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History of Lycoming County Pennsylvania
edited by John F. Meginness; ©1892

CHAPTER LV.

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES.

LOYALSOCK, HEPBURN, AND ELDRED TOWNSHIPS.


  WILLIAM COLLINS was a native of the southern part of Pennsylvania. He came to Lycoming county about the year 1780, and purchased 800 acres of land in what is now Loyalsock township. He settled on the river portion of this land, and the remainder of it was subsequently occupied by his children. At that time the only means by which he could secure goods from Philadelphia and Pottsville was by wagon. He married a Miss Brewster, a lady of French descent, by whom he had nine children.

  ISAAC COLLINS was the second son of William Collins, and received an ordinary education. He married Mary Dominy, and soon after located on the farm where their son, William, now resides, which they cleared and improved. He died in 1848, and his wife, who was of German descent, died in 1858. He was a Democrat in politics, changing in after life to the Republican party, and was a strong adherent of the principles of that organization till his death. He filled various township offices, and with his wife belonged to the Methodist Episcopal church of Williamsport. They reared seven children, two of whom are now living: Mary, who married Enoch Winner, and William.

  WILLIAM COLLINS, farmer, was born on the farm where he now resides, February 17, 1827, son of Isaac and Mary (Dominy) Collins. He was educated in the common schools, and has devoted his life almost exclusively to farming, having on his farm one of the finest fruit Orchards in the county, including 800 peach trees. He was married in 1849, to Miss Mary, daughter of Jacob and Mary Winner, natives of New Jersey and Bucks county, Pennsylvania, respectively, who located in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, about the year 1800. To this union were born eight children: Jennie, who married George Casselberry; Cyrus; Irene, who married Oliver Stahl; Jeffrey; Annie; William; Sadie, who married Ambrose Hyman, and Howard. Mr. Collins is a Republican in politics, and has served as a school director and supervisor of his township. He furnished a substitute to help put down the rebellion. He and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is steward and trustee.

  JAMES T. KING, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, January 25, 1835, and is a son of Joseph and Mary (Corson) King. His father was born in Lycoming county in 1807, was always engaged in farming, and died April 29, 1870. His grandfather, William King, was among the earliest settlers of the county. Joseph King located in Loyalsock township, where he spent the remaining years of his life. He was a Democrat, and filled the various offices in his township. His wife died in 1871, and they were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church. Their family consisted of three sons and two daughters, as follows: James T. ; John, of St. Louis; Ellen, widow of Nelson Oakes; Charles R., of Loyalsock township, and Mary, wife of William Page, of Williamsport. The subject of this sketch was educated in the. public schools of Loyalsock township, and has always followed agricultural pursuits, settling on his present farm in 1863. Mr. King was married in 1858 to Mary R., daughter of William Wheeland, of Loyalsock township, and has three surviving children: William C. and Joseph N., of Williamsport, and Fannie,. wife of Wilbur Kimbal, of Loyalsock township. Mr. King is a Democrat, and has been a school director in his township for seven years. He was one of the organizers of the Lutheran church of his township, is treasurer of that organization, and both he and wife are consistent members.

  CHARLES R. KING, farmer, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, May 30, 1844, son of Joseph and Mary (Carson) King. He was principally reared in Loyal-sock township, and was educated in the common schools. He was married in 1867 to Catherine, daughter of William Strieby. She died in 1886, leaving one daughter, Catherine Ann. Mr. King is a Democrat in politics and was elected school director for his township but did not serve. He is a member of the Lutheran church located in that township.

  EVAN C. WILSON was born in Loyalsock (now Eldred) township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 6, 1817, and was a son of Jonathan Wilson, a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, born March 15, 1775, who was one of the very early settlers of Loyalsock township, where he and his elder brother, Elihu, came in 1796, and purchased a large tract of land. Jonathan Wilson was a Quaker, and served as a justice of the peace for many years, and during the latter part of his life he settled near Millville, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, where he could have the benefit of the Quaker church, and died in 1856. He reared four children: Evan C., deceased; Mary Ann, deceased, who married Aaron Clayton, Abigail, who married J. O. Crawford, and William, deceased. Evan C. was the eldest of these children, and obtained more than the average education of that period. He engaged in teaching school during his younger days, but afterward followed farming. He married Sarah Ann, daughter of William Crawford, and for about ten years after they lived on his fatherís farm, and then purchased a farm on the line of Eldred and Loyalsock townships. He was an earnest supporter of the Republican party, and was a strict temperance man. While he attended the Christian church, and gave it earnest support, he lived and died in the Quaker faith, May 9, 1866. His wife died in August, 1850, leaving four children: Albert; Mary Jane, wife of Joseph Yeagle; Rebecca Ann, deceased wife of Thomas Frymire, and Crawford, who died in childhood. His second marriage was with Leah Crawford, a sister of his first wife, who bore him two sons: William C., and E. H., both of whom survive.

  ALBERT WILSON, farmer and horse dealer, was born on the old homestead in what is now Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 15, 1842, son of Evan C. and Sarah Ann (Crawford) Wilson. He received a fair education, and upon reaching his majority he engaged in butchering, and eventually went into the buying and shipping of cattle, and also embarked in the horse business. He was married in 1867, to Elizabeth, daughter of Joshua Brelsford, who died January 9, 1890, leaving five children: Charles, deceased; Frances; Albert; Elizabeth Ellen, and Henry Harrison. Mr. Wilson was again married early in 1892, to Mrs. Hannah Thompson, widow of George Thompson. He is an active and enthusiastic Republican, and is one of the enterprising citizens of his native county.

  JOHN NEECE was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 17, 1802. He was a son of John Neece, a native of New Jersey of German extraction, who married a Miss Ridge, of New Jersey, a lady of English descent, by whom he had eight children, all of whom are deceased: Sarah; Lucretia; William; Catherine; Ann; John; Eliza, and Henry. John Neece received only a limited education, and after marrying Mary Mackey he located at Pennís Dale, where he worked at the shoemaker trade. He afterwards established a tannery at that place, which he operated for a number of years, when he sold it and engaged in the mercantile business, continuing until his death in April, 1871. His widow died in 1884; she was the mother of eleven children, eight of whom are now living: Mary Matilda, who married Charles Narber; Ann Eliza, who married Henry E. Warner; Sarah, who married Daniel Courson; Clara, who married Joseph Edler; Emily Jane, who married Jacob Courson; Thomas V. B.; Joseph M., and Alice A., who married Pierson L. Koons. John Neece was a Democrat and filled several offices in the township. He and his wife were both consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  THOMAS V. B. NEECE, truck farmer and butcher, was born in Muncy township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 24, 1840, son of John and Mary (Mackey) Neece. He received his education in the township schools and at Dickinson Seminary, and afterwards was graduated from the Iron City Commercial College, Pittsburg. He then engaged in the mercantile business for two years at Hepburnville, after which he entered his fatherís store at Pennís Dale, remaining a short time. His next employment was with the firm of Potter & Company, of Williamsport, in the position of bookkeeper, with whom he remained a number of years. Leaving this he formed a partnership with A. Shultz, and engaged in the grocery business on Fourth street, Williamsport, and subsequently followed the merchant tailoring and dry goods business for a short time, moving thence to Perrysville, where he taught school for one season. He returned to Williamsport and kept books for Brown, Early & Company, and was engaged in the coal business on East Third street for two years. In 1879 he moved to his present farm, where he has followed truck farming and butchering. He was married, January 20, 1863, to Joann, daughter of Isaiah Hayes, and to this union have been born seven children, four of whom are now living: Mary Ida; Lewis Eugene; Myra Jeannette, and Rachel Estella. Mr. Neece is a Democrat, and has served as auditor of his township; his wife belongs to the First Presbyterian church of Williamsport.

  WILLIAM WHEELAND was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1808. He was a farmer by occupation, and also followed the trade of shoemaker. He was a Democrat in politics, filled various township offices, and died in 1862. His widow, whose maiden name was Mary Magdalene Follmer, survives him, and was the mother of six children, four of whom are living: Catherine, who married Abraham Winner; Rosanna, who married James King; Clarence F., and Lydia, who married John Hagerman.

  CLARENCE F. WHEELAND, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 2, 1851, son of William and Mary Magdalene (Follmer) Wheeland. He was educated in the common schools and brought up in his native township, where he has always followed farming. He is recognized as one of the representative farmers of Lycoming county, and has also carried on a dairy business, disposing of the milk in Williamsport for the past fifteen years. He was married in 1870 to Miss Sarah J. Strieby, daughter of William Strieby, and to this union have been born five children: Orella; William S.; Ralph V.; Clara V., and Florence A. Mr. Wheeland is a Democrat, and in 1880 was elected county auditor, which position he filled for three years; he has also been school director in his township. He is a prominent member of the Lutheran church, is a deacon of the same, and has been chorister for twenty years. He is a stockholder in the Merchantsí National Bank, of Williamsport, and in the Central Pennsylvania Telephone and Supply Company.

  GOTTLEIB HEIM, a native of Germany, emigrated to Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, about the year 1804. His father, Jacob Heim, also came to Lycoming county at the same time, and his mother died while on the way across the water. Gottleib Heim married Margaret Steiger, and after living in Hepburn township for some time, they settled on the farm in Loyalsock township now owned by Abram Heim. He was a member of the Dunkard church at Blooming Grove, was a Democrat in politics, and died in 1881; his wife died in 1884. They were the parents of six children: Mary, who married John Rentz; Jacob; Isaac; Abraham; Elizabeth, who married William Weyman, and Margaret, who married David B. Waltz.

  ISAAC HEIM, farmer, was born in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, May 23, 1834, son of Gottleib and Margaret (Steiger) Heim. He was educated in both German and English, and learned the carpenterís trade, which he followed for thirty-seven years, He was married in 1858 to Mary, daughter of George Mutchler, and to this union have been born eight children: William; Reuben; Margaret, who married James Derone; Martha; Thomas; Sarah; Elizabeth, and Bertha. Soon after marriage Mr. Heim located on his present farm, which he has cleared and improved. He is a Democrat in politics, has served as school director, and with his family belongs to the Warrensville Baptist church, in which he holds the office of deacon.

  JACOB SWEELY was born in Hepburn township in 1821, and died in 1885. He was a son of Jacob Sweely, a native of Germany, who was one of the pioneers of Lycoming county. He was a farmer, and after marrying Hettie Decker he located in what is known as Jersey Shore bottom, afterwards removing to Armstrong township. His wife was a daughter of Alexander Decker, a native of Lycoming county, and died in 1861. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church during their early life, but in later years became identified with the Evangelical church. They were the parents of six children, four of whom are living: Henry; Jacob F.; Rosa, who married Charles Bower, and Anna, who married Oliver Carson.

  JACOB F. SWEELY, farmer, was born in Armstrong township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 29, 1855, son of Jacob and Hettie (Decker) Sweely. He received his education in the public schools and Dickinson Seminary, after completing which he worked in the lumber mills and the Lycoming Rubber Works for a number of years. He was married in 1877 to Miss Ida Bell, daughter of Jacob Fessler. She died in March, 1890, leaving four children: Chester E.; Truman Bardell; Ralph Leo, and Florence Myrtle. He was again married in 1891 to Miss Jennie, daughter of William King, of Level Corner. Soon after his first marriage he removed to Ohio, remaining there for two years, and returning to this county he settled on his present farm in the spring of 1880. He is an active Republican, is serving his ninth year as overseer of the poor of Loyalsock township, and has also, been school director and supervisor. He and wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church at Newberry.

  THOMAS CUPP, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 10, 1830, son of Thomas and Elizabeth (Reighard) Cupp, natives of Berks county, Pennsylvania, and early settlers of Lycoming county. His father married Elizabeth Reighard; he died in 1844, followed by her in 1866. They were both members of the Lutheran church, and reared nine children, all of whom are deceased except one son, Thomas. Thomas Cupp, Sr., was a Whig in politics, and served as overseer of the poor and supervisor of the township. Our subject Thomas Cupp, received his education in the early schools of the township, and learned the carpenterís trade, which he followed for a number of years in connection with farming. In 1853 he was married to Margaret Eder; he lived on his fatherís farm for fourteen years, and settled on his present farm in 1870. To their union have been born eight children: Jane Elizabeth, who married Daniel Baker; John Porter; Lucy Ann, who married John Bennett; Susan Emma, who married William Seitzer; Sallie L.; Henry; Catherine A., and Samuel. Mr. Cupp is a Republican in politics, and he and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

  SAMUEL EDER, deceased, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1770, and came with his father, Matthias Eder, to Lycoming county, in 1806. His father immigrated from Germany to the United States, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and a member of the Society of Friends. Samuel Eder, after locating in Lycoming county, engaged for a number of years in teaching school. He was married in 1806 to Miss Nancy Pervail, and to them was born one son, William, July 25, 1820, who died December 24, 1889; James Eder was married in 1854 to Sarah, daughter of Rev. Alexander Longsdorf, and to this union were born seven .children: Rebecca J., who married John Shroder; Emma, who married Charles Foulk; Samuel A.; Elizabeth Ann, who married William Rathmell; Ettie, who married Harry Griggs; Maggie, who married Elias Seitzer, and Harry L., who resides with his mother on the homestead. Samuel Eder was married a second time, to Jane Porter, a native of Lycoming county, and to them were born eight children: Ann, who married Daniel Griggs; James, deceased; Mary, deceased; Hannah, who married Peter Griggs; Sarah, deceased; Margaret, who married Thomas Cupp; John, deceased, who married Sarah Scott, and Elizabeth, deceased, who married Jacob Ball. Mr. Eder became one of the prominent and influential farmers of Loyalsock township, owning at his death 600 acres of land. He served in the war of 1812, was a Democrat in politics, and filled various township offices. He died in 1865, followed by his second wife in 1877; both were members of the Presbyterian church.

  DANIEL T. THOMAS Was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, December 31, 1815. His father, Rev. John Thomas, was of German descent, and one of the early Methodist preachers who traveled his circuit on horseback; he finally settled in Loyalsock township, and was at one time an associate judge of Lycoming county. Daniel T. Thomas was a man who possessed more than the average education at that period. He taught school in connection with farming. He was a Democrat in politics, and served as county auditor and in various township offices. He became a member of the Methodist church at the age of fifteen years, and helped to build the Methodist Episcopal church of Loyalsock township, of which he was one of the most prominent members, and was class leader for many years. He died in 1888, and his wife, whose maiden name was Rachel Scott, a native of Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, died in 1880. To them were born seven children: John B., deceased; Charles, deceased; Henry S.; Emily, deceased, who married Frederick Young; Harriet, who married George Koons; Rebecca, who married Philip Probst, and Daniel T.

  HENRY S. THOMAS, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 1, 1844, son of Daniel T. and Rachel (Scott) Thomas. He was educated in the common schools, and has devoted his business life to. farming. He is now serving his fourth term as township auditor and has served as school director and assessor. In 1867 he was married to Harriet, daughter of Rev. Jacob Probst, and he immediately settled on the farm where he has since resided. To this union have been born four children: Charles S.; James Oscar; Henry, and Jacob. Mr. Thomas conducts a dairy in connection with his farm. He and wife are members of the Methodist church, in which he is steward.

  WILLIAM FOLLMER was a native of Turbut township, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, where he was born, December 19, 1793 and was a son of John Adam Follmer, whose father, Michael Follmer, came from Germany to Berks county, Pennsylvania, in 1737. He settled near Milton, Northumberland county, in 1778, and died in 1793. Michael Follmer was the father of six sons and three daughters. The family donated the site of the Follmer Lutheran church, and a farm of eighty acres to the congregation. He and wife are buried in the cemetery at that church, His son John Adam sent his three sons: William; Jonathan, and David, to Lycoming county about 1815, to settle a tract of land in Loyalsock township which he had purchased. William Follmer married Catharine Swartz, a daughter of Peter Swartz,. a native of Germany and one of the pioneers of Loyalsock township, where she was born, April 9, 1791. He cleared and improved his land, and became one of the prominent and substantial farmers of Loyalsock township. He was a Democrat, and, filled various township offices. He and wife were members of the Lutheran church, and lived and died in that faith. Mrs. Follmer died, April 2, 1855; he survived her fifteen years, and died, April 25, 1870. They were the parents of thirteen children: Mary M., widow of William Wheeland of Loyalsock township, born December 14, 1815; Sarah, wife of George Hartman of Syracuse, Nebraska, born March 2, 1817; Rosanna, who was born August 6, 1818, and died September 18, 1826; Adam, of Williamsport, born May 19, 1820; Catharine, who was born December 29, 1821, married Christian Edler, and died September 20, 1847; Julia Ann, widow of Jesse. Strieby of Eldred township, born July 10, 1823; Susanna, widow of James McWilliams of Kansas, born May 21, 1825; Margaret, wife of William Hayes of Montoursville, born March 11, 1827; Charlotte F., second wife of Christian Edler of Montoursville, born February 6, 1829; Lydia, wife of James M. Neece of Williamsport, born. October 29, 1830; Amelia, widow of Jesse Hyman of New York State, born May 13,. 1833; William, of Watsontown, born April 23, 1835, and Peter, of Loyalsock township.

  PETER FOLLMER, farmer, was born on the farm where he now resides in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 1, 1837, and is the youngest son of William and Catherine Follmer. He was educated in the common schools and reared on the farm; he also spent two winters at Dickinson Seminary. He has always been engaged in farming, with the exception of four years which were spent in the lumber business in the State of Michigan. In 1862 he was drafted in the war of the rebellion, but furnished a substitute. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank and the Lycoming National Bank of Williamsport. He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as school director, auditor, and supervisor of his township. He was married, January 3, 1860, to Miss Lavina Metzger, daughter of George Metzger, and to this union were born four children: Alice R.; Annie L., who married C. E. Berger; Alva E., and Estella. Mrs. Follmer died in 1872, and he was again married, in 1875, to Miss Sarah G. Wilcox, daughter of Lewis G. Wilcox, and to them have been born four children: William; Margaret M.; Mabel, and Clinton Lee. Mr. Follmer is a member of the Lutheran church of Loyalsock township, was one of its principal organizers, and has served as elder of the same for many years.

  SOLOM FOLLMER was born in Loyalsock township in 1829, son of Jonathan Follmer, a native of Northumberland county. In 1852 he married Elizabeth, daughter of John and Elizabeth Swartz. John Swartz moved to Loyalsock township with his father at an early day, and settled on the farm now occupied by John S. Follmer. He was a justice of the peace for a number of years, and was one of the reputable citizens of the community in which he resided. His daughter, Elizabeth, married Solomon Follmer, and to them were born four children: John S.; Charles F.; William P., and Foster M., deceased. Mr. Follmer was a Democrat in politics, and served as school director and auditor of Loyalsock township; he was one of the organizers of the Grange Lodge, P. of H., and Master of the same for several years, and a member of the I. O. O. F. He died in January, 1880.

  JOHN S. FOLLMER, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county Pennsylvania, July 17, 1854, son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Swartz) Follmer. He received his education in the township schools and has always followed farming. He was married in 1877 to Miss Mary, daughter of Frederick Harman, of Eldred township, and to them were born two children: Orrell Myrtle and Florence Emma, He is a Democrat in politics, and has served as supervisor of the township; is a member of the Patriotic Order of the Sons of America, and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran church at Montoursville, of which he has been deacon.

  WILLIAM P. FOLLMER, farmer, was born on the farm where he now resides, Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, January 16, 1858,. son of Solomon and Elizabeth (Swartz) Follmer. He was educated in the common schools and has always resided on his present farm. He was married in 1882, to Miss Addie, daughter of Benjamin Carson, of Loyalsock township, and to this union have been born two children: Raymond 0. and Pearl E. Mr. Follmer is an active Democrat, has served as school director, and is a deacon of the Lutheran church. .

  JOSEPH LOWE was born in New Jersey in 1812, and died February 19, 1890. He was married in his native State, and migrated to Lycoming county about 1830, settling on the farm where his son, Joseph M. Lowe, now resides. He was one of the prominent farmers of the township, and took an active interest in everything that tended to build up the community in which he lived. He was a Republican in politics. He was one of the builders of the Methodist Episcopal church of Lycom-ing township, of which he was steward and class leader for many years. His wife, whose maiden name was Rebecca Huick, died in 1884; she was the mother of eight children, six of whom grew to maturity: Agnes, who married Perry A. Bush; Joseph M.; Ella M., who married Robert Porter; Emma L., who married James Bower; James C., and George Franklin.

  JOSEPH M. LOWE, farmer, was born on the farm where he now lives, in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 6, 1849, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Huick) Lowe. He received his education in the common schools and has devoted his life to farming. He was married in 1886 to Olive, daughter of Myron Lamberson, and to this union have been born two children: Lodeska, and Annie. Mr. Lowe is a Republican in politics, and in 1884 was elected to the office of county commissioner. He was also once the candidate of his party for county auditor, but was defeated. He is a member of the I. O. O. F. He and family belong to the Methodist Episcopal church, of which he has been a class leader. For fourteen years he was engaged in the dairy business, but is now giving his attention to the growing of small fruits.

  JAMES C. LOWE, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, August 25, 1858, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Huick) Lowe. He was educated in the public schools, and was married in 1882 to Rebecca A., daughter of Robert Y. Simpson, of Susquehanna township, who was for several years during. the late war a lone Republican of Bastress township, in which he then resided, and manifested an ardent devotion to the principles of that party. To Mr. and Mrs. Lowe have been born four children: Archie F.; Mary A.; Earl, and E. Media. The two last named are deceased. Mr. Lowe is a Republican in politics, is extensively engaged in truck farming, and with his family belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church.

  GEORGE F. LOWE, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, March 26,1861, son of Joseph and Rebecca (Huick) Lowe. He received his education in the public schools, and is engaged in farming and trucking. He was married in 1885 to Miss Martha Weikle, and to this union have been born four children: Ethel; Warren; Blanche, and Orville. Mr. Lowe is a Republican, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church.

  JOSEPH STRIEBY was a native of Northampton county, Pennsylvania, and came to Lycoming county with his father, Jacob Strieby, when he was about twelve years old. He located on a farm and always followed the occupation of farming. He married Margaret Follmer, and soon after that event they settled on the farm now owned by Charles King. He died in 1881, followed by his widow in 1882. He was one of the organizers of the Montoursville Lutheran church, of which he and family were prominent members. To their union were born four children: Aaron L.; Jacob P., M. D.; J. F., a lawyer of Williamsport, and Joseph W.

  AARON L. STRIEBY, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 2, 1846, son of Joseph and Margaret (Follmer) Strieby. He was educated in the common schools and has devoted his life principally to farming. He operated a tannery on Loyalsock creek for about five years, and conducts a dairy in connection with his farm. He was married in 1870 to Miss Jo Ann, daughter of Samuel T. Sedam, and to this union have been born six children: Piatt; William J.; Maggie; Samuel S.; Bayard B., and Frances Helen. Mr. Strieby is a Democrat in politics, is school director, and has been secretary of the school board for the past two years. He and his family are members of the Montoursville Lutheran church, of which he has been older and deacon.

  JOSEPH W. STRIEBY, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 2, 1855, son of Joseph and Margaret (Follmer) Strieby. He was educated in the township schools and the Montoursville Normal School, and has devoted his business life to farming. He was married in 1880 to Carrie, daughter of William Arnold, of Loyalsock township, and to this union has been born one child, Lulu Maude. He has lived on his present farm since 1861, and in connection with farming he conducts a dairy business, disposing of the product in Williamsport. He is an active Democrat, has served as assessor of the township and inspector of elections, and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran church at Montoursville, in which he holds the office of elder and superintendent of the Sunday school.

  JOHN HARRIS was born in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and was a son of Peter Harris, one of the early settlers of this county. He married Abigail Ogden, of Columbia county, Pennsylvania, where he worked at the carpenterís trade and resided until about 1852, when he moved to Montoursville, and there died in 1887 at the age of seventy-five years. He belonged to the State militia, and was the father of twelve children, four of whom are living: Thomas O.; Lucy E., who married Wallace Dunlap; Charlotte, who married George Federhoff, and Theodore.

  THOMAS OGDEN HARRIS, farmer, was born near Bloomsburg, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, October 15, 1840, son of John and Abigail (Ogden) Harris. He was educated in the public schools, and learned the trade of brick molder, which he followed for some time, but for the past twenty-seven years he has been engaged in farming. He was married in 1864 to Miss Emarone, daughter of Joseph Pass, and to them have been born eight children: Claude; Andrew G.; Letitia A.; Alice; Thomas Walter; Dewitt B.; Rachel, and Charles R. Mr. Harris purchased his present farm of ninety acres in 1888. In 1862 he enlisted in Company G, One Hundred and Thirty-First Pennsylvania Volunteers, and was corporal of that company; he saw service until May 21, 1863, and participated in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He is a Republican in politics, has served as supervisor of the township for two terms, and is a leading member of the Limestone Methodist Episcopal church, of which he is a trustee.

  DAVID WHEELAND was born near Milton, Northumberland county, Pennsylvania, and was of German extraction. He was principally brought up in Loyalsock township, and devoted the most of his life to farming, becoming one of the most prominent farmers in the county. He possessed a limited education, but was a leader in everything that tended to build up the community in which he resided. He was a Whig in politics, and afterwards a Republican, and died in 1862. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Ann Slout, was a native of Hunterdon county, New Jersey, and died in 1870. They were both members of the Lutheran church of Montoursville, and were the parents of five children,í all of whom are dead except one son, William Wheeland.

  WILLIAM WHEELAND, farmer, was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, February 6, 1836, son of David and Mary Ann (Slout) Wheeland. He received his primary education in the common schools, and afterwards took a two yearsí course at Dickinson Seminary, but was prevented from completing his education by having to assist his father on the farm. He was married in 1861 to Catherine J., daughter of John Glosser, and to this union have been born eleven children: Emma A., who was born January 22, 1863, and died September 20, 1890, the wife of Oliver Strunk; Mary Ellen, born July 2, 1865, who married Eugene Culver; Harry Emerson, born July 9, 1867; Annie A., born July 9, 1868, who married William Fagles; Jennie W., born September 6, 1871; William A., who was born September 4, 1873, and died May 31, 1882; Carrie M., who was born December 9, 1875, and died February 26, 1876; Maggie B., who was born June 24, 1877; Stella Maude, born May 3, 1880, and two who died in infancy. Mr. Wheeland is a Republican, has served as school director for six years, has been secretary of the school board six Years, and clerk of the election board. In 1890 he was census enumerator for Loyalsock township. He is one of the charter members of the West Branch Fire Insurance Company, was director for ten years, and is now its agent for Lycoming county. He is a member of the West Branch Grange, P. of H., and has served as overseer and steward of the same. Both he and wife belong to the Methodist Episcopal church of Loyalsock township, of which he is steward and trustee. He united with the church in 1866.

  HENRY MOSTELLER was born in Monroe county, Pennsylvania, in 1810, and was a son of William Mosteller, also a native of Monroe county, of German extraction, and was a farmer and weaver by trade. He was the second of fourteen children, and learned the weaverís trade in his native county by instruction of his father. In 1838, he came to Muncy Dam, where he lived with an uncle; he was married in 1837 to Mary Fogleman and with her settled at Quaker Hill, in Hepburn township, where he purchased and cleared a farm, also engaging extensively in the weaving business. He was recognized as one of the leading farmers of the township, was a Democrat in politics, a member of the Lutheran church, and died in 1886, preceded by his wife in 1854. They reared a family of seven children, four of whom are living: William; Catherine, who married George Dangler; Hiram, and Hannah, who married Henry Loudenslager.

  WILLIAM MOSTELLER, farmer, was born in a portion of Hepburn township, now included in Eldred, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, March 27, 1842, son of Henry and Mary (Fogleman) Mosteller. He was educated in the public schools and has devoted his business life to farming. He was married in 1864 to Almira C., daughter of Peter Palmer, and for about seven years thereafter they lived on his fatherís farm. In 1871 he purchased his present farm, and has resided thereon ever since. He is a Democrat in politics, has served as school director of the township for two terms, and is the father of three children: Savilla, who married Ellis Loudenslager; Frank, and George. Mr. Mosteller and family are members of the Lutheran church of Montoursville, of which he is a trustee.

  PETER MILLER was a farmer and an extensive distiller, and in 1867 he purchased the Spring Garden mills, which he rebuilt in 1873 and operated successfully up to the time of his death, February 9, 1876. He was born in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 4, 1818, and was a son of William Miller, a Dative of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and one of the pioneer settlers of Loyalsock township. He married Lavina Follmer, and to them were born nine children, three of whom are living: Simon P.; William, who is a merchant and postmaster at Salladasburg, and Laura, who married Jacob C. Harman. Peter Miller was an active Democrat, served as school director, was an elder in the Lutheran church, and one of the upright and reliable citizens of the community in which he lived. His wife survives and is living on the old homestead.

  SIMON P. MILLER, proprietor of the Spring Garden mills, was born on the farm where he now lives, in Loyalsock township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, October 24, 1847, son of Peter and Lavina (Follmer) Miller. He attended the schools in his township, and the Williamsport Commercial College, afterward entering the grist mill of his father and becoming a practical miller. Since coming into possession of this mill, in April, 1886, he has added the full roller process, and it has now a daily capacity of twenty-five barrels. He was married April 9, 1878, to Catherine, daughter of Charles Bucher, and has no children. Mr. Miller is an active member of the Democratic party, has served as township auditor and school director, and with his wife belongs to the Lutheran church at Montoursville, of which he has served as elder.

  CHRISTIAN SHIFFLER married Catherine Gilbert and they were both natives of Lebanon county, Pennsylvania. He was a blacksmith by trade and followed that occupation for many years; he was a Whig in politics, and he and wife were prominent members of the Lutheran church, of which he was an elder for many years. He died in 1843, followed by his widow in 1855, and they were both buried in a cemetery near Harrisburg. Their family consisted of twelve children, four of whom are living: Matthias; Catherine, who married Benjamin Brooks; Aaron G., and Levi.

  AARON G. SHIFFLER, farmer, was born in Dauphin county, Pennsylvania, November 6, 1822, son of Christian and Catherine (Gilbert) Shiffler. He received his education in the common schools of that period, learned the carpenterís trade, and traveled for three years in the West following his trade. In the spring of 1854 he came to Lycoming county, and built the first railroad bridge for the Philadelphia and Erie Railroad Company across the West Branch of the Susquehanna. In 1855, he built the bridge on the North Branch at Northumberland, and in 1865 he rebuilt the one at Williamsport. He continued the bridge building business, and finally formed a partnership with J. L. Piper, which eventually developed into the Keystone Bridge Company. This company built the great steel truss bridge at St. .Louis, and have built five bridges across the Ohio river, one on the Mississippi, at Dubuque, and one at Kansas City across the Missouri river, also several other large bridges. Mr. Shiffler retired from the bridge business in 1882, and has since been engaged in farming. He furnished a substitute in the late rebellion, and is identified with the Democratic party. He was married July 6, 1855, to Miss Eliza, daughter of Francis Edkin, of Monroe county, Pennsylvania, who died in 1863 leaving one child, George E. Mr. Shiffler was again married in 1867, to Joanna Edkin, a sister of his former wife; she died without issue. He was again married, to Susan, daughter of Daniel Weiss, of Monroe county, Pennsylvania, and to this union have been born six children: Grace; John; Susan; Mary; Helen, and Aaron G. Mr. Shiffler is a member of the Masonic fraternity. Mrs. Shiffler is a consistent member of St. Paulís Lutheran church of Williamsport.

  GEORGE E. SHIFFLER, proprietor of the East Lawn farm, and breeder of thoroughbred Jersey cattle, was born in Williamsport, Pennsylvania, July 17, 1869, son of A. G. and Elizabeth (Edkin) Shiffler. He received his education in Dickinson Seminary, Shortledgeís Academy, Media, Pennsylvania, and Newell Institute, Pittsburg. His business life has been devoted to farming, in which he has been quite successful. He was married in 1881 to Miss Madge, daughter of Robert Hawley, of Williamsport, and of this union three children survive: George; Elizabeth, and Elsie. Mr. Shiffler is a Democrat in politics; his wife is a member of the Episcopal church.

  MICHAEL MOYER was a native of Berks county, Pennsylvania, where he grew to manhood, and married Maria Hock, a native of Maryland. In 1844 they removed to Northumberland county, and about 1850 settled in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, where they engaged in farming. They were the parents of six children, as follows: Annie, wife of N. C. Johnson, of Barbourís Mills; Harriet, widow of Charles Boyer, of Iowa; Catharine, wife of William Arnold, of Loyalsock township; Ellen, wife of Henry Tallman, of Fairfield township; Harry, of Loyalsock township, and Mary, wife of John Meckley, of Muncy Creek township. Mr. Moyer died in 1879; his widow survived him until October, 1891. They were consistent members of the German Reformed church.

  HARRY MOYER, county commissioner, was born in Berks county, Pennsylvania, February 21, 1842, and is the only son of Michael and Maria Moyer. He was reared in Northumberland and Lycoming counties, and received a common school education. In 1864 he enlisted in Company I, Two Hundred and Seventh Pennsylvania Volunteers, and served until the close of the war, as corporal of his company. He participated in the battles of Petersburg and Fort Stedman, and after the war closed he returned to his home and resumed farming. Mr. Moyer was married, December 21, 1865, to Maggie, daughter of William Bellas, of Columbia county, and after his marriage he settled in Fairfield township. In 1870 he removed to his present farm in Loyalsock township, where he has since resided. In 1890 he was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of county commissioner, which position he is now filling. He has two children: Cora E. and Mary E., twins. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

  JAMES BLAIR was a native of Bucks county, Pennsylvania, and came to Lycoming county when a boy with his father, John Blair, who first settled in Armstrong township, and subsequently on what is known as the Grier farm, where they lived for over twenty years. James always followed farming, and after his marriage to Rebecca W. Vananda, he settled on what is known as Bottle run, where he died in 1876. His wife was a native of southern Pennsylvania, and died in 1861. They were both members of the Methodist Episcopal church, and were the parents of four children: John; Peter B.; William Levi, and Mary Jane, deceased, who married Henry S. Williamson.

  PETER V. BLAIR, farmer, was born in Lycoming township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, July 15, 1828, son of James and Rebecca W. (Vananda) Blair. He was reared in his native township and educated in the public schools, and has, devoted his life to farming. He was married in 1856 to Miss Margaret Reighard, daughter of Henry Reighard, and to this union have been born seven children: James H., deceased; Henry, deceased; Oliver W., deceased; Alice, who married Samuel Eder; Clara; Gertrude, and Lottie. Mr. Blair is a Republican in politics, has served as supervisor for several terms, and as overseer of the poor and school director; he is a member of the United American Mechanics, and with his family belongs to the Evangelical church.

  ABRAHAM SANDER, farmer, was born in Lycoming township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 24, 1855, son of Jacob M. and Sophia (Aderhold) Sander, residents of Lycoming township. He received his education in the common schools, and has always followed farming. He was married in 1877, to Miss Caroline, daughter of George Long, of Lewis township, and settled on his present farm in 1878. To their union have been born five children: George Michael; William Luther; John Frederick; Ella May, and Catherine Sophia. Mr. Sander is a Democrat in politics, and he and wife are members of the Lutheran church. He owns a fine farm of 175 acres, and is recognized as one of the representative farmers of his township.

  THOMAS EVENDEN was born in Kent, England, September 16, 1823, son of John. and Sarah (Chalklin) Evenden. He was reared in his native country, and educated in the public schools of Kent. He learned the occupation of a florist, and on March 19, 1849, he emigrated to America. He first located in New York and Brooklyn, where he was employed in gardening for about three and one-half years, returning then to England. In 1853 he returned to the United States, coming direct to Williamsport, where he engaged in gardening, until 1858, when he established the present business, which is now conducted under the name of Evenden Brothers. He was married in England in 1853 to Mary Baldwin, who died July 8, 1879, leaving three children: George W.; William J., and Elizabeth, who married Richard Painton. Mr. Evenden was again married, December 23, 1885, to Belinda Diller, of Hanover, Pennsylvania. Mr. Evenden is the oldest florist in the city; he is a Republican in politics, and a member of the Episcopal church.

  GEORGE W. EVENDEN was born in Williamsport, August 22, 1855, and was educated in the public schools and the Williamsport Commercial College. He was married, April 29, 1881, to Miss Annie, daughter of James Harding, and to them have been born three children: Mary Bell; Lulu, and Charles. He is a Republican, is a member of Ivy Lodge, No. 397, F. & A. M., and he and wife are members of the Episcopal church.

  WILLIAM J. EVENDEN was born in South Williamsport, October 14, 1857, and was educated in the public schools. He learned the florist business with his father, in which he has always been engaged. In 1884 he and his brother, George W., formed the present firm of Evenden Brothers. He was married in 1884 to Martha Crossmore, of Williamsport, and to this union have been born four children: John O.; Madolene; Robert B., and Harry. Mr. Evenden is a Republican in politics.

  CHRISTIAN KARN, proprietor of the Loyalsock Hotel, was born in Wurtemberg, Germany, January 16, 1824. His father, Michael Karn, emigrated to America in 1836, and located in Muncy township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, where he followed farming and died in 1850. He married Elizabeth Burhast, who died in 1880, leaving five children: Christian; Catherine, who married John Bennett; John; Ann, and Julia, who married John Benning and lived in Loyalsock township. Christian Karn, the oldest of these children, received his educa-tion in Germany, and learned the stone mason trade, which he followed until 1866, when he purchased property and erected a hotel, naming it the Loyalsock House, and has kept the same ever since. He was married in 1848 to Miss Rosa Collins, and to them have been born three children: John; Rosa, who married Charles, Koons, and Anna, who died October 12, 1891. Mr. Karn is a Democrat in politics, and was overseer of the poor of Loyalsock township for a number of years.

  F. P. GSTALDER was born in St. Amarin, Haut Rhine, France, March 16, 1840, son of Francis P. and Mary Ann (Huber) Gstalder. His father was a commission merchant and accumulated a large property; he was a soldier at the age of sixteen years, and participated at the battle of Waterloo. His family consisted of twelve children, nine of whom grew to maturity. Our subject, F. P. Gstalder, was the youngest of the family and received his education in his native country. At the age of twenty-one years he entered the French army, saw active service for six years, and was promoted from private to sergeant. In May, 1867, he immigrated to New York City, where he worked at the house painting trade for three months. Thence he came to Williamsport, where he worked at the painting and graining trade until 1886. In 1882 he purchased the Lafayette House, corner of Grove and East Third streets, and kept the same from 1885 to 1800; he then leased it and purchased his present farm of fifty acres in Loyalsock township, locating thereon in 1891. He has a fine vineyard, consisting of 6,500 vines, and proposes to make it the finest in the county. In 1866 he was married in France to Adele, daughter of John Peter and Julia Lintenberger, and to this union have been born eight children: Adele E.; Emile M., a painter and grainer by trade; Julia C.; F. P., lithographer; Emily E.; John E.; Paul A., and Ernest A. Mr. Gstalder is a Democrat in politics, and with his family belongs to the Catholic church of Williamsport.

  WILLIAM MUIRHEID HOWELL, physician and surgeon, was born at Orangeville, Columbia county, Pennsylvania, in 1847, and was the fourth of a family of ton children. His father, Alfred Howell, was a native of Easton, Pennsylvania, and removed to Orangeville when a young man, where he married Phebe Harman, a native of that village. In 1865 they came to Williamsport, where they continued to live until the death of Mr. Howell, which occurred at the home of his son, Dr. Howell, May 26, 1886. Mrs. Phebe Howell is Still living in Williamsport. The subject of this sketch received his education at the Orangeville Academy and took a business course at the Williamsport Commercial College in the early days of that institution, then in charge of Prof. J. F. Davis. He then read medicine with the late Dr. Samuel Pollock, and took his medical lectures at Bellevue Hospital Medical College, New York City, and graduated from that institution in the spring of 1869. After remaining with Dr. Pollock for about one year, he located at Cogan Station, in Hepburn township, at which place he has remained in active practice up to the present. At the time of his location at Cogan Station he had quite a juvenile appearance and the comments of the citizens of his neighborhood as well as of some of the profession in Williamsport that he was too boyish looking to succeed, were quite discouraging to him; but with an inborn determination to win success he soon built up a large and lucrative practice, his rides extending for many miles in all directions, and by common consent, he was soon accorded the prestige of commanding the largest country practice within the knowledge of the profession hereabout. By his genial nature he has made scores of friends, and his skill as a physician has more than a local reputation. In December, 1871, he was married to Priscilla C. Weis, daughter of Charles and Barbara Weis of Trout Run. He is the father of two children, Fred M., aged eighteen years, who after having completed his academical education at Chambersburg is now about to enter Princeton College, and Stella M., aged twenty years, who was educated at Wilson College and is now residing at home. Dr. Howell belongs to the Masonic order, and in politics is a sincere Democrat. He is a member of the State and County Medical Societies, a director in the Merchantsí National Bank of Williamsport, and is president of the Keystone Lithograph Company of the same city.

  BENJAMIN PIDCOE was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, May 12, 1774, and was a son of Emanuel Pidcoe, who came to Lycoming county in the last decade of the eighteenth century, and settled in Hepburn township, where the remaining years of his life were passed. Benjamin was married in this county, July 4, 1799, to Anna Heylman, and entered a tract of 700 acres of government land in what is now Hepburn township. He settled upon it, building his cabin in the midst of a forest, and through the passing years he cleared and improved a good farm, upon which he resided up to his death, December 1, 1861. He possessed a very good education for that period, and was justice of the peace for many years. He was in early life a Whig, and afterwards affiliated with the Republican party. He was a member of the State militia and took quite an active interest in such matters. His wife died, March 2, 1862, aged eighty-two years. They were members of the Christian church. Ton children were born to them, only three of whom are living: Malialeth, wife of Napoleon Welper of Michigan; Emanuel, of Williamsport, and Sarah, widow of William Rathmell of Hepburn township. The deceased are as follows: Elizabeth, who married Peter Wheeland of Loyalsock township; Barbara M., who married Samuel Wheeland of the same township; Charlotte, who first married James Hilands, and afterwards George Staddon; Martin; William; Julia Ann, who married Robert Wilson, of Hepburn township, and Mary Jane, who married Joseph Tallman of Loyalsock township.

  ABRAHAM PAULHAMUS was born, September 20, 1805, in what is now Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. His father migrated from New Jersey to Lycoming county and bought land from the State of Pennsylvania in what is now Hepburn township, and improved the same. His family consisted of five sons and three daughters. Upon reaching his majority, Abraham learned the blacksmith trade which he followed for some time at Hepburnville. He afterward carried on this business at Williamsport, on the corner of Fourth and Williams streets where the residence of J. B. Otto now stands. After following his trade for some time in that city he removed his shop to Hepburnville, where he carried on business for a number of years. He finally had to give up his trade on account of his eyes failing, and about the year 1838 he located on the Packer farm; here he engaged in farming in connection with butchering for two years, having John Bredin as a partner in the latter business. In 1840 he took charge of the Park farm in the vicinity of Williamsport, and in 1842 he moved to the John K. Hays farm on Lycoming creek, where he remained for eight years. He then moved to the Grier farm. His death occurred on the 23d of September, 1853. He was a Whig and a strong Abolitionist. Mr. Paulhamus was largely instrumental in building the Beantier Run Methodist chapel in Lycoming township, and was for many years a class leader of the same. His wife, whom he married September 30, 1831, was Susan Marr, whose parents came from New Jersey and located at Milton, Pennsylvania. To this union were born six sons and three daughters, two of whom are living: John and Maberry Goheen.

  JOHN PAULHAMUS, son of Abraham and Susan (Marr) Paulhamus, was born, July 5, in Hepburn township. He remained at home until eighteen years of age, he went into the business of lumbering on Larryís creek, Cogan valley, Lycoming county, and afterward followed the same business on Big Pine creek, Tioga county, and in Clearfield county, and then in Cameron and Elk counties, Pennsylvania. He carried on the same business in Sullivan county, this State, where he accumulated large interests which he still retains. In 1867, in partnership with A. T. Nichols of Williamsport, he purchased the farm whereon he now resides. This farm is one of the finest in the township, and consists of about 100 acres of hill and river bottom land. The purchase also included a flour and grist mill. After a while an arrangement was effected by which Mr. Nichols took the grist mill and Mr. Paulhamus the farm, which he now successfully tills. Mr. Paulhamus was married, May 20, 1860, to Clarinda B. Randall, daughter of Orran and Esther Randall, who located at Columbia, Bradford county, Pennsylvania, when Clarinda was but six months old. She was one of twelve children, six brothers and six sisters, all of whom grew to maturity. Her six brothers were all engaged in the late war. There were six children born to Mr. and Mrs. Paulhamus, of whom only one survives, Harry R., who was born, June 9, 1869. Mr. Paulhamus has always been a very energetic and hardworking man, and one who possesses more than ordinary ability for general business. He maintains, in a high degree, the respect of his friends and neighbors. Politically he is a stanch Republican, and is assessor of his township. He and family are members of the Presbyterian church now in course of erection in Hepburnville.

  ABRAHAM ADERHOLD came from Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1807 and settled near Ballís Mills, in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania; here he lived for a few years, and then moved to Rose valley, where he worked a farm for twelve or thirteen years. It was during this period that he purchased the farm now known as the Aderhold homestead. He died at about sixty-three years of age, and was one of the earliest pioneers of the county. The names and births of his children are as follows: Joseph F., April 19, 1798; Elizabeth, October 6, 1799; John, January 3, 1801; Mary, April 4, 1802, and Annie, April 17, 1,806.

  JOHN ADERHOLD, the third child, was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, in 1801, and came to this county with his parents when he was six years of age. In 1825 he was married to Regina Stoltz, who was born in Wittenberg, Germany, in, 1802, and immigrated to America in 1817. To this union there were born eleven children, of whom the names and respective dates of birth were as follows: Catherine, September 28, 1826; David, November 17, 1828; Sophia, September 17, 1830; Abraham, November 8, 1832; Elizabeth, December 15, 1834; Joseph S., April 5, 1837; Caroline, May 6, 1839; Esther, August 24, 1841; John W., May 29, 1843; Sarah, November 5, 1845, and Fred, March 23, 1848. John Aderhold and wife attended the Lutheran church. He died, November 16, 1877, and she died, March 28, 1854.

  JOSEPH S. ADERHOLD was born, April 5, 1837, in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and is a son of John and Regina (Stoltz) Aderhold. He received a common school education, and was married in 1867 to Louisa Schuch, who was born in Lewis township, this county, in 1841. There have been born to them six children: George W., July 22, 1868; Abraham A., August 9,1871; Caroline R., March 24, 1875; John P., September 24, 1877; William H., September 8, 1879, and Joseph A., June 11, 1884. In 1869 Mr. Aderhold purchased the farm where he now resides, now containing about 240 acres, which, with its fine residence and barns, is one of the best in the township. He is a Democrat and himself and family attend the Lutheran church.

  JOHN J. MILLER, farmer and butcher, is a son of Frederick and Margaret (Singlin) Miller. The grandfather of our subject was John J. Miller, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, who was one of the early residents of Williamsport, where he located and engaged in his business of wagon making until his death. He was married in Germany and was the father of five children: Charlotte; Frederick; Mary; Sarah, and Emanuel. Frederick, the father of John J. Miller, was born in Germany in 1814. He learned the trade of a wagon maker and subsequently settled in Hepburnville, Pennsylvania, where he carried on business for some time. He purchased twenty-eight acres of land in Hepburn township, where his son John J. now lives, and established a wagon making business, which he conducted until his death in April, 1843. His wife was Margaret Singlin, a native of Wurtemberg, who survived him until 1884, when she died in Williamsport, leaving two children: our subject, John J. Miller, and Mary F., wife of Joseph A. Gilmer, of Williamsport. The first named was born in Hepburnville, February 28, 1841. He was reared in Hepburn township, and received his education in the public schools. He followed the usual duties of a farmerís boy until he reached his majority. In 1865 he engaged in the butcher business, which he has ever since followed in connection with extensive farming, having under cultivation two farms consisting of 326 acres. He has been twice married; his first wife was Margaret Wheeland, who died in 1864, and to this union was born one child, an infant, deceased. His second marriage was with Louisa, daughter of William Rathmell, and to this union have been born three children: Herman F.; Mary C., and Clara, deceased. Mr. Miller is a Democrat in his political affiliations and has filled many of the minor township offices. His religious connection is with the Ballís Mills Evangelical church, of which he is one of the stewards. He is one of Lycoming countyís extensive farmers, is an enterprising businessman, and manifests a deep interest in the public and social development of his county.

  GEORGE SHALEMILLER, was born near the border of Germany in the district called "Romans" in Italy. He came to the United States in December, 1800, and settled in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, remaining there twelve years, thence coming to what was called at that time Loyalsock township and settling in that portion now known as Hepburn township. He was married twice, the name of his first wife being Mary Shearer; this union resulted in the birth of three children, two of whom are living: Catharine and Peter. About the year 1820, some time after the death of his first wife, he was again united in marriage to Eucille Blair and to this union there were also born three children, two of whom are living. Mr. Shalemiller was one of the earliest pioneers and did much to aid in the development of the township, part of his work being to engage in the construction of a road from Ballís Mills to his own place.

  TOBIAS SHALEMILLER was born in Hepburn township in 1832 and is a son of George Shalemiller. He was educated in a German school which was founded by the local inhabitants before the date of free schools. He has followed the business of farming and lumbering and has always resided in his native township. Between 1860 and 1862 he built three saw mills. He now owns and operates a steam saw mill for custom work. He was married in 1857 to Susan Maniwell, who was born in Liberty township, Tioga county, Pennsylvania. There were born four children to this union: Catharine; Angeline; Emma, and Eda. Mr. Shalemiller is a Demo-crat in politics and in religion a Lutheran.

  GEORGE W. BALL was born, June 19, 1814, in that part of Loyalsock township now known as Hepburn. His father came from England with his parents, who located at Hillsgrove, Sullivan county, Pennsylvania. When his father was five years of age occurred the death of the grandfather. He was bound out to learn the, trade of a millwright, to a Mr. Shane. The first work for himself was in a saw and grist mill in Hepburn township, which he built for Mr. Weisel. He carried on this business for five or six years, and also did a general millwright business. In 181(J he purchased the right of a stream known as Mill run, and built a fulling mill for fulling and coloring cloth and finishing the same for use. After this he purchased a carding mill to use in connection with the first. About the year 1838 he built a woolen mill at his place of residence. In 1812 he was married to Catherine Weisel, who was born at the Rising Sun Inn, which is located in Berks county about forty miles from Philadelphia. As a result of this union there were born eleven children: Isaac; George W.; John; Elizabeth; Samuel; Mary Ann; Jacob; William; Joseph; Sarah, and Jane.

  Our subject, George W. Ball, received a common school education, and from about the age of seven years her age more or less work around the fulling mill owned by his father. After a time he learned the carding of wool and rolls for spinning. When his father bought the woolen mill he went there and carried on the business for twenty years. He then sold to his brothers, and in 1860 purchased the farm upon which he now resides, and moved upon the same in 1861. It is a fine farm, containing, about 115 acres, eighty of which are under cultivation. His wifeís maiden name was Anna Harmon, who was born in Williamsport, a daughter of George and Polly Harmon. Mr. Ball is a Democrat, and he and wife attend the Presbyterian church.

  JACOB HEIM immigrated to what is now Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in the year 1817. He was married to Regina Staiger, who was born in this township in 1812; this important event took place May 31, 1831, and to, this union there were born the following children: Gottlieb; Dorothy; Jacob; John; Christian; Margaret; Regina; Joseph; Christina, and Mary.

  GOTTLIEB HEIM is the eldest son of Jacob Heim, Sr., and was born in 1833 in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. He was educated in the township schools, and for a time taught the German school that has been referred to in other sketches. He has been school director for nine years, also secretary of the school board for six years. He was married in 1856 to Sarah A. Staiger, daughter of Michael and Susanna (Hessler) Staiger. She was born in Luzerne county, Pennsylvania, in 1834. To this union three children have been born: Daniel M.; Susanna, and Hiram J. Mr. Heim is a stanch Democrat, has served his party on com-mittees and he and his wife attend the Blooming Grove Dunkard church.

  JACOB HEIM, JR., was born, April 13, 1837, in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and is a son of Jacob and Regina (Staiger) Heim. He was educated at the township schools, and at a German school which was originated and supported by the local inhabitants. He is what might be termed a self-made man, is naturally of a studious and thinking turn of mind, and has the respect of all who know him. He settled on the farm where he now resides in 1860, and was united, in marriage the same year to Mary Schaefer, who was born in Hepburn township, November 15, t836. To this union have been born four children: Regina; Matilda; Sarah, and Ezra. Mr. Heim and his wife are members of the Dunkard church in Hepburn township. Politically he is a Democrat, and has served his party as a committee man. He was elected a justice of the peace for Hepburn township in t882 and was re-elected in 1887 and 1892.

  DAVID and SOPHIA STOLTZ, natives of Germany, emigrated to America in 1817. They settled in Hepburn township on the farm now owned by Jacob Gehr, where, they both died and were buried thereon. Mr. and Mrs. Stoltz were Lutherans in religion, and he was a Democrat. They had seven children who grew to maturity:. Regina, who was sold and served three years in Philadelphia to pay for a part of her parentsí voyage across the ocean; David; Michael; Jacob; George; Caroline, and Sophia. Michael and Caroline are the only ones now living.

  MATHIAS and MARGARETTA MUTCHLER came to Hepburn township in 1818. They resided for a time with Mr. Mutchlerís brother-in-law, Mr. Heid, and together they cleared a tract of land containing 300 acres which was purchased from a Mr. Embart. Mr. Mutchlerís trade was shoemaking, which he followed when not otherwise employed. In his political sympathy he was Democratic. He attended the Dunkard church, where himself and wife were consistent members. They had seven children, four sons and three daughters: George, born January 29, 1805; Jacob, born February 7, 1810; David, born February 28, 1813; Mary, born January 20, 1820; Elizabeth, born November 6, 1823; Rosina, born January 26, 1826, and Nathaniel, born December 5, 1828. Mr. and Mrs. Mutchler both died in December, 1830, and on the same day.

  DAVID MUTCHLER came with his parents, Mathias and Margaretta Mutchler, to this county in t8t8. He received a common school education and was brought up, on a arm. The farm of 110 acres upon which he now resides is a part of the 300 acres which were cleared by his father and Mr. Heid. It was the expressed wish U his father that David should become owner of this farm, and accordingly he came into possession of the same by paying $1,000 to the other heirs. Mr. Mutchler is a good farmer, having made a success of agriculture; he is a Democrat, and with his. wife belongs to the Dunkard church.

  PHILIP LEHMAN was born in 1831 in Germany, and when a child five years of age he immigrated to America with his parents. His father, Simon Lehman, was. born October 26, 1798, and first settled in Williamsport. He afterwards moved to that portion known at that time as the "Long Reach," which now is a part of Will-iamsport. He remained here about six years, and then located on a farm in Hepburn township. He was a shoemaker by trade, which he followed while living on the farm; he died March 27, 1891. He was the father of six children: John C.; Philip; David; Harriet; Sarah, wife of Philip Hoag, and Fred. Our subject, Philip Lehman, worked for his father on the farm, and in 1860 took the deed and had full charge of the same farm. In 1857 he was united in marriage to Levina Keiser, whose home was in Upper Fairfield township, this county, and who was a daughter of Jacob and Dora Keiser. To this union were born the following children: Hannah; Mary; Sarah Frederick; Dora; Daniel; David; Emma; Melinda; Benjamin, and Reuben. Mr. Lehman is a Democrat and has hold the office of overseer of the poor in his district for the past eighteen years. He has always lived on the farm which he owns, containing about 130 acres, and has a fine residence, barn, and out buildings.

  PETER SCHUCH was born in 1800, in Germany. He received a good German education and learned the tailorís trade, which he followed in his native country for many years in connection with farming. He also served six years in the German army. He married Barbara Drumm, also a native of Germany, and after five children had been born to them they emigrated to America in 1841. They located in Lewis township, Lycoming county, and began life anew in that then unbroken forest, with only $40. In 1861 they removed to the farm now owned and occupied by their son, Jacob Schuch, in Hepburn township. Here Mr. Schuch died, May 6, 1886, followed by Mrs. Schuch on June 27th of the same Year. Both were consistent members of the Lutheran church, and he was a Democrat in politics. Their children were as follows: Margaret, who married Philip Heisley, and resides in Perry county; Peter, who lives in Ohio; Jacob, who lives in Hepburn township; Catharine, who married William Krisher, of Ohio; Sarah, who married Charles Smith; Louisa, who married Joseph S. Aderhold; Frederick, deceased; Lizzie, deceased, and Julia, deceased.

  JACOB SCHUCH, farmer, was born, February 17, 1835, in Germany, son of Peter and Barbara (Drumm) Schuch. He came to America with his parents in 1841. He was educated in Lewis and Cogan House townships, and was married, November 27, 1860, to Regina Staltz, daughter of Jacob and Henrietta (Heisley) Staltz. To this union have been born ton children, eight of whom are living: William; Charles; Emma J., who married Dr. C. B. Bastian; Peter L.; Phoebe E.; Hattie; Mary C., and Jacob H. Mr. Schuch settled on his present farm in 1861. He is a Democrat in politics and has been school director. He and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

  ISAAC FLEMING was born in Halifax, Yorkshire, England, December 8, 1817, and emigrated to the United States in the year 1840, locating in Centre county, Pennsylvania, where for fourteen years he operated a woolen factory. He married Margaret Ann Stradley, a native of McHenry township, Lycoming county. They lived in Centre and Clinton counties until 1863, when they moved to Larryís Creek, Piatt township, Lycoming county, remaining there until 1866, and moving thence to Hep-burn township, where Mr. Fleming was foreman of a woolen factory until 1880. At this time he settled on a farm, where he now resides. He is a Republican in politics and taken an active interest in the success of his party, and with his wife belongs to the Methodist Episcopal church. To their union were born nine children: John W., who is principal of the Stevens school building of Williamsport; W. H., who now resides in Missouri; Samuel S., Hudson R., and Edward S., who are residents of Williamsport; Wilson I., ex-burgess of Bellefonte; Dr. J. F.; Eugene E., and Carrie E., wife of Elmer Rathmell.

  WILLOUGHBY and SOPHIA (WEIGLEY) SHOLLEN BERGER, natives of Berks county, Pennsylvania, came to Lycoming county about 1857 or 1858. They settled in Muncy Crook township, and here, for many years, Mr. Shollenberger operated what are known as the Schumacher Mills, after which he milled through the West, finally returning to Lycoming county and locating at Montgomery, where he still resides. Himself and wife have been identified with the Lutheran church for a long time. Their family consists of six children: D. W.; William L.; Vilera, who married Elias Reed; Louisa, who is the widow of William Davis; Elizabeth, and Daniel A.

  WILLIAM L. SHOLLENBERGER, a member of the firm of Fleming & Shollenberger, proprietors of the Hepburnville roller mills, was born in Muncy Creek township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, September 1, 1859, and is a son of Willoughby and Sophia (Weigley) Shollenberger. He received his education in the public schools and was graduated from the Williamsport Commercial College. He learned the milling trade from his father, and when nineteen years old, he took charge of the White Deer mills, which he continued for one year. He then in company with Frank Porter, operated the Montgomery mills for four years, after which he came to Williamsport and spent two years with the Mackey Furniture Company. In 1888 he became interested in his present enterprise, and soon after sold an interest to J. E. Heilman, the firm taking in the name of J. E. Heilman & Company. The mills were at once rebuilt with the complete roller system. In March 1891, Mr. Heilman sold his interest to H. R. Fleming, and the business has since been conducted under the firm name of Fleming & Shollenberger. In 1884, Mr. Shollenberger was married to Ida M., daughter of. Joseph Heilman of Clinton township, Lycoming county, and to this union four children have been born: Florence Puala; Zilla May; Joseph Heilman, and William Howell. Mr. Shollenberger is a Republican in politics, and himself and wife are members of the Lutheran church.

  GEORGE BOVEE was born in 1843, at Athens, Tioga county, New York. His parents, Peter and Nancy Bovee, natives of Broome county, New York, came to Hepburn township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1860. They were the parents Of eight children: Adeline, deceased; Kate L.; Dolly Ann, deceased; Rodney M., deceased; John O.; George; Perry H., and Walter H. At the age of eighteen years, upon the breaking out of the late war, George joined Company B, Eighth Pennsylvania Cavalry, and after seeing some hard service during the Peninsular campaign, was discharged on account of disability, his term of service having been nine-teen months. He is a carpenter by trade, and followed that occupation for many years. He bought the farm of ninety-one acres where he now resides in Hepburn township ten years ago; he has improved the place in every way and has recently built a large barn, the house being also new and commodious. Mr. Bovee was married in 1866 to Sarah E., Ball, who was born in Hepburn township and is the daughter of Samuel and Belinda (Wilson) Ball. Four children have been born to this union: Alice E.; Samuel B.; Burton R., and Erving E. Mr. Bovee is a Republican in politics.

  JOSEPH W. MILNOR was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, September 4, 1819, son of Joseph and Mary (Wright) Milnor, born in 1795 and 1796, respectively. In the fall of 1819 his parents came to Lycoming county, where the father died in 1867 and the mother in 1836. At the age of twenty Joseph W. taught the first term of school in Rose valley under the free school system. He was considered a good practical schoolmaster, and was quite successful in this, his first term, as well as several terms taught in the following years. While at Sunday school in Lower Fairfield township, he saw for the first time, Mary Jane Reeder, who, December 6, 1842, became his wife. He purchased a few acres of rough land in Fairfield township, on which he constructed a rude dwelling, surrounded by forests, and there began his active career. After a few years of hard labor clearing much of the ground and making other improvements, he sold, realizing considerable profit, and purchased another farm in the same township. Within a short time he sold this to good advantage, and was thereby enabled to obtain a large farm in Eldred township near Quaker Hill, to which he moved his family. In 1851 he sold the farm And purchased a store in Warrensville. He moved his family to this village and later started for Philadelphia to secure a stock of goods. This, his first trip to that city, was made by packet boat by way of Harrisburg, and it took several days to make the journey there and back. His mercantile trade grew steadily, but bright hopes of enlarging the store were shattered by the sudden death of his wife, February 21, 1853. He subsequently enlarged his business cares by erecting a larger store building, a flour and saw mill, and engaging also in the manufacture of flour and lumber. October 19, 1854, he was again married, to Mary Jane Taylor, who was born, October 31, 1832, daughter of Samuel H. Taylor, then an editor in Bellows Falls, Vermont. She removed to Pennsylvania about 1840 with her father, who became the editor of the Whig Gazette at Mauch Chunk. The second Mrs. Milnor had been a school teacher, and this experience no doubt aided her in disciplining as well as in educating the eight children to whom she had become a step-mother. She has always been a worker in the Sunday school and the church. Mr. Milnor is the father of sixteen children, fourteen of whom grew to maturity, the others dying when two years old. To his first union were born the following: Harriet G., who married Joseph Gray; Rebecca k, who married Peter F. Kimble; D. Ellen, deceased wife of William, Hanna; Mary Etta, who married Joseph C. Budd; Tacy J., who married Thomas J. Funston; Alice E., deceased; H. G., who married Theressa Ryan, and Josephine, who died in infancy. To his second marriage were also born eight children: Mahlon T., who married Addis Champion; Clara B., who married Ellis Lundy; Joseph W., who married Jennie Fague; Agnes, who died young; Ida T.; C. Omer; Robert H., and G. Bruce. Mr. Milnor is one of the prominent and influential Democrats of his township, and has been a justice of the peace for thirty years. He also served as jury commissioner in 1866, and has filled nearly all of the important offices of Eldred township. He has always taken a very deep interest in the cause of education. He is an adherent of the Quaker faith, to which his mother belonged. Through the passing years he has accumulated considerable valuable real estate, and is one of the prominent farmers of his township.

  JOHN WILSON was one of the earliest settlers in Lycoming county, and came here from New Jersey about the time of the Revolution. He took up 440 acres of land, which he purchased of John Hutton, and, erecting a cabin, began clearing off the unbroken forest. His home was near the place where the family lived in later years. He married Elizabeth Schooley in New Jersey, prior to the Revolution, and she bore him seven children: Enoch; Ezra; Robert, who married and settled in Canada; Ann, who married Jonathan Wilson; Belinda, who married Aaron Wilson; Amy, who was twice married, her first husband being Clifton Wilson, and her second husband Abraham Kinney, and Lavina, who married James Marshall, all of whom are dead. Mr. Wilson divided his farm between his sons, Enoch and Ezra, before he died, the former taking the lower 240 acres, on which the house stood, and Ezra the upper 200 acres, where he afterwards resided. The parents died in this township.

  ENOCH WILSON was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, in 1775, and came to Lycoming county with his father. He was a surveyor and farmer, and followed that business. He was twice married, first to a Miss Marshall, who bore him five children: Marshall; James; Robert; Rachel, and Belinda, who married Samuel Ball, all of whom are dead. His second wife was Sarah Castner, of which marriage there was no issue. He died July 20, 1849; his widow survived him sixteen years, dying October 16,1865. Mr. Wilson was a Quaker, and an ardent advocate of the principles of that faith. In politics he was an old line Whig, and filled man y of the offices in his township.

  EZRA WILSON, second son of John and Elizabeth Wilson, was born in Sussex county, New Jersey, March 7, 1779, and accompanied the family to Lycoming county, where he grew to manhood. About 1806 he married Nancy Flatt, and they were the parents of ten children: William, who married Phoebe Belknap; Andrew, who was twice married, first to Louisa Wheeden, and afterwards to Elizabeth Corwin; Charles, who married Nancy Scales; Henry, who married Sarah Hester; John, who married Elizabeth Roe Deborah, who married Daniel Griggs; Rebecca, who died unmarried; Aaron, who died in early youth; Samuel, who married Lucinda Kimble, and Amos, who married Elizabeth Reeder. Mr. Wilson lived with his father on the old homestead, and inherited one-half of the farm. He died there at the age of seventy-five years, dying as he had lived, a firm adherent of the Quaker faith. In politics he was a Whig, and during his active life filled many of the important offices in his township.

  ROBERT WILSON, third son of Enoch Wilson, was born on the old John Wilson, homestead, October 5, 1815. He was reared a farmer, and received such an education as the pioneer schools afforded. On the 3d of November, 1836, he married Juliann Pidcoe, of which union two children, are believed to have been the only issue: Enoch, and Byron. The former was educated at the public schools, followed farming, and engaged for a time in the profession of teaching. He enlisted for service in the war of the rebellion, became ill, and returned to his home, where he died shortly after his arrival. Robert Wilson, his father, died on the 24th of May, 1884. He was a Republican in politics.

  AMOS WILSON, youngest son of Ezra Wilson, was born on the old homestead, January 22, 1828. He resided at home until 1869, when he removed to where he now lives. He married Elizabeth Reeder, August 21, 1851, who bore him three children: Mary Alice, deceased; Elma Louise, wife of James Miller, of Wisconsin, and one who died in infancy. Mr. Wilson is now comparatively retired from active life, and is spending his declining years upon a farm near Warrensville. He is a Republican in politics, and one of the old, respected citizens of his native county.

  ANDREW F. WILSON, eldest son of William and Phoebe (Belknap) Wilson, and grandson of Ezra Wilson, was born, December 12, 1834, in Canada. He moved with his father to the site of Warrensville in 1840, where his father went into business, conducting a tannery, a shoemaker shop, and a farm. At an early age Andrew took charge of his fatherís business, and lived with him until he was twenty-six years old. When only twelve or fourteen years of age he traveled for miles up Loyalsock creek, collecting his fatherís bills, and laying the foundation for a sound business education. After reaching manhood he attended Dickinson Seminary several terms, and afterwards taught school five successive terms in the township. He was married, May 5, 1861, to Ann Castner, who also bad taught the same length of time in the schools of the same township. After his marriage he bought the old homestead from his father, and went into the business of butchering, tanning, and farming, which proved quite successful. Four children were born of their union: Harry G., a graduate of Muncy Normal School and the Williamsport Commercial College, who taught school four successive terms, and is now employed in a large store near Philadelphia; John; Mary, and William. Mr. Wilson also reared Rose Morgan, daughter of John Morgan, and granddaughter of Hon. Joseph B. Anthony. She is a graduate of the Lock Haven State Normal School, and was connected with that institution in a professional capacity for five years; she is now attending a medical college in Philadelphia. Mr. Wilson has resided at Warrensville longer than any other citizen of the village, and has always taken a deep interest in the social and material development of his native township. Politically he is a stanch Republican, and wields considerable influence in the local councils of his party. He has been a member of the I. O. O. F. for twenty-one years. He is one of the best known and most progressive citizens of Eldred township.

  BYRON WILSON was born on the old homestead in Eldred township, October 25, 1851, and is a son of Robert and Juliann Wilson. He lived with his father until his marriage to Jane Hartman, in 1870. Four children are the fruits of this union: Annie; Alice; Asher, and Enoch. Mr. Wilson has always resided on the homestead farm, and in connection with farming he has carried on the butcher trade for about sixteen years. after his marriage he took charge of the farm, his father making his home with him up to his death. In politics he is a Republican, and has filled the offices of school director and supervisor. He has in his possession all of the old legal documents connected with the settlement of the family in this county, even to the parchment deed obtained by his great grandfather, John Wilson, when he purchased the land upon which our subject resides.

  WILLIAM CRAWFORD was born in Jersey Shore, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 27, 1793, and was a son of Sampson Crawford, a native of Scotland, and one of the pioneers of Lycoming county. After reaching manhood, William engaged in teaching school, and also followed farming. He lived in Upper Fairfield and Eldred townships, successively, and was one of the representative farmers of that locality. During the latter part of the war of 1812 he was drafted, but as the war closed soon afterwards he was engaged in active duty. He was a leading member of the Methodist Episcopal church in early life, and later became connected with the Christian church, in which he was an exhorter. He organized the first Sunday school in Upper Fairfield township in 1835 at the Buckley school house. Mr. Crawford married Rebecca, a daughter of Jeremiah Tallman, and a native of Williamsport, and reared a family of six sons and four daughters: Nicholas F., of Kansas; Jonathan O., of, Montoursville; Leah F.; Nancy; Sarah Ann; William, an active business man at Williamsport, where he built and conducted the Hotel Crawford, subsequent to which he removed to the West and died in Lincoln county, Kansas, in September, 1887; Jeremiah F., of Trout Run; John K., of Williamsport; Joseph T., and Rebecca, wife of Gideon King, of Trout Run. Mrs. Crawford died in 1838, and he was again married, to Jane Adlum who died without issue. He died in Warrensville, Eldred township, in 1885, at the age of ninety-two.

  SAMUEL CASNER was born in Bucks county, Pennsylvania, about 1783. He learned the shoemakerís trade, and in 1813 came to Lycoming county and purchased a tract of land from James Marshall, situated in Hepburn township; this he sold in a few years and bought a small tract of James Winner, within the present limits of Eldred township. Mr. Casner was married to Mary Wagner, of Bucks county who bore him a family of eleven children: Sarah; Reuben; Cornelius; Henry; Samuel L.; Mary Ann; Peter; Eliza; Rebecca; William, and John, all of whom are dead, except Samuel, Mary Ann, and John. Politically Mr. Casner was a Democrat during his early life, but in later years he affiliated with the Whig party. He took no active part in political affairs, though he filled nearly all of the important offices in the township.

  SAMUEL L. CASNER, son of Samuel and Mary Casner, was born in Alexander township, Hunterdon county, New Jersey, November 4, 1810, and came to this county with his parents in 1813. He was reared on the homestead farm, and has always followed the shoemaking business. In 1833 he married Elizabeth Swearer, who bore him eight children: Mary, who married John K. Crawford; Louis E., who married Mary Jane Lundy; Sarah, deceased; Ann, who married Andrew Wilson; Catharine, deceased; Anson, deceased; William, who married Elizabeth Long, and John, who married Mary Morris. Mrs. Casner died, and in 1857 he married Martha Oliver, who became the mother of two children: Cyrus H., who married Josephine Folk, and Horace G. Mr. Casner is quite prominent in the local councils of the Republican party, and has been a justice of the peace for three terms.

  CYRUS H. CASNER, eldest son of Samuel L. and Martha Casner, was born in Warrensville, Eldred township, September 14, 1858. He resided with his parents until he was twenty years of age, and then engaged in the butchering business, which he has since followed. Mr. Casner was married, January 19, 1882, to Josephine Folk, and has a family of three children: Samuel L., Jr.; John Leroy, and Annie May. He resided in the township for a number of years, and then moved into Warrensville, where he has since carried on business. He is a member of the Warrensville Baptist church, and is connected with the I. O. O. F. and K. of P. He has been constable of the township for six years, and is an ardent supporter of the Republican party.

  FREDERICK GROSS, a native of Wurtemberg, Germany, where he was born about 1765, immigrated to America in 1804. He secured 160 acres of land in Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, cleared and improved the same, and resided thereon until his death in 1820. In his native country he married Barbara Graff, and they were the parents of six children: Michael, deceased; Barbara, deceased; John, deceased, who married Dorothea Wagner; Christina, who married Jacob Scherer; Margaret, deceased, and Joseph, who married Christina Ulmer. Mr. Gross was a member of the Dunkard church.

  JOSEPH GROSS, son of Frederick and Barbara Gross, was born in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1808. As his first wife he married Christina Ulmer, in 1833, and they were the parents of five children: Regina, who married Jacob G. Heim; Dorothea, who marriedí Frederick Lust; Elizabeth, who married Christian D. Heim; John, deceased, and Christina, who married George Kiess . In 1853 he married as his second wife Catharine Stall. Mr. and Mrs. Gross reside on the homestead farm; Mr. Gross is one of the oldest native residents of Lycoming county.

  ADAM FULLMER was born in Northumberland county, and was a descendant of a family of that name which settled in Turbutt township in 1778. He married Susan Wauck, who bore him the following children: Adam C., who married Elizabeth Boyd; Joseph; George, who married Caroline Marsh; James, who married Susan Marshall; Jonathan, who was killed in the battle of Fredericksburg; Aaron C., who was killed in the same battle; Margaret, deceased wife of Joseph Woodley; Rosanna, and Caroline, who married John Smith. About 1830 Mr. Fullmer bought a farm in Lycoming county, and resided upon it until his death, September 4, 1858. He .was a member of the Lutheran church, and an active adherent of the Democratic party. He served in the Black Hawk war, in Illinois, and witnessed the defeat of that celebrated Indian chieftain.

  ADAM CONRAD FULLMER, eldest son of Adam and Susan Fullmer, was born in Northumberland county, June 17, 1823. He removed with his parents to Lycoming county, and here grew to manhood. December 26, 1843, he married Elizabeth Boyd, and had a family of two children: Boyd, and Isabella, who married J. B. Casebeer. After his marriage he removed to the place now occupied by his son, where he spent the balance of his life, and died June 7, 1887. He was a member of the Lutheran church, and an adherent of the Democratic party.

  BOYD FULLMER, only son of Adam C. and Elizabeth Fullmer, was born in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, June 13, 1849. He was reared on the homestead farm, and was married November 26, 1868, to Frances Sunderland. They are the parents of three children: Herman; Albert, and Clarence. He is an Adventist in religion, and a Democrat in politics.

  JACOB HEIM was a native of Wittenberg, Germany, where he was born about 1786. He grew to manhood in his native land, and married a Miss Gohl, who died on the voyage to America. In 1817 he immigrated to the United States and landed at Philadelphia on the 4th of July. Mr. Heim was accompanied by his father-in-law, and they came direct from Philadelphia to Hepburn township, Lycoming county, traveling most of the distance on foot. They entered 106 acres of land, which they cleared and improved. Mr. Heim lived upon this farm up to within a few years of his death, and then made his home with his daughter Margaret the balance of his days. He was the father of five children: Christina, deceased; Margaret, deceased wife of Jacob Ulmer; Gottlieb, deceased, who married Margaret Stiger; Jacob, who married Regina Stiger, and Anna M., deceased. Mr. Heim was a Dunkard in religious faith, and in politics a Democrat.

  JACOB HEIM son of Jacob Heim, Sr., was born in Wittenberg, Germany, in 1806, and came to this county with his father in 1817. He was reared on the homestead in Hepburn township, and in 1831 was married to Regina Stiger. Ten children were the fruits of this union: Gottlieb; Dorothy, who married Frederick Shafer; Jacob; John J.; Christian D.; Margaret, who married John Heim; Regina, who married John B. Waltz; Joseph; Christina, who married Simon Waltz, and Mary, who married Samuel B. Shafer. After his marriage Mr. Heim removed to his father-in-lawís farm, where he resided until his death in the seventy-fifth year of his age. He was a devout member of the Dunkard church, and a stanch supporter of the Democratic party.

  CHRISTIAN D. HEIM was born on the homestead in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, August 31, 1841, and is a son of Jacob and Regina Heim. He was reared a farmer, and when twenty-three of age removed to his present home. He was married, October 6, 1864, to Elizabeth Gross, who is the mother of seven children: Louise, who married J. W. Waltz; Ephraim; Hannah, who married C. F. Fisher; Sarah A.; Susie; Joseph, and Samuel. Mr. Heim is an ardent Democrat, and has been a delegate to the county conventions a number of times, and also a member of the standing committee. He has held nearly all the offices in his township, and has been a school director for nine years, and is now township auditor. He is a member of the Dunkard church, and one of the respected citizens of Eldred township.

  GEORGE KIESS was born in Wittenberg, Germany, about 1771, and immigrated to Williamsport, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, in 1804. When he landed in the United States he was the possessor of only 50 cents, and coming direct to Williamsport, he found employment and lived there until 1805. He then removed to Hepburn township, where he purchased a small piece of land, to which he added at different times as he could pay for it, until he owned 137 acres. He was the father of six children: Catharine, who married George Waltz; Rachel, who married David Young; Dorothy, who married William Rote; Betsey, who married Jacob Kremer; Rosanna, who became the wife of Jacob Sweeley, and John. Mr. Kiess was a member of the Dunkard church, and died upon his farm in Hepburn township.

  JOHN KIESS, only son of George Kiess, was born in Wittenberg, Germany, about 1793, and came to this country with his father. He was reared in Hepburn township, and about 1818 he married Elizabeth Seamiller, and they were the parents of the following children: Elizabeth, deceased wife of Leonard Kiess; Mary, deceased wife of Jacob Cook; John, who married Mary Cook; David, deceased, who married Sarah Herritt; Jacob, who married Elizabeth Steiger; Rachael, deceased, who became the wife of Samuel Young, and George. Mr. Kiess was a Dunkard in religion, and in politics was a Democrat.

  JACOB KIESS, son of John and Elizabeth Kiess, was born on the old homestead in Hepburn township, October 12, 1826, and has always followed the occupation of a. farmer. He was married in 1849 to Elizabeth Steiger, who has borne him eight children: Mary, who married Abraham Klump; John, deceased; David; Hannah; Edward; Jacob; Benjamin, and Rebecca, deceased. Mr. Kiess bought a part of the old Wilson farm, which he has improved and lived upon for twenty-five years. He is a Baptist in faith, and a Democrat in politics.

  CHRISTOPHER KIESS, a weaver and school teacher, was born in Wittenberg, Stuttgart, Germany, about 1778. He grew to manhood in his native land, obtained a good education, and learned the weaverís trade. He there married Christina Sheets, who bore him four children before they immigrated to America, as follows: Margaret, who married a Mr. Kurtz, and after his death a Mr. Eckart; Abraham, who married Catharine Waltz; Christopher, who died in infancy, and Catharine, who never married. In 1806 or 1807 the family came to the United States and settled on a farm near Warrensville, in Eldred township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania. The date of their settlement is established by the births of Catharine, who was born in Germany in October, 1805, and William, who was born on the homestead near Warrensville, in February, 1808. Seven children were born after their settlement in Lycom-ing county: William, who married Margaret Rote; Jacob, who married Catharine Rote; Salome and Dorothy, who remained unmarried; Sophia, who married George Rote; Emanuel, who married Charlotta Sigman, and Christina, who became the wife of Samuel Entz. All of the foregoing children are dead, except Sophia, Emanuel, and Christina. Mr. Kiess purchased 150 acres of land from Daniel Bailey. It was. covered with an unbroken forest, in the midst of which he built his cabin and began making for himself a home in the now world. He resided upon this farm until his death, March 26, 1866. In connection with farming he did considerable weaving for the pioneers, and thus made an occasional dollar. He also taught a German school in h is neighborhood for many years. He was a member of the Dunkard church, and always voted the Democratic ticket.

  EMANUEL KIESS, youngest son of Christopher Kiess, was born on the homestead in Eldred township, July 9, 1818, and has lived thereon up to the present. In 1844, he married Charlotta Sigman, who has borne him five children: Samuel S., who married Annie Winner; Thomas E., who married Mary Lundy; Franklin C., who married Ella Guinter; Reuben, who died in childhood, and John C., who died after reaching his majority. Politically Mr. Kiess is a Democrat, and during the, Mexican war he served as first lieutenant in the militia. He is a member of the Evangelical church, and has served as trustee since the erection of the present building. He has been overseer of the poor, collector, and school director at different periods.

  FRANKLIN C. KIESS, youngest living son of Emanuel Kiess, was born on the homestead, January 14, 1849, and has always lived on the same farm. In 1876 he married Ella Guinter, and has a family of four children: Rosa May; Lottie C.; Clayton K., and Verus M. Politically he is a Democrat, and has served as school director, and as secretary of the board of education.

  HENRY THOMAS was born in Germany about. 1755, and after reaching manhood became to America and settled near Philadelphia. He soon after enlisted in the army of the Revolution, served throughout the war, and was mustered out at its close with the rank of ensign. He reared a family of six children: Mary; Elizabeth; John;. Anna; Henry, and Sarah. After the Revolution closed Mr. Thomas settled upon a farm, where he resided until his death.

  JOHN THOMAS, eldest son of Henry and Elizabeth Thomas, was born near Philadelphia, May 23, 1783. He was reared upon his fatherís farm, and received a good education. He took up the vocation of preaching, and was a minister of the Methodist Episcopal church. He removed to this county at an early date and located in Loyalsock township, north of Williamsport, where he died at the age of eighty-four years. Mr. Thomas was a very devout Christian, and preached the Gospel for many years. He was a Democrat in politics, and served as associate judge of Lycoming county, and also as county commissioner for several years. He married Rebecca Tallman, April 30, 1814, and was the father of one son, Daniel Tallman, long a resident of Loyalsock township.

  DANIEL TALLMAN THOMAS, only son of John and Rebecca Thomas, was born in Lycoming county, December 31, 1815, and was reared upon the old homestead. He married Rachel Scott, December 25,1839, and they were the parents of seven children.: John B.; Charles S.; Emily, who married Frederick Young; Harriet, who married George Koons; Rebecca, who married Philip Probst; Daniel T., and H. S. After is marriage Mr. Thomas removed to the old Collins farm, which is now owned by Albert Wilson and Daniel T. and H. S. Thomas. He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and was active in promoting the welfare of that organization. Politically he was a Democrat, and filled the office of county auditor, and nearly all the offices in his township.

  DANIEL T. THOMAS is a son of Daniel Tallman Thomas, and was born in Lycoming county, August 17, 1853. He was reared in Loyalsock township, and was married, December 2, 1875, to Emma J. Phillips, and has two children: John W. and Rachel Al. He received a common school education, and has followed farming all his life. He is a Democrat, and has filled many of the offices in his township. In religion he has followed in the footsteps of his grandfather, and is an adherent of the Methodist Episcopal church.

  JACOB STRIEBY was a native of Philadelphia county, Pennsylvania, born July 28, 1787, and was a farmer and cooper. In 1807 he married Sarah Keyser, who bore him the following children, all of whom were born in Northampton county, Pennsyl-vania: Jonas, who married Sarah Stout; Charles; Jesse, who married Juliann Follmer; Joseph, who married Margaret Follmer; Anna Catharine, who married Adam, Follmer; William, who married Margaret Metzger, and Sallie Ann, who married Christian Raish. All of the foregoing are dead except ĎMrs. Adam Follmer, of Williamsport, and Mrs. Christian Raish of Huron county, Ohio.

  JESSE STRIEBY was born in Upper Mount Bethel township, Northampton county, Pennsylvania, September 14, 1814, and was reared to agricultural pursuits. He married Juliann Follmer, February 22, 1844, who bore him the following children: Hiram E.; Amanda, who married Firman Marshall; Norman, who married Louisa Cummings; William F.; Mary A.; Simon P.; George K.; John R., and Emma Z., who married W. M. T. Artley. After his marriage Mr. Strieby moved to the old homestead, where he lived the balance of his days. He was a deacon in the Lutheran church, and a man of upright, honest character. Politically he was a Democrat, took an active part in public affairs, and filled several of the offices in his township. Hiram E. Strieby, oldest son of Jesse Strieby, was born upon the homestead farm, August 31, 1845, and inherited the place at his fatherís death.

  EPHRAIM SHAFER, son of John F. and Elizabeth Shafer, was born in Hepburn township, Lycoming county, September 30, 1859. John F. Shafer, a native of the same township, was born in 1821, and removed to the farm where he now lives after his marriage about 1848 to Elizabeth Heim, who bore him four children: Samuel B., who married Mary Heim; Christian, deceased; Ephraim, who married Malinda Koch, and William F., who married Mattie Beidlespacher. Mr. Shafer is a member of the Dunkard church, and is a supporter of the Democratic party. His son Ephraim, the subject of this sketch, was reared on the homestead farm, and received a common school education. August 17, 1882, he was married to Malinda Koch, who has had four children: Miriam; Mabel, deceased; Edna, and Horace. The family are adherents of the Baptist church; in politics Mr. Shafer is a Democrat, and has filled the office of school director six years.

  E. W. LUNDY was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, June 22, 1830. His father, Samuel Lundy, was born in Fairfield township, Lycoming county, in 1807, and was a son of one of the early settlers of that locality. His mother, Mary (Milnor) Lundy, was born in 1806, and by her marriage to Mr. Lundy became the mother of five children: E. W.; Jerome B.; Anna Eliza, who married John Entz; Mary Jane, who married Lewis Casner, and Sarah Emily, who married Jacob Smithgall. The subject of this sketch was married to Mary Guinter in 1854. She bore him the following children: John B., who married Margaret Jane Smithgall; Samuel I., who married Alice Sweeley; Catharine, who became the wife of Charles P. Hoover; Joseph W., who married Emma Reecer; George Alva; Cora A.; Michael E., and Nathan B. In politics Mr. Lundy is a stanch Democrat. He has been a justice of the peace for fifteen years, has filled nearly all of the important offices in his township, and has been a member of the school board about thirty years. For the past twenty-five years Mr. Lundy has been engaged in the tanning business, in which he has been quite successful, and is one of the well to do citizens of Eldred township.

  NATHAN BURROWS KIMBLE was born in Upper Fairfield township, Lycoming county, March 20, 1836, and was the oldest of five brothers. He was educated in the common schools. When quite young he was employed by J. W. Milnor as a clerk in his store. In 1856 he was appointed postmaster at Warrensville and filled the position until 1858, when he located in Williamsport. He served as deputy prothonotary during the official terms of Jacob S. Runyon and Charles D. Eldred, beginning, respectively, in 1859 and 1862. In 1865 he was elected prothonotary and served out the term to the eminent satisfaction of all, and retired from office greatly respected for the faithfulness and ability he had displayed. He afterwards devoted most of his time to clerking in the various office of the court house, and was able to render valuable service to incoming officials, especially the prothonotaries, sheriffs, and recorders of deeds. For several years he was frequently called on to act as administrator in the settlement of estates, to serve on commissions to take testimony, and to attend to the auditing of accounts, arbitrations, etc. When the McBrides were murdered in 1873, Mr. Kimble was appointed administrator. In 1876 he was nominated and elected to the legislature and served with credit. In politics, Mr. Kimble was a Democrat of the old school, and never sought to disguise his sentiments or shirk his duty in a partisan sense. For his firmness and candor he commanded the respect of his political adversaries and the admiration and confidence of the members of his own party. He possessed the wonderful faculty of closely forecasting results in local political contests, and his estimates of majorities, in advance of elections, often proved marvelously accurate. On this account he was regarded as a political oracle about election times, and men of all parties eagerly sought his opinion and advice. His political sagacity was not unlike that possessed by Samuel J. Tilden, although it was confined to a narrower sphere, and those who know him best regarded him as the political "sage" of Williamsport. After a long and severe sickness, he died at his rooms in the Henry House, May 29, 1890. He lived and died a bachelor. He was a man whose friendship was always warm and true, and one whose honesty, purity of purpose, and fidelity were never questioned. His memory, therefore, will be fondly cherished and kept green in the hearts of those whom he numbered among his associates and friends.

  JOHN FISHER was born in Germany in 1831, and came to this country when he was fifteen years old. He lived in Ohio three years, and subsequently came to Anthony township, Lycoming county, Pennsylvania, and bought a tract of forest land, upon which he settled. He went to work clearing and improving it, and in the course of time brought it under cultivation. By his first marriage, to Mary Ulmer, Mr. Fisher was the father of two children: Mary and Jacob Henry. In 1861 he married Mary Ann Deiffenwait, who bore him the following children: John D.; Charles F.; Peter M.; Lavina; Louisa; Abraham, deceased; Lucinda; Rosella; David, deceased, and Jeanette. Towards the close of the war Mr. Fisher enlisted in the Union army and served until mustered out of the service. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and a supporter of the Democratic party. He still resides upon the farm which he cleared and improved, enjoying the fruits of his rigid industry.

  CHARLES F. FISHER, son of John and Mary Ann (Deiffenwait) Fisher, was born on the homestead in Anthony township, Lycoming county, February 2, 1865. He lived with his parents until he was fifteen years old, and then commenced working out as a farm hand, which he followed until his marriage, February 13, 1890, to Hannah Heim; he then removed to his present homestead in Eldred township. Politically he is a Democrat, and is an adherent of the Baptist church.


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