scott and family are members of the First Baptist church of Williamsport.

  LEWIS W. TALLMAN, general manager of the Singer Manufacturing Company for thirteen counties surrounding the city of Williamsport, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, November 15, 1855, son of Lewis Tallman of Fairfield township, Lycoming county. He was reared in this county and after receiving a thorough public school education he engaged in teaching at Montoursville and Muncy. He had charge of the model department of the Montoursville Normal School. In 1876 he became connected with the Singer Manufacturing Company, and opened an office in Muncy, Pennsylvania, whence he removed to Wellsboro, Pennsylvania, in 1880 and to Williamsport in 1882. In the sale of the Singer sewing machine he furnishes employment to thirty-five men, and does a very extensive business throughout this portion of Pennsylvania, his territory embracing thirteen counties. Mr. Tallman was married, in 1881 to F. Lou, daughter of S. D. Wood of Binghamton, New York, and has one child, Robert Wood. He and wife are members of the Protestant Episcopal church.

  WILSON BUTZ, marble dealer, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, March 12, 1855, son of Daniel and Elvina (Desch) Butz, natives of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, who settled in Allentown in 1856. Our subject was educated in the public schools of Lehigh county and learned the marble cutterís trade by serving an apprenticeship of three years, extending from 1871 to 1874. In 1875 he came to Williamsport, where he conducted the Williamsport branch of the Milton Marble Works until 1885, at which time he established his present business and is now the leading marble dealer in the city. He was married October 13, 1878, to Annie L., daughter of Edward A. Meninger, of Lehigh county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born three children: Elsie; Ray, and Clyde.

  WILLIAM S. LEINBACH was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, son of Amos and Mary (Schrom) Leinbach. His parents were natives of Berks and Lebanon counties, respectively, and are both deceased. In early life our subject had only the advantages of a common school education, and went into a woolen factory when he was only fourteen years old, in Reading, Pennsylvania, where he remained until 1861. He removed from there to Union county, Pennsylvania, where he was foreman in the weaving department of the White Deer Woolen Mills until 1862, when he volunteered in Company B, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was assigned to the third division of the regiment under General Humphrey. He gave nine monthsí service at this time, and then re-enlisted in 1863 in Company C, First Pennsylvania Light Artillery, served about two years, and was mustered out at the close of the war at Harperís Ferry, and finally discharged at Harrisburg. From there he returned to Union county, where he resided until 1867, being employed in the White Deer Woolen Mills. He then moved to Lewisburg, where he worked in a woolen mill for twenty years. In 1887 he came to Lycoming county and became a member of the firm of Halfpenny, Campbell & Company, and operated the Nippenose Woolen Mills until 1892, when he withdrew and was admitted to a partnership in the firm of W. & C. Stadon & Leinbach, of Williamsport. Mr. Leinbach was married in 1865 to Eliza J. Dieffenderfer, daughter of Paul and Harriet Dieffenderfer, residents of Union county, and to this union have been born seven children: Harry, who lives in Tennessee; Frank; Murray; Hattie; Fountain; Freddie, and Robert. Mr. Leinbach and wife are members of the Reformed church, and he is a Republican in politics.

  GEORGE LUPPERT, proprietor of the Keystone Furniture Company, was born in Germany, November 2, 1835, and remained in his native land until his eighteenth year, receiving in the meantime a good common school education. He came to the United States in 1853, and located in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, where he followed the carpenterís trade for three years. He then went to work in the Williamsport car shops, and remained there until the breaking out of the rebellion; he then enlisted in the Construction Corps, and served until after the battle of Gettysburg, when he was discharged on account of sickness. Returning to Williamsport he formed a partnership with Fred Mankey, under the firm name of Luppert & Mankey, and began the manufacture of furniture. This firm is claimed to have been the pioneer steam furniture manufacturers of the city, and continued in business several years. Mr. Luppert then sold his interest, removed to South Williamsport, and established what was known as the West Branch Susquehanna Furniture Company, which he operated in connection with A. H. Heilman & Company. After three years of successful business the factory was burned, but Mr. Luppert rebuilt it and continued the business under his own name. He has been burned out several times, suffering a total loss of about $150,000. In 1881 the firm of Luppert & Kline was formed, but after one yearís business the name was changed to Luppert, Kline & Company. They failed in business, but Mr. Luppert continued until the factory was burned in 1887. In October of that year Mr. Luppert erected his present buildings, organized the Keystone Furniture Company, and is now the sole owner and proprietor of the same. He employs seventy-five hands, and manufactures from twenty-five to thirty suites of furniture daily. Mr. Luppert was married, March 11, 1856, to Mary Welker, to whom have been born five children: Mary; George deceased; John; Elizabeth, and Annie. The whole family are members of the German Reformed church. In politics Mr. Luppert is a stanch Democrat, and is now a member of the South Williamsport council.

  VALENTINE LUPPERT, lumber manufacturer of South Williamsport, was born in Bavaria, Germany, June 10, 1838, and was reared and educated in his native land. In 1853 he immigrated to Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and was engaged in boating for a short time. He then engaged in the lumber business, and was manager for the firm of B. H. Taylor & Son fifteen years. In 1879 he established his present business in South Williamsport, and has since built up and carries on an extensive trade. In August, 1864, he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Third Pennsylvania Volunteers, and participated in the battles of Chapinís Farm and Fort Fisher; he also took part in the closing scenes of the rebellion near Richmond. He was mustered out of service, July 4, 1865, and returned to Williamsport, where he has since resided.

  AUGUST KOCH, SR., was born in the Kingdom of Wurtemberg, Germany, April 1, 1807, grew to manhood in his native land, and served three years in the German army. He received a limited education, which he improved as he grew older by self-application. He learned the millwrightís trade, and at an early age commenced taking contracts for the erection of flouring mills, and built some of the largest mills in Wurtemberg, Bavaria, Baden, and Hungary. In the spring of 1850 he sold his property at a sacrifice, and with his family immigrated to the United States, finally settling in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. By the time he had settled down in this city his means were sadly reduced, and he was in a strange land, with whose language and customs he was unacquainted. Nothing daunted, however, he went to work energetically, and in 1851 established a small brewery in what is now South Williamsport, which he carried on until the fall of 1868, increasing its size and capacity in the meantime, and then sold out to his sons, August and Edmund G., who have since conducted it under the firm name of A. Koch & Brother. In 1856 he erected a flour mill, operated it in connection with the brewery until he retired from business, and it, too was afterwards carried on by his sons. He accumulated through the passing years a handsome competence for himself and family, and died in Philadelphia, May 10, 1873, while under medical treatment for an affection of the throat. Mr. Koch married Whilhelmina Ferber of Germany, who survives him. They reared four children: August; Edmund G.; Alvina, and Minnie.

  AUGUST KOCH was born in Germany in 1837, and is the eldest son of August Koch. He came to Williamsport with his parents in 1850, and since 1868 he has been the senior member of the firm of A. Koch & Brother. He is an enthusiastic student of natural history and a skillful taxidermist. He possesses the largest and finest collection of stuffed birds and quadrupeds in Pennsylvania; is a member of several European scientific societies, and keeps up a constant correspondence with savants in various parts of the world. Mr. Koch was married in 1861 to Sarah, daughter of Daniel Wise of Lycoming county, and has five children: Edmund V.; Laura; Ida; Clara, and Harry.

  EDMUND G. KOCH was born in Germany in 1846, and came with his parents to Williamsport when four years old. He received a public school education and afterwards attended Dickinson Seminary and Eastmanís Business College, at Poughkeepsie, New York. He learned the brewing business with his father, and in 1868 formed a partnership with his brother August, and succeeded to the business which his father bad established, under the firm name of A. Koch & Brother. This firm has built up a large trade in the West Branch valley, and carries on a very successful business. Mr. Koch was one of the organizers of the Board of Trade, and has served as treasurer of that institution. He was married in 1869 to Clara, daughter of Joseph Filmeyer of Philadelphia, and has one daughter, Alvina. Mr. Koch is one of the substantial and enterprising business men of Lycoming county.

  WILLIAM SWEELEY druggist, was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 19, 1842. His father, Jacob Sweeley, married Rosanna Keyes, who bore him a large family, William being the eighth son. Jacob Sweeley came to Williamsport from Philadelphia, when this now flourishing city contained only six houses. Our subject was reared in this county, obtained on education in the public schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and graduated at the Williamsport Commercial College. In 1857 he entered the employ of the Williamsport and Elmira Railroad Company, and remained with that company until August, 1862. He then enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was with his regiment at Second, Bull Run, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville, and was mustered out with the regiment at Harrisburg. He then re-entered the employ of the Williamsport and Elmira Railroad Company and was engaged in railroading and running engines in different States up to 1875, when the death of his father induced him to return to Williamsport. He was engaged in the real estate business here up to 1879, when in partnership with G. F. Hart, he entered the drug business on the corner of Fourth and Neece streets, where he remained until 1885. He then withdrew from the firm, built a residence in South Williamsport, and also opened a drug store, where he has since been engaged in business. He was instrumental in having South Williamsport incorporated as a borough, and was elected a member of the first council. In 1886 he made application to the postoffice department and had an office established in South Williamsport, under the name of Burlingame, of which he was appointed postmaster. He served in that office until April 1, 1891, and then resigned. During his residence in Williamsport he served in the common council, and was also a member of the school board. Mr. Sweeley was prominent in the organization of St. Johnís Protestant Episcopal chapel in South Williamsport, and organized the Sunday school, of which he was elected superintendent. He is a member of Reno Post, No. 64, G. A. R., and has hold most of the offices up to post Commander. He has been a delegate to many of the department encampments, also to the national encampment at Detroit in 1891, and was a member of General Algerís staff; He is a member of the board of managers and treasurer of the Monumental Association. He has been identified with the National Guard of Pennsylvania since 1879, is captain of Company B, Twelfth Regiment, and the senior captain of that regiment. Mr. Sweeley is a member of the Pennsylvania Pharmaceutical Association, and one of the well known druggists of the West Branch valley. He was one of the first to advocate the abolition of tolls on the river bridges, and has done his full share in furthering that measure. He married Jane E., youngest daughter of Samuel and Martha Carothers, of the "Long Reach," Lycoming county.

  APPLETON R. JACKSON was born in Polk township, Crawford county, Ohio, November 4, 1838, son of Enoch and Rhoda (Lewis) Jackson, the former a native of Maine and the latter of Knox county, Ohio. He received a common school education and learned the trade of saw-filing, at which he was employed until 1865. He then engaged in the oil business on Pioneer run, a tributary of Oil creek, Venango county, Pennsylvania, where he drilled several wells and was a partner in the well known Andrews well on Western run. After this he returned to Williamsport and was employed at his trade until 1872, when he invested in real estate on the opposite side of the river (then Armstrong township) and removed thither, continuing to prosecute his trade. In 1885 he engaged in mercantile pursuits and has since enjoyed a flourishing business; he also deals largely in real estate. Mr. Jackson was married in 1859 to Mary E., daughter of Reuben Heller, of Williamsport, Pennsylvania, and they are the parents of seven children, five of whom are living: Orville E., attorney at law, Boise City, Idaho; Walter E.; John S.; Anthony R., and Charles R. C. Mr. Jackson is a Republican in politics and a member of the Masonic fraternity. The family are adherents of the Methodist Episcopal church of South Williamsport.

  JOHN H. RIALE, of the firm of Miller & Riale, was born in Chester county, Pennsylvania, December 2, 1862, son of George W. and Hester (Hufford) Riale, natives of Chester and Bucks counties, Pennsylvania, respectively, farmers by occupation and residents of York county, Pennsylvania, where they are prominent members of the Presbyterian church. He was educated in the public schools of Chester county and reared principally in York county, Pennsylvania. He came to Williamsport in 1882 and took employment with the Williamsport Furniture Company, where he remained until March, 1890, at which time he became a member of the present firm of Miller & Riale, grocers of South Williamsport. He was married in July, 1887, to Miss Clara E., daughter of Joseph Heilman, of Clinton township, and to this union has been born one child, Blanche E. He is a Democrat in politics, and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran church.

  JOSEPH H. MILLER, Of the firm of Miller & Riale, grocers, South Williamsport, was born in Dauphin county, May 11, 1862, son of Joseph and Susan (Glase) Miller, natives of the same county. The father was a stockholder in the Millersburg bank, and one of the original stockholders of the Halifax bank; he was a Democrat in politics, and died January 26, 1883; with his widow, who survives, he was a member of the United Brethren church. Our subject was reared in his native county, where he received his education in the common schools. He came to Williamsport in 1882, and worked in the Williamsport Furniture Company until March, 1890, when he formed his present partnership; he is a Democrat in politics and is a member of the Knights of Pythias. He was married in 1881, to Miss Clara, daughter of Alfred Burnett, of Perry county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born four children: Ralph B.; Hans A.; Florence M., and Charles. Mr. and Mrs. Miller are members of the Lutheran church, in which he has filled the office of deacon for the past four years.


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